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  • 1.
    Bajic, Dragan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Canto Moreira, Nuno
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Asymmetric Development of the Hippocampal Region Is Common: A Fetal MR Imaging Study2012In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, ISSN 0195-6108, E-ISSN 1936-959X, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 513-518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Hippocampal development is poorly understood. This study evaluated the normal development of the hippocampal region during the fetal period by using MR imaging.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: MR images of 63 fetuses without intracranial pathology were reviewed independently by 2 radiologists with no knowledge of the fetal GA. Three MR images were performed postmortem and 60 in vivo. The progress of hippocampal inversion was analyzed in coronal sections, and the left and right sides of the hippocampal region were compared in every case.

    RESULTS: The fetuses in the postmortem examinations were at GWs 17-18 and in the in vivo examinations, at GWs 19-36. The hippocampal sulcus was open, bi- or unilaterally, in 39 fetuses. The oldest was at GW 32. The sulcus was closed at GW 21 at the earliest, unilaterally. In 26/63 fetuses (41%), the deepening or closure of the hippocampal sulcus or hippocampal inversion was asymmetric; in 23 fetuses, the right side developed faster. A shallow collateral sulcus was found earliest at GW 17. A deep collateral sulcus was visible earliest at GW 26 unilaterally, but in all fetuses from GW 31 onward, it was seen bilaterally. The orientation of the collateral sulcus was not related to the GA.

    CONCLUSIONS: There are wide individual temporal variations in the development and the inversion process of the hippocampal sulcus as well as in the formation of the collateral sulcus. Asymmetric development is common, and in most of the asymmetric cases, the right hippocampus develops faster.

  • 2.
    Bajic, Dragan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Canto Moreira, Nuno
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Development of the hippocampal region demonstrated on fetal MRI: A preliminary report2011In: NRJ Digital, ISSN 2239-7493, Vol. 1, no 12, p. 555-557Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coronal slices of three fetal MRIs performed post mortem and 37 performed in utero, all without intracranial pathology, was assessed. Progress of the hippocampal inversion was analyzed, the left and right sides were compared and occurrence of the collateral sulcus was revealed. The fetuses in the post mortem examinations were at gestation weeks (GW) 17-18 and in the in utero examinations at GW 19-35. The symmetric development of the hippocampal sulcus was revealed in 26 subjects and asymmetric in 14. The non-ovoid hippocampal formation could be evaluated at GW 24 at earliest and an ovoid hippocampus at GW 29. The collateral sulcus could be recognized at GW 17 in post mortem and at GW 22 in in utero examinations. From GW 29 onwards it was seen in all fetuses and it was symmetric in all but one case. Evaluation of the hippocampi is difficult on fetal MRI, especially in in utero examinations. The hippocampal development is not fulfilled at GW 21 as presumed. There is a wide temporal variation in the development of the hippocampal region, and the developmental process does not progress simultaneously in the right and left side of the same individual.

  • 3.
    Bajic, Dragan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Canto Moreira, Nuno
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Hippocampal development demonstrated by fetal MRI. Asymmetric development is common.2011In: Insights into Imaging, Vol. 2, no Suppl 1, p. B-831-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Canto Moreira, Nuno
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Nylander, Ruta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Briaukaite, Inesa
    Velyvyte, Severina
    Gleizniene, Rymante
    Monastyreckiene, Egle
    Superficial Siderosis: A Case Report2011In: Medicina (Kaunas), ISSN 1010-660X, E-ISSN 1648-9144, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 320-322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Superficial siderosis of the central nervous system is the result of chronic recurrent hemorrhages (e.g., arteriovenous malformations, tumors, or trauma), which leads to the accumulation of cytotoxic hemosiderin and presents with hearing loss, cerebellar dysfunction, and myelopathy. This article presents a clinical case of an 11-year-old boy in whom the diagnosis of medulloblastoma was established. He underwent surgery, and after a few years, he began to complain of hearing loss. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the cause of the hearing disturbance. The aim of this article is to review the recent literature related to the etiology, clinical and radiologic features of superficial siderosis, emphasizing the role of magnetic resonance imaging.

