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  • 1.
    Aftab, Obaid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Fryknäs, Mårten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Hassan, Saadia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Nygren, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Larsson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Hammerling, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Gustafsson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Label free quantification of time evolving morphologies using time-lapse video microscopy enables identity control of cell lines and discovery of chemically induced differential activity in iso-genic cell line pairs2015In: Chemometrics and Intelligent Laboratory Systems, ISSN 0169-7439, E-ISSN 1873-3239, Vol. 141, p. 24-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Label free time-lapse video microscopy based monitoring of time evolving cell population morphology has potential to offer a simple and cost effective method for identity control of cell lines. Such morphology monitoring also has potential to offer discovery of chemically induced differential changes between pairs of cell lines of interest, for example where one in a pair of cell lines is normal/sensitive and the other malignant/resistant. A new simple algorithm, pixel histogram hierarchy comparison (PHHC), for comparison of time evolving morphologies (TEM) in phase contrast time-lapse microscopy movies was applied to a set of 10 different cell lines and three different iso-genic colon cancer cell line pairs, each pair being genetically identical except for a single mutation. PHHC quantifies differences in morphology by comparing pixel histogram intensities at six different resolutions. Unsupervised clustering and machine learning based classification methods were found to accurately identify cell lines, including their respective iso-genic variants, through time-evolving morphology. Using this experimental setting, drugs with differential activity in iso-genic cell line pairs were likewise identified. Thus, this is a cost effective and expedient alternative to conventional molecular profiling techniques and might be useful as part of the quality control in research incorporating cell line models, e.g. in any cell/tumor biology or toxicology project involving drug/agent differential activity in pairs of cell line models.

  • 2. Berenjian, Saideh
    et al.
    Hu, Kefei
    Abedi-Valugerdi, Manuchehr
    Hassan, Moustapha
    Hassan, Sadia Bashir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Morein, Bror
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Medicine.
    The nanoparticulate Quillaja saponin KGI exerts anti-proliferative eff ects by down-regulation of cell cycle molecules in U937 and HL-60 human leukemia cells2014In: Leukemia and Lymphoma, ISSN 1042-8194, E-ISSN 1029-2403, Vol. 55, no 7, p. 1618-1624Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cancer cells are characterized by uncontrolled replication involving loss of control of cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) and cyclins, and by abolished differentiation. In this study we introduce KGI, which is a nanoparticle with a Quillaja saponin as an active molecule. By the use of RNA array analysis and confirmation at the protein level, we show that KGI affects myeloid leukemia cells (in particular, the U937 monoblast cancer cell) by the following mechanisms: (A) ceasing cell replication via proteasome degradation, (B) down-regulation of key molecules at check points between G1/S and G2/M phases, (C) reduction of thymidine kinase activity, followed by (D) exit to differentiation and production of interleukin-8 (IL-8), eventually leading to apoptosis. Leukemia cell lines (U937 and HL-60 cells) were exposed to KGI for 8 h, after which the drug was removed. The cancer cells did not revert to replication over the following 10 days. Thus our findings suggest that the nanoparticle KGI inhibits proliferation and promotes differentiation in leukemic cells by interfering with the cell cycle process.

  • 3.
    Eriksson, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Osterros, Albin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Hassan, Sadia Bashir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Gullbo, Joachim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Rickardson, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Jarvius, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Nygren, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Fryknäs, Mårten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Höglund, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Larsson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Repositioning of Quinacrine for Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia2014In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 124, no 21Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Eriksson, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Österroos, Albin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Hassan, Sadia Bashir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Gullbo, Joachim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Rickardson, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Jarvius, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Nygren, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Fryknäs, Mårten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Höglund, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Larsson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Drug screen in patient cells suggests quinacrine to be repositioned for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia2015In: Blood Cancer Journal, ISSN 2044-5385, E-ISSN 2044-5385, Vol. 5, article id e307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To find drugs suitable for repositioning for use against leukemia, samples from patients with chronic lymphocytic, acute myeloid and lymphocytic leukemias as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were tested in response to 1266 compounds from the LOPAC1280 library (Sigma). Twenty-five compounds were defined as hits with activity in all leukemia subgroups (<50% cell survival compared with control) at 10 mu M drug concentration. Only one of these compounds, quinacrine, showed low activity in normal PBMCs and was therefore selected for further preclinical evaluation. Mining the NCI-60 and the NextBio databases demonstrated leukemia sensitivity and the ability of quinacrine to reverse myeloid leukemia gene expression. Mechanistic exploration was performed using the NextBio bioinformatic software using gene expression analysis of drug exposed acute myeloid leukemia cultures (HL-60) in the database. Analysis of gene enrichment and drug correlations revealed strong connections to ribosomal biogenesis nucleoli and translation initiation. The highest drug-drug correlation was to ellipticine, a known RNA polymerase I inhibitor. These results were validated by additional gene expression analysis performed in-house. Quinacrine induced early inhibition of protein synthesis supporting these predictions. The results suggest that quinacrine have repositioning potential for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia by targeting of ribosomal biogenesis.

  • 5.
    Fryknäs, Mårten
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Gullbo, Joachim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Wang, Xin
    Rickardson, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Jarvius, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Wickström, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Hassan, Saadia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Andersson, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Gustafsson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Westman, Gunnar
    Nygren, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Linder, Stig
    Larsson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Screening for phenotype selective activity in multidrug resistant cells identifies a novel tubulin active agent insensitive to common forms of cancer drug resistance2013In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 13, p. 374-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Drug resistance is a common cause of treatment failure in cancer patients and encompasses a multitude of different mechanisms. The aim of the present study was to identify drugs effective on multidrug resistant cells. Methods: The RPMI 8226 myeloma cell line and its multidrug resistant subline 8226/Dox40 was screened for cytotoxicity in response to 3,000 chemically diverse compounds using a fluorometric cytotoxicity assay (FMCA). Follow-up profiling was subsequently performed using various cellular and biochemical assays. Results: One compound, designated VLX40, demonstrated a higher activity against 8226/Dox40 cells compared to its parental counterpart. VLX40 induced delayed cell death with apoptotic features. Mechanistic exploration was performed using gene expression analysis of drug exposed tumor cells to generate a drug-specific signature. Strong connections to tubulin inhibitors and microtubule cytoskeleton were retrieved. The mechanistic hypothesis of VLX40 acting as a tubulin inhibitor was confirmed by direct measurements of interaction with tubulin polymerization using a biochemical assay and supported by demonstration of G2/M cell cycle arrest. When tested against a broad panel of primary cultures of patient tumor cells (PCPTC) representing different forms of leukemia and solid tumors, VLX40 displayed high activity against both myeloid and lymphoid leukemias in contrast to the reference compound vincristine to which myeloid blast cells are often insensitive. Significant in vivo activity was confirmed in myeloid U-937 cells implanted subcutaneously in mice using the hollow fiber model. Conclusions: The results indicate that VLX40 may be a useful prototype for development of novel tubulin active agents that are insensitive to common mechanisms of cancer drug resistance.

  • 6.
    Hassan, Saadia Bashir
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Gullbo, Joachim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Hu, Kefei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Virology.
    Berenjian, Saideh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Virology.
    Morein, Bror
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Virology.
    Nygren, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    The Nanoparticulate Quillaja Saponin BBE Is Selectively Active Towards Renal Cell Carcinoma2013In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 143-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To characterize the cytotoxic effect of BBE, the particulate of desacyl-saponin, in model systems of solid tumours. Materials and Methods: Cytotoxic activity of BBE was investigated in solid human tumour cell lines, in tumour cells from patients with renal cell carcinoma, in normal human renal cells and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The BBE mode of cell death was assessed in vitro. In vivo effect of BBE was evaluated in xenograft-bearing mice. Results: BBE was selectively active against renal cell carcinoma, with no or little effect on normal cells. BBE induced caspase activity and apoptosis. An inhibitory activity of BBE on xenograft tumour growth, with no apparent signs of haematological toxicity was shown. In the non-proliferative model of patient tumour cells, BBE was active on only 1/5 patient samples, suggesting association of BBE effect with cell proliferation. Conclusion: BBE has interesting activities against renal cell carcinoma and should be further explored as a drug against this resistant tumour type.

