uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 40 of 40
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Aspers, Patrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Corte, Ugo
    What is Qualitative in Qualitative Social Science?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Burns, Tom R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Corte, Ugo
    Kamali, Masoud
    L’evoluzione dei parlamenti. Panorama storico-comparativo delle assemblee parlamentari e dei processi di decisione politica2001In: Storia d’ Italia: Il Parlamento / [ed] Luciano Violante, Einaudi, 2001, p. 1261-1289Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Burns, Tom R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. CIES ISCTE, Lisbon Univ Inst, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Machado des Johansson, Nora
    Lisbon University Institute.;CIES-ISCTE, Lisbon, Portugal.;Department of Sociology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The sociology of creativity: PART III: Applications – The socio-cultural contexts of the acceptance/rejection of innovations2016In: Human Systems Management, ISSN 0167-2533, E-ISSN 1875-8703, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 11-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The three-part article of which this one is Part III is predicated on the principle that creativity is a universal activity, essential in an evolutionary perspective to adaptation and sustainability. This work on the sociology of creativity has three purposes: (1) to develop the argument that key factors in creative activity are socially based and developed; hence, sociology can contribute significantly to understanding and explaining human creativity; (2) to present a systems approach which enables us to link in a systematic and coherent way the disparate social factors and mechanisms that are involved in creative activity and to describe and explain creativity; (3) to illustrate a sociological systems theory's (Actor-Systems-Dynamics) conceptualization of multiple interrelated institutional, cultural, and interaction factors and mechanisms - and their role in creativity and innovative developments in diverse empirical cases. Part I of this article introduced and applied a general model of innovation and creative development stressing the sociocultural and political embeddedness of agents, either as individuals or groups, in their creative activities and innovative productions. Part II investigated the ldquocontext of innovation and discoveryrdquo considering a wide range of applications and illustrations. This 3rd segment, Part III, specifies and analyzes the ldquocontext of receptivity and institutionalizationrdquo where innovations and creative developments are socially accepted, legitimized, and institutionalized or rejected and suppressed. A number of cases and illustrations are considered. Power considerations are part and parcel of these analyses, for instance the role of the state as well as powerful private interests and social movements in facilitating and/or constraining innovations and creative developments in society. In the perspective presented here, generally speaking, creativity can be consistently and systematically considered to a great extent as social, cultural, institutional and material as much as psychological or biological.

  • 4.
    Burns, Tom R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Machado, Nora
    Lisbon University Institute.; CIES-ISCTE, Lisbon, Portugal.; Sociologiska Institutionen, University of Göteborg.
    The Sociology of Creativity: Part II: Applications: the socio-cultural conditions of the production of novelty2015In: Human Systems Management, ISSN 0167-2533, E-ISSN 1875-8703, Vol. 34, p. 263-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is Part II of a three-part article. The article is predicated on the principle that creativity is a universal activity, essential in an evolutionary perspective, to adaptation and sustainability. This manuscript on the sociology of creativity has three purposes: (1) to develop the argument that key factors in creative activity are socially based and developed; hence, sociology can contribute significantly to understanding and explaining human creativity; (2) to present a systems approach which enables us to link in a systematic and coherent way the disparate social factors and mechanisms that are involved in creative activity and to describe and explain creativity; (3) to illustrate sociological systems theory’s (Actor-Systems-Dynamics) conceptualization of multiple interrelated institutional, cultural, and interaction factors and mechanisms and their role in creativity and innovative developments in diverse empirical instances.

    The preceding segment of this article, Part I, introduced a general model of innovation and creative development stressing the socio-cultural and political embeddedness of agents, either as individuals or groups, in their creative activities and innovative productions.

    This second part, Part II, investigates the “context of innovation and discovery” considering applications and illustrations ranging from, for instance: (i) “the independent innovator or entrepreneur” who exercises creativity based on absorbing a field of knowledge, concepts, challenges, problems, solution strategies, creativity production functions or programs (and who is likely to be in contact with libraries, relevant journals and may be directly or indirectly in contact with a network of others); (ii) groups in their particular fields operating greenhouse types of organization driving problem-solving and creative activities – both self-organizing groups as well as groups established by external powers (whether a private company, a government, or a non-government organization or movement); (iii) entire societies undergoing transformations and radical development as in the industrial and later revolutions. Part III of this article investigates and analyzes “the context of receptivity, selection, and institutionalization” of novelty.

  • 5.
    Burns, Tom R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Machado des Johansson, Nora
    Lisbon University Institute, Lisbon, Portugal.;.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Toward a Universal Theory of the Human Group: Sociological Systems Framework applied to the Comparative Analysis of Groups and Organizations2015In: Outlooks and Insights