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  • 1.
    Berg, Elisabeth Gräslund
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Du Pradel, Carolina Durieu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Fiebranz, Rosemarie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Jacobsson, Benny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Jansson, Karin Hassan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Lennersand, Marie
    Lindberg, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Lindström, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Lindström, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Ling, Sofia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Mispelaere, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Oja, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Pihl, Christopher
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Rydén, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Ågren, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Östman, Ann-Catrin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Praktiker som gör skillnad: Om den verb-inriktade metoden2013In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 133, no 3, p. 335-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the so-called verb-oriented method and its role in the research project Gender and Work in early modern Sweden (GaW), which is based at Uppsala University. It provides a presentation of the GaW-database, which has been designed to allow analysis according to the verb-method. Finally, the article points out that this method can be combined with a number of different theoretical approaches as long as the focus is on practices. It is therefore compatible with the approaches of e.g., Judith Butler, Michel de Certeau, and Amartya Sen. Work is defined as "time-use with the purpose of making a living" and the article discusses why data on time-use, or actual work activities, are better suited for research into early modern Swedish working life than other types of data. It shows that activities are usually described in the sources by verb-phrases, and explains how and from what sources verb-phrases are collected and analyzed within the project. In order to allow for generalizations the verb-method presupposes large amounts of data. This is the rationale for the GaW-database, which at present includes around 5000 verb-phrases and 75000 data posts.

  • 2.
    Lennersand, Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Mispelaere, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Pihl, Christopher
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Ågren, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Gender, Work, and the Fiscal-Military State2017In: Making a Living, Making a Difference: Gender and work in early modern European society / [ed] Maria Ågren, New York: Oxford University Press, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In contrast to the early twentieth century, when marriage could set an end to women’s working lives, early modern society was based on the fundamental necessity of married women’s work. This chapter looks at one part of the labor market where this was particularly salient: state service. The new states of Europe created a market in male labor and new career opportunities for men. States were, however, just as dependent on women’s work, both for their households and directly for the state. Looking at men’s and women’s work in four state-run sectors (the customs administration, the army, large-scale production units, and midwifery), this chapter explores the ways in which state formation, commercialization, and people’s everyday lives were entangled.

  • 3.
    Lindström, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Mispelaere, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Genus, arbete och hushåll bland jordfattiga på landsbygden2011In: Levebröd: vad vet vi om tidigmodern könsarbetsdelning? / [ed] Benny Jacobsson & Maria Ågren, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet, 2011, p. 131-154Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Lindström, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Mispelaere, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Interdependent living: Labouring families and the Swedish mining industry in the late seventeenth century2017In: The History of the Family, ISSN 1081-602X, E-ISSN 1873-5398, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 136-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The history of the labouring family has gained increasing attention among European scholars in the last decades, but in Sweden, it remains an under-researched topic. Still, in the early modern period, labourers and their families made vital contributions to the country’s important mining industry. This paper examines the household economy of labouring families related to the mining industry in two Swedish areas in the late seventeenth century. On the basis on account books and court records, combined with demographic data, we explore the diversity of livelihoods and the complex web of interdependencies that made this economy feasible. We show that, while monetary remuneration was limited, wage labour in mines and metalwork gave the labouring family access to resources in the form of land, labour and credit beyond its own assets. Within the household, the man generally worked for wages, while his wife made use of the use-rights that came with his employment. The mining industry, and thereby also Swedish state finances, depended on this diverse family economy. In conclusion, interdependence, rather than the independent economic position described by classical models of early modern households, characterized the household economy of the labouring family.

  • 5.
    Mispelaere, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Barn och ungdomar i behov av slående förebilder: uppfostran som rättsväsendets verktyg under 1600- och 1700-talen2009In: Det mångsidiga verktyget: elva utbildningshistoriska uppsatser / [ed] Anne Berg & Hanna Enefalk, Uppsala: Historiska instutionen , 2009, no 39, p. 89-103Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Mispelaere, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    När det så stor varder att det något kan göra: om barns och ungdomars arbete i det tidigmoderna Sverige2013In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 133, no 1, p. 3-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Indispensable help: Child and teenage labour in early modern Sweden

    In the older literature, the work performed by children and teenagers in early modern Sweden is often associated with a specific type of simple tasks carried out within the household, particularly undervalued domestic work such as running errands and taking care of livestock. Newer evidence suggests that what seems to be a range of less important tasks were not only of substantial importance to the economy of the household, but were also of great importance to the economy as a whole. This article focuses primarily on young people's work: what they did and at what age. The aim is also to study the division of labour between the sexes or the absence of such a division among young people. Previous research on early modern labour has sometimes emphasized that men's and women's work was undertaken in two different spheres in accordance with a widespread gendered division of labour. New research has underlined that factors such as status, poverty and work force shortages meant that the relatively strict boundaries between male and female spheres were abandoned. An important element that also affected the division of labour was age. According to Orvar Lofgren, separation into a male and female sphere did not exist for children to the same extent as it did for adults. The study shows that the labour of children and young teenagers of both sexes was regularly carried out at great distances from their homes and over extensive areas. It appears that girls were not more limited by the boundaries of the domestic sphere than boys were. A distinct gendered division of labour therefore did not exist for children and young teenagers. Age not only defined what type of work early modern people were expected to do, in some cases age eliminated other factors which were determinative for what was considered to be typically female and male behaviour. Being neither a permanent or stable workforce, the effect of child and teenage work at home as well as on the local labour market was obvious. The use of a young labour force worked like a domino effect. By working, children saved their parents, older siblings, relatives, neighbours and employers much time. The domino effect of their efforts was enormous. Parents with small children could do certain things that had been impossible without this help, older youths could instead help adults with heavier work and corvee, and employers could do their own business, maintain social contacts, visit marketplaces and perform work that could only be managed by one or more adults.

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