  • 7.
    Hassan, Saadia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology.
    Laryea, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology.
    Mahteme, Haile
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Colorectal Surgery.
    Felth, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Fryknäs, Mårten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology.
    Fayad, Walid
    Linder, Stig
    Rickardson, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology.
    Gullbo, Joachim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology.
    Graf, Wilhelm
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Colorectal Surgery.
    Pålman, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Colorectal Surgery.
    Glimelius, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Larsson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology.
    Nygren, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Novel activity of acriflavine against colorectal cancer tumor cells2011In: Cancer Science, ISSN 1347-9032, E-ISSN 1349-7006, Vol. 102, no 12, p. 2206-2213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A high-throughput screen of the cytotoxic activity of 2000 molecules from a commercial library in three human colon cancer cell lines and two normal cell types identified the acridine acriflavin to be a colorectal cancer (CRC) active drug. Acriflavine was active in cell spheroids, indicating good drug penetration and activity against hypoxic cells. In a validation step based on primary cultures of patient tumor cells, acriflavine was found to be more active against CRC than ovarian cancer and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. This contrasted to the activity pattern of the CRC active standard drugs 5-fluorouracil, irinotecan and oxaliplatin. Mechanistic studies indicated acriflavine to be a dual topoisomerase I and II inhibitor. In conclusion, the strategy used seems promising for identification of new diagnosis-specific cancer drugs.

  • 8.
    Hassan, Sadia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Jonsson, Elin
    Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Larsson, Rolf
    Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Karlsson, MO
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Model for time dependency of the cytotoxic effect of CHS 828 in vitro suggests two different mechanisms of action.2001In: J Pharmacol Exp Ther, Vol. 299, p. 1140-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Hovstadius, Peter
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lindhagen, Elin
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Hassan, Sadia
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Nilsson, Kenneth
    Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Jernberg-Wiklund, Helena
    Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Nygren, Peter
    Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Binderup, Lise
    Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Larsson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Cytotoxic effect in vivo and in vitro of CHS 828 on human myeloma cell lines.2004In: Anticancer Drugs, ISSN 0959-4973, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 63-70Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Jonsson, Elin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Simonsen, LE
    Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences. Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Hassan, Sadia
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Freijs, A
    Hansen, K
    Karlsson, MO
    Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences. Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Larsson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Determination of drug effect on tumor cells, host animal toxicity and drug pharmacokinetics in a hollow fiber model in rats.2000In: Cancer Chemother Pharmacol, Vol. 46, p. 493-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Kashif, Muhammad
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Andersson, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Hassan, Sadia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Karlsson, Henning
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Senkowski, Wojciech
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Fryknäs, Mårten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Nygren, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Larsson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Gustafsson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    In vitro discovery of promising anti-cancer drug combinations using iterative maximisation of a therapeutic index2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, article id 14118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In vitro-based search for promising anti-cancer drug combinations may provide important leads to improved cancer therapies. Currently there are no integrated computational-experimental methods specifically designed to search for combinations, maximizing a predefined therapeutic index (TI) defined in terms of appropriate model systems. Here, such a pipeline is presented allowing the search for optimal combinations among an arbitrary number of drugs while also taking experimental variability into account. The TI optimized is the cytotoxicity difference (in vitro) between a target model and an adverse side effect model. Focusing on colorectal carcinoma (CRC), the pipeline provided several combinations that are effective in six different CRC models with limited cytotoxicity in normal cell models. Herein we describe the identification of the combination (Trichostatin A, Afungin, 17-AAG) and present results from subsequent characterisations, including efficacy in primary cultures of tumour cells from CRC patients. We hypothesize that its effect derives from potentiation of the proteotoxic action of 17-AAG by Trichostatin A and Afungin. The discovered drug combinations against CRC are significant findings themselves and also indicate that the proposed strategy has great potential for suggesting drug combination treatments suitable for other cancer types as well as for other complex diseases.

