uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Berggren, Daniel Moreno
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Folkvaljon, Yasin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Engvall, Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Sundberg, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Lambe, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Antunovic, Petar
    Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Haematol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Garelius, Hege
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sect Haematol & Coagulat, Dept Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lorenz, Fryderyk
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Umea, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lars
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Haematol Oncol & Radiat Phys, Lund, Sweden.
    Rasmussen, Bengt
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Sch Med Sci, Orebro, Sweden.
    Lehmann, Sören
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Hellstrom-Lindberg, Eva
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Huddinge, Ctr Haematol & Regenerat Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jadersten, Martin
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Huddinge, Ctr Haematol & Regenerat Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ejerblad, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Prognostic scoring systems for myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) in a population-based setting: a report from the Swedish MDS register2018In: British Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0007-1048, E-ISSN 1365-2141, Vol. 181, no 5, p. 614-627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) have highly variable outcomes and prognostic scoring systems are important tools for risk assessment and to guide therapeutic decisions. However, few population-based studies have compared the value of the different scoring systems. With data from the nationwide Swedish population-based MDS register we validated the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS), revised IPSS (IPSS-R) and the World Health Organization (WHO) Classification-based Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS). We also present population-based data on incidence, clinical characteristics including detailed cytogenetics and outcome from the register. The study encompassed 1329 patients reported to the register between 2009 and 2013, 14% of these had therapy-related MDS (t-MDS). Based on the MDS register, the yearly crude incidence of MDS in Sweden was 2<bold></bold>9 per 100000 inhabitants. IPSS-R had a significantly better prognostic power than IPSS (P<0<bold></bold>001). There was a trend for better prognostic power of IPSS-R compared to WPSS (P=0<bold></bold>05) and for WPSS compared to IPSS (P=0<bold></bold>07). IPSS-R was superior to both IPSS and WPSS for patients aged 70years. Patients with t-MDS had a worse outcome compared to de novo MDS (d-MDS), however, the validity of the prognostic scoring systems was comparable for d-MDS and t-MDS. In conclusion, population-based studies are important to validate prognostic scores in a real-world' setting. In our nationwide cohort, the IPSS-R showed the best predictive power.

  • 2.
    Bhoi, Sujata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Baliakas, Panagiotis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Cortese, Diego
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Mattsson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Sevov, Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Smedby, Karin E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Juliusson, Gunnar
    Sutton, Lesley-Ann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Mansouri, Larry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    UGT2B17 expression: a novel prognostic marker within IGHV-mutated chronic lymphocytic leukemia?2016In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 101, no 2, p. E63-E65Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Kaderi, Mohd Arifin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Kanduri, Meena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Buhl, Anne Mette
    Department of Hematology, Leukemia Laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Sevov, Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Cahill, Nicola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Gunnarsson, Rebeqa
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Stem Cell Center, Hematology and Transplantation, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Jansson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Ekström Smedby, Karin
    Department of Medicine, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hjalgrim, Hendrik
    Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Juliusson, Gunnar
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Stem Cell Center, Hematology and Transplantation, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Jurlander, Jesper
    Department of Hematology, Leukemia Laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Mansouri, Larry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    LPL is the strongest prognostic factor in a comparative analysis of RNA-based markers in early chronic lymphocytic leukemia2011In: Haematologica (online), ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 96, no 8, p. 1153-1160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    The expression levels of LPL, ZAP70, TCL1A, CLLU1 and MCL1 have recently been proposed as prognostic factors in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. However, few studies have systematically compared these different RNA-based markers.

    DESIGN AND METHODS:

    Using real-time quantitative PCR, we measured the mRNA expression levels of these genes in unsorted samples from 252 newly diagnosed chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients and correlated our data with established prognostic markers (for example Binet stage, CD38, IGHV gene mutational status and genomic aberrations) and clinical outcome.

