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  • 1.
    Aakhus, Mark
    et al.
    Rutgers University.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Information Systems.
    Lennmyr, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Digital Innovation as Design of Digital Practice: Doctors as Designers in Healthcare2018In: Proceedings of the 51st Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, Association for Information Systems, Association for Information Systems, 2018, p. 4594-4601Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Medical professionals are increasingly assuming the role of maker and creator. At the same time, digital innovations, as part of evolving information infrastructures, are becoming increasingly prevalent in healthcare. In this paper, we adopt a Schönian approach to understand how a medical professional, who is not an IS designer by trade, engages in the design of digital practice -” turning what may appear as a failed digital innovation effort into a successful design of digital practice. Our inquiry suggests three pragmatic principles that call for further investigation: (a) professionals can make a significant contribution to design work by inventing means for fact-based, reflective engagement with the situation; (b) the reorganization of work practice involves organizational design, information system design, and communication design; and (c) developing design as digital practice entails the development of fact-based design practice and must engage practical theories.

  • 2. Aakhus, Mark
    et al.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Lyytinen, Kalle
    Te’eni, Dov
    Symbolic Action Research in Information Systems: Introduction to the Special Issue2014In: Management Information Systems Quarterly, ISSN 0276-7783, E-ISSN 2162-9730, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 1187-1200Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue introduction explores the need to study information systems as symbolic action systems, defines broadly the research domain and related assumptions, notes the origins of this perspective, articulates its key lines of study, and discusses the state of the field in light of published research. The essay also positions the three papers of the special issue in the broader Information Systems (IS) discourse and notes their specific contribution in bridging so far unconnected streams of research and expanding research methods amenable to symbolic action research. This introductory essay furthermore observes some unique challenges in pulling together the special issue that invited the editors to combat against the tendency to approach communicative processes associated with information systems as primarily psychological processes. In closing we note several lines of inquiry that can strengthen future studies of symbolic action including better design theories, more flexible and open use of methods, and attentive use of rich traditions that inform symbolic action research in IS.

  • 3.
    Bengtsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Ågerfalk, Pär J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Sustaining Sustainability: Investigating the Long-Term Effects of a Sustainability Initiative2016In: Nordic Contributions in IS Research: 7th Scandinavian Conference on Information Systems, SCIS 2016 and IFIP8.6 2016, Ljungskile, Sweden, August 7-10, 2016, Proceedings / [ed] Lundh Snis, Ulrika, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing , 2016, p. 86-99Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates to what extent holistic sustainability values persist when a sustainability innovation initiative is transformed to standard mode of operation in a Swedish municipality through the lens of actor-network theory. The focus is on the effect of change in sustainability routines, inscribed in IT systems, when governance shifts from a dedicated initiative management to regular management. This longitudinal study shows that information systems can play a central role to enrol stakeholders in sustainable practices, but that sustainability outcomes are closely related to the view of sustainability inscribed in routines and supportive IT systems.

  • 4.
    Conchúir, Eoin
    et al.
    University of Limerick.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Holmström Olsson, Helena
    IT-universitetet i Göteborg.
    Fitzgerald, Brian
    Global software development: Where are the benefits?2009In: Communications of the ACM, ISSN 0001-0782, E-ISSN 1557-7317, Vol. 52, no 8, p. 127-131Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Eriksson Lundström, Jenny
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Information Systems.
    Wiberg, MikaelUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.Hrastinski, StefanUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.Edenius, MatsUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.Ågerfalk, Pär J.Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Managing Open Innovation Technologies2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Eriksson, Owen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Henderson-Sellers, Brian
    Ågerfalk, Pär J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Ontological and linguistic metamodelling revisited: A language use approach2013In: Information and Software Technology, ISSN 0950-5849, E-ISSN 1873-6025, Vol. 55, no 12, p. 2099-2124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Although metamodelling is generally accepted as important for our understanding of software and systems development, arguments about the validity and utility of ontological versus linguistic metamodelling continue. Objective: The paper examines the traditional, metamodel-focused construction of modelling languages in the context of language use, and particularly speech act theory. These concepts are then applied to the problems introduced by the "Orthogonal Classification Architecture" that is often called the ontological/linguistic paradox. The aim of the paper is to show how it is possible to overcome these problems. Method: The paper adopts a conceptual-analytical approach by revisiting the published arguments and developing an alternative metamodelling architecture based on language use. Results: The analysis shows that when we apply a language use perspective of meaning to traditional modelling concepts, a number of incongruities and misconceptions in the traditional approaches are revealed - issues that are not evident in previous work based primarily on set theory. Clearly differentiating between the extensional and intensional aspects of class concepts (as sets) and also between objects (in the social world) and things (in the physical world) allows for a deeper understanding to be gained of the relationship between the ontological and linguistic views promulgated in the modelling world. Conclusions: We propose that a viewpoint that integrates language use ideas into traditional modelling (and metamodelling) is vital, and stress that meaning is not inherent in the physical world; meaning, and thus socially valid objects, are constructed by use of language, which may or may not establish a one-to-one correspondence relationship between objects and physical things. 

  • 7.
    Goldkuhl, Göran
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media. Linköping Univ, Dept Management & Engn, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Sjöström, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    A Design Science Approach to Information Systems Education2017In: Designing The Digital Transformation, Desrist 2017 / [ed] Maedche, A., vom Brocke J. & Hevner, A., Springer, 2017, Vol. 10243, p. 383-397Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information systems (IS) education is concerned with design and management of information systems. To be prepared to work as an IS practitioner, there is a need for training in design issues during education. This paper investigates what a design science approach would imply for IS education. Such an IS education approach is elaborated and synthesized in eight principles: (1) Exploit resonance between IS research and IS development, (2) conduct theory-informed design-exercises, (3) conduct practice-inspired design-exercises, (4) alternate between the concrete and the abstract, (5) reflect based on experiences for own design-theoretical synthesis, (6) evaluate design processes and design products, (7) archive design reflections in a knowledge diary, (8) compile design artifacts into a portfolio. One key characteristic of design science (DS) is the integration of research and design. A DS approach to IS education means an integration of design and learning. This education approach is theoretically grounded in IS design science literature and also broader in literature of design inquiry (Dewey), experiential learning theory (Kolb) and education of the reflective practitioner (Schön).

  • 8.
    Henderson-Sellers, Brian
    et al.
    University of Technology, Sydney, Australia.
    Ralyté, Jolita
    University of Geneva, Carouge, Switzerland.
    Ågerfalk, Pär J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Rossi, Matti
    Aalto University, Aalto, Finland.
    Situational Method Engineering2014Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    While previously available methodologies for software – like those published in the early days of object technology – claimed to be appropriate for every conceivable project, situational method engineering (SME) acknowledges that most projects typically have individual characteristics and situations. Thus, finding the most effective methodology for a particular project needs specific tailoring to that situation. Such a tailored software development methodology needs to take into account all the bits and pieces needed for an organization to develop software, including the software process, the input and output work products, the people involved, the languages used to describe requirements, design, code, and eventually also measures of success or failure.

    The authors have structured the book into three parts. Part I deals with all the basic concepts, terminology and overall ideas underpinning situational method engineering. As a summary of this part, they present a formal meta-model that enables readers to create their own quality methods and supporting tools. In Part II, they explain how to implement SME in practice, i.e., how to find method components and put them together and how to evaluate the resulting method. For illustration, they also include several industry case studies of customized or constructed processes, highlighting the impact that high-quality engineered methods can have on the success of an industrial software development. Finally, Part III summarizes some of the more recent and forward-looking ideas.

    This book presents the first summary of the state of the art for SME. For academics, it provides a comprehensive conceptual framework and discusses new research areas. For lecturers, thanks to its step-by-step explanations from basics to the customization and quality assessment of constructed methods, it serves as a solid basis for comprehensive courses on the topic. For industry methodologists, it offers a reference guide on features and technologies to consider when developing in-house software development methods or customising and adopting off-the-shelf ones.

  • 9.
    Holmström Olsson, Helena
    et al.
    DSV.
    Ò Conchúir, Eoin
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Information Science.
    Fitzgerald, Brian
    Two-Stage Offshoring: An Investigation of the Irish Bridge2008In: Management Information Systems Quarterly, ISSN 0276-7783, E-ISSN 2162-9730, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 257-279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates two-stage offshoring as experienced by the Irish sites of two large global companies, headquartered in the United States, with significant software development operations. As part of these companies, the Irish sites act as a bridge in their offshoring arrangements: While the United States sites offshore work to Ireland, the Irish sites offshore work further to India and, hence, have experience of being both customer and vendor in two-stage offshore sourcing relationships. Using a framework derived from relational exchange theory (RET), we conducted multiple case study research to investigate and develop an initial theoretical model of the implementation of this two-stage offshoring bridge model. Our study shows that while both companies act as bridges in two-stage offshoring arrangements, their approaches differ in relation to (1) team integration, (2) organizational level implementation, and (3) site hierarchy. Although, there are opportunities afforded by the bridge model at present, the extent to which these opportunities will be viable into the future is open to question. As revealed in our study, temporal location seems to favor a bridge location such as Ireland, certainly with United States–Asian partners. However, location alone will not be enough to maintain position in future two-stage offshoring arrangements. Furthermore, our research supports the view that offshoring tends to progress through a staged sequence of progressively lower cost destinations. Such a development suggests that two-stage offshoring, as described in this paper, will eventually become what we would term multi-stage offshoring.

  • 10. Karlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Ågerfalk, Par J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Information Systems.
    MC Sandbox: Devising a tool for method-user-centered method configuration2012In: Information and Software Technology, ISSN 0950-5849, E-ISSN 1873-6025, Vol. 54, no 5, p. 501-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Method engineering approaches are often based on the assumption that method users are able to explicitly express their situational method requirements. Similar to systems requirements, method requirements are often vague and hard to explicate. In this paper we address the issue of involving method users early in method configuration. This is done through borrowing ideas from user-centered design and prototyping, and implementing them on the method engineering layer. Objective: We design a computerized tool, MC Sandbox, to capture method requirements through the use of method-user-centered method configuration, hence bridging the gap between systems developers’ and method engineers’ understanding of and expectations on a situational method. Method: The research method adopted can be characterized as multi-grounded action research. Our implementation of multi-grounded action research follows the traditional ‘canonical’ action research method, which has cycles of diagnosing, action planning, action taking, evaluating, and specifying learning. The research project comprised three such action research cycles where 10 action cases were performed. Results: MC Sandbox has proven useful in eliciting and negotiating method requirements in a continuously ongoing dialog between the method users and the method engineers during configuration workshops. The results also show that the method engineer role rotated among the systems developers and that they were indeed committed to the negotiated methods during the systems development projects. Conclusion: It is possible for method users to actively participate and construct suitable situational methods if they are provided with appropriate high-level modelling concepts, such as method components, configuration packages and configuration templates. This way, the project members’ understanding of the current development practice develops incrementally, both in terms of understanding the needs and available method support. In addition, both method requirements and commitments are made explicit, which are important aspects when working with method configuration from a collaboration point of view.

  • 11.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Exploring agile values in method configuration2009In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 300-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Method for Method Configuration (MMC) has been proposed as a method engineering approach to tailoring information systems development methods. This meta-method has been used on a variety of methods, but none of these studies have focused on the ability to manage method tailoring with the intention to promote specific values and goals, such as agile ones. This paper explores how MMC has been used during three software development projects to manage method tailoring with the intention to promote agile goals and values. Through content examples of method configurations we have shown that it is possible to use MMC and its conceptual framework on eXtreme Programming and we report on lessons learned with regard to maintaining coherency with the overall goals of the original method.

  • 12.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Method Configuration: The eXtreme Programming Case2008In: Agile processes in software engineering and eXtreme programming: 9th international conference, XP 2008, Limerick, Ireland, June 10-14, 2008 : proceedings / [ed] Pekka Abrahamsson ... [et al.], Berlin: Springer , 2008, p. 32-41Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Method for Method Configuration (MMC) has been proposed as a method engineering approach to tailoring software development methods. This paper evaluates MMC during three software development projects where it was used to tailor eXtreme Programming (XP). The study has been justified by the need to complement earlier evaluations of MMC and providing more conclusive tests to determine the effectiveness of the meta-method in practice. Also, since MMC originates from the plan-based method community, no tests have so far been made on agile methods. Many method engineering concepts have similar roots and it is of interest to evaluate their applicability also in the agile context. We report on the migration results together with lessons learned.

  • 13. Karlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Information Science.
    Multi-Grounded Action Research in Method Engineering: The MMC Case2007In: Proceedings of IFIP WG8.1 Working Conference on Situational Method Engineering: Fundamentals and Experiences, 2007, p. 19-32Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There appears to be two schools of information systems development methods research that largely pursue their own agendas without many cross-references. On the one hand there is the method engineering research and on the other hand there is the method-in-action research. There seems to be much to be gained from integrating these two schools, developing knowledge that both has the formality (rigor) and reflects its enactment in practice. To achieve this, the research approach adopted has to embrace this duality. In this paper we explore how Multi-Grounded Action Research (MGAR) can contribute to achieving this aim. MGAR has been used in the development of a Method for Method Configuration, a research product that integrates the strengths of both schools.

  • 14.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Towards Structured Flexibility in Information Systems Development: Devising a Method for Method Configuration2009In: Journal of Database Management, ISSN 1063-8016, E-ISSN 1533-8010, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 51-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Method configuration is a specific type of Method Engineering (ME) that takes an existing organization-wide Information Systems Development Method (ISDM) as its point of departure. Existing assembly-based ME approaches are not well suited to this task. As an alternative, this article suggests a metamethod approach to tailoring organization-wide ISDMs. We refer to this approach as the Method for Method Configuration (MMC). MMC takes into account the need to combine structure, which is one reason for choosing an organization-wide ISDM in the first place, with flexibility, which is essential for making the chosen ISDM fit actual projects. The metamethod is built using a three-layered reuse model comprising method components, configuration packages, and configuration templates. These concepts are combined efficiently to produce a situational method and thereby to facilitate the work of method engineers.

  • 15. Keller, Christina
    et al.
    Wiberg, MikaelUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.Ågerfalk, Par J.Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Information Systems.Eriksson Lundström, Jenny S. Z.Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Nordic Contributions in IS Research: Third Scandinavian Conference on Information Systems, SCIS 2012, Sigtuna, Sweden, August 2012, Proceedings2012Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 16. Lane, Michael
    et al.
    Fitzgerald, Brian
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Information Systems.
    Identifying Lean Software Development Values2012In: Proceedings of the 20th European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS 2012), Barcelona, Spain, June 10–13, 2012., Association for Information Systems, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agile software development (ASD) has emerged as a practice-led initiative which offers great promise in improving software productivity. However some confusion exists as to its relationship with Lean Software Development (LSD). Some treat LSD as more or less synonymous with ASD whereas others view LSD as a different concept. The definition and positioning of LSD relative to ASD is important as it gets to the heart of software development as craft versus science debate. The purpose of this paper is to identify core LSD values that 'define' LSD much as the agile manifesto values unified and defined so-called "lightweight methods" for ASD. We posit that LSD is more management philosophy than method and illuminate this through a genealogical analysis of the origins of LSD. We identify principles from various sources on the application of lean thinking in different domains. Synthesizing these principles we derive a candidate set of lean values that characterise LSD. Although immediately valuable to practitioners seeking to apply lean values in agile projects, future research will use this value-set to assess elements of "lean thinking" in the practices and principles of various agile methods so as to facilitate optimal applicability of these methods in a lean context.