  • 5.
    Canto Moreira, Nuno
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Ribeiro, Valentina
    Teixeira, João
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wikstrom, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Visualization of the Fetal Lip and Palate: Is Brain-Targeted MRI Reliable?2013In: The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal, ISSN 1055-6656, E-ISSN 1545-1569, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 513-519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective : 

    To evaluate the ability of brain-targeted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess the anatomy of the fetal upper lip and palate.

    Design : 

    Two independent readers made a blind retrospective review of 60 brain-targeted MRIs of fetuses from 20 to 38 gestational weeks (GW). Fifty-five MRIs were normal and five had orofacial anomalies, including one isolated cleft lip and four cleft lip and palate. Both normal and cleft MRIs had postnatal confirmation. The upper lip, primary palate, secondary palate, and nasal septum were scored into four levels, from evidently normal to evidently abnormal. In case of a suspected pathology, the readers attempted a diagnosis.

    Setting :

    Collaboration between a university hospital and a large private practice MRI center.

    Results : 

    Interobserver agreement (weighted kappa) was 0.79 for the upper lip, 0.70 for the primary palate, 0.86 for the secondary palate, and 0.90 for the nasal septum. The scoring levels of the readers did not change significantly across gestational age. Normality was correctly scored in 96% to 100% of the normal lips and primary palates and in 93% to 97% of the normal secondary palates depending on the reader. A deviated septum was only scored in two fetuses with unilateral cleft palates. The readers identified all pathological cases.

    Conclusion :

    Brain-targeted fetal MRI in experienced hands seems to be highly accurate for the evaluation of the lip and palate in fetuses above 20 GW, regardless of gestational age. The assessment of the secondary palate may be slightly more limited than the lip or primary palate.

  • 6.
    Canto Moreira, Nuno
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Ribeiro, Valentina
    Hospital S. Antonio, Porto, Portugal.
    Teixeira, João
    Hospital S. Antonio, Porto, Portugal.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Visualisation of the fetal lip and palate: is brain-targeted MRI reliable?2011In: Neurology, ISSN 0028-3878, E-ISSN 1526-632XArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the ability of brain-targeted MRI to assess the anatomy of the fetal upper lip and palate.

     

    Methods: Two independent readers made a blind retrospective review of 60 MRI of fetuses of 20 to 38 gestational weeks (GW). Fifty-five fetuses had normal post-natal follow-up.  Five fetuses had oro-facial anomalies at post-natal follow-up, including five cleft lips (two bilateral, three unilateral), four cleft primary palates (two bilateral, two unilateral) and two cleft secondary palates.

    The upper lip, primary palate, secondary palate and nasal septum were scored into four levels, from evidently normal to evidently abnormal. In case of a suspected pathology, the readers attempted a diagnosis.

     

    Results: Interobserver agreement (weighted kappa) was 0.79 for the upper lip, 0.70 for the primary palate, 0.86 for the secondary palate, and 0.90 for the nasal septum. The scoring levels of the readers did not change significantly across gestational age.

    The readers identified 100% of all pathological cases. The normality was correctly scored in 96-100% of the normal lips and primary palates and in 93-97% of the normal secondary palates depending on the reader. A deviated septum was only scored in two fetuses with unilateral cleft palates.

     

    Conclusion:  MRI in experienced hands seems reliable for assessment of the fetal lip and palate, even in brain-targeted examinations. Attention should therefore be paid to the lip and palate in all fetal MRI examinations, since unsuspected clefts may be revealed.

     

     

  • 7.
    Canto Moreira, Nuno
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Teixeira, J.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    The ear in fetal MRI: What can we really see?2011In: Neuroradiology, ISSN 0028-3940, E-ISSN 1432-1920, Vol. 53, no Suppl 1, p. S23-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Canto Moreira, Nuno
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Teixeira, João
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    The ear in fetal MRI: what can we really see?2011In: Neuroradiology, ISSN 0028-3940, E-ISSN 1432-1920, Vol. 53, no 12, p. 1001-1008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to investigate the ability to depict the components of the ear on brain-oriented fetal MRI studies.

    METHODS: Retrospective evaluation of the ear in MRI studies was performed post-mortem in 16 fetuses ranging from 15 to 22 gestation weeks (GW), and in 122 examinations in vivo of fetuses ranging from 20 to 38 GW. The cochlea, vestibular apparatus, middle ear, and external auditory canal were separately graded according to the components that were delineated.

    RESULTS: The components of the inner and middle ear were fully delineated in 100% of the post-mortem examinations, but the external auditory canals were only seen in only 25%. In the in vivo group, the imaging detail was much lower. Cochlear turns could be identified in 75% of the fetuses, the vestibule and the lateral semicircular canals in 72% andossicles in 70%. Before 25 GW, the ability to identify these individual parts was 50%, 30%, and 33%, respectively, and above it was 89%, 93%, and 90% . In most cases, the external auditory canals could only be seen after 29 GW.

    CONCLUSION: In fetal MRI studies in vivo, it is possible to depict the components of the ear in the majority of the fetuses, in such a manner as to exclude major malformations. However, MRI might not provide enough detail to rule out pathology of the ear before 25 GW, this being a critical age for pregnancy management in many countries.

  • 9.
    Canto Moreira, Nuno
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Teixeira, João
    Department of Neuroradiology, H. G. S. Antonio, Porto, Portugal.
    Themudo, Raquel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Amini, Hashem
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Axelsson, Ove
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Measurements of the normal fetal brain at gestation weeks 17 to 23: a MRI study2011In: Neuroradiology, ISSN 0028-3940, E-ISSN 1432-1920, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 43-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: To obtain measurements of the normal fetal brain before 24 weeks of gestation (GW), a deadline for medical decisions on fetal viability in a large number of countries. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 70 normal MR examinations of fetuses aged GW 17 to 23. The fronto-occipital diameter, the cerebral bi-parietal diameter, the transverse cerebellar diameter, the vermian height, and antero-posterior diameter were measured. RESULTS: The median, maximum, and minimum values for each parameter were displayed for each individual GW. CONCLUSION: The recorded data might contribute to a better assessment of fetal health by providing normal boundaries for the brain growth.

  • 10.
    Danfors, Torsten
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    Velickaite, Vilma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Canto Moreira, Nuno
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    The role of methionine positron emission tomography in the evaluation of central nervous system tumors in children2016In: Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, ISSN 0271-678X, E-ISSN 1559-7016, Vol. 36, no Suppl. 1, p. 394-395, article id 538Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Ehrstedt, Christoffer
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Neuropediatrics/Paediatric oncology.
    Canto Moreira, Nuno
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Casar Borota, Olivera
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Strömberg, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Neuropediatrics/Paediatric oncology.
    Ahlsten, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Neuropediatrics/Paediatric oncology.
    Glioneuronal tumors in childhood - Before and after surgery. A long-term follow-up study2017In: Epilepsy & Behavior, ISSN 1525-5050, E-ISSN 1525-5069, Vol. 72, p. 82-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To give a detailed description of the long-term outcome of a cohort of children with glioneuronal tumors regarding pre-and postsurgical factors, including "dual" and "double" pathology, seizure freedom, and psychosocial outcome.

    Methods: During a fifteen-year period (1995-2009), all patients (age 0-17.99 years) with a glioneuronal brain tumor diagnosed and treated at Uppsala University Children's Hospital were identified from the National Brain Tumor Registry and the National Epilepsy Surgery Registry. Hospital medical records were reviewed and neuroradiological and neuropathological findings were re-evaluated. A cross-sectional long-term follow-up prospective evaluation, including an interview, neurologic examination, and electroencephalogram, was accomplished in patients accepting participants in the study.

    Results: A total of 25 out of 28 (89%) eligible patientswere included. The M: F ratiowas 1.5: 1. Mean follow-up time after surgery was 12.1 years (range 5.0-19.3). Twenty patients were adults (N18 years) at follow-up. Seizure freedomwas achieved in 64%. Gross total resection (GTR) was the only preoperative factor significantly correlating to seizure freedom (p= 0.027). Thirty-eight percent were at some time postoperatively admitted for a psychiatric evaluation. There was a trend towards both higher educational level and employment status in adults who became seizure free.

    Conclusion: Long-termoutcome is good regarding seizure freedom if GTR can be achieved, but late seizure recurrence can occur. "Dual" and "double" pathology is uncommon and does not influence seizure outcome. Obtaining seizure freedomseems to be important for psychosocial outcome, but there is a risk for psychiatric comorbidities and long-term follow-up by a multi-professional team is advisable.

  • 12.
    Fragata, Isabel
    et al.
    Ctr Hosp Lisboa Cent, Dept Neuroradiol, Rua Jose Antonio Serrano, P-1150099 Lisbon, Portugal..
    Alves, Marta
    Ctr Hosp Lisboa Cent, Ctr Invest, Lisbon, Portugal..
    Papoila, Ana Lusia
    Ctr Hosp Lisboa Cent, Ctr Invest, Lisbon, Portugal.;Ctr Hosp Lisboa Cent, Unidade Cerebrovasc, Lisbon, Portugal.;NOVA Med Sch, Fac Ciencias Med, Lisbon, Portugal..
    Nunes, Ana Paiva
    Ferreira, Patricia
    Ctr Hosp Lisboa Cent, Unidade Cerebrovasc, Lisbon, Portugal..
    Canto-Moreira, Nuno
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Canhao, Patricia
    Ctr Hosp Lisboa Norte, Dept Neurol, Lisbon, Portugal.;Univ Lisbon, Fac Med, Inst Med Mol, Lisbon, Portugal..
    Early Prediction of Delayed Ischemia and Functional Outcome in Acute Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Role of Diffusion Tensor Imaging2017In: Stroke, ISSN 0039-2499, E-ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 48, no 8, p. 2091-2097Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Purpose-Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters are markers of cerebral lesion in some diseases. In patients with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), we investigated whether DTI parameters measured at < 72 hours might be associated with delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and with poor functional outcome at 3 months (modified Rankin Scale score =3).

    Methods-DTI was performed in a prospective cohort of 60 patients with nontraumatic SAH at < 72 hours. Association of fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient values at < 72 hours with the occurrence of DCI and outcome at 3 months was evaluated with logistic regression models, adjusting for known predictors of prognosis.

    Results-At < 72 hours after SAH, fractional anisotropy values at the cerebellum were associated with DCI occurrence (78% less odds of DCI for each 0.1 increase in fractional anisotropy; P=0.019). Early apparent diffusion coefficient values were not associated with DCI. After adjusting for confounding variables, an increase of 10 U in apparent diffusion coefficient at the frontal centrum semiovale corresponded to 15% increased odds of poor outcome (P=0.061).

    Conclusions-DTI parameters at < 72 hours post-SAH are independently associated with the occurrence of DCI and functional outcome. These preliminary results suggest the role of DTI parameters as surrogate markers of prognosis in nontraumatic SAH.

  • 13. Fragata, Isabel
    et al.
    Canhão, Patrícia
    Alves, Marta
    Papoila, Ana Luísa
    Canto Moreira, Nuno
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Evolution of diffusion tensor imaging parameters after acute subarachnoid haemorrhage: a prospective cohort study2017In: Neuroradiology, ISSN 0028-3940, E-ISSN 1432-1920, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 13-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Few studies assessed diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) changes in the acute phase of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). We prospectively evaluated DTI parameters in the acute phase of SAH and 8-10 days after and analysed whether changes could be related to SAH severity or to the development of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI).