    RESULTS:

    High expression levels of all RNA-based markers, except MCL1, predicted shorter overall survival and time to treatment, with LPL being the most significant. In multivariate analysis including the RNA-based markers, LPL expression was the only independent prognostic marker for overall survival and time to treatment. When studying LPL expression and the established markers, LPL expression retained its independent prognostic strength for overall survival. All of the RNA-based markers, albeit with varying ability, added prognostic information to established markers, with LPL expression giving the most significant results. Notably, high LPL expression predicted a worse outcome in good-prognosis subgroups, such as patients with mutated IGHV genes, Binet stage A, CD38 negativity or favorable cytogenetics. In particular, the combination of LPL expression and CD38 could further stratify Binet stage A patients.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    LPL expression is the strongest RNA-based prognostic marker in chronic lymphocytic leukemia that could potentially be applied to predict outcome in the clinical setting, particularly in the large group of patients with favorable prognosis.

  • 4.
    Mansouri, Mahmoud R
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Sevov, Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Åleskog, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Jondal, Mikael
    Merup, Mats
    Sundström, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Osorio, Lyda
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    IGHV3-21 gene usage is associated with high TCL1 expression in chronic lymphocytic leukemia2010In: European Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0902-4441, E-ISSN 1600-0609, Vol. 84, no 2, p. 109-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    T-cell leukemia/lymphoma protein 1 (TCL1) was recently shown to display an expression pattern in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) corresponding to molecular subtypes, where poor-risk patients demonstrated higher expression levels. Here, we examined the mRNA expression pattern of TCL1 in 144 patients with CLL, including 67 immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable (IGHV) mutated, 58 IGHV unmutated and 19 patients with IGHV3-21 usage. A higher TCL1 expression level was detected in patients with CLL with unmutated vs. mutated IGHV genes (P < 0.001), whereas no difference was demonstrated within the IGHV3-21 cohort (i.e., mutated vs. unmutated and stereotyped vs. non-stereotyped complementarity determining region 3). The IGHV3-21 subgroup displayed high TCL1 mRNA expression, differing significantly from other IGHV mutated cases (P < 0.001), although 11/19 had mutated IGHV genes. Furthermore, high TCL1 expression levels were associated with significantly shorter overall survival (P < 0.001). Altogether, we show that TCL1 mRNA expression may predict clinical outcome in CLL and that the IGHV3-21 subset, regardless of mutational status, displays high TCL1 expression.

  • 5.
    Mansouri, Mahmoud
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Sevov, Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Fahlgren, Emma
    Tobin, Gerard
    Jondal, Mikael
    Osorio, Lyda
    Roos, Göran
    Olivecrona, Gunilla
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Lipoprotein lipase is differentially expressed in prognostic subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia but displays invariably low catalytical activity2010In: Leukemia research: a Forum for Studies on Leukemia and Normal Hemopoiesis, ISSN 0145-2126, E-ISSN 1873-5835, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 301-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) expression has been shown to correlate with IGHV mutational status and to predict outcome in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). We here investigated the prognostic impact of LPL expression in relation to other prognostic markers including IGHV3-21 usage in 140 CLL patients. Additionally, we studied the catalytic activity of LPL in CLL cells. A significant difference in LPL mRNA expression was detected in IGHV unmutated compared to mutated CLL patients (p<0.001). However, the poor-prognostic mutated/stereotyped IGHV3-21 patients did not differ from other mutated CLL cases. Clinical outcome was significantly different in CLL cases with high versus low LPL expression (p<0.001), and LPL expression exceeded mutation status/IGHV3-21 usage as an independent prognostic marker. Finally, LPL protein expression correlated significantly with mRNA expression and was higher in IGHV unmutated versus mutated CLL (p=0.018), although the majority of synthesized protein was catalytically inactive indicating a non-catalytical function in CLL.

  • 6.
    Sevov, Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    RNA-based Prognostic Markers in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a heterogeneous disease where a significant proportion of patients will develop an aggressive disease. Today, the mutational status of the immunoglobulin heavy variable (IGHV) genes is one of the strongest prognostic markers in CLL, where unmutated IGHV genes correlate with poor outcome. In addition, IGHV3-21 gene usage is associated with poor prognosis independent of mutational status. Recently, several genes were shown to be differently expressed between IGHV mutated and unmutated CLL and were suggested as prognostic markers. The aim of this thesis was to examine the applicability of these RNA-based prognostic markers in CLL.

