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  • 1.
    Jonsson, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology, Ångström Space Technology Centre (ÅSTC).
    Microsystems Technology for Underwater Vehicle Applications2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis work has been to investigate how miniaturization, such as microsystems technology, can potentially increase the scientific throughput in exploration of hard-to-reach underwater environments, such as the subglacial lakes of Antarctica, or other challenging environments, including cave systems and wrecks. A number of instruments and subsystems applicable to miniature submersibles have been developed and studied, and their potential to provide a high functionality density for size-restricted exploration platforms has been assessed.

    To provide an onboard camera system with measurement capabilities, simulation and design tools for diffractive optics were developed, and microoptics realized to project reference patterns onto objects to reveal their topography. The influence of murky water on the measurement accuracy was also studied.

    For longer-range mapping of the surroundings, and under conditions with even less visibility, the performance of a very small, high-frequency side-scanning sonar was investigated using extensive modeling and physical testing. In particular, the interference on the acoustic beam from tight mounting in a hull was investigated. A range in excess of 30 m and centimeter resolution were obtained.

    Besides these systems, which can be used to navigate and map environments, a two-dimensional, thermal sensor for minute flows was developed. Measuring speed and direction of water flows, this sensor can aid in the general classification of the environment and also monitor the submersible’s movement. As the flow of waters in subglacial lakes is estimated to be minute, the detection limit and sensitivity were investigated.

    Measurements of water properties are facilitated by the chip-based conductivity, temperature, and depth sensor system developed. Macroscopically, this is an essential oceanographic instrument with which salinity is determined. Contrary to what was expected, MHz frequencies proved to be advantageous for conductivity measurements.

    Finally, sampling of water using an acoustically enriching microdevice, and even enabling return of pristine samples via the use of integrated latchable, high-pressure valves, was realized and evaluated. Particularly, investigations of the device’s ability to capture and hold on to microorganisms, were conducted.

    Further developed and studied, these devices – as subsystems to miniature submersibles, or as stand-alone instruments – should enable exploration of previously unreachable submerged environments.

    List of papers
    1. Simulation, manufacturing, and evaluation of a sonar for a miniaturized submersible explorer
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Simulation, manufacturing, and evaluation of a sonar for a miniaturized submersible explorer
    Show others...
    2010 (English)In: IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control, ISSN 0885-3010, E-ISSN 1525-8955, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 490-495Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Single-beam side-scan sonar elements, to be fitted on a miniaturized submersible, are here simulated, manufactured, and evaluated. Finite element analysis simulations are compared with measurements, and an overall observation is that the agreement between simulations and measurements deviates from the measured values of 1.5 to 2°, for the narrow lobe angle, by less than 10% for most models. An overall finding is that the lobe width along the track direction can be accurately simulated and, hence, the resolution of the sonars can be predicted. This paper presents, to the authors’ knowledge, the world’s smallest side-scan sonars.

    Keywords
    Sonar, beam width, acoustic imaging
    National Category
    Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics
    Research subject
    Engineering Science with specialization in Microsystems Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-121440 (URN)10.1109/TUFFC.2010.1429 (DOI)000274817300023 ()
    Projects
    Deeper Access, Deeper Understanding (DADU)
    Note

    This article is presented to ensure timely dissemination of scholarly and technical work. Copyright and all rights therein are retained by authors or by other copyright holders. All persons copying this information are expected to adhere to the terms and constraints invoked by each author's copyright. In most cases, this work may not be reposted without the explicit permission of the copyright holder.