  • 17. Lane, Michael
    et al.
    Fitzgerald, Brian
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Information Systems.
    The Influence of New Product Development on Scrum Practices2012In: Researching Agile Development of Information Systems (RAISE 2012), 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most widely used Agile software development (ASD) methods is Scrum. The underlying inspiration for Scrum came from an examination of new product development (NPD). This work proposes that the combination of six management characteristics results in very positive and effective product development: built-in instability, self-organizing project teams, overlapping development phases, "multi-learning", subtle control and organizational transfer of learning (Takeuchi et al. 1986). This paper reports on one strand of an overall research study investigating the motivations for adoption of Scrum. The strand in question focuses on the identification of the particular Scrum practices that relate to NPD characteristics.

  • 18.
    Lane, Michael
    et al.
    University of Limerick.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Informationssystem.
    Experiences in Global Software Development: A Framework-based Analysis of Distributed Product Development Projects2009In: Fourth IEEE International Conference on Global Software Engineering, Limerick, 13-16 July, 2009, Los Alamitos, CA: IEEE Computer Society , 2009, p. 244-248Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many authors have reported on various challenges and benefits encountered by teams engaged in global software development (GSD). Previous research has proposed a framework to structure these challenges and benefits within dimensions of distance and process. In this paper, the framework was used as an analytic device to investigate various projects performed by distributed teams in order to explore further the mechanisms used in industry both to overcome obstacles posed by distance and process challenges and also to exploit potential benefits enabled by global software development.

  • 19.
    Lane, Michael
    et al.
    University of Limerick.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    On the Suitability of Particular Software Development Roles to Global Software Development2008In: Proceedings of the The 3rd International Conference on Global Software Engineering. ICGSE 2008. Bangalore, 17-20 Aug. 2008., 2008, p. 3-12Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global software development surfaces various challenges and benefits that are not always present in co-located teams. The purpose of this paper is to explore a set of propositions that address the suitability of four different software development roles to Global software development (GSD). A qualitative research approach was applied to collaborations undertaken between remote counterparts playing the same development role in various GSD projects. Specific development roles were considered: business analyst, designer, developer and development-support. A framework that details the benefits and challenges of GSD was used as a basis for this research. Suitability of a role to GSD is based upon the balance of challenges and benefits discovered in that role's case. Finally, opportunities for future research are presented.

  • 20. Larsson, Anders Olof
    et al.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Snowing, freezing... tweeting?: Organizational Twitter use during crisis2013In: First Monday, ISSN 1396-0466, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 18, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a study on Twitter use by SJ, the national Swedish train operator. The aim of the study is to investigate how SJ (known on Twitter under the handle @SJ_AB) made use of the platform at hand to communicate with customers during the tumultuous Christmas season of 2010. The paper features an analysis of an extensive data set containing 3,394 tweets tagged as relevant and archived during the winter of 2010/11. Findings show that while SJ are indeed utilizing Twitter to communicate with their customers, the discerned communicative patterns are mostly pertaining to what is described as an “office hour”–approach — making use of the Twitter platform in a way that largely conforms to established routines of organizational communication.

  • 21. Lings, Brian
    et al.
    Lundell, Björn
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Information Science.
    Fitzgerald, Brian
    A reference model for successful Distributed Development of Software Systems2007In: Proceedings of the 2nd IEEE International Conference on Global Software Engineering, 2007, p. 130-139Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Distributed Development (DD) of Software Systems is an issue of increasing significance for organisations today, all the more so given the current trend towards globalisation. In this paper we present a reference model which can be used as a reference point for any company wishing to review their own DD scenario. This is particularised in two forms, one as an exemplar model for a global (GSD) development scenario and one as a particularisation of this for intra-national DD scenarios. By drawing from eight case-studies on DD, we present ten general strategies for successful DD together with our reference model which characterises an ideal DD situation.

  • 22.
    Rafiq, Asma
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Information Systems.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Information Systems.
    Sjöström, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Information Systems. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Psychosocial oncology and supportive care.
    Boundary Resources Dependency in Third-Party Development from the Developer's Perspective2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to explore issues pertaining to the devel- opment of third-party applications aimed to be hosted at software platforms. While prior research has addressed design challenges in platform design, and suggested a boundary resources model to understand such design, we argue that the application developers’ perspective has not yet been scrutinized. Drawing on design experiences from application development for the Facebook platform, we suggest further elaboration of the boundary resources model for software platforms. Our results show that the developers and applications are highly af- fected by the unpredictability of software platforms. Based on an empirically justified account of experience with boundary resources dependencies, we pro- pose a set of implications for third-party development as well as platform development and maintenance. The study should be helpful in determining the influence of boundary resources on third-party developers and applications whilst planning for application development on such platforms. It should also be useful to platform owners involved in the development and maintenance of boundary resources for third-party development.

  • 23.
    Sjöström, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Information Systems. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Psychosocial oncology and supportive care.
    Rahman, Mohammad Hafijur
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Psychosocial oncology and supportive care.
    Rafiq, Asma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Lochan, Ruth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Ågerfalk, Pär J
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Respondent Behavior Logging: An Opportunity for Online Survey Design2013In: Design Science at the Intersection of Physical and Virtual Design: 8th International Conference, DESRIST 2013, Helsinki, Finland, June 11-12, 2013. Proceedings. / [ed] J vom Brocke et al., Springer, 2013, p. 511-518Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work-in-progress paper introduces the concept of Respondent Behavior Logging (RBL), consisting of static and dynamic models that conceptualize respondent behavior when filling in online questionnaires. It is argued that web-based survey design may benefit from logging as a technique for evaluation, since such data may prove useful during re-design of questionnaires. Although other aspects of online surveys have attracted considerable attention both in industry and in literature, how the Web may leverage new and innovative techniques to support survey design is still underexplored. Some preliminary results are reported in the paper, and issues are raised regarding how to appropriately evaluate and demonstrate the qualities of the RBL concept as a means for survey re-design.

  • 24.
    Sjöström, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Rahman, Mohammad Hafijur
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Rafiq, Asma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Lochan, Ruth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Ågerfalk, Pär J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Respondent Behavior Logging: An Opportunity for Online Survey Design2013In: Design Science at the Intersection of Physical and Virtual Design, 2013, p. 511-518Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work-in-progress paper introduces the concept of Respondent Behavior Logging (RBL), consisting of static and dynamic models that conceptualize respondent behavior when filling in online questionnaires. It is argued that web-based survey design may benefit from logging as a technique for evaluation, since such data may prove useful during re-design of questionnaires. Although other aspects of online surveys have attracted considerable attention both in industry and in literature, how the Web may leverage new and innovative techniques to support survey design is still underexplored. Some preliminary results are reported in the paper, and issues are raised regarding how to appropriately evaluate and demonstrate the qualities of the RBL concept as a means for survey re-design.

  • 25.
    Sjöström, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Information Systems.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Information Systems.
    An Analytic Framework for Design-oriented Research Concepts2009In: AMCIS 2009: Proceedings, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last few decades, the field of information systems has shown a steadily increasing interest in design-oriented research. This is manifested through the emergence of different ontological and epistemological positions among IS researchers. Some challenges arise from this development, such as (a) a need to understand design-oriented IS research in relation to design-oriented approaches in other disciplines, and (b) a need for design theory representation that targets and is useful to stakeholders in both research and practice. This paper proposes a conceptual framework for understanding designoriented research, and its implications for research with a focus on meeting the two challenges mentioned above.

  • 26.
    Sjöström, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Hevner, Alan R.
    Privacy and Accountability in Online Communities: Towards a Theory of Scrutiny2014In: DESIGN SCIENCE: PERSPECTIVES FROM EUROPE, 2014, p. 41-51Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information systems design must balance requirements of privacy and accountability for the good of individuals and society. We ground our study in the context of the design and development of a eHealth system for psychosocial care. Multi-level privacy protections are balanced with the need to provide for accountable interventions in well-defined critical care situations. We identify a set of meta-requirements leading towards a theory of scrutiny.

  • 27.
    Sjöström, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Information Systems.
    Ågerfalk, Pär J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Information Systems.
    Hevner, Alan R.
    Univ S Florida, Informat Syst & Decis Sci Dept, USA.
    Scrutinizing Privacy and Accountability in Online Psychosocial Care2017In: IT Professional Magazine, ISSN 1520-9202, E-ISSN 1941-045X, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 45-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors' scrutiny-management technique supports managers and IT developers to systematically address privacy and accountability issues when designing software for the online delivery of health servicesspecifically, psychosocial care.

  • 28.
    Sjöström, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Information Systems.
    Ågerfalk, Pär Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Information Systems.
    Lochan, Ruth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Information Systems.
    Mutability Matters: Baselining the Consequences of Design2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Artefact mutability has been proposed as an important component of design theory in information systems. Although initial work on establishing a solid foundation for discussing mutability has been reported, conceptual as well as practical uncertainty still prevails. This paper draws on empirical work in a design science research project in the health sector to explore the notion of mutability and provides a novel conceptualization based on four different types of mutability. The study shows that in order to embrace mutability, IS researchers need to establish a sound philosophy of mutability and be open to incorporate theory and best practices from neighbouring fields, perhaps primarily from software engineering.

