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  • 1.
    Forssberg, Anna Maria
    et al.
    Armémuseet.
    Hallenberg, MatsStockholms universitet.Husz, OrsiUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.Nordin, JonasKungliga Biblioteket.
    Organizing history: studies in honour of Jan Glete2011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Gustavsson, Martin
    et al.
    Department of Economic History, Stockholm University.
    Husz, Orsi
    Department of History, Stockholm University.
    Söderberg, Johan
    Department of Economic History, Stockholm University.
    Collapse of a Bourgeoisie?: The Wealthy in Stockholm, 1915-19652009In: Scandinavian Economic History Review, ISSN 0358-5522, E-ISSN 1750-2837, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 88-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper explores the decline of the propertied bourgeoisie in Sweden in the twentieth century by analysing data from Stockholm Directory of Wealth reporting on private wealth in the years 1914, 1928 and 1963. Wealth tax statistics are used as complementary sources. How did the overall level of wealth change among the affluent Stockholmers during this period? Who were the wealthiest people in Stockholm and how did the social stratification within the richest change over time?

    The main results are: 1. Strongly declining overall mean wealth (-58 per cent) among the richest with a dramatic drop already before 1945 (thus before the expansion of the welfare state) and 2. Surprisingly stable social positions among the wealthiest between 1914 and 1963, despite radical changes in society and a dramatic decline in mean wealth.

     

  • 3.
    Husz, Orsi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Att räkna värdighet: Privatekonomi och medelklasskultur vid mitten av 1900-talet2013In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 79, no 1, p. 87-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Counting worth. Personal finances and middle class culture in the mid twentieth century

    The article discusses how culture and economy are melded together in everyday definitions of class and classification processes, using as a case-study the heated press debate in Sweden in 1950 about the supposedly worsening economic circumstances of the middle classes. Under the slogan 'Rattvisa at medelklassen' ('Justice for the middle classes'), the debate introduced the statistical concept of lifetime earnings to a wider public. My ambition here is to analyse how this new calculative device (also called life incomes) was launched, and how it was used to define and redefine the middle classes. The empirical study highlights new aspects of the history of the middle classes in the twentieth century, a topic otherwise rarely studied by Swedish historians. The focus here is on the discourses about middle-class identity and class distinctions in the middle of the century. I then consider the theories of class analysis, arguing for a cultural-economic approach; more specifically, the ideas on the 'economies of worth' developed by Luc Boltanski and Laurent Thevenot (2006 [1990, and David Stark (2009) as analytic tools. What counts? How is the calculation of lifetime earnings and domestic budgets bound up with culture? An analysis of both the historical practices of calculating and the discourses about private economic issues reveals the problems inherent in the conventional understanding of class in binary terms. Although most social scientists now agree that the economy and economic practices are culturally embedded, it is common in class analyses (including those inspired by Weber or Bourdieu) to distinguish between the 'objective' and instrumental economic criteria of class on one hand, and the 'subjective' and normative cultural criteria of class on the other. It is shown here that such criteria not only are combined (or embedded into each other), but, in fact, they dissolve in practice. The calculative devices used to define the middle class in objective economic terms were culturally created, and thus the debates about middle-class personal finances were inescapably also a debate about culture, (normative) values, and worth(iness).