    Available from: 2010-03-23 Created: 2010-03-23 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    2. Enclosure-Induced Interference Effects in a Miniaturized Sidescan Sonar
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enclosure-Induced Interference Effects in a Miniaturized Sidescan Sonar
    Show others...
    2012 (English)In: IEEE Journal of Oceanic Engineering, ISSN 0364-9059, E-ISSN 1558-1691, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 236-243Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    On, for instance, the miniaturized submersible explorer, Deeper Access, Deeper Understanding (DADU), only 20 cm in length and 5 cm in diameter, the sidescan sonar needs to be tightly mounted in the hull. Finite element analysis (FEA) as well as physical measurements were used to investigate the effects of beam interaction with acoustically nearby rigid boundaries. Computer simulations showed the first major dip in the beam shape to vary in strength, size, and position with the enclosure wall height, from a position of 47° at 0.0-mm wall height to 32° at 3.0-mm wall height. Hydrophonic measurements on the manufactured test device confirmed these values to within 9%, varying between 47° and 29°. In addition, Schlieren imaging was proposed and used as a noninvasive means of qualitative beam shape characterization. A field test was performed with the enclosure height set to 0 and 3 mm. With the latter height, a dark band, corresponding to a sonar sensitivity dip at about 30° in the beam, appeared in the sonar image. It was found that the beam shape is sensitive to small mounting errors, in this case where the wavelength of the sonar is on the same size scale as the enclosure. Furthermore, it was found that FEA models can be used to accurately predict enclosure effects on sonar beam shapes, and Schlieren imaging can be used to visually detect the shape deformations in mounted sonar devices.

    Keywords
    Beam shape, finite element analysis (FEA), miniaturize, Schlieren, sidescan sonar
    National Category
    Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics
    Research subject
    Engineering Science with specialization in Microsystems Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-171730 (URN)10.1109/JOE.2012.2188160 (DOI)000303326500007 ()
    Projects
    Deeper Access, Deeper Understanding (DADU)
    Available from: 2012-03-26 Created: 2012-03-26 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    3. A compact system to extract topography information from scenes viewed by a miniaturized submersible explorer
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A compact system to extract topography information from scenes viewed by a miniaturized submersible explorer
    Show others...
    2012 (English)In: Sensors and Actuators A-Physical, ISSN 0924-4247, E-ISSN 1873-3069, Vol. 188, no SI, p. 401-410Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In images taken underwater, it is generally difficult to correctly extract distances and geometric informationof objects. Different techniques, collectively referred to as photogrammetry, exist to measurefeatures in images. One of these is to project a reference pattern onto an object in a scene viewed by acamera, and register the distortion of this pattern, to calculate the shape of, and distance to, that object.This method is implemented here on a miniaturized submersible explorer equipped with, among manyother instruments, a camera. Diffractive optical elements (DOEs) have been designed and manufacturedusing microsystems technology, to, together with a laser diode, camera, and in-house developed software,provide a compact system for projecting reference patterns and analyzing their deformations. Thesystem has been characterized by measuring the distances and angles of objects in a water tank, andattempting to reproduce their shapes. The range of operation of the system, verified to be at least onemeter, is limited by the compact mounting in the small submersible and the cameras’ performance.The system was found to work well under turbid conditions as well as in water containing larger particles.Together with a vehicle-mounted camera, the compact and low-power DOE laser projection systemenables topographical measurement.

    Keywords
    Photogrammetry, Diffractive, Laser, Underwater, Images, Miniaturized
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Research subject
    Engineering Science with specialization in Microsystems Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-171732 (URN)10.1016/j.sna.2012.02.034 (DOI)000312692500054 ()
    Conference
    The 16th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems, 5-9 June, 2011, Beijing, CHINA
    Projects
    Deeper Access, Deeper Understanding (DADU)
    Available from: 2012-03-26 Created: 2012-03-26 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    4. Acoustically enriching, large-depth aquatic sampler
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acoustically enriching, large-depth aquatic sampler
    Show others...
    2012 (English)In: Lab on a Chip, ISSN 1473-0197, E-ISSN 1473-0189, Vol. 12, no 9, p. 1619-1628Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In marine biology, it is useful to collect water samples when exploring the distribution and diversity of microbial communities in underwater environments. In order to provide, e.g., a miniaturized submersible explorer with the capability of collecting microorganisms, a compact sample enrichment system has been developed. The sampler is 30 mm long, 15 mm wide, and just a few millimetres thick. Integrated in a multilayer steel, polyimide and glass construction is a microfluidic channel with piezoelectric transducers, where microorganism and particle samples are collected and enriched, using acoustic radiation forces for gentle and labelless trapping. High-pressure, latchable valves, using paraffin as the actuation material, at each end of the microfluidic channel keep the collected sample pristine. A funnel structure raised above the surface of the device directs water into the microfluidic channel as the vehicle propels itself or when there is a flow across its hull. The valves proved leak proof to a pressure of 2.1 MPa for 19 hours and momentary pressures of 12.5 MPa, corresponding to an ocean depth of more than 1200 metres. By reactivating the latching mechanism, small leakages through the valves could be remedied, which could thus increase the leak-less operational time. Fluorescent particles, 1.9 µm in diameter, were successfully trapped in the microfluidic channel at flow rates up to 15 ml min-1, corresponding to an 18.5 cm s-1 external flow rate of the sampler. In addition, liquid-suspended GFP-marked yeast cells were successfully trapped.