  • 12.
    Larsson, Dhana E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Hassan, Saadia Bashir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Granberg, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    The Cytotoxic Effect of Emetine and CGP-74514A Studied with the Hollow Fiber Model and ArrayScan Assay in Neuroendocrine Tumors In Vitro2012In: ANTI-CANCER AGENT ME, ISSN 1871-5206, Vol. 12, no 7, p. 783-790Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emetine and CGP-74514A have previously shown antitumor activity in neuroendocrine tumor cell lines. The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic activity of the drugs in a three-dimensional model and to study if the mechanism of the cytotoxic activity was induction of apoptosis. An in vitro hollow fiber model was used to study the cytotoxic effect and a multiparametric high-content screening assay was used for measurement of apoptosis. The human pancreatic carcinoid cell line, BON-1 and the human typical and atypical bronchial carcinoid cell lines NCI-H727 and NCI-H720 were tested. Emetine and CGP-74514A showed higher antitumor activity on NCI-H720 compared to NCI-H727 and 3 day cultures were more sensitive than the 14 day cultures. A time-and dose-dependent activation of caspase-3 and increase in nuclear fragmentation and condensation were observed for the drugs in NCI-H727 and BON-1 using a multiparametric apoptosis assay. These results were confirmed with nuclear morphological examinations on microscopic slides. Emetine and CGP-74514A showed antitumor activity and induced caspase-3 activation with modest changes in nuclear morphology, indicating induction of apoptosis.

  • 13.
    Martinsson, Petra
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Liminga, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Dhar, Sumeer
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    de la Torre, M
    Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Lukinius, A
    Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Jonsson, Elin
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Hassan, Sadia
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Binderup, L
    Kristensen, J
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Larsson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Temporal effects of the novel antitumour pyridyl cyanoguanidine CHS 828, on human lymphoma cells.2001In: Eur J Cancer, Vol. 37, p. 260-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Strese, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Hassan, Saadia Bashir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Velander, Ebba
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Haglund, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Höglund, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Larsson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Gullbo, Joachim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    In vitro and in vivo anti-leukemic activity of the peptidase-potentiated alkylator melflufen in acute myeloid leukemia2017In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 6341-6352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The novel aminopeptidase potentiated alkylating agent melflufen, was evaluated for activity in acute myeloid leukemia in a range of in vitro models, as well as in a patient derived xenograft study. All tested AML cell lines were highly sensitive to melflufen while melphalan was considerably less potent. In the HL-60 cell line model, synergy was observed for the combination of melflufen and cytarabine, an interaction that appeared sequence dependent with increased synergy when melflufen was added before cytarabine. Also, in primary cultures of AML cells from patients melflufen was highly active, while normal PBMC cultures appeared less sensitive, indicating a 7-fold in vitro therapeutic index. Melphalan, on the other hand, was only 2-fold more potent in the AML patient samples compared with PBMCs. Melflufen was equally active against non-malignant, immature CD34(+) progenitor cells and a more differentiated CD34(+) derived cell population (GM14), whereas the stem cell like cells were less sensitive to melphalan. Finally, melflufen treatment showed significant anti-leukemia activity and increased survival in a patient derived xenograft of AML in mice. In conclusion, melflufen demonstrates high and significant preclinical activity in AML and further clinical evaluation seem warranted in this disease.

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