    In papers I and II, the prognostic significance of LPL and TCL1A mRNA expression in CLL was investigated in 140 and 144 patients, respectively. High expression was found to be associated with inferior clinical outcome for both markers. However, CLL cases with mutated IGHV3-21 genes displayed low levels of LPL expression, indicating that LPL cannot identify this poor-risk patient group. In contrast, high TCL1A expression was detected in all IGHV3-21 cases. To elucidate the functionality of LPL in CLL, LPL lipase activity was measured in 33 cases. The lipase activity was found to be invariably low, implying an alternative function for LPL in CLL.

    In paper III, a comprehensive analysis of five RNA-based markers (LPL, TCL1A, ZAP70, CLLU1 and MCL1) was performed in 252 CLL patients. All RNA-based markers except MCL1 predicted clinical outcome, with LPL being the strongest. Moreover, LPL expression independently predicted overall survival when adjusted for established markers. All of the RNA-based markers added additional prognostic information to established markers, e.g. high LPL expression predicted an inferior outcome in patients with mutated IGHV genes or good-risk cytogenetics.

    For clinical application, over time stability of prognostic markers is crucial. In paper IV, the expression of LPL, TCL1A, ZAP70 and MCL1 was investigated in samples taken at diagnosis and at a follow-up of seven years in 104 CLL patients. LPL was found to be the most stable marker, displaying high correlation between the sequential samples, whereas ZAP70 and MCL1 varied significantly. TCL1A expression increased at follow-up, which may indicate disease progression as TCL1A promotes cell survival.

    In summary, this thesis highlights the applicability of RNA-based markers in CLL prognostication, both as single markers or in combination with established markers. In particular, LPL was shown to be the strongest RNA-based marker in terms of prognostic strength and stability.

    List of papers
    1. Lipoprotein lipase is differentially expressed in prognostic subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia but displays invariably low catalytical activity
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lipoprotein lipase is differentially expressed in prognostic subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia but displays invariably low catalytical activity
    Show others...
    2010 (English)In: Leukemia research: a Forum for Studies on Leukemia and Normal Hemopoiesis, ISSN 0145-2126, E-ISSN 1873-5835, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 301-306Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) expression has been shown to correlate with IGHV mutational status and to predict outcome in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). We here investigated the prognostic impact of LPL expression in relation to other prognostic markers including IGHV3-21 usage in 140 CLL patients. Additionally, we studied the catalytic activity of LPL in CLL cells. A significant difference in LPL mRNA expression was detected in IGHV unmutated compared to mutated CLL patients (p<0.001). However, the poor-prognostic mutated/stereotyped IGHV3-21 patients did not differ from other mutated CLL cases. Clinical outcome was significantly different in CLL cases with high versus low LPL expression (p<0.001), and LPL expression exceeded mutation status/IGHV3-21 usage as an independent prognostic marker. Finally, LPL protein expression correlated significantly with mRNA expression and was higher in IGHV unmutated versus mutated CLL (p=0.018), although the majority of synthesized protein was catalytically inactive indicating a non-catalytical function in CLL.

    Keywords
    LPL expression, LPL catalytical activity, IGHV mutational status, IGHV3 21 usage, Chronic lymphocytic leukemia, Prognosis
    National Category
    Cancer and Oncology Hematology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-121105 (URN)10.1016/j.leukres.2009.07.032 (DOI)000274529600008 ()19709746 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2010-03-18 Created: 2010-03-18 Last updated: 2019-04-01Bibliographically approved
    2. IGHV3-21 gene usage is associated with high TCL1 expression in chronic lymphocytic leukemia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>IGHV3-21 gene usage is associated with high TCL1 expression in chronic lymphocytic leukemia
    Show others...
    2010 (English)In: European Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0902-4441, E-ISSN 1600-0609, Vol. 84, no 2, p. 109-116Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    T-cell leukemia/lymphoma protein 1 (TCL1) was recently shown to display an expression pattern in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) corresponding to molecular subtypes, where poor-risk patients demonstrated higher expression levels. Here, we examined the mRNA expression pattern of TCL1 in 144 patients with CLL, including 67 immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable (IGHV) mutated, 58 IGHV unmutated and 19 patients with IGHV3-21 usage. A higher TCL1 expression level was detected in patients with CLL with unmutated vs. mutated IGHV genes (P < 0.001), whereas no difference was demonstrated within the IGHV3-21 cohort (i.e., mutated vs. unmutated and stereotyped vs. non-stereotyped complementarity determining region 3). The IGHV3-21 subgroup displayed high TCL1 mRNA expression, differing significantly from other IGHV mutated cases (P < 0.001), although 11/19 had mutated IGHV genes. Furthermore, high TCL1 expression levels were associated with significantly shorter overall survival (P < 0.001). Altogether, we show that TCL1 mRNA expression may predict clinical outcome in CLL and that the IGHV3-21 subset, regardless of mutational status, displays high TCL1 expression.