    Keywords
    Acoustic, microorganism, enriching, trap, valve, paraffin, sampler, marine, actuator
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Research subject
    Engineering Science with specialization in Microsystems Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-171734 (URN)10.1039/C2LC00025C (DOI)000302368200009 ()
    Projects
    Deeper Access, Deeper Understanding (DADU)
    Available from: 2012-03-26 Created: 2012-03-26 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    5. A latchable high-pressure thermohydraulic valve actuator
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A latchable high-pressure thermohydraulic valve actuator
    2012 (English)In: Sensors and Actuators A-Physical, ISSN 0924-4247, E-ISSN 1873-3069, Vol. 188, p. 292-297Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This work presents a latchable thermohydraulic microactuator for use in high-pressure valves, e.g. for oceanic sampling in missions of long duration. Mounted on a miniature submersible, it can be used in confined spaces to explore previously unreachable environments. However, the device can be used in any high-pressure application where long duration open and/or closed valve states are required, and power consumption is an issue. The actuator is fabricated using standard batch-processes as photochemical machining, wet etching and photolithography. The actuation and latching mechanisms are both thermohydraulic, using solid-to-liquid phase transition of paraffin for actuation and of a low melting point alloy for latching. Focus of this work is on the endurance of the actuator to facilitate a bistable valve. The actuator managed to keep a deflected position for almost 50 hours to the load equivalent to 1.8 MPa applied pressure, after which the experiment was aborted. No pressure dependence was discovered in the latching losses, i.e. the difference in deflection before and after the actuator is powered off. Furthermore, the effect of intermixing of paraffin and the low melting point alloy was evaluated.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2012
    Keywords
    Fluid control, Bistable, Steel, Actuator, Paraffin, Low melting point alloy
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Research subject
    Engineering Science with specialization in Microsystems Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-171755 (URN)10.1016/j.sna.2011.11.027 (DOI)000312692500039 ()
    Conference
    The 16th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems, 5-9 June, 2011, Beijing, CHINA
    Available from: 2012-03-27 Created: 2012-03-27 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    6. Two-Dimensional Thermal Velocity Sensor for Submersible navigation and Minute Flow Measurements
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Two-Dimensional Thermal Velocity Sensor for Submersible navigation and Minute Flow Measurements
    2013 (English)In: IEEE Sensors Journal, ISSN 1530-437X, E-ISSN 1558-1748, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 359-370Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A 2-D thermal velocity microsensor for use as a navigational aid and for flow measurements on a miniaturized submersible is developed in this paper. The sensor with nickel heater and temperature sensors on a Pyrex substrate, designed for mounting on the outside of the submersible hull, is fabricated and tested in an application-like environment and proven to be able to measure water speed from zero to 40 mm/s with a power consumption less than 15 mW and determine the flow direction with an error less than ±8°. Finite Element Analysis is used to investigate design and operation parameters and possible biofouling effects on the sensor signal. The effect on shape and orientation of the sensor's mounting surface is also studied.