  • 29.
    Smite, Darja
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola.
    Moe, Nils BredeSINTEF.Ågerfalk, PärUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Agility Across Time and Space: Implementing Agile Methods in Global Software Projects2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Rather than deciding whether or not to get involved in global sourcing, many companies are facing decisions about whether or not to apply agile methods in their distributed projects. These companies are often motivated by the opportunities to solve the coordination and communication difficulties associated with global software development. Yet while agile principles prescribe close interaction and co-location, the very nature of distributed software development does not support these prerequisites. Šmite, Moe, and Ågerfalk structured the book into five parts. In "Motivation" the editors introduce the fundamentals of agile distributed software development and explain the rationale behind the application of agile practices in globally distributed software projects. "Transition" describes implementation strategies, adoption of particular agile practices for distributed projects, and general concepts of agility. "Management" details practical implications for project planning, time management, and customer and subcontractor interaction. "Teams" discusses agile distributed team configuration, effective communication and knowledge transfer, and allocation of roles and responsibilities. Finally, in the "Epilogue" the editors summarize all contributions and present future trends for research and practice in agile distributed development. This book is primarily targeted at researchers, lecturers, and students in empirical software engineering, and at practitioners involved in globally distributed software projects. The contributions are based on sound empirical research and identify gaps and commonalities in both the existing state of the art and state of the practice. In addition, they also offer practical advice through many hints, checklists, and experience reports. Questions answered in this book include: What should companies expect from merging agile and distributed strategies? What are the stumbling blocks that prevent companies from realizing the benefits of the agile approach in distributed environments, and how can we recognize infeasible strategies and unfavorable circumstances? What helps managers cope with the challenges of implementing agile approaches in distributed software development projects? How can distributed teams survive the decisions taken by management and become efficient through the application of agile approaches?

  • 30. Smite, Darja
    et al.
    Moe, Nils Brede
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Agility Across Time and Space: Summing up and Planning for the Future2010In: Agility Across Time and Space: Implementing Agile Methods in Global Software Projects / [ed] Darja Šmite, Nils Brede Moe and Pär J. Ågerfalk, Heidelberg: Springer , 2010, 1, p. 333-337Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter identifies the emerging trends in understanding the application of agility across time and space. The chapter presents findings from an expert survey that summarize the most important practical advice and the major areas of improvement and future work.

  • 31.
    Smite, Darja
    et al.
    BTH.
    Moe, Nils Brede
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Fundamentals of Agile Distributed Software Development2010In: Agility Across Time and Space: Implementing Agile Methods in Global Software Projects / [ed] Darja Šmite, Nils Brede Moe and Pär J. Ågerfalk, Heidelberg: Springer , 2010, 1, p. 3-7Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter provides an introduction to the area of agile distributed software development. It proceeds as follows. We start by introducing and motivating (globally) distributed software development, and follow on with agile software development. With this foundation we discuss the concept of agile distributed development, its motivation and some of the pertinent issues involved.

  • 32. Te'eni, Dv
    et al.
    Rowe, Frantz
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Lee, Jong Seok
    Publishing and getting published in EJIS: marshaling contributions for a diversity of genres2015In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 559-568Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Thorén, Claes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Ågerfalk, Pär J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Edenius, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Through the Printing Press: An Account of Open Practices in the Swedish Newspaper Industry2014In: Journal of the AIS, ISSN 1536-9323, E-ISSN 1536-9323, ISSN 1536-9323, Vol. 15, no 11, p. 779-804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizational practices that foster a dialogic relationship between organizations and their constituent customers have created an arena for inbound and outbound innovation. At the nexus of this development occurring in the media industries, these flows are carried by various forms of digital, social media and an increasing digital presence in the form of dynamic websites with varying degrees of interactive capabilities. In this paper, we posit that the newspaper industry is torn between indifference and cautious apprehension caused by the difficulty in marrying the journalism profession’s carefully guarded gatekeeping practices with the revolving doors of open innovation. Gatekeeping has emerged as a fiercely defended cornerstone for the industry and the profession of journalism itself is not enough to distinguish amateurs from professionals; for the segregation between professionals and amateurs to carry weight rather than being reduced to a hollow title, the segregation needs a practice that explicitly enforces gatekeeping—where actions speak louder than titles. Against this backdrop, we pursue the following research question: Why has IT-enabled open innovation become such a contentious issue in the context of the newspaper industry? Combining contextual in-situ ethnographic interviews and observation with an industry-wide content analysis of Swedish newspaper websites, we present an in-depth view of what IT-enabled open innovation means in the context of the newspaper industry. Results show that the process of legitimization inscribed by a particularly charged information technology—the printing press—continues to exert great influence in what constitutes open practice in the newspaper industry.

  • 34.
    Thorén, Claes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Ågerfalk, Pär J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Rolandsson, Bertil
    Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Voicing the Puppet: Accommodating unresolved institutional tensions in digital open practices2018In: Organization Studies, ISSN 0170-8406, E-ISSN 1741-3044, Vol. 39, no 7, p. 923-945Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines managerial control and the tensions caused by digital open practices. Drawing on qualitative interviews with managers of a prominent Swedish newspaper corporation, we apply the theoretical lens of institutional logics to analyse the institutional tensions stemming from pressure to integrate user-generated content, and the strategies for managing multiple logics that emerge as a result. Specifically, by linking managerial control to the logics of ‘profession’, the ‘market’ and the ‘corporation’, we use the concept of ventriloquism to show how managers recreate professional legitimacy when handling digital open practices by letting the corporate logic mimic the values of the profession. The study at hand contributes to the understanding of how digital open practices leverage managerial and corporate control, and the consequences thereof, and how the newspaper industry still has not fully managed to reconcile with user-generated content. Prior research is inconclusive as to whether digital open practices increase or decrease managerial control. This study concludes that framing the market logic in digital media exerts pressure on managers to find a defensive compromise to cope with unresolved tensions between the corporate and professional logics.

  • 35.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Getting Pragmatic2010In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 251-256Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Going through changes2018In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 1-2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Information Systems.
    Stimulating academic discourse: a call for response2019In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 1-5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Boldyreff, CorneliaGonzález-Barahona, Jesús M.Madey, Gregory R.Noll, John
    Open Source Software: New Horizons. 6th International IFIP WG 2.13 Conference on Open Source Systems, OSS 2010, Notre Dame, IN, USA, May 30 – June 2, 2010. Proceedings2010Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 6th International IFIP WG 2.13 Conference on Open Source Systems, OSS 2010, held in Notre Dame, IN, USA, in May/June 2010. The 23 revised full papers presented together with 17 short papers, 5 workshop abstracts and 4 panel descriptions were carefully reviewed and selected from 51 submissions. The papers reflect the international communities of active OSS researchers and present a broad range of perspectives on open source systems ranging from software engineering through organizational issues to law.

  • 39.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Information Science.
    Brinkkemper, Sjaak
    Gonzalez-Perez, Cesar
    Henderson-Sellers, Brian
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    Kelly, Steven
    Ralyté, Jolita
    Modularization Constructs in Method Engineering: Towards Common Ground?2007In: Proceedings of IFIP WG8.1 Working Conference on Situational Method Engineering: Fundamentals and Experiences, 2007, p. 359-368Conference paper (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the Method Engineering (ME) research community has reached considerable maturity, it has not yet been able to agree on the granularity and definition of the configurable parts of methods. This state of affairs is causing unnecessary confusion, especially with an ever increasing number of people contributing to ME research. There are several competing notions around, most significantly ‘method fragments’ and ‘method chunks’, but also ‘method components’ and ‘process components’ are used in some quarters and have also been widely published. Sometimes these terms are used interchangeably, but there appears to be important semantic and pragmatic differences. If the differences are unimportant, we should be able to come to an agreement on what construct to promote. Alternatively, the different constructs may serve different purposes and there is a need for them to coexist. If this is the case, it should be possible to pinpoint exactly how they are related and which are useful in what contexts. This panel is a step towards finding common ground in this area, which arguably is at the very core of ME.

  • 40.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Eriksson, Owen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Information Systems.
    The Stolen Identifier: An Inquiry into the Nature of Identification and the Ontological Status of Information Systems2011In: Proceedings of the 2011 International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS 2011), Shanghai, China, December 4–7, 2011., Association for Information Systems, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on real-world examples of identity theft, and particularly a recent incident in Sweden, this paper explores the nature of identification from a social ontology point of view. This is contrasted with the traditional representational view, which is shown unable to handle critical aspects related to institutional control of identifiers and identity. Specifically, the paper shows that identification and the definition and allocation of identifiers is an institutional and political rather than scientific process, and that since “identity” in itself is a social construct, the process of identification depends on the institutional context in which the objects to identify exist as valid institutional facts. These institutional objects are often originally generated by the use of information systems, which means that genuine real-world institutional objects and their identifiers can be found within these information systems. This implies that the representational view of information systems with a sharp distinction between the real world outside the information system and the system itself (only seen as a model or perceived state of that real world) cannot be maintained.

  • 41.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Information Science.
    Fitzgerald, Brian
    Outsourcing to an Unknown Workforce: Exploring Opensourcing as an Offshore Sourcing Strategy2008In: Management Information Systems Quarterly, ISSN 0276-7783, E-ISSN 2162-9730, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 385-409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a psychological contract perspective on the use of the open source development model as a global sourcing strategy—opensourcing, as we term it here—whereby commercial companies and open source communities collaborate on development of software of commercial interest to the company. Building on previous research on information systems outsourcing, a theoretical framework for exploring the opensourcing phenomenon is derived. The first phase of the research concerned qualitative case studies involving three commercial organizations (IONA Technologies, Philips Medical Systems and Telefonica) that had "liberated" what had hitherto been proprietary software and sought to grow a global open source community around their product. We followed this with a large-scale survey involving additional exemplars of the phenomenon. The study identifies a number of symmetrical and complementary customer and community obligations that are associated with opensourcing success. We also identify a number of tension points on which customer and community perceptions tend to vary. Overall the key watchwords for opensourcing are openness, trust, tact, professionalism, transparency, and complementariness: The customer and community need to establish a trusted partnership of shared responsibility in building an overall opensourcing ecosystem. The study reveals an ongoing shift from OSS as a community of individual developers to OSS as a community of commercial organizations, primarily small- to medium-sized enterprises. It also reveals that opensourcing provides ample opportunity for companies to headhunt top developers, hence moving from outsourcing to a largely unknown OSS workforce toward recruitment of developers from a global open source community whose talents have become known as a result of the opensourcing experience.

  • 42.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Information Science. Data- och systemvetenskap.
    Fitzgerald, Brian
    Holmström, Helena
    Ó Conchúir, Eoin
    Global Software Development: How Real are the Benefits?2007In: Engineers Journal, Vol. 61, no 6, p. 353–356-Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 43.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Information Science.
    Fitzgerald, Brian
    Holmström Olsson, Helena
    Ó Conchúir, Eoin
    Benefits of Global Software Development: The Known and Unknown2008In: Making Globally Distributed Software Development a Success Story: Proceedings of 2008 International Conference on Software Process, 2008, p. 1-9Conference paper (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizations are increasingly moving to the global software development (GSD) model because of significant benefits that can accrue. However, GSD is fraught with difficulties arising from geographical, temporal and socio-cultural distances. The emphasis in the literature to date has typically been on how to overcome these significant challenges associated with GSD. While a number of GSD benefits have been identified in the literature, there are also a number of less obvious, what we term ’unknown,’ potential benefits that can accrue from GSD. Here we synthesize and integrate an overall set of potential GSD benefits and categorize them according to the organizational, team and process level to which they are most applicable. The ’unknown’ includes organization benefits, such as improved resource allocation, team benefits, such as reduced coordination cost and improved team autonomy, and process benefits, such as improved documentation and clearly defined processes.

  • 44.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Fitzgerald, Brian
    Stol, Klaas-Jan
    Not so Shore Anymore: The New Imperatives When Sourcing in the Age of Open2015In: Proceedings of the 23rd European Conference on Information Systems / [ed] Jörg Becker, Jan vom Brocke, Marco de Marco, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Software outsourcing has been the subject of much research in the past 25 years, largely because of potential cost savings envisaged through lower labour costs, ‘follow-the-sun’ development, access to skilled developers, and proximity to new markets. In recent years, the success of the open source phe-nomenon has inspired a number of new forms of sourcing that combine the potential of global sourcing with the elusive and much sought-after possibility of increased innovation. Three of these new forms of sourcing are opensourcing, innersourcing and crowdsourcing. Based on a comparative analysis of a number of case studies of these forms of sourcing, we illustrate how they differ in both significant and subtle ways from outsourcing. We conclude that these emerging sourcing approaches call for conceptual development and refocusing. Specifically, to understand software sourcing in the age of open, the important concept is no longer ‘shoring,’ but rather five identified imperatives (governance sharedness, unknownness, intrinsicness, innovativeness and co-opetitiveness) and their implications for the development situation at hand.

  • 45.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Fitzgerald, Brian
    Stol, Klaas-Jan
    Software Sourcing in the Age of Open: Leveraging the Unknown Workforce2015 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This SpringerBrief discusses multiple forms of open-source-inspired outsourcing: opensourcing, innersourcing and crowdsourcing. It uses a framework-based comparison to explain the strengths and weaknesses of each approach. By pointing out characteristics along with benefits and pitfalls of each approach, the authors provide nuanced and research-based advice to managers and developers facing software sourcing decisions. The differences and commonalities of these three emerging approaches are carefully analyzed. Chapters explore the primary challenges of reliability, efficiency and robustness in open-source methods. Examples from industrial cases are included, along with extensive references to recent research. The brief concludes with a comparative analysis of approaches and outlines key implications to be aware of when outsourcing. Software Sourcing in the Age of Open: Leveraging the Unknown Workforce is designed for professionals and researchers interested in outsourcing challenges. The content is also suitable for postgraduate students interested in contemporary software sourcing approaches.

  • 46.
    Ågerfalk, Pär J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Embracing diversity through mixed methods research2013In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 251-256Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Ågerfalk, Pär J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Insufficient theoretical contribution: a conclusive rationale for rejection?2014In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 593-599Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Ågerfalk, Pär J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Whither design science research?2018In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 127-128Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Ågerfalk, Pär J.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Information Science, Computer Science.
    Edenius, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Information Science, Computer Science.
    Framing participation in organizational online communities: research challenges2008In: Proc. 31st Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although many organizations have started to experiment with online communities, there is little theoretically grounded knowledge on how to develop, manage and improve such communities. In addressing this gap, we explore how participation in organizational online communities can be framed with the purpose to identify future research challenges. By conceptualizing the online community phenomenon the paper reflects on what motivates people and organizations to participate in such communities. Special attention is given to organizational online communities and potential research areas. A number of imminent research challenges are suggested.

  • 50.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Information Science.
    Sjöström, Jonas
    Jönköping International Business School.
    Sowing the Seeds of Self: A Socio-pragmatic Penetration of the Web Artefact2007In: Proceedings of the 2nd international conference on Pragmatic web / [ed] Simon Buckingham Shum, Mikael Lind, Hans Weigand, 2007, p. 1-8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses the concept of the information technology artefact in a pragmatic web context with a special focus on its user interface. Assuming a communicative socio-pragmatic view of the use of Web artefacts, a distinction is made between explicit performance of essential communication actions and "give offs"; our sometimes unintentional traces left on the Web, which we may even be unaware of. It is argued that both aspects are key to understanding the role of IT artefacts and user interfaces in the Web context.

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