    National Category
    Hematology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-121110 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-0609.2009.01369.x (DOI)000273301600003 ()19889012 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2010-03-18 Created: 2010-03-18 Last updated: 2019-04-01
    3. LPL is the strongest prognostic factor in a comparative analysis of RNA-based markers in early chronic lymphocytic leukemia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>LPL is the strongest prognostic factor in a comparative analysis of RNA-based markers in early chronic lymphocytic leukemia
    Show others...
    2011 (English)In: Haematologica (online), ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 96, no 8, p. 1153-1160Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    The expression levels of LPL, ZAP70, TCL1A, CLLU1 and MCL1 have recently been proposed as prognostic factors in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. However, few studies have systematically compared these different RNA-based markers.

    DESIGN AND METHODS:

    Using real-time quantitative PCR, we measured the mRNA expression levels of these genes in unsorted samples from 252 newly diagnosed chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients and correlated our data with established prognostic markers (for example Binet stage, CD38, IGHV gene mutational status and genomic aberrations) and clinical outcome.

    RESULTS:

    High expression levels of all RNA-based markers, except MCL1, predicted shorter overall survival and time to treatment, with LPL being the most significant. In multivariate analysis including the RNA-based markers, LPL expression was the only independent prognostic marker for overall survival and time to treatment. When studying LPL expression and the established markers, LPL expression retained its independent prognostic strength for overall survival. All of the RNA-based markers, albeit with varying ability, added prognostic information to established markers, with LPL expression giving the most significant results. Notably, high LPL expression predicted a worse outcome in good-prognosis subgroups, such as patients with mutated IGHV genes, Binet stage A, CD38 negativity or favorable cytogenetics. In particular, the combination of LPL expression and CD38 could further stratify Binet stage A patients.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    LPL expression is the strongest RNA-based prognostic marker in chronic lymphocytic leukemia that could potentially be applied to predict outcome in the clinical setting, particularly in the large group of patients with favorable prognosis.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Medical Genetics Cancer and Oncology
    Research subject
    Clinical Genetics; Medical Genetics; Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-111078 (URN)10.3324/haematol.2010.039396 (DOI)000294722700013 ()21508119 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-12-02 Created: 2009-12-02 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
    4. Longitudinal study of RNA-based prognostic markers in chronic lymphocytic leukemia reveals LPL as the most stable
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Longitudinal study of RNA-based prognostic markers in chronic lymphocytic leukemia reveals LPL as the most stable
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Several genes display differential expression in prognostic subsets in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), including LPL, TCL1, ZAP70 and MCL1. CLL patients commonly have an indolent course with low stage disease and long survival, and in this study we aimed to investigate the stability of RNA-based prognostic markers in such an indolent cohort over time. mRNA expression of LPL, TCL1, ZAP70 and MCL1 was measured in sequential unsorted samples obtained from 96 CLL patients at both diagnosis and a median follow-up of seven years. LPL was the only RNA-based marker that did not demonstrate any significant changes in expression in diagnostic vs. follow-up samples. Furthermore, an 82% concordance between both time-points was observed when grouping cases based on high or low expression. LPL expression was not affected by treatment and in addition, LPL expression in follow-up samples could predict overall survival. In contrast, TCL1 expression was found to increase at follow-up, especially in cases displaying low expression at diagnosis. As TCL1 promotes cell survival this increase could possibly be of importance for progression of the disease. Both ZAP70 and MCL1 mRNA expression were found to vary significantly during the disease course. In summary, using unsorted CLL samples, we have demonstrated that LPL is superior to other RNA-based markers based on stability over time. These findings fully endorse the use of LPL analysis at any time point of the disease.