  • 4.
    Husz, Orsi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Att sälja kredit som pengar: Kreditkortets domesticering i 1960-talets Sverige2016In: Vardagslivets finansialisering / [ed] Erik Andersson, Oskar Broberg, Marcus Gianneschi & Bengt Larsson, Göteborg: Centrum för konsumtionsvetenskap , 2016, p. 46-58Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Husz, Orsi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Att sätta sig i skuld utan skuldkänsla: Kreditkortets introduktion i 1960-talets Sverige2016In: Ord & Bild, ISSN 0030-4492, no 2, p. 48-58Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Husz, Orsi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Att upptäcka sin forskningsfråga: Identitetssökande i bankarkivet2016In: Historia i praktiken / [ed] Lundgren, Frans & Josephsson, Peter, Studentlitteratur AB, 2016, 1, p. 23-38Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Husz, Orsi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Bank Identity: Banks, ID Cards, and the Emergence of a Financial Identification Society in Sweden2018In: Enterprise & society, ISSN 1467-2227, E-ISSN 1467-2235, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 391-429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today nearly the entire adult population in Sweden uses a digital BankID for more purposes than only financial ones. Issuing identity documents is commonly perceived as a task for state authorities, but in Swedish society banks have played a dominant role as identificators. The first contribution of this article is that it explains this unique emergence of bank identity and traces the historical roots of a financial identification society to the mid-1960s. Banks started issuing standardized identity cards as a complement to the new system of paying salaries and wages by direct deposit to checking accounts, and these cards eventually became quasi-official identity documents. The Swedish story thus contrasts the scholarship on identification and state control. By treating identity as both a socio-cultural category and a materialization of a technology of control, I argue that the formalization of official identity documents for everyday use was intertwined with the creation of new financial identities. The introduction and general distribution of ID cards were parts of a process whereby wage earners became financial consumers, and the banks transformed themselves into retail companies. My second contribution therefore relates to the scholarly narrative on the financialization of everyday life since the 1980s. While the mass move to financial identification in Sweden, highlighted in this article, certainly fits the content of this narrative, it questions its chronology.

  • 8.
    Husz, Orsi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Comment les salariés suédois sont devenus des consommateurs de produits dinanciers: L'expérience des 'comptes chèques salariaux' dans le années 1950 et 19602015In: Critique Internationale, ISSN 1290-7839, E-ISSN 1777-554X, Vol. 69, no oct-dec, p. 99-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the late 1950s Swedish commercial banks started to offer payroll services to employers and open current accounts with chequebooks for both white- and blue-collar employees. Within a decade Swedish wage earners were turned into bank customers and the commercial banks – formerly solemn institutions serving business and the very richest – became retail companies selling a wide range of products to a broad public. The paper investigates, through the case of so-called cheque account salaries, the cultural challenges posed by the exceptionally early bancarisation (spread of the use of banking services) in Swedish society. I argue against over-emphasising the individual self-governing financial subjects depicted in Foulcauldian studies of the financialisation process. The making and control of new financial subjects in Sweden was made possible, at least during its first phase, by technologies and discourses rooted in a more directly disciplinary and hierarchical value system impregnated by class (as defined by production rather than consumption). Collective affiliations of groups of employees, building on wage earner identities, rather than on consumer identities, proved to be instrumental in the financialisation of everyday life. The new everyday consumers of financial products were created in a back and forth movement between the older subject positions and the models imagined for the new. Furthermore, my study demonstrates that the prevalent chronology of the financialisation of daily life in Europe can be traced further back in time.

  • 9.
    Husz, Orsi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Den rätta känslan för tingen.: Debatten om köp-slit-släng i Sverige 1960-61 i en historisk kontext2009In: Mode – en introduktion:En tvärvetenskaplig betraktelse / [ed] Dirk Gindt och Louise Wallenberg, Stockholm: Raster , 2009, p. 21-46Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Husz, Orsi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Department Stores2011In: Encyclopedia of Consumer Culture / [ed] Dale Southerton, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications , 2011Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Husz, Orsi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Drömmar och kompetens: Kvinnor och det tidiga 1900-talets varuhus1999In: Kvinnovetenskaplig tidskrift, ISSN 0348-8365, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 36-54Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Husz, Orsi
    Stockholms universitet.
    Drömmars värde: Varuhus och lotteri i svensk konsumtionskultur 1897-19392004Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dissertation explores ideas about consumption in general and about consumer dreams in particular in early twentieth century Sweden. This is done in an analysis of two specific consumer environments –- the department store and the lottery. Both have often been explicitly related to dreams by contemporary observers as well as modern-day researchers. My case studies concern Sweden’s first real department store –- Nordiska Kompaniet (NK) in Stockholm –- in the period 1902 to 1939, and Swedish lotteries in the period 1897 to 1939.