    National Category
    Other Materials Engineering
    Research subject
    Engineering Science with specialization in Microsystems Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-171767 (URN)10.1109/JSEN.2012.2216866 (DOI)000313685400028 ()
    Available from: 2012-03-27 Created: 2012-03-27 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    7. Towards chip-based salinity measurements for small submersibles and biologgers
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards chip-based salinity measurements for small submersibles and biologgers
    2013 (English)In: International Journal of Oceanography, ISSN 1687-9406, E-ISSN 1687-9414, Vol. 2013, p. 529674-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Water’s salinity plays an important role in the environment. It can be determined by measuring conductivity, temperature, anddepth (CTD). The corresponding sensor systems are commonly large and cumbersome. Here, a 7.5 × 3.5mm chip, containingmicrostructured CTD sensor elements, has been developed. On this, 1.5mm2 gold finger electrodes are used to measure theimpedance, and thereby the conductivity of water, in the MHz frequency range. Operation at these frequencies resulted in highersensitivities than those at sub-MHz frequencies. Up to 14 kΩ per parts per thousand salt concentration was obtained repeatedlyfor freshwater concentrations.This was three orders of magnitude higher than that obtained for concentrations in and above thebrackish range. A platinumelectrode is used to determine a set ambient temperature with an accuracy of 0.005∘C.Membranes withNichrome strain gauges responded to a pressure change of 1 bar with a change in resistance of up to 0.21Ω. A linear fit to data over7 bars gave a sensitivity of 0.1185Ω/bar with an R2 of 0.9964. This indicates that the described device can be used in size-limitedapplications, like miniaturized submersibles, or as a bio-logger on marine animals.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2013
    Keywords
    Conductivity, Temperature, Depth, CTD, Pressure, Marine, thin film, micro
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Research subject
    Engineering Science with specialization in Microsystems Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-171740 (URN)10.1155/2013/529674 (DOI)
    Projects
    Deeper Access, Deeper Understanding (DADU)
    Funder
    Mistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research
    Available from: 2012-03-27 Created: 2012-03-27 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
  • 2.
    Jonsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Berglund, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Kratz, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Nguyen, Hugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Thornell, Greger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    A compact projection system enabling topographical measurements for a miniaturized submersible explorer2011In: Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems (TRANSDUCERS), 2011, IEEE conference proceedings, 2011, p. 2518-2521Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To enable photogrammetry of underwater images using a miniaturized submersible explorer, a compact projection system has been developed. By registering the deformation of a known projected pattern, using a laser and a diffractive optical element (DOE), the distance to, shape and size of an object can be calculated. The DOE has been designed, using in-house developed software, and manufactured using microstructure technology. Distances to objects 45 to 30 cm away were determined to within 0.5 cm, and the developed GUI was able to recreate the shape from the measurements for easier examination of the object.

  • 3.
    Jonsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Berglund, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Kratz, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Nguyen, Hugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Thornell, Greger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    A compact system to extract topography information from scenes viewed by a miniaturized submersible explorer2012In: Sensors and Actuators A-Physical, ISSN 0924-4247, E-ISSN 1873-3069, Vol. 188, no SI, p. 401-410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In images taken underwater, it is generally difficult to correctly extract distances and geometric informationof objects. Different techniques, collectively referred to as photogrammetry, exist to measurefeatures in images. One of these is to project a reference pattern onto an object in a scene viewed by acamera, and register the distortion of this pattern, to calculate the shape of, and distance to, that object.This method is implemented here on a miniaturized submersible explorer equipped with, among manyother instruments, a camera. Diffractive optical elements (DOEs) have been designed and manufacturedusing microsystems technology, to, together with a laser diode, camera, and in-house developed software,provide a compact system for projecting reference patterns and analyzing their deformations. Thesystem has been characterized by measuring the distances and angles of objects in a water tank, andattempting to reproduce their shapes. The range of operation of the system, verified to be at least onemeter, is limited by the compact mounting in the small submersible and the cameras’ performance.The system was found to work well under turbid conditions as well as in water containing larger particles.Together with a vehicle-mounted camera, the compact and low-power DOE laser projection systemenables topographical measurement.

  • 4.
    Jonsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Edqvist, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Kratz, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Almqvist, Monica
    Electrical Measurements, Lund University.
    Thornell, Greger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Simulation and Evaluation of Small High-Frequency Side Scan Sonars Using COMSOL2009In: COMSOL Conference 2009 Milan, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    High frequency side-scan sonar, to be fitted on a miniaturized submersible explorer, have been simulated and built. The purpose of this study is to see if COMSOL Multiphysics can be used to predict the performance of the sonar, especially the beam width, setting the resolution of the system. Four models were created, from simple 2-D geometries to more complex 3-D models. The simulated beam widths were compared with measurements to see which of the models agreed best. It was found that all models agree with the experimental results to varying degrees, and mostly with a difference of less than 6%. . It was found that the simplest model agreed best with the measurements, closely followed by the most complex model. Also taking the computational load into consideration the simpler model might then be a better choice to use.

  • 5.
    Jonsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Edqvist, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Micro Structural Technology.
    Kratz, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Almqvist, Monica
    Electrical Measurements, Lund University.
    Thornell, Greger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Simulation, manufacturing, and evaluation of a sonar for a miniaturized submersible explorer2010In: IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control, ISSN 0885-3010, E-ISSN 1525-8955, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 490-495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Single-beam side-scan sonar elements, to be fitted on a miniaturized submersible, are here simulated, manufactured, and evaluated. Finite element analysis simulations are compared with measurements, and an overall observation is that the agreement between simulations and measurements deviates from the measured values of 1.5 to 2°, for the narrow lobe angle, by less than 10% for most models. An overall finding is that the lobe width along the track direction can be accurately simulated and, hence, the resolution of the sonars can be predicted. This paper presents, to the authors’ knowledge, the world’s smallest side-scan sonars.

  • 6.
    Jonsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Lekholm, Ville
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Kratz, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Monica, Almqvist
    Dept of Measurement Technology and Industrial Electrical Engineering, Lund University.
    Thornell, Greger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Enclosure-Induced Interference Effects in a Miniaturized Sidescan Sonar2012In: IEEE Journal of Oceanic Engineering, ISSN 0364-9059, E-ISSN 1558-1691, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 236-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On, for instance, the miniaturized submersible explorer, Deeper Access, Deeper Understanding (DADU), only 20 cm in length and 5 cm in diameter, the sidescan sonar needs to be tightly mounted in the hull. Finite element analysis (FEA) as well as physical measurements were used to investigate the effects of beam interaction with acoustically nearby rigid boundaries. Computer simulations showed the first major dip in the beam shape to vary in strength, size, and position with the enclosure wall height, from a position of 47° at 0.0-mm wall height to 32° at 3.0-mm wall height. Hydrophonic measurements on the manufactured test device confirmed these values to within 9%, varying between 47° and 29°. In addition, Schlieren imaging was proposed and used as a noninvasive means of qualitative beam shape characterization. A field test was performed with the enclosure height set to 0 and 3 mm. With the latter height, a dark band, corresponding to a sonar sensitivity dip at about 30° in the beam, appeared in the sonar image. It was found that the beam shape is sensitive to small mounting errors, in this case where the wavelength of the sonar is on the same size scale as the enclosure. Furthermore, it was found that FEA models can be used to accurately predict enclosure effects on sonar beam shapes, and Schlieren imaging can be used to visually detect the shape deformations in mounted sonar devices.

  • 7.
    Jonsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Ogden, Sam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Johansson, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Hjort, Klas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Thornell, Greger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Acoustically enriching, large-depth aquatic sampler2012In: Lab on a Chip, ISSN 1473-0197, E-ISSN 1473-0189, Vol. 12, no 9, p. 1619-1628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In marine biology, it is useful to collect water samples when exploring the distribution and diversity of microbial communities in underwater environments. In order to provide, e.g., a miniaturized submersible explorer with the capability of collecting microorganisms, a compact sample enrichment system has been developed. The sampler is 30 mm long, 15 mm wide, and just a few millimetres thick. Integrated in a multilayer steel, polyimide and glass construction is a microfluidic channel with piezoelectric transducers, where microorganism and particle samples are collected and enriched, using acoustic radiation forces for gentle and labelless trapping. High-pressure, latchable valves, using paraffin as the actuation material, at each end of the microfluidic channel keep the collected sample pristine. A funnel structure raised above the surface of the device directs water into the microfluidic channel as the vehicle propels itself or when there is a flow across its hull. The valves proved leak proof to a pressure of 2.1 MPa for 19 hours and momentary pressures of 12.5 MPa, corresponding to an ocean depth of more than 1200 metres. By reactivating the latching mechanism, small leakages through the valves could be remedied, which could thus increase the leak-less operational time. Fluorescent particles, 1.9 µm in diameter, were successfully trapped in the microfluidic channel at flow rates up to 15 ml min-1, corresponding to an 18.5 cm s-1 external flow rate of the sampler. In addition, liquid-suspended GFP-marked yeast cells were successfully trapped.