    METHODS: Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) changes over time were assessed in a prospective cohort of patients with acute SAH. Two MRI studies were performed at <72 h (MRI-1) and 8-10 days (MRI-2). DTI parameters were recorded in 15 ROIs. Linear mixed regression models were used.

    RESULTS: Forty-two patients were included. Subtle changes in DTI parameters were found between MRI-1 and MRI-2. At the posterior limb of internal capsule (PLIC), a weak evidence of a 0.02 mean increase in FA (p = 0.064) and a 17.55 × 10(-6) mm(2)/s decrease in ADC (p = 0.052) were found in MRI-2. Both FA and ADC changed over time at the cerebellum (increase of 0.03; p = 0.017; decrease of 34.73 × 10(-6) mm(2)/s; p = 0.002, respectively). Patients with DCI had lower FA values on MRI-1 and lower ADC on MRI-2, although not reaching statistical significance, compared to non-DCI patients. DTI parameters on MRI-1 were not correlated to clinical admission scales.

    CONCLUSION: ADC and FA values show subtle changes over time in acute SAH at the PLIC and cerebellum although not statistically associated with the severity of SAH or the occurrence of DCI. However, DTI changes occurred mainly in DCI patients, suggesting a possible role of DTI as a marker of DCI.

  • 14.
    Naseh, Nima
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Gonzalez, Karla Elizabeth Tamez
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Uppsala Univ, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Vaz, T.
    Univ Lisbon, Fac Sci, Inst Biophys & Biomed Engn, Lisbon, Portugal..
    Ferreira, H.
    Univ Lisbon, Fac Sci, Inst Biophys & Biomed Engn, Lisbon, Portugal..
    Kaul, Ylva Fredriksson
    Johansson, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ågren, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Canto Moreira, Nuno
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Karolinska Hosp, Solna, Sweden..
    Hellström-Westas, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Early Hyperglycemia And Brain MRI Findings In Very Preterm Infants2017In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 106, no SI 469, p. 16-16Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: A previous study in extremely preterm infants demonstrated an association between hyperglycemia >8.3 mmol/l (150 mg/dl) on the first day of life and white matter reduction. The objectives of the present study were to further investigate possible associations between hyperglycemia and abnormal brain development and to evaluate the effect of hyperglycemia on neurodevelopment.

    Method: Retrospective study of cerebral MRIs performed at term equivalent age in 75 very preterm infants (GA 22–31 weeks) born 2011–2015. The highest glucose values for each day, and the number of days with glucose >8.3 mmol/l during the first week of life were analyzed in relation to clinical data and MRI (1.5 T). The MRI evaluation included: visual scoring of gray and white matter abnormalities; measurement of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in periventricular white matter, basal ganglia and pons, and a newly developed method for semi-automatic segmentation of brain volumes. MRI data were analyzed without knowledge of clinical data. No infant had IVH grade 3–4. No infant received insulin. Follow up at 2.5 years of corrected age is ongoing; data including Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID-III) was available in 45 infants.

    Results: Clinical data are shown in the table. Significant (p < 0.05) univariate correlations were found between GA, BW, days on mechanical ventilation, highest blood glucose levels on days 2–5 and number of days with glucose >8.3 mmol/l, PVL and white matter volume. Days with glucose >8.3 mmol/l correlated independently with reduced white matter volume (p = 0.045), but not GA and days on mechanical ventilation. When BW was included in the analysis, days with glucose >8.3 mmol/l reached borderline significance (p = 0.068), but no other factor reached significance. For PVL, days of mechanical ventilation was the only independently associated factor (p = 0.012). In the 45 infants with follow up, only days with glucose >8.3 mmol/l was independently associated with a lower motor index on BSID-III.

    Conclusion: Prolonged duration of high blood glucose >8.3 mmol/l during the first week of life in very preterm infants is associated with reduced white matter volume and may also be associated with poorer motor performance at 2.5 years.

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