    The dissertation consists of four parts. The first part presents the starting points of the investigations. Previous research has described the consumer culture of this period either as conveying a normative message about rational thinking or as imbued with a new hedonism. Consequently, I apply the notions of rationality, irrationality, hedonism, and asceticism as analytical concepts. I analyse ideas as expressed in words, in actions and in the shaping of institutions. I investigate the material in both empirical substudies from the perspective of three basic issues. Firstly, I examine the perception of old and new; secondly, the role of pecuniary values and ideal values; thirdly, the power relationships reflected and created by the institutions of the department store and the lottery.

    Part Two is a study of the department store NK. The empirical chapters discuss issues about the ‘enchantment’ of rationality and modernity within the department store, the attempted reconciliation of commerce and (high) culture, and how gender and class were defined by the shaping of the store space and by the interactions between sales staff and customers. In a concluding chapter I point out the cultural implications of the department store’s business principle of providing a complete range of all possible consumer goods.

    Part Three investigates the issue of Swedish lotteries in the early twentieth century. I focus on the political and press debates about a proposed state lottery but I also illuminate the institutional forms of lotteries and some aspects of gambling practices. In the empirical chapters of this case study I explore how the perception of the lottery as an antiquated phenomenon shifted to the exact opposite; I examine the conflict between individual dreams and collective future planning as expressed in the political debate; and I discuss how the lottery was related to the work ethic in the normative discourse and in the practice of gambling. I also study how the ‘good public causes’ which Swedish lotteries financed were used by contemporaries to provide moral legitimacy to the lottery. To sum up, I argue that the various and shifting social meanings of money should be considered as a key to understanding both individual and collective attitudes to dreams in the lottery issue.

    Part Four summarises the results and discusses the two case studies together. Rational, irrational, hedonistic and ascetic features were brought together in the ideas about consumption and in the practice of consuming. I isolate three mechanisms that were used in the period to reconcile apparently contradictory notions and actual opposites. I call these mechanisms redefinition, value equalising and stereotyping.

    In summary, the dissertation illuminates the interpretation of consumer dreams by placing them in a broader context. It shows how dreams were related to the view of modernity and to the power relationships in society and how they were ascribed ideal and pecuniary values.

  • 13.
    Husz, Orsi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Från levande musik till högtalarekonomi: Recension av Rasmus Fleischer, Musikens politiska ekonomi (2012)2014In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 134, no 4, p. 725-734Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Husz, Orsi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Golden everyday. Housewifely consumerism and the domestication of banks in 1960s Sweden2015In: Le Mouvement social, ISSN 0027-2671, E-ISSN 1961-8646, no 250, p. 41-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper explores cultural historical and gender aspects of the financialisation of everyday life through a case study of an extensive Swedish bank campaign in the 1960s targeting women. I analyse the so called Golden Everyday conferences (1961-1969) as representations of popular finance and I focus on two questions: firstly how the financial identities for a broad population were constructed and enacted; and secondly, which role the bank adopted in relation to its (presumptive) clients. The development of retail banking has been roughly outlined in historical studies of banking, but the challenge faced by the banks, and their strategies for entangling finances in everyday practices has not been looked upon in detail. Through the case of the Golden Everyday conferences I argue that in he 1960s a domestication of banks occurred intertwined with the “bancarisation of households” described in the history and sociology of banking.

    I highlight how emotionality, familiarity and references to consumer skills were used to domesticate a new kind of popular banking. The conferences attempted to reconcile the “hostile worlds” of economy and intimacy. They furthermore framed everyday finance by a ‘housewifely’, consumerist and familiar discourse, which reinforced the bank’s new role in managing personal finance on an everyday basis. This new line was made practically possible by the introduction of a system of direct deposits and cheque accounts for salaries and wages, but the new practices were to be extended also to those who did not lift own salaries and even more importantly needed to be rooted in a domestic context – for both women and men. The financial identity that came into being in the Golden Everyday conferences differed from the identities emphasised by scholars of financialisation of everyday life or those writing about popular finance. The new clients of the Swedish bank, might very well have been engaged in investing, saving or borrowing, but they were addressed here as consumers of financial products. They were supposed to choose and buy in the “department store of finances”.