  • 8.
    Jonsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Smedfors, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Nyholm, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Thornell, Greger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Towards chip-based salinity measurements for small submersibles and biologgers2013In: International Journal of Oceanography, ISSN 1687-9406, E-ISSN 1687-9414, Vol. 2013, p. 529674-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water’s salinity plays an important role in the environment. It can be determined by measuring conductivity, temperature, anddepth (CTD). The corresponding sensor systems are commonly large and cumbersome. Here, a 7.5 × 3.5mm chip, containingmicrostructured CTD sensor elements, has been developed. On this, 1.5mm2 gold finger electrodes are used to measure theimpedance, and thereby the conductivity of water, in the MHz frequency range. Operation at these frequencies resulted in highersensitivities than those at sub-MHz frequencies. Up to 14 kΩ per parts per thousand salt concentration was obtained repeatedlyfor freshwater concentrations.This was three orders of magnitude higher than that obtained for concentrations in and above thebrackish range. A platinumelectrode is used to determine a set ambient temperature with an accuracy of 0.005∘C.Membranes withNichrome strain gauges responded to a pressure change of 1 bar with a change in resistance of up to 0.21Ω. A linear fit to data over7 bars gave a sensitivity of 0.1185Ω/bar with an R2 of 0.9964. This indicates that the described device can be used in size-limitedapplications, like miniaturized submersibles, or as a bio-logger on marine animals.

  • 9.
    Jonsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Sundqvist, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Nguyen, Hugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Berglund, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Ogden, Sam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Palmer, Kristoffer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Smedfors, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Johansson, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Hjort, Klas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Thornell, Greger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Instrumentation and vehicle platform of a miniaturized submersible for exploration of terrestrial and extraterrestrial aqueous environments2012In: Acta Astronautica, ISSN 0094-5765, E-ISSN 1879-2030, Vol. 79, p. 203-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An example of an extraterrestrial environment likely to support life is the vast liquid body believed to hide underneath the frozen crust of Jupiter's moon Europa. The hypothetical exploration of this, as well as the more accessible subglacial lakes on Earth, has been used as model applications for the development of a heavily miniaturized, yet qualified, submersible with the potential to be deployable either in itself through a long and narrow borehole or as the daughter craft of an ice-penetrating cryobot.

    Onboard the submersible, which is only 20 cm in length and 5 cm in diameter, accommodation of a versatile set of sensors and instruments capable of characterizing and imaging the surroundings, and even collecting water samples with microorganisms for return, is facilitated through the use of miniaturization technologies. For instance, together with a small camera, a laser-based, microoptic device enables the 3-D reconstruction of imaged objects for topographical measurements. As a complement, when the water is turbid or a longer range is wanted, the world's smallest side-scanning sonar, exhibiting centimeter resolution and a range of over 30 m, has been developed. The work on miniaturizing a CTD, which is a widely employed oceanographic instrument used to measure and correlate conductivity, temperature, and depth, has commenced. Furthermore, a device employing acoustics to trap microscopic particles and organisms, and, by this, enrich water samples, is under development. To ensure that the gathered samples are pristine until analyzed at the end of a mission, the device is equipped with high-pressure, latchable valves.

    Remote operation and transfer of measurement data and images, or even live streaming of video, is made possible through a kilometer-long fiber optic cable being reeled out from the vehicle underway and tethering it to a terminal. To extend the missions, the same fiber shall also be capable of charging the onboard batteries.

    In this paper, the vehicle and its subsystems are summarized. Subsystems essential for the vehicle's operation, e.g., hull structure, communication and power management, are treated separately from those of more mission-specific nature, like the instruments mentioned above.

