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  • 1.
    Amcoff, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Do Rural Districts Die When Their Schools Close?: Evidence from Sweden around 2000.2012In: Educational Planning, ISSN 0315-9388, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 47-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At the beginning of the twenty-first century, the continued existence of many rural schools is being threatened. It has often been suggested that the closure of a rural school renders the area it serves less attractive, and can prejudice in-migration and encourage out-migration as the school is often expected to have more functions than the mere provision of basic education. In this paper, using, geographically detailed population data, no significant such effects on migration patterns can be demonstrated, either in the immediate surroundings of the school or in its wider catchment area. These results remain even if the migrants being considered are limited to families with children (a group expected to be particularly affected by school closures).

  • 2.
    Amcoff, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Food deserts in Sweden?: Access to food retail in 1998 and 20082017In: Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography, ISSN 0435-3684, E-ISSN 1468-0467, Vol. 99, no 1, p. 94-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using an approach that is as unprejudiced as possible, this study sets out to examine people's access to food shops in Sweden. The focus is particularly on disadvantaged groups in the population, since it has been suggested that their increased frequency of welfare diseases (e.g. obesity or diabetes) may be explained by deficient access to healthy foods. It is established that disadvantaged groups generally have shorter distances to food shops than the general population. Disadvantaged groups are also not hit harder than others by changes in accessibility. Nonetheless, it is possible to identify a number of geographical concentrations of disadvantaged people with longer than average distances to the nearest food shop. Besides that, access to car(s) appears to be higher in the types of areas where the distance to food shops tends to be longer.

  • 3.
    Amcoff, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Hur bra fungerar SAMS-områdena i studier av grannskapseffekter?: En studie av SAMS-områdenas homogenitet2012In: Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift, ISSN 1104-1420, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 93-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How well do SAMS work in studies of neighbourhood effects?

    Abstract

    The subdivision of Sweden into small areas (SAMS) was launched in 1994 and is presented by Statistics Sweden as bringing about in homogenous residential areas. It has been widely used for research purposes ever since. One of the most common fields of research to use SAMS is research on neighborhood effects. The purpose of this study is to estimate how homogenous the SAMS-areas really are. Therefore, each and every SAMS-area has been classified according to its most common type of housing, where after their degree of homogeneity has been calculated as standardized entropy. On average, the areas do not turn out to appear as very homogenous. A reference subdivision is defined by setting out from each and every populated 100m-grid square and its neighboring squares. By comparing the SAMS-areas with this reference, it can be made clear that a heterogeneous realty might explain the low level of homogeneity of SAMS-areas in city-centres, whereas in outer parts of cities and outside them, the low homogeneity of the SAMS-areas is rather a consequence of an insufficient subdivision. This is also obvious from overlaying the SAMS-borders onto satellite images. However, there are huge regional variations which can be explained by the construction of the subdivision. The results of this study points at a need and possibilities to construct a new nationwide subdivision of Sweden into small homogenous areas. Conclusions based on the SAMS-subdivision concerning issues such as neighborhood effects need to be drawn with caution.

  • 4.
    Amcoff, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Rapid regional enlargement in Sweden: A phenomenon missing an explanation2009In: Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography, ISSN 0435-3684, E-ISSN 1468-0467, Vol. 91, no 3, p. 275-287Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Amcoff, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Rural Population Growth in Sweden in the 1990s – Unexpected Reality or Spatial-Statistical Chimera2006In: Population, Space and Place, ISSN 1544-8444, E-ISSN 1544-8452, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 171-185Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Amcoff, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Sveriges måttfulla urbanisering2017In: Stad och land / [ed] Kurt Almqvist, Stockholm: Axel och Margaret Ax:son Johnsons stifteklse för allmännyttiga ändamål , 2017, p. 39-46Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Amcoff, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    The geographical redistribution of retail outlets in Sweden 1998–20082016In: International Review of Retail Distribution & Consumer Research, ISSN 0959-3969, E-ISSN 1466-4402, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 242-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Detailed descriptive data are used to analyse the geographical redistribution of different kinds of retail. It is shown that in 2008, town centres generally still had a strong position as retail centres, although many small towns (including their centres) had been depleted of their retailers during the previous 10 years. Locations in built-up areas, outside of retail agglomerations, seem to be most affected by ‘shop death’. A diffuse tendency to dispersion, countering the general trend towards concentration, can be observed in rural areas. Shops specialised in durable goods are leaving town centres everywhere, no matter whether large out-of-town developments are established or not. There are also indications that the customer base necessary for a shop to make a profit has increased. These findings fit well with established explanations and underpin the insight that the growth of out-of-town developments is a symptom of restructuring forces, rather than a cause of restructuring.

  • 8.
    Amcoff, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    The importance of geographical data compilation units in monitoring metropolitan versus nonmetropolitan or urban versus rural population change2006In: Urban geography, ISSN 0272-3638, E-ISSN 1938-2847, Vol. 27, no 8, p. 757-767Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Amcoff, Jan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Mohall, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Waxell, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Östh, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Detaljhandelns förändrade geografi2015Report (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Amcoff, Jan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Möller, Peter
    Högskolan Dalarna.
    Westholm, Erik
    SLU.
    The (un)importance of the closure of village shops to rural migration patterns2011In: International Review of Retail Distribution & Consumer Research, ISSN 0959-3969, E-ISSN 1466-4402, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 129-143Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Amcoff, Jan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Niedomysl, Thomas
    Kulturgeografiska inst, Lunds universitet.
    Back to the city: internal return migration to metropolitan regions in Sweden2013In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 45, no 10, p. 2477-2494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Longitudinal microdata on the Swedish population, 1990-2006, are used to examine the numbers and characteristics of internal return migrants, emphasizing Sweden's three largest cities. Our study indicates that metropolitan regions are gaining population from net return migration, which thus carries people in the same direction as does most internal migration. Evidence also indicates that returnees to metropolitan regions are more likely to stay permanently than are migrants returning elsewhere. Furthermore, return migrants to metropolitan regions are distinguished from other return migrants in ways that emphasize the advantages of these regions, higher incomes and levels of education being among the pronounced attributes. However, metro-bound returnees do not have as many children as do other return migrants.

  • 12.
    Amcoff, Jan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Niedomysl, Thomas
    Lund Univ, Dept Human & Econ Geog, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, CIRCLE, Lund, Sweden..
    Is the Tied Returnee Male or Female?: The Trailing Spouse Thesis Reconsidered2015In: Population, Space and Place, ISSN 1544-8444, E-ISSN 1544-8452, Vol. 21, no 8, p. 872-881Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common finding of 30-40 years of family migration studies worldwide is that such migration primarily benefits the careers of men in couples but generally damages the women's careers. Findings have recently become more nuanced as the research focus has broadened, hinting that families returning to one spouse's region of previous residence might deviate from this general observation of men as gainers. The present research demonstrates that when families migrate to regions where one spouse has previously lived, it is the female spouse who tends to return, the male spouse (and children, if any) accompanying her as a trailing spouse. This result also holds when restricting attention to those few families in which the female spouse experiences the greatest income increase by moving. There is no evidence of a tradeoff between returning to a region of previous residence and career development. The findings suggest that women compensate for the slighter economic gains with greater non-monetary gains.

  • 13. Amcoff, Jan
    et al.
    Niedomysl, Thomas
    Institutet för framtidsstudier.
    Why return migrants return: survey evidence of motives for internal return migration in Sweden2011In: Population, Space and Place, ISSN 1544-8444, E-ISSN 1544-8452, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 656-673Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Amcoff, Jan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Westholm, Erik
    Understanding rural change—demography as a key to the future2007In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 363-379Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Möller, Peter
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Department of Human Geography .
    Amcoff, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Tourism’s localised population effect in the rural areas of Sweden2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 39-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines how population change among young adults in rural areas is affected when tourism is the dominant industry. The relation between tourism and population change is often implicitly assumed but has not been well examined on a broader societal level. Existing studies have indicated that the effect of tourism on population change is limited in geographical range, and therefore a fine geographical resolution is useful. This analysis is based on yearly information on each individual who resided in Sweden in any year between 1990 and 2010, with 100-metre grid cells as the finest geographical resolution. Since young adults constitute a large part of all migration that takes place, they are the focus of this study. The findings show that the net population change among young adults is clearly more positive in tourism-dominated areas (TDAs) than in non-TDAs, and this becomes more significant the more remote the areas. Further, there is a better gender balance and a younger population in TDAs. Stayers and return migrants can partly explain the positive population change in TDAs, but as shown in previous research, there is a higher turnover of population in TDAs, and in-migration seems to be the key to positive population change.

  • 16. Niedomysl, Thomas
    et al.
    Amcoff, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Is There Hidden Potential for Rural Population Growth in Sweden?2011In: Rural sociology, ISSN 0036-0112, E-ISSN 1549-0831, Vol. 76, no 2, p. 257-279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rural depopulation is a concern in many countries, and various policy initiatives have been taken to combat such trends. This article examines whether hidden potential for rural population growth can be found in Sweden. If such potential exists, it implies that the development prospects for many rural areas are not as unpromising as they may seem today. If not, rapid rural depopulation can be expected and policymakers will have to increase their focus on how to lessen problems associated with population decline. We employ a combination of survey data and register data to identify the characteristics of people who have expressed a desire to move to rural areas and compare this population with those who actually do move to these areas. The results show that more people have rural residential preferences than the actual number of migrants to rural areas suggest. The findings indicate that there is a general potential for rural population growth; however, the characteristics of these two groups are similar and we cannot discern any group as constituting this hidden potential. Nonetheless, we argue that this potential is unlikely to be realized in terms of rural population growth and we discuss the further implications of these findings.

1 - 16 of 16
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