    The bank certainly represented itself as a “department store” of finances. At the same time it also institutionalised the expertise about family economics/personal finances, an expert knowledge that previously belonged to many different governmental and non-profit organisations. Thereby the topics of sharing within the family were discussed in the same context as shareholding. 

  • 15.
    Husz, Orsi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Klass, människovärde, pengar2008In: Arbetarhistoria : Meddelande från Arbetarrörelsens Arkiv och Bibliotek, ISSN 0281-7446, no 3-4, p. 22-31Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Class, human worth and money

    This article discusses class, economy and culture in a rather down-to-earth way. Empirically the study focuses on debates on household budgets and the growing anxieties of economical decline among the Swedish middle classes during the first half of the twentieth century. Class is conventionally defined by socio-economical or/and cultural criteria. The point of this paper is to analyse source material about the economical situation of (self-defined) middle class groups from a cultural perspective. Theoretically I address the question how people try to make the seemingly contradictory economic value and ideal values commeasurable in everyday practice. In other words I show by three historical examples how writings about financial issues can shed light on cultural and moral boundaries between classes and how the ambiguous concept of value/values can be used as an analytical tool in the study of class.

  • 16.
    Husz, Orsi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Konsumentupplysningens uppgång och fall: recension av Sophie Elsässer: Att skapa en konsument : Råd & Rön och den statliga konsumentupplysningen2013In: Respons, no 2Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Husz, Orsi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Lagom moderna kvinnor2019In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 139, no 3, p. 605-612Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Husz, Orsi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Lotterifeber: Om lotterikritik och lotteridrömmar under tidigt 1900-tal1999In: Feministiskt perspektiv Göteborg : Forum för kvinnliga forskare och kvinnoforskningtiv, ISSN 1403-1477, Vol. [19]99, no 4, p. 15-21Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Husz, Orsi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Människovärde på distans: Kunskap mellan ekonomi och idealitet i brevskolornas reklam 1920-19702012In: Människans kunskap och kunskapen om människan: En gränslös historia / [ed] M. W. Bondesson, O. Husz, M. Tydén & J. Myrdal, Lund: Sekel Bokförlag, 2012, p. 146-173Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Husz, Orsi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Nya ljudmedier gjorde musiken till en vara2012In: Svenska Dagbladet, 2012-09-22Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Recension av Rasmus Fleischers avhandling Musikens politiska ekonomi.

  • 21.
    Husz, Orsi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Passionate about things: The Swedish Debate on Throwawayism (1960-1961)2011In: Revue d'histoire Nordique, ISSN 1778-9605, no 12, p. 135-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the notorious Swedish debate called “slit-och-släng” [wear and tear and throwaway] in 1960–61. This large-scale media debate on consumption and the throwaway mentality was triggered by a dispute between two leading media personalities specialised in consumer issues and engaged intellectuals, economists, designers, producers, consumer representatives as well as the general public. The analysis in this paper applies three overlapping historical contexts: modernity, morality and emotionality. First, I interpret the debate as a conflict between traditional and modern consumer attitudes. Second, I show that the debate, at first sight, can easily be placed within the tradition of a dichotomised normative criticism, whereby the rational and active consumer is endorsed and contrasted with the negative image of the emotionally-driven and manipulated victim of market forces (Slater 1997: p. 33). Third, I argue that the debate was a breaking point in the very same normative discourse. It signals a rupture in the persistent polarisation, by introducing emotions in a positive way – on both sides of the debate. Rather unexpectedly, the Swedish debate on throwawayism justified a passion for commodities. Consequently, the analysis sheds new light upon the prevalent interpretations of Swedish consumerism in terms of rationality, collectivism, state-controlled consumer education and consumer protection (e.g. Aléx 1994; 2003) by showing how leading consumer educators “got tired of” rationality.

  • 22.
    Husz, Orsi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Private dreams and public expectations: Lotteries and dilemmas of progress and social welfare in early 20th-century Sweden2002In: Journal of Consumer Culture, ISSN 1469-5405, E-ISSN 1741-2900, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 53-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores morality and contradictions in Swedish political discussions between 1899 and 1939 concerning lotteries in general and the state lottery in particular. The seemingly narrow debates on lotteries reflected general dilemmas of the emerging modern consumer and welfare society. In order to balance economic value against the perceived lack of moral and social values, politicians were forced to define and redefine the concept of lottery. They also tried to handle the contradictions it presented. This article first argues that a paradoxical change occurred in the understanding of lottery in relation to modernity. Politicians redefined lottery as a modern consumer practice during this period. Lottery is then investigated as a means of envisaging the future. In the practice of playing the lottery, the community’s planning for the future and the individual’s dreams about his or her own future had come into conflict. A proposed solution to this was to let the lottery finance the general pension insurance. The contradictions between backwardness and progress, individualism and collectivism or hedonistic dreaming and rational calculations were not solved, but this article suggests that these notions may not have been as incompatible in practice as in theory.

  • 23.
    Husz, Orsi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Privatekonomin och den borgerliga medelklassens identitetskris 1920-19702007In: Fronesis, ISSN 1404-2614, no 24, p. 116-130Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Husz, Orsi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Puderdosan, syetuiet och den nya kvinnan2014In: Fråga föremålen / [ed] Anna Maria Forssberg & Karin Sennefelt, Studentlitteratur, 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Husz, Orsi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Quotidien doré : consommation des ménagères et domestication des banques dans la Suède des années 19602015In: Le Mouvement social, ISSN 0027-2671, E-ISSN 1961-8646, Vol. 250, no 1, p. 41-63Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Husz, Orsi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Spara, Slösa och alla de andra2009In: Signums Svenska Kulturhistoria. 1900-talet / [ed] Jakob Christensson, Stockholm: Signum/Atlantis , 2009, p. 279-330Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Husz, Orsi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    The entrepreneur’s dream. Credit card history between PR and academic research2020In: Histories of Knowledge in Postwar Scandinavia:: Actors, Arenas and Ambitions, / [ed] Johan Östling, David Larsson Heidenblad & Niklas Olsen, Routledge, 2020Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Husz, Orsi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    The morality of quality: assimilating material mass culture in twentieth-century Sweden2012In: Journal of Modern European History, ISSN 1611-8944, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 152-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses perceptions of material mass culture in twentieth century Sweden through the lens of the concept of “quality”. It aims to shed light on how the concept of quality emerged in connection with mass culture and mass consumerism in Swedish public debates and writings and how it was used, defined and redefined between the seemingly opposite poles of feelings/subjectivity and reason/objectivity. By analysing the ways in which quality was positioned historically within the complex web of relations woven between the individual, the society and the commodity, I will show how and why it is to be seen as a key term in the attempts of shaping mass consumerism within the framework of the emerging Swedish welfare state. During this process, the concepts of quality and quantity were repeatedly reconciled - in different ways; this is exemplified by two mass-medial debates on material mass culture taking place in the 1930s and in the 1960s.

  • 29.
    Husz, Orsi
    Stockholms universitet.
    Varuhuset NK och det moderna samhället: Inte ett hus utan en värld1999In: Tvärsnitt : humanistisk och samhällsvetenskaplig forskning, ISSN 0348-7997, no 2, p. 16-31Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Husz, Orsi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Även för hundra år sedan mätte vi tillvaron i pengar2011In: Tvärsnitt : humanistisk och samhällsvetenskaplig forskning, ISSN 0348-7997, no 1, p. 6-10Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Husz, Orsi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Arnberg, Klara
    Stockholms universitet.
    From the great department store with love: window display and the transfer of commercial knowledge in early twentieth-century Sweden2018In: History of Retailing and Consumption, ISSN 2373-518X, E-ISSN 2373-5171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article highlights the transfers and practical uses of the commercial knowledge of window dressing in early twentieth-century Sweden through the analysis of the professional career and family business of Oscar Lundkvist, Swedish display pioneer and former window dresser in chief of the largest and first Swedish department store, Nordiska Kompaniet. Building on rich source material including unique written and photographic documents from the Lundkvist family, educational material and trade journals, we show how the innovative and spectacular became ordinary and mundane in retail praxis. We argue that the emergence and professionalization of window display brought with it the dissemination and trivialization of the same practice. By focusing on not only the most conspicuous aspects and cultural meanings of window displays but also on the materials and competences involved, we explain how setting up the displays became an everyday commercial practice and how it was positioned between advertising and retail as well as between the artistic and the commercial.

  • 32.
    Husz, Orsi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Carlsson, Karin
    Stockholms universitet.
    Kökskunskap: Det svenska köket mellan socialt ingenjörskap och global kommersialism2018In: Köket: rum för drömmar, ideal och vardagsliv under det långa 1900-talet / [ed] Lee, Jenny & Torell, Ulrika, Nordiska museets förlag, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Husz, Orsi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Carlsson, Karin
    Marketing a New Society or Engineering Kitchens?: The Swedish Consumer Agency and IKEA in the 1970s2018In: "Consumer Engineering”::  Marketing between Planning Euphoria and the Limits of Growth, 1930s-1970s / [ed] Gary Cross, Ingo Köhler, and Jan Logemann, Palgrave Macmillan, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Husz, Orsi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Forsell, Håkan
    Hermodseleven och den svenska idén om framgång2020In: Historiska typer / [ed] Leif Runefelt, Peter Josephsson, Gidlunds förlag, 2020Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Husz, Orsi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Glover, Nikolas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Between human capital and human worth: Popular valuations of knowledge in 20th-century Sweden2019In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 484-509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study concerns the history of Swedish public everyday discourse about knowledge and its benefits for the individual, c. 1920–1974. We examine the value(s) ascribed to knowledge – in economic and/or idealistic terms – using private correspondence institutes as our point of departure. These were immensely popular, yet have hitherto been overlooked by historians. First, we argue that commercially driven correspondence education, which was a mass phenomenon in early and mid-20th-century Sweden, blurred the demarcation lines between general and vocational education, and more importantly between formal and so-called popular education (folkbildning). Second, we examine how knowledge and education were promoted and justified in the widely circulated advertisements for Hermods Korrespondensinstitut, the largest of the Swedish correspondence schools. By analysing and contextualizing advertisements over six decades, we find a strong dominance of individualistic economic valuations from the beginning, a successive increase in idealistic valuations over the decades, and an increasing amalgamation of idealistic and economic justifications for knowledge. We argue that the extensive scale of Hermods’ and similar institutes’ educational activities offers an important key for understanding the social context in which the overall marketization and capitalization of knowledge in the latest decades was able to take root.

  • 36.
    Husz, Orsi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Lagerkvist, Amanda
    Södertörns högskola.
    Konsumtionens motsägelser: En inledning2001In: Förbjudna njutningar: Spår från konsumtionskulturens historia i Sverige / [ed] Aléx, Peder och Söderberg, Johan, Stockholm: Stockholm : Ekonomisk-historiska institutionen, Univ., :Print on demand http://www.podium.nu , 2001Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Husz, Orsi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Sjöblom, Alf
    Historiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet.
    Qualifying the life insurance agent: uncertain values and intertwined processes of economization in early twentieth century Sweden2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Husz, Orsi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Wallenberg Bondesson, MariaStockholms universitet.Tydén, MattiasLinköpings universitet.Myrdal, JankenSLU.
    Människans kunskap och kunskapen om människan: En gränslös historia2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
1 - 38 of 38
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