  • 10.
    Jonsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Sundqvist, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Nguyen, Hugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Kratz, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Berglund, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Ogden, Sam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Palmer, Kristoffer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Smedfors, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Wagner, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Hjort, Klas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Thornell, Greger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Miniaturized submersible for exploration of aqueous environments on Earth and beyond2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some of the most likely environments to support extraterrestrial life in our solar system are the ice-covered moons, suchas Europa, thought to harbor a liquid ocean underneath its frozen crust. Exploration, however, necessitates an ice-penetratingcryobot, or a long and narrow borehole, and the subsequent deployment of a small submersible, a hydrobot, with severe sizerestrictions imposed on its scientific payload. As a stepping stone for exploration of such environments, a small instrumentladenedsubmersible vehicle is currently under development.Employment of a large set of instruments capable of characterizing the aqueous environment, imaging the surroundingsand collecting microorganisms is essential for the determination of habitability. Despite the submersible being only 20 cm inlength and 5 cm in diameter, a high degree of functionality is facilitated here through the use of miniaturization technologies. Forinstance, a compact laser-illuminated diffractive optical element, paired with a high-resolution camera, enable photogrammetryand the reconstruction of objects’ shapes in 3-D space. Also for imaging, the world’s smallest side-scanning sonar has beendeveloped to acoustically image, either where water is too turbid for the camera, or where longer range is necessary. Currently,the sonar exhibits centimeter resolution and ranges over 30 meters. On the sensor side, a most vital oceanographic instrument, theCTD, used to measure the conductivity, temperature, and depth of water, has been heavily miniaturized and preliminaryevaluated. Additionally, a water sampler combining integrated selection and enriching capabilities to filter out and accommodate,e.g., microbes in the size range of 1-10 μm, is under development. Among other parts, its high-pressure valves and microfluidicacoustic traps have already been realized.For remote operation and upload of measurement data or images, or even live streaming of video, the submersible will betethered with a bi-directionally transmitting fiber optic cable, also capable of charging the onboard batteries for long missions.The one kilometer long fiber will be fitted within the hull, and by reeling out the fiber from the submersible, drag will be reduced.Herein, test results and images of the vehicle and its complete, and continuously developed, subsystems are presented.The vehicle, and its subsystems as stand-alone instruments, will enable the exploration of previously unreachable analogenvironments on Earth, vital to the field of astrobiology, and act as a forerunner to a submersible hydrobot that can explore icecoveredoceans elsewhere in our solar system.

  • 11.
    Jonsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Sundqvist, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Nguyen, Hugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Kratz, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Berglund, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Ogden, Sam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Palmer, Kristoffer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Smedfors, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Wagner, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Thornell, Greger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Miniaturized submersible for exploration of small aqueous environments2011In: Oceans’11 MTS/IEEE Kona, Hilton Waikoloa Village, Kona, Hawai‘i September 19-22, 2011, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) are commonlyused for sub-surface exploration. However, multi-functionalROVs tend to be fairly large, while preferred small and compactROVs suffer from limited functionality. The Deeper Access,Deeper Understanding (DADU) project aims to develop a smallsubmersible concept using miniaturization technologies to enablea high functionality. An operator is able to maneuver the vehiclewith five degrees of freedom using eight small thrusters, while aset of accelerometers and gyros monitor the orientation of thesubmersible. A single fiber optic cable will connect thesubmersible to a control station and enable simultaneous dataand command transfers. Rechargeable battery packs providepower to the submersibles subsystems during operation. Thesewill be rechargeable through the fiber connection. A forwardlooking camera is aided by a laser topography measurementsystem, where distances, sizes and shapes of objects in view canbe determined to within 0.5 cm. For murkier environments, orwhen a more extensive mapping of the surroundings is needed,the small high-frequency side-scanning sonar can be used.Salinity calculations of the water will be available throughmeasurements of the conductivity, temperature and depth.Samples of water and particles within it will be enabled through awater sampler with an enriching capability. Flow sensors will beable to measure the water movement around the submersible’shull. The submersible and its subsystems are under continuousdevelopment. The vehicle itself, and its subsystems as stand-aloneinstruments, will enable the exploration of previouslyunreachable submerged environments, such as the sub-glaciallakes found in Iceland and Antarctica, or other submerged smallenvironments, such as pipe and cave systems.

  • 12.
    Ogden, Sam
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Jonsson, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Bodén, Roger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Thornell, Greger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Hjort, Klas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Latchable Valve for Microfluidic Sampling from a Miniature Submersible2012In: Actuator, 2012, p. 717-720Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work presents latchable high-pressure valves. Such valves are useful in a number of applications, e.g deep-sea sampling. Actuation and latching are achieved by using sequential melting and solidification of three connected paraffin-filled cavities, as well as a compliant valve seat. The valve seat design uses the applied back pressure to improve sealing, shown both in the valve’s endurance and burst pressure. The valves were evaluated by pressurizing them with both compressed air and water. At an applied hydrostatic back pressure kept above 2.1 MPa, the valve managed to stay closed without power consumption for 19 hours. The burst pressure was determined to 20 MPa when subjected to a hydrostatic pressure, and 5.6 MPa when subjected to a pneumatic pressure.

  • 13.
    Ogden, Sam
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Jonsson, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Hjort, Klas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Thornell, Greger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    A Latchable High-pressure Composite Valve Actuator Combining Paraffin and a Low Melting Point Alloy2011In: Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems Conference (TRANSDUCERS), 2011 16th International, Beijing, China, 2011, p. 474-477Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work presents a latchable valve microactuator for use in high-pressure environments, for instance deep-sea sampling in missions of long duration. Mounted on a minisubmersible, it can be used in confined spaces, earlier virtually unreachable. However, the device can be used in any high-pressure application where long open and/or closed times are required, and power supply is an issue. The actuator is fabricated using standard batch-processes as photochemical machining, wet etching and lithography. Focus of this work is on the endurance of the actuator to facilitate a bistable valve. The actuator managed to keep a deflected position for almost 50 hours at 1.8 MPa applied pressure, after which the experiment was aborted.

  • 14.
    Ogden, Sam
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Jonsson, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Thornell, Greger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Hjort, Klas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    A latchable high-pressure thermohydraulic valve actuator2012In: Sensors and Actuators A-Physical, ISSN 0924-4247, E-ISSN 1873-3069, Vol. 188, p. 292-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work presents a latchable thermohydraulic microactuator for use in high-pressure valves, e.g. for oceanic sampling in missions of long duration. Mounted on a miniature submersible, it can be used in confined spaces to explore previously unreachable environments. However, the device can be used in any high-pressure application where long duration open and/or closed valve states are required, and power consumption is an issue. The actuator is fabricated using standard batch-processes as photochemical machining, wet etching and photolithography. The actuation and latching mechanisms are both thermohydraulic, using solid-to-liquid phase transition of paraffin for actuation and of a low melting point alloy for latching. Focus of this work is on the endurance of the actuator to facilitate a bistable valve. The actuator managed to keep a deflected position for almost 50 hours to the load equivalent to 1.8 MPa applied pressure, after which the experiment was aborted. No pressure dependence was discovered in the latching losses, i.e. the difference in deflection before and after the actuator is powered off. Furthermore, the effect of intermixing of paraffin and the low melting point alloy was evaluated.

  • 15.
    Palmer, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Jonsson, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Nguyen, Hugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Thornell, Greger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Two-Dimensional Thermal Velocity Sensor for Submersible navigation and Minute Flow Measurements2013In: IEEE Sensors Journal, ISSN 1530-437X, E-ISSN 1558-1748, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 359-370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A 2-D thermal velocity microsensor for use as a navigational aid and for flow measurements on a miniaturized submersible is developed in this paper. The sensor with nickel heater and temperature sensors on a Pyrex substrate, designed for mounting on the outside of the submersible hull, is fabricated and tested in an application-like environment and proven to be able to measure water speed from zero to 40 mm/s with a power consumption less than 15 mW and determine the flow direction with an error less than ±8°. Finite Element Analysis is used to investigate design and operation parameters and possible biofouling effects on the sensor signal. The effect on shape and orientation of the sensor's mounting surface is also studied.

1 - 15 of 15
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