    Keywords
    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia, prognostic markers, RNA-based markers, LPL, longitudinal
    National Category
    Medical Genetics Hematology
    Research subject
    Medical Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-133249 (URN)
    Available from: 2010-11-04 Created: 2010-11-04 Last updated: 2018-01-12
  • 7.
    Sevov, Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Bunikis, Ignas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Häggqvist, Susana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Höglund, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Ameur, Adam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Cavelier, Lucia
    Targeted RNA Sequencing Assay Efficiently Identifies Cryptic KMT2A (MLL)-Fusions in Acute Leukemia Patients2014In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 124, no 21Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Sevov, Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Elfineh, Lioudmila
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Cavelier, Lucia B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Resveratrol regulates the expression of LXR-alpha in human macrophages2006In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 348, no 3, p. 1047-1054Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The naturally occurring polyphenol resveratrol has been associated with the beneficial effects of red wine consumption on cardiovascular disease and shown to inhibit atherosclerosis in animal models. To determine if resveratrol affects the expression of genes that control lipid homeostasis in human macrophages, we measured expression changes in the LXR-alpha pathway, crucial to cholesterol efflux, and in genes that mediate lipoprotein uptake. Resveratrol treatment of THP-1 macrophages induced LXR-alpha at mRNA and protein levels. Increased recruitment of RNA polymerase 11 to the LXR-alpha promoter suggested that up-regulation was at least partly mediated by transcriptional mechanisms. Resveratrol also induced LXR-alpha in human monocyte-derived macrophages together with elevated ABCAI and ABCGI mRNA levels. Moreover, resveratrol repressed the expression of the lipid uptake genes LPL and SR-All. The ability of resveratrol to modulate expression of the genes involved in lipid uptake and efflux suggests that polyphenols can potentially limit cholesterol accumulation in human macrophages.

  • 9.
    Sevov, Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Mansouri, Larry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    RNA-based markers as prognostic factors in chronic lymphocytic leukemia2012In: Expert Review of Hematology, ISSN 1747-4086, E-ISSN 1747-4094, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 69-79Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is most often indolent at diagnosis but has a highly variable clinical course, and many patients will eventually progress and require treatment. Currently, there are a number of clinical and molecular markers known to be predictive of prognosis in CLL that can be applied to discriminate patients that are more likely to develop a progressive disease. Gene-expression profiling studies have identified genes with differential expression between prognostic subgroups in CLL, and research on these RNA-based prognostic markers has expanded during recent years. For example, high lipoprotein lipase and CLLU1 mRNA expression have recently been shown to be strong markers of poor clinical outcome. In this review we will provide a summary of the most significant prognostic markers in CLL, focusing on the recent category of RNA-based markers in particular.

  • 10.
    Wetterbom, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Sevov, Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Cavelier, Lucia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Bergström, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, The Linnaeus Centre for Bioinformatics.
    Comparative genomic analysis of human and chimpanzee indicates a key role for indels in primate evolution2006In: Journal of Molecular Evolution, ISSN 0022-2844, E-ISSN 1432-1432, Vol. 63, no 5, p. 682-690Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sequence comparison of humans and chimpanzees is of interest to understand the mechanisms behind primate evolution. Here we present an independent analysis of human chromosome 21 and the high-quality BAC clone sequences of the homologous chimpanzee chromosome 22. In contrast to previous studies, we have used global alignment methods and Ensembl predictions of protein coding genes (n = 224) for the analysis. Divergence due to insertions and deletions (indels) along with substitutions was examined separately for different genomic features (coding, noncoding genic, and intergenic sequence). The major part of the genomic divergence could be attributed to indels (5.07%), while the nucleotide divergence was estimated as 1.52%. Thus the total divergence was estimated as 6.58%. When excluding repeats and low-complexity DNA the total divergence decreased to 2.37%. The chromosomal distribution of nucleotide substitutions and indel events was significantly correlated. To further examine the role of indels in primate evolution we focused on coding sequences. Indels were found within the coding sequence of 13% of the genes and approximately half of the indels have not been reported previously. In 5% of the chimpanzee genes, indels or substitutions caused premature stop codons that rendered the affected transcripts nonfunctional. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that indels comprise the majority of the genomic divergence. Furthermore, indels occur frequently in coding sequences. Our results thereby support the hypothesis that indels may have a key role in primate evolution.

1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf