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  • 1.
    Bjermo, Helena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Iggman, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Kullberg, Joel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Dahlman, Ingrid
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Medicine.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Persson, Lena
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes.
    Berglund, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Pulkki, Kari
    University of Eastern Finland, Department of Clinical Chemistry and Eastern Finland Laboratory Centre.
    Basu, Samar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Oxidative Stress and Inflammation.
    Uusitupa, Matti
    University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, Clinical Nutrition.
    Rudling, Mats
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes.
    Arner, Peter
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Medicine.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Dietary fat modification and liver fat content in abdominal obesityManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Bjermo, Helena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Iggman, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Kullberg, Joel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Dahlman, Ingrid
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Persson, Lena
    Berglund, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Pulkki, Kari
    Basu, Samar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Oxidative Stress and Inflammation.
    Uusitupa, Matti
    Rudling, Mats
    Arner, Peter
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Effects of n-6 PUFAs compared with SFAs on liver fat, lipoproteins, and inflammation in abdominal obesity: a randomized controlled trial2012In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 95, no 5, p. 1003-1012Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Replacing SFAs with vegetable PUFAs has cardiometabolic benefits, but the effects on liver fat are unknown. Increased dietary n-6 PUFAs have, however, also been proposed to promote inflammation-a yet unproven theory.

    OBJECTIVE:

    We investigated the effects of PUFAs on liver fat, systemic inflammation, and metabolic disorders.

    DESIGN:

    We randomly assigned 67 abdominally obese subjects (15% had type 2 diabetes) to a 10-wk isocaloric diet high in vegetable n-6 PUFA (PUFA diet) or SFA mainly from butter (SFA diet), without altering the macronutrient intake. Liver fat was assessed by MRI and magnetic resonance proton (1H) spectroscopy (MRS). Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type-9 (PCSK9, a hepatic LDL-receptor regulator), inflammation, and adipose tissue expression of inflammatory and lipogenic genes were determined.

    RESULTS:

    A total of 61 subjects completed the study. Body weight modestly increased but was not different between groups. Liver fat was lower during the PUFA diet than during the SFA diet [between-group difference in relative change from baseline; 16% (MRI; P < 0.001), 34% (MRS; P = 0.02)]. PCSK9 (P = 0.001), TNF receptor-2 (P < 0.01), and IL-1 receptor antagonist (P = 0.02) concentrations were lower during the PUFA diet, whereas insulin (P = 0.06) tended to be higher during the SFA diet. In compliant subjects (defined as change in serum linoleic acid), insulin, total/HDL-cholesterol ratio, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides were lower during the PUFA diet than during the SFA diet (P < 0.05). Adipose tissue gene expression was unchanged.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Compared with SFA intake, n-6 PUFAs reduce liver fat and modestly improve metabolic status, without weight loss. A high n-6 PUFA intake does not cause any signs of inflammation or oxidative stress. Downregulation of PCSK9 could be a novel mechanism behind the cholesterol-lowering effects of PUFAs.

  • 3.
    Bjermo, Helena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Iggman, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Should dietary SFA be exchanged for linoleic acid?: Reply2012In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 96, no 4, p. 945-946Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Elmsjö, Albert
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Rosqvist, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Engskog, Mikael K R
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Haglöf, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Kullberg, Joel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Iggman, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Arvidsson, Torbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Pettersson, Curt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    NMR-based metabolic profiling in healthy individuals overfed different types of fat: links to changes in liver fat accumulation and lean tissue mass.2015In: Nutrition & Diabetes, ISSN 2044-4052, E-ISSN 2044-4052, Vol. 5, no 19, p. e182-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Overeating different dietary fatty acids influence the amount of liver fat stored during weight gain, however, the mechanisms responsible are unclear. We aimed to identify non-lipid metabolites that may differentiate between saturated (SFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) overfeeding using a non-targeted metabolomic approach. We also investigated the possible relationships between plasma metabolites and body fat accumulation.

    METHODS: In a randomized study (LIPOGAIN study), n=39 healthy individuals were overfed with muffins containing SFA or PUFA. Plasma samples were precipitated with cold acetonitrile and analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Pattern recognition techniques were used to overview the data, identify variables contributing to group classification and to correlate metabolites with fat accumulation.

    RESULTS: We previously reported that SFA causes a greater accumulation of liver fat, visceral fat and total body fat, whereas lean tissue levels increases less compared with PUFA, despite comparable weight gain. In this study, lactate and acetate were identified as important contributors to group classification between SFA and PUFA (P<0.05). Furthermore, the fat depots (total body fat, visceral adipose tissue and liver fat) and lean tissue correlated (P(corr)>0.5) all with two or more metabolites (for example, branched amino acids, alanine, acetate and lactate). The metabolite composition differed in a manner that may indicate higher insulin sensitivity after a diet with PUFA compared with SFA, but this needs to be confirmed in future studies.

    CONCLUSION: A non-lipid metabolic profiling approach only identified a few metabolites that differentiated between SFA and PUFA overfeeding. Whether these metabolite changes are involved in depot-specific fat storage and increased lean tissue mass during overeating needs further investigation.

  • 5.
    Gillberg, Linn
    et al.
    Rigshosp, Dept Endocrinol, Sect 7652,Tagensvej 20, DK-2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark.;Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Perfilyev, Alexander
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Epigenet & Diabet Unit, Jan Waldenstroms Gata 35, SE-20502 Malmo, Sweden..
    Brons, Charlotte
    Rigshosp, Dept Endocrinol, Sect 7652,Tagensvej 20, DK-2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark..
    Thomasen, Martin
    Rigshosp, Dept Endocrinol, Sect 7652,Tagensvej 20, DK-2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark..
    Grunnet, Louise G.
    Rigshosp, Dept Endocrinol, Sect 7652,Tagensvej 20, DK-2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark..
    Volkov, Petr
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Epigenet & Diabet Unit, Jan Waldenstroms Gata 35, SE-20502 Malmo, Sweden..
    Rosqvist, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Iggman, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Dahlman, Ingrid
    Huddinge Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, S-14186 Huddinge, Sweden..
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Rönn, Tina
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Epigenet & Diabet Unit, Jan Waldenstroms Gata 35, SE-20502 Malmo, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Emma
    Rigshosp, Dept Endocrinol, Sect 7652,Tagensvej 20, DK-2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark.;Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Epigenet & Diabet Unit, Jan Waldenstroms Gata 35, SE-20502 Malmo, Sweden..
    Vaag, Allan
    Rigshosp, Dept Endocrinol, Sect 7652,Tagensvej 20, DK-2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark.;Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Ling, Charlotte
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Epigenet & Diabet Unit, Jan Waldenstroms Gata 35, SE-20502 Malmo, Sweden..
    Adipose tissue transcriptomics and epigenomics in low birthweight men and controls: role of high-fat overfeeding2016In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 59, no 4, p. 799-812Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims/hypothesis Individuals who had a low birthweight (LBW) are at an increased risk of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes when exposed to high-fat overfeeding (HFO). We studied genome-wide mRNA expression and DNA methylation in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) after 5 days of HFO and after a control diet in 40 young men, of whom 16 had LBW. Methods mRNA expression was analysed using Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST arrays and DNA methylation using Illumina 450K BeadChip arrays. Results We found differential DNA methylation at 53 sites in SAT from LBW vs normal birthweight (NBW) men (false discovery rate < 5%), including sites in the FADS2 and CPLX1 genes previously associated with type 2 diabetes. When we used reference-free cell mixture adjustments to potentially adjust for cell composition, 4,323 sites had differential methylation in LBW vs NBW men. However, no differences in SAT gene expression levels were identified between LBW and NBW men. In the combined group of all 40 participants, 3,276 genes (16.5%) were differentially expressed in SAT after HFO (false discovery rate < 5%) and there was no difference between LBW men and controls. The most strongly upregulated genes were ELOVL6, FADS2 and NNAT; in contrast, INSR, IRS2 and the SLC27A2 fatty acid transporter showed decreased expression after HFO. Interestingly, SLC27A2 expression correlated negatively with diabetes- and obesity-related traits in a replication cohort of 142 individuals. DNA methylation at 652 CpG sites (including in CDK5, IGFBP5 and SLC2A4) was altered in SAT after overfeeding in this and in another cohort. Conclusions/interpretation Young men who had a LBW exhibit epigenetic alterations in their adipose tissue that potentially influence insulin resistance and risk of type 2 diabetes. Short-term overfeeding influences gene transcription and, to some extent, DNA methylation in adipose tissue; there was no major difference in this response between LBW and control participants.

  • 6.
    Iggman, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Dietary Fatty Acids and Cardiometabolic Risk: Influence on Lipoproteins, Insulin Resistance and Liver Fat2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis was to investigate how dietary fatty acids affect the risk for cardiometabolic disease, i.e. cardiovascular disease (CVD), type 2 diabetes and obesity. The overall hypothesis was that unsaturated fatty acids and especially the predominant polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) linoleic acid (LA), 18:2n-6, would decrease cardiometabolic risk compared with saturated fatty acids (SFAs), in line with current recommendations to partly replace dietary SFA with PUFA.

    Papers I and V were observational studies based on the community-based cohort Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM). Adipose tissue fatty acid composition was determined as biomarker for dietary fat intake. Studies II, III and IV were randomised short-term interventions on human volunteers, in which different dietary fats were provided to the participants.

    In 71-year-old men, adipose tissue LA and α-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) were associated with insulin sensitivity (euglycaemic clamp), although this association was diminished for LA after adjusting for lifestyle variables. Different SFA displayed divergent associations; only palmitic acid (16:0) was inversely associated with insulin sensitivity (Paper I). In Cox regression analyses, LA was modestly associated with decreased all-cause mortality, but not CVD mortality during 15 years follow-up (Paper V).

    In a 3+3-week cross-over study on 20 weight-stable volunteers with dyslipidaemia, all foods were provided. A rapeseed oil-based diet distinctly lowered low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides compared with a dairy-fat based diet (butter, cream and fatty cheese). Insulin sensitivity or coagulation factors were not affected (Paper II).

    In a 10-week randomised trial on 67 abdominally obese participants, PUFA (mostly sunflower oil) decreased liver fat compared with SFA (mostly butter) under isocaloric conditions. In individuals considered highly compliant to study diets, lipoproteins were also decreased during the PUFA diet (Paper III).

    In a 7-week double-blind randomised trial on 41 healthy volunteers, PUFA (sunflower oil) decreased the total:HDL cholesterol ratio compared with SFA (palm oil) during moderate weight gain (1.5 kg) (Paper IV).

    In conclusion, LA (PUFA) intake is associated with decreased cardiometabolic risk compared with higher SFA intake, overall supporting a beneficial role of non-tropical vegetable oils in place of solid fats in preventing fatty liver and cardiometabolic disorders.

    List of papers
    1. Adipose tissue fatty acids and insulin sensitivity in elderly men.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adipose tissue fatty acids and insulin sensitivity in elderly men.
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    2010 (English)In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 53, no 5, p. 850-857Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS

    Dietary fatty acids may affect insulin sensitivity. Adipose tissue fatty acid composition partly reflects long-term dietary intake, but data from large studies regarding relationships with insulin sensitivity are lacking. We aimed to determine the association between adipose tissue fatty acids and insulin sensitivity in elderly Swedish men.

    METHODS

    In a cross-sectional analysis of the community-based Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (n = 795, mean age 71 years), adipose tissue biopsies were obtained and fatty acid composition was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. Insulin sensitivity was measured directly by a euglycaemic clamp.

    RESULTS

    Palmitic acid (16:0), the major saturated fatty acid (SFA) in the diet and in adipose tissue, was negatively correlated with insulin sensitivity (r = -0.14), as were 16:1 n-7 (r = -0.15), 20:3 n-6 (r = -0.31), 20:4 n-6 (r = -0.38), 22:4 n-6 (r = -0.37) and 22:5 n-3 (r = -0.24; p < 0.001 for all). Some minor SFAs were positively correlated; 12:0 (r = 0.46), 14:0 (r = 0.32), 17:0 (r = 0.21) and 18:0 (r = 0.41; p < 0.001 for all), as were essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) 18:2 n-6 (r = 0.10, p < 0.01) and 18:3 n-3 (r = 0.16, p < 0.001). Docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 n-3) was negatively correlated (r = -0.11, p < 0.01), whereas eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5 n-3) was not (r = -0.02, NS). Most associations diminished or disappeared in lean individuals, indicating an effect of obesity.

    CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION

    Adipose tissue enriched with palmitic acid and depleted of essential PUFAs is associated with insulin resistance. The positive association between minor SFAs and insulin sensitivity merits further investigation.

    Keywords
    Adipose tissue, Dietary fatty acids, Fatty acid composition, Insulin resistance, Insulin sensitivity
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-122778 (URN)10.1007/s00125-010-1669-0 (DOI)000276424300007 ()20127308 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2010-04-19 Created: 2010-04-19 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    2. Replacing dairy fat with rapeseed oil causes rapid improvement of hyperlipidaemia: a randomized controlled study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Replacing dairy fat with rapeseed oil causes rapid improvement of hyperlipidaemia: a randomized controlled study
    Show others...
    2011 (English)In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 270, no 4, p. 356-364Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Rapeseed oil (RO), also known as canola oil, principally contains the unsaturated fatty acids 18:1n-9, 18:2n-6 and 18:3n-3 and may promote cardiometabolic health.

    Objective. To investigate the effects on lipoprotein profile, factors of coagulation and insulin sensitivity of replacing a diet rich in saturated fat from dairy foods (DF diet) with a diet including RO-based fat (RO diet).

    Design. During a 2 x 3-week randomized, controlled, cross-over trial, 20 free-living hyperlipidaemic subjects were provided with isocaloric test diets that differed in fat composition alone. Blood lipoprotein profile, coagulation and fibrinolytic factors and insulin sensitivity (euglycaemic clamp) were determined before and after the dietary intervention.

    Results. All subjects completed the study, and compliance was high according to changes in serum fatty acids. The RO diet, but not the DF diet, reduced the levels of serum cholesterol (-17%), triglycerides (-20%) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (-17%), cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol ratio (-21%), apolipoprotein (apo) B/apo A-I ratio (-4%) and factor VII coagulant activity (FVIIc) (-5%) from baseline. These changes were significantly different between the diets (P = 0.05 to P < 0.0001), except for FVIIc (P = 0.1). The RO diet, but not the DF diet, modestly increased serum lipoprotein( a) (+6%) and tended to increase the glucose disappearance rate (K-value, +33%). HDL cholesterol, insulin sensitivity, fibrinogen and tissue plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels did not change from baseline or differ between the two diets.

    Conclusions. In a diet moderately high in total fat, replacing dairy fat with RO causes a rapid and clinically relevant improvement in serum lipoprotein profile including lowering of triglycerides in hyperlipidaemic individuals.

    Keywords
    cholesterol, coagulation, diet, fatty acids, lipoproteins
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-160127 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2796.2011.02383.x (DOI)000295096600009 ()
    Available from: 2011-10-17 Created: 2011-10-17 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
    3. Effects of n-6 PUFAs compared with SFAs on liver fat, lipoproteins, and inflammation in abdominal obesity: a randomized controlled trial
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of n-6 PUFAs compared with SFAs on liver fat, lipoproteins, and inflammation in abdominal obesity: a randomized controlled trial
    Show others...
    2012 (English)In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 95, no 5, p. 1003-1012Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Replacing SFAs with vegetable PUFAs has cardiometabolic benefits, but the effects on liver fat are unknown. Increased dietary n-6 PUFAs have, however, also been proposed to promote inflammation-a yet unproven theory.

    OBJECTIVE:

    We investigated the effects of PUFAs on liver fat, systemic inflammation, and metabolic disorders.

    DESIGN:

    We randomly assigned 67 abdominally obese subjects (15% had type 2 diabetes) to a 10-wk isocaloric diet high in vegetable n-6 PUFA (PUFA diet) or SFA mainly from butter (SFA diet), without altering the macronutrient intake. Liver fat was assessed by MRI and magnetic resonance proton (1H) spectroscopy (MRS). Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type-9 (PCSK9, a hepatic LDL-receptor regulator), inflammation, and adipose tissue expression of inflammatory and lipogenic genes were determined.

    RESULTS:

    A total of 61 subjects completed the study. Body weight modestly increased but was not different between groups. Liver fat was lower during the PUFA diet than during the SFA diet [between-group difference in relative change from baseline; 16% (MRI; P < 0.001), 34% (MRS; P = 0.02)]. PCSK9 (P = 0.001), TNF receptor-2 (P < 0.01), and IL-1 receptor antagonist (P = 0.02) concentrations were lower during the PUFA diet, whereas insulin (P = 0.06) tended to be higher during the SFA diet. In compliant subjects (defined as change in serum linoleic acid), insulin, total/HDL-cholesterol ratio, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides were lower during the PUFA diet than during the SFA diet (P < 0.05). Adipose tissue gene expression was unchanged.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Compared with SFA intake, n-6 PUFAs reduce liver fat and modestly improve metabolic status, without weight loss. A high n-6 PUFA intake does not cause any signs of inflammation or oxidative stress. Downregulation of PCSK9 could be a novel mechanism behind the cholesterol-lowering effects of PUFAs.

    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-172856 (URN)10.3945/ajcn.111.030114 (DOI)000303140700004 ()22492369 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2012-04-16 Created: 2012-04-16 Last updated: 2018-02-22Bibliographically approved
    4. Role of Dietary Fats in Modulating Cardiometabolic Risk During Moderate Weight Gain: A Randomized Double-Blind Overfeeding Trial (LIPOGAIN Study)
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Role of Dietary Fats in Modulating Cardiometabolic Risk During Moderate Weight Gain: A Randomized Double-Blind Overfeeding Trial (LIPOGAIN Study)
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    2014 (English)In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 3, no 5, article id e001095Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Whether the type of dietary fat could alter cardiometabolic responses to a hypercaloric diet is unknown. In addition, subclinical cardiometabolic consequences of moderate weight gain require further study.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: In a 7-week, double-blind, parallel-group, randomized controlled trial, 39 healthy, lean individuals (mean age of 27±4) consumed muffins (51% of energy [%E] from fat and 44%E refined carbohydrates) providing 750 kcal/day added to their habitual diets. All muffins had identical contents, except for type of fat; sunflower oil rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA diet) or palm oil rich in saturated fatty acids (SFA diet). Despite comparable weight gain in the 2 groups, total: high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein:HDL cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B:AI ratios decreased during the PUFA versus the SFA diet (-0.37±0.59 versus +0.07±0.29, -0.31±0.49 versus +0.05±0.28, and -0.07±0.11 versus +0.01±0.07, P=0.003, P=0.007, and P=0.01 for between-group differences), whereas no significant differences were observed for other cardiometabolic risk markers. In the whole group (ie, independently of fat type), body weight increased (+2.2%, P<0.001) together with increased plasma proinsulin (+21%, P=0.007), insulin (+17%, P=0.003), proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9, (+9%, P=0.008) fibroblast growth factor-21 (+31%, P=0.04), endothelial markers vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and E-selectin (+9, +5, and +10%, respectively, P<0.01 for all), whereas nonesterified fatty acids decreased (-28%, P=0.001).

    CONCLUSIONS: Excess energy from PUFA versus SFA reduces atherogenic lipoproteins. Modest weight gain in young individuals induces hyperproinsulinemia and increases biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction, effects that may be partly outweighed by the lipid-lowering effects of PUFA.

    CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION URL: http://ClinicalTrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01427140.

    National Category
    Nutrition and Dietetics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-234939 (URN)10.1161/JAHA.114.001095 (DOI)000357396800016 ()25319187 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, K2012-55X-22081-01-3, K2013-55X-15075-10-3Swedish Heart Lung FoundationSwedish Diabetes Association
    Available from: 2014-10-27 Created: 2014-10-27 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    5. Adipose tissue fatty acids and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in elderly men: a prospective cohort study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adipose tissue fatty acids and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in elderly men: a prospective cohort study
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: For several fatty acids, adipose tissue reflects long-term dietary intake and may provide more objective information than self-reported intake. No prospective studies have examined whether adipose tissue fatty acids predict cardiovascular and all-cause mortality.

    Objective: To investigate associations between adipose tissue fatty acids and cardiovascular and overall mortality in a cohort of elderly men. We hypothesized that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) could be inversely associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality.

    Methods: In the Swedish community-based cohort study ULSAM, adipose tissue biopsies were taken from the buttocks of 853 men at age 71. Cox regression analyses were performed primarily for four PUFA that were considered to reflect dietary intake (linoleic acid, 18:2n-6, alpha-linolenic acid, 18:3n-3, eicosapentaenoic acid, 20:5n-3, and docosahexaenoic acid, 22:6n-3), and for all other available fatty acids (secondary analyses) analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography.

    Results: During 20-year follow-up, 605 individuals died of which 251 were cardiovascular deaths. After adjusting for risk factors, none of the four primary fatty acids were associated with cardiovascular mortality (hazard ratios (HR)=0.92-1.05 for each SD increase, P≥0.27). Linoleic acid was inversely associated with mortality (HR=0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.82-0.99, P=0.03). In secondary analyses, palmitoleic acid, 16:1n-7, (HR=1.11, 95% CI 1.02-1.21, P=0.01), and arachidonic acid, 20:4n-6, (HR=1.09, 95% CI 1.00-1.19, P=0.05) were associated with increased mortality, whereas heptadecanoic acid, 17:0, was inversely associated with mortality (HR=0.89, 95% CI 0.79-1.00, P=0.05).

    Conclusions: Adipose tissue PUFA was inversely associated with total mortality, but not cardiovascular mortality in elderly men. The mechanisms behind adipose tissue PUFA and longevity warrant further investigation.

    Keywords
    Dietary fat, adipose tissue, linoleic acid, PUFA, mortality
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Research subject
    Medical Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-252065 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-04-28 Created: 2015-04-28 Last updated: 2018-02-22
  • 7.
    Iggman, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Gustafsson, I. -B
    Berglund, L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Marckmann, P.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Replacing dairy fat with rapeseed oil causes rapid improvement of hyperlipidaemia: a randomized controlled study2011In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 270, no 4, p. 356-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Rapeseed oil (RO), also known as canola oil, principally contains the unsaturated fatty acids 18:1n-9, 18:2n-6 and 18:3n-3 and may promote cardiometabolic health.

    Objective. To investigate the effects on lipoprotein profile, factors of coagulation and insulin sensitivity of replacing a diet rich in saturated fat from dairy foods (DF diet) with a diet including RO-based fat (RO diet).

    Design. During a 2 x 3-week randomized, controlled, cross-over trial, 20 free-living hyperlipidaemic subjects were provided with isocaloric test diets that differed in fat composition alone. Blood lipoprotein profile, coagulation and fibrinolytic factors and insulin sensitivity (euglycaemic clamp) were determined before and after the dietary intervention.

    Results. All subjects completed the study, and compliance was high according to changes in serum fatty acids. The RO diet, but not the DF diet, reduced the levels of serum cholesterol (-17%), triglycerides (-20%) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (-17%), cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol ratio (-21%), apolipoprotein (apo) B/apo A-I ratio (-4%) and factor VII coagulant activity (FVIIc) (-5%) from baseline. These changes were significantly different between the diets (P = 0.05 to P < 0.0001), except for FVIIc (P = 0.1). The RO diet, but not the DF diet, modestly increased serum lipoprotein( a) (+6%) and tended to increase the glucose disappearance rate (K-value, +33%). HDL cholesterol, insulin sensitivity, fibrinogen and tissue plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels did not change from baseline or differ between the two diets.

    Conclusions. In a diet moderately high in total fat, replacing dairy fat with RO causes a rapid and clinically relevant improvement in serum lipoprotein profile including lowering of triglycerides in hyperlipidaemic individuals.

  • 8.
    Iggman, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Role of different dietary saturated fatty acids for cardiometabolic risk2011In: Journal of Clinical Lipidology, ISSN 1933-2874, E-ISSN 1876-4789, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 209-223Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is clinical and observational evidence to suggest that saturated fatty acids (SFA) increase cardiovascular disease risk compared with polyunsaturated fatty acids from vegetable oils. Replacing SFA intake has thus been a public health target, but the role of individual SFA in metabolic disease is still incompletely understood. Observational data Indicate that all SFA may not necessarily be detrimental. The cholesterol-raising effect of SFA differs among individual SFA and possibly also with regard to cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors. The impact of dietary SFA on cardiovascular disease remains somewhat controversial, possibly due to such individual differences. In this article, we will also separately discuss the effects of dairy SFA, including biomarkers, as a means to elucidate these relationships between fatty acids, foodstuffs and cardiometabolic disease.

  • 9.
    Iggman, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Rosqvist, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Beckman, Lena
    Rudling, Mats
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Role of Dietary Fats in Modulating Cardiometabolic Risk During Moderate Weight Gain: A Randomized Double-Blind Overfeeding Trial (LIPOGAIN Study)2014In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 3, no 5, article id e001095Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Whether the type of dietary fat could alter cardiometabolic responses to a hypercaloric diet is unknown. In addition, subclinical cardiometabolic consequences of moderate weight gain require further study.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: In a 7-week, double-blind, parallel-group, randomized controlled trial, 39 healthy, lean individuals (mean age of 27±4) consumed muffins (51% of energy [%E] from fat and 44%E refined carbohydrates) providing 750 kcal/day added to their habitual diets. All muffins had identical contents, except for type of fat; sunflower oil rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA diet) or palm oil rich in saturated fatty acids (SFA diet). Despite comparable weight gain in the 2 groups, total: high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein:HDL cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B:AI ratios decreased during the PUFA versus the SFA diet (-0.37±0.59 versus +0.07±0.29, -0.31±0.49 versus +0.05±0.28, and -0.07±0.11 versus +0.01±0.07, P=0.003, P=0.007, and P=0.01 for between-group differences), whereas no significant differences were observed for other cardiometabolic risk markers. In the whole group (ie, independently of fat type), body weight increased (+2.2%, P<0.001) together with increased plasma proinsulin (+21%, P=0.007), insulin (+17%, P=0.003), proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9, (+9%, P=0.008) fibroblast growth factor-21 (+31%, P=0.04), endothelial markers vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and E-selectin (+9, +5, and +10%, respectively, P<0.01 for all), whereas nonesterified fatty acids decreased (-28%, P=0.001).

    CONCLUSIONS: Excess energy from PUFA versus SFA reduces atherogenic lipoproteins. Modest weight gain in young individuals induces hyperproinsulinemia and increases biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction, effects that may be partly outweighed by the lipid-lowering effects of PUFA.

    CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION URL: http://ClinicalTrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01427140.

  • 10.
    Iggman, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Dalarna Univ, Falun, Sweden..
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Adipose tissue fatty acids and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in elderly men2015In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 67, p. 422-422Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Iggman, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Adipose tissue fatty acids and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in elderly men: a prospective cohort studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: For several fatty acids, adipose tissue reflects long-term dietary intake and may provide more objective information than self-reported intake. No prospective studies have examined whether adipose tissue fatty acids predict cardiovascular and all-cause mortality.

    Objective: To investigate associations between adipose tissue fatty acids and cardiovascular and overall mortality in a cohort of elderly men. We hypothesized that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) could be inversely associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality.

    Methods: In the Swedish community-based cohort study ULSAM, adipose tissue biopsies were taken from the buttocks of 853 men at age 71. Cox regression analyses were performed primarily for four PUFA that were considered to reflect dietary intake (linoleic acid, 18:2n-6, alpha-linolenic acid, 18:3n-3, eicosapentaenoic acid, 20:5n-3, and docosahexaenoic acid, 22:6n-3), and for all other available fatty acids (secondary analyses) analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography.

    Results: During 20-year follow-up, 605 individuals died of which 251 were cardiovascular deaths. After adjusting for risk factors, none of the four primary fatty acids were associated with cardiovascular mortality (hazard ratios (HR)=0.92-1.05 for each SD increase, P≥0.27). Linoleic acid was inversely associated with mortality (HR=0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.82-0.99, P=0.03). In secondary analyses, palmitoleic acid, 16:1n-7, (HR=1.11, 95% CI 1.02-1.21, P=0.01), and arachidonic acid, 20:4n-6, (HR=1.09, 95% CI 1.00-1.19, P=0.05) were associated with increased mortality, whereas heptadecanoic acid, 17:0, was inversely associated with mortality (HR=0.89, 95% CI 0.79-1.00, P=0.05).

    Conclusions: Adipose tissue PUFA was inversely associated with total mortality, but not cardiovascular mortality in elderly men. The mechanisms behind adipose tissue PUFA and longevity warrant further investigation.

  • 12.
    Iggman, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. School of Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Association of Adipose Tissue Fatty Acids With Cardiovascular and All-Cause Mortality in Elderly Men2016In: JAMA cardiology, ISSN 2380-6591, Vol. 1, no 7, p. 745-753Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Importance: The major polyunsaturated fatty acids in adipose tissue objectively reflect long-term dietary intake, and may provide more reliable information than would self-reported intake. Whether adipose tissue fatty acids predict cardiovascular and all-cause mortality needs investigation.

    Objective: To investigate associations between adipose tissue fatty acids and cardiovascular and overall mortality in a cohort of elderly men.

    Design, Setting, and Participants: We hypothesized that polyunsaturated fatty acids reflecting dietary intake, are inversely associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. In the Swedish cohort study Uppsala Longitudinal Cohort of Adult Men, buttock fatty acid composition was analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography in 1992 to 1993 and 2008. The study participants were followed during 11 311 person-years, between 1991 and 2011 (median follow-up, 14.8 years). In this community-based study that took place from 1970 to 1973, all men born in 1920 to 1924 in Uppsala, Sweden, were invited and 2322 (82%) were included (at age 50 years). At the reinvestigation at age 71 years, 1221 (73%) of the 1681 invited men participated. Adipose tissue biopsy specimens were taken in a subsample of 853 men. There was no loss to follow-up.

    Exposures: Adipose tissue proportions of 4 polyunsaturated fatty acids that were considered to mainly reflect dietary intake (linoleic acid, 18:2n-6; α-linolenic acid, 18:3n-3; eicosapentaenoic acid, 20:5n-3; and docosahexaenoic acid, 22:6n-3) comprised primary analyses, and all other available fatty acids were secondary analyses.

    Main Outcomes and Measures: Hazard ratios (HRs) for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality using Cox proportional hazards regression analyses, performed in 2015.

    Results: Among the 853 Swedish men, there were 605 deaths, of which 251 were cardiovascular deaths. After adjusting for risk factors, none of the 4 primary fatty acids were associated with cardiovascular mortality (HR, 0.92-1.05 for each standard deviation increase; P ≥ .27). Linoleic acid was inversely associated with all-cause mortality (HR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.82-0.98; P = .02) and directly associated with intake (P < .001). In secondary analyses, palmitoleic acid, 16:1n-7 (HR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.02-1.21; P = .02) was associated with higher all-cause mortality, whereas heptadecanoic acid, 17:0, tended to be associated with lower all-cause mortality (HR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.79-1.00; P = .05). Arachidonic:linoleic acid ratio was associated with both cardiovascular (HR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.05-1.31; P = .04) and all-cause (HR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.04-1.23; P = .005) mortality.

    Conclusions and Relevance: Adipose tissue linoleic acid was inversely associated with all-cause mortality in elderly men, although not significantly with cardiovascular mortality.

  • 13.
    Iggman, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Sjögren, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Adipose tissue fatty acids and insulin sensitivity in elderly men.2010In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 53, no 5, p. 850-857Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS

    Dietary fatty acids may affect insulin sensitivity. Adipose tissue fatty acid composition partly reflects long-term dietary intake, but data from large studies regarding relationships with insulin sensitivity are lacking. We aimed to determine the association between adipose tissue fatty acids and insulin sensitivity in elderly Swedish men.

    METHODS

    In a cross-sectional analysis of the community-based Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (n = 795, mean age 71 years), adipose tissue biopsies were obtained and fatty acid composition was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. Insulin sensitivity was measured directly by a euglycaemic clamp.

    RESULTS

    Palmitic acid (16:0), the major saturated fatty acid (SFA) in the diet and in adipose tissue, was negatively correlated with insulin sensitivity (r = -0.14), as were 16:1 n-7 (r = -0.15), 20:3 n-6 (r = -0.31), 20:4 n-6 (r = -0.38), 22:4 n-6 (r = -0.37) and 22:5 n-3 (r = -0.24; p < 0.001 for all). Some minor SFAs were positively correlated; 12:0 (r = 0.46), 14:0 (r = 0.32), 17:0 (r = 0.21) and 18:0 (r = 0.41; p < 0.001 for all), as were essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) 18:2 n-6 (r = 0.10, p < 0.01) and 18:3 n-3 (r = 0.16, p < 0.001). Docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 n-3) was negatively correlated (r = -0.11, p < 0.01), whereas eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5 n-3) was not (r = -0.02, NS). Most associations diminished or disappeared in lean individuals, indicating an effect of obesity.

    CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION

    Adipose tissue enriched with palmitic acid and depleted of essential PUFAs is associated with insulin resistance. The positive association between minor SFAs and insulin sensitivity merits further investigation.

  • 14.
    Jobs, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Jobs, Magnus
    University of Dalarna.
    Nerpin, Elisabet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Iggman, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Basu, Samar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Oxidative Stress and Inflammation.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Lars, Lind
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Serum cathepsin S is associated with decreased insulin sensitivity and the development of diabetes type 2 in a community-based cohort of elderly men2013In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 163-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To investigate associations between serum cathepsin S, impaired insulin sensitivity, defective insulin secretion, and diabetes risk in a community-based sample of elderly men without diabetes.

    RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

    Serum cathepsin S, insulin sensitivity (euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp), and insulin secretion (early insulin response during an oral glucose tolerance test) were measured in 905 participants of the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (mean age, 71 years). Thirty participants developed diabetes during 6 years of follow-up.

    RESULTS:

    After adjustment for age, anthropometric variables, and inflammatory markers, higher cathepsin S was associated with decreased insulin sensitivity (regression coefficient per SD increase -0.09 [95% CI -0.14 to -0.04], P = 0.001), but no association with early insulin response was found. Moreover, higher cathepsin S was associated with a higher risk for developing diabetes (odds ratio per SD increase 1.48 [1.08-2.01], P = 0.01).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Cathepsin S activity appears to be involved in the early dysregulation of glucose and insulin metabolism.

  • 15. Magnusdottir, O. K.
    et al.
    Landberg, R.
    Gunnarsdottir, I.
    Cloetens, L.
    Akesson, B.
    Landin-Olsson, M.
    Rosqvist, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Iggman, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Schwab, U.
    Herzig, K-H
    Savolainen, M. J.
    Brader, L.
    Hermansen, K.
    Kolehmainen, M.
    Poutanen, K.
    Uusitupa, Matti
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Thorsdottir, I.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Plasma alkylresorcinols C17:0/C21:0 ratio, a biomarker of relative whole-grain rye intake, is associated to insulin sensitivity: a randomized study2014In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0954-3007, E-ISSN 1476-5640, Vol. 68, no 4, p. 453-458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Few studies have used biomarkers of whole-grain intake to study its relation to glucose metabolism. We aimed to investigate the association between plasma alkylresorcinols (AR), a biomarker of whole-grain rye and wheat intake, and glucose metabolism in individuals with metabolic syndrome (MetS). SUBJECTS/METHODS: Participants were 30-65 years of age, with body mass index 27-40 kg/m(2) and had MetS without diabetes. Individuals were recruited through six centers in the Nordic countries and randomized to a healthy Nordic diet (ND, n=96), rich in whole-grain rye and wheat, or a control diet (n=70), for 18-24 weeks. In addition, associations between total plasma AR concentration and C17:0/C21:0 homolog ratio as an indication of the relative whole-grain rye intake, and glucose metabolism measures from oral glucose tolerance tests were investigated in pooled (ND + control) regression analyses at 18/24 weeks. RESULTS: ND did not improve glucose metabolism compared with control diet, but the AR C17:0/C21:0 ratio was inversely associated with fasting insulin concentrations (P=0.002) and positively associated with the insulin sensitivity indices Matsuda ISI (P=0.026) and disposition index (P=0.022) in pooled analyses at 18/24 weeks, even after adjustment for confounders. The AR C17:0/C21:0 ratio was not significantly associated with insulin secretion indices. Total plasma AR concentration was not related to fasting plasma glucose or fasting insulin at 18/24 weeks. CONCLUSIONS: The AR C17:0/C21:0 ratio, an indicator of relative whole-grain rye intake, is associated with increased insulin sensitivity in a population with MetS.

  • 16.
    Perfilyev, Alexander
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Clin Res Ctr, Diabet Ctr, Epigenet & Diabet Unit,Dept Clin Sci, Malmo, Sweden..
    Dahlman, Ingrid
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gillberg, Linn
    Rigshosp, Dept Endocrinol, Diabet & Metab, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Rosqvist, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Iggman, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Volkov, Petr
    Lund Univ, Clin Res Ctr, Diabet Ctr, Epigenet & Diabet Unit,Dept Clin Sci, Malmo, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Emma
    Lund Univ, Clin Res Ctr, Diabet Ctr, Epigenet & Diabet Unit,Dept Clin Sci, Malmo, Sweden..
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Ling, Charlotte
    Lund Univ, Clin Res Ctr, Diabet Ctr, Epigenet & Diabet Unit,Dept Clin Sci, Malmo, Sweden..
    Impact of polyunsaturated and saturated fat overfeeding on the DNA-methylation pattern in human adipose tissue: a randomized controlled trial2017In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 105, no 4, p. 991-1000Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Dietary fat composition can affect ectopic lipid accumulation and, thereby, insulin resistance. Diets that are high in saturated fatty acids (SFAs) or polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have different metabolic responses. Objective: We investigated whether the epigenome of human adipose tissue is affected differently by dietary fat composition and general overfeeding in a randomized trial. Design: We studied the effects of 7 wk of excessive SFA (n = 17) or PUFA (n = 14) intake (+750 kcal/d) on the DNA methylation of similar to 450,000 sites in human subcutaneous adipose tissue. Both diets resulted in similar body weight increases. We also combined the data from the 2 groups to examine the overall effect of overfeeding on the DNA methylation in adipose tissue. Results: The DNA methylation of 4875 Cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) sites was affected differently between the 2 diets. Furthermore, both the SFA and PUFA diets increased the mean degree of DNA methylation in adipose tissue, particularly in promoter regions. However, although the mean methylation was changed in 1797 genes [e.g., alpha-ketoglutarate dependent dioxygenase (FTO), interleukin 6 (IL6), insulin receptor (INSR), neuronal growth regulator 1 (NEGR1), and proopiomelanocortin (POMC)] by PUFAs, only 125 genes [e.g., adiponectin, C1Q and collagen domain containing (ADIPOQ)] were changed by SFA overfeeding. In addition, the SFA diet significantly altered the expression of 28 transcripts [e.g., acyl-CoA oxidase 1 (ACOX1) and FAT atypical cadherin 1 (FAT1)], whereas the PUFA diet did not significantly affect gene expression. When the data from the 2 diet groups were combined, the mean methylation of 1444 genes, including fatty acid binding protein 1 (FABP1), fatty acid binding protein 2 (FABP2), melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), MC3R, PPARG coactivator 1 alpha (PPARGC1A), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF), was changed in adipose tissue by overfeeding. Moreover, the baseline DNA methylation of 12 CpG sites that was annotated to 9 genes [e.g., mitogen-activated protein kinase 7 (MAPK7), melanin concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHR1), and splicing factor SWAP homolog (SFRS8)] was associated with the degree of weight increase in response to extra energy intake. Conclusions: SFA overfeeding and PUFA overfeeding induce distinct epigenetic changes in human adipose tissue. In addition, we present data that suggest that baseline DNA methylation can predict weight increase in response to overfeeding in humans.

  • 17.
    Rosqvist, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Iggman, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Kullberg, Joel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Cedernaes, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Johansson, Hans-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Arner, Peter
    Dahlman, Ingrid
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Overfeeding Polyunsaturated and Saturated Fat Causes Distinct Effects on Liver and Visceral Fat Accumulation in Humans2014In: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 63, no 7, p. 2356-2368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Excess ectopic fat storage is linked to type 2 diabetes. The importance of dietary fat composition for ectopic fat storage in humans is unknown. We investigated liver fat accumulation and body composition during overfeeding saturated (SFA) or polyunsaturated (PUFA) fat. LIPOGAIN was a double-blind, parallel-group, randomized trial. Thirty-nine young and normal-weight individuals were overfed muffins high in SFA (palm oil) or n-6 PUFA (sunflower oil) for 7 weeks. Liver fat, visceral (VAT), subcutaneous abdominal (SAT), and total adipose tissue (TAT), pancreatic fat, and lean tissue was assessed by MRI. Transcriptomics were performed in SAT. Both groups gained similar weight. SFA however markedly increased liver fat compared with PUFA and caused 2-fold larger increase in VAT than PUFA. Conversely, PUFA caused a nearly 3-fold larger increase in lean tissue than SFA. Increase in liver fat directly correlated with changes in plasma SFA and inversely with PUFA. Genes involved in regulating energy dissipation, insulin resistance, body composition and fat cell differentiation in SAT were differentially regulated between diets, and associated with increased PUFA in SAT. In conclusion, overeating SFA promotes hepatic and visceral fat storage whereas excess energy from PUFA may instead promote lean tissue in healthy humans.

  • 18.
    Rydell, Andreas
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Family Med & Primary Care, Huddinge, Sweden;Norslund Svardsjo Primary Hlth Care Ctr, Dalarna Cty Council, Falun, Sweden.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Lisspers, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Ställberg, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Nowak, Christoph
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Family Med & Primary Care, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Axel C
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Family Med & Primary Care, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Feldreich, Tobias
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Hlth & Social Sci, Falun, Sweden.
    Iggman, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Norslund Svardsjo Primary Hlth Care Ctr, Dalarna Cty Council, Falun, Sweden.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Arnlov, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Family Med & Primary Care, Huddinge, Sweden;Dalarna Univ, Sch Hlth & Social Sci, Falun, Sweden;Norslund Svardsjo Primary Hlth Care Ctr, Dalarna Cty Council, Falun, Sweden.
    Endothelial dysfunction is associated with impaired lung function in two independent community cohorts2018In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 143, p. 123-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Prior studies investigating the association between endothelial dysfunction and impaired lung function have been small and inconsistent. The primary aim was to investigate the association between endothelial function and lung function in two community-based cohorts. Methods: We used a discovery/replication approach to study the association between endothelial function and lung function in the Prospective investigation of Obesity, Energy and Metabolism (POEM, discovery cohort, n = 490, mean age 50.3 +/- 0.2 years) and the Prospective Study of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS, replication cohort, n = 892, mean age 70.2 +/- 0.15 years). Spirometry and three different measures of endothelial function were performed including both the invasive forearm technique (endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilation [EDV and EIDV, respectively] and noninvasive flow mediated dilation [FMD]). Results: An age and sex adjusted association between lower EDV and lower FEV1 was found in POEM and replicated in PIVUS. After merging the two cohorts, 1 standard deviation decrease in EDV was associated with 1.57% lower FEV1 after additional adjustment for smoking status, body mass index, exercise level, and C-reactive protein (95% confidence intervals 0.63-2.51, p = 0.001). The association was slightly lower albeit still statistically significant after excluding participants without cardiovascular disease and chronic respiratory disease and appeared stronger among previous/current smokers vs. non-smokers and in men vs. women (p for interaction = 0.2 and 0.02 respectively). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that even individuals with sub-clinical impairments of lung function in the community have concomitant endothelial dysfunction.

  • 19.
    Rydell, Andreas
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Lisspers, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Ställberg, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Nowak, Christoph
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Axel
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Feldreich, Tobias
    Dalarna Univ, Falun, Sweden.
    Iggman, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Endothelial dysfunction is associated with impaired lung function in two independent community cohorts2018In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 52Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20. Uusitupa, M.
    et al.
    Hermansen, K.
    Savolainen, M. J.
    Schwab, U.
    Kolehmainen, M.
    Brader, L.
    Mortensen, L. S.
    Cloetens, L.
    Johansson-Persson, A.
    Onning, G.
    Landin-Olsson, M.
    Herzig, K. -H
    Hukkanen, J.
    Rosqvist, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Iggman, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Paananen, J.
    Pulkki, K. J.
    Siloaho, M.
    Dragsted, L.
    Barri, T.
    Overvad, K.
    Knudsen, K. E. Bach
    Hedemann, M. S.
    Arner, P.
    Dahlman, I.
    Borge, G. I. A.
    Baardseth, P.
    Ulven, S. M.
    Gunnarsdottir, I.
    Jonsdottir, S.
    Thorsdottir, I.
    Oresic, M.
    Poutanen, K. S.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Akesson, B.
    Effects of an isocaloric healthy Nordic diet on insulin sensitivity, lipid profile and inflammation markers in metabolic syndrome: a randomized study (SYSDIET)2013In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 274, no 1, p. 52-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Different healthy food patterns may modify cardiometabolic risk. We investigated the effects of an isocaloric healthy Nordic diet on insulin sensitivity, lipid profile, blood pressure and inflammatory markers in people with metabolic syndrome. Methods We conducted a randomized dietary study lasting for 18-24weeks in individuals with features of metabolic syndrome (mean age 55years, BMI 31.6kgm-2, 67% women). Altogether 309 individuals were screened, 200 started the intervention after 4-week run-in period, and 96 (proportion of dropouts 7.9%) and 70 individuals (dropouts 27%) completed the study, in the Healthy diet and Control diet groups, respectively. Healthy diet included whole-grain products, berries, fruits and vegetables, rapeseed oil, three fish meals per week and low-fat dairy products. An average Nordic diet served as a Control diet. Compliance was monitored by repeated 4-day food diaries and fatty acid composition of serum phospholipids. Results Body weight remained stable, and no significant changes were observed in insulin sensitivity or blood pressure. Significant changes between the groups were found in non-HDL cholesterol (-0.18, mmolL-1 95% CI -0.35; -0.01, P=0.04), LDL to HDL cholesterol (-0.15, -0.28; -0.00, P=0.046) and apolipoprotein B to apolipoprotein A1 ratios (-0.04, -0.07; -0.00, P=0.025) favouring the Healthy diet. IL-1 Ra increased during the Control diet (difference -84, -133; -37ngL-1, P= 0.00053). Intakes of saturated fats (E%, beta estimate 4.28, 0.02; 8.53, P=0.049) and magnesium (mg, -0.23, -0.41; -0.05, P=0.012) were associated with IL-1 Ra. Conclusions Healthy Nordic diet improved lipid profile and had a beneficial effect on low-grade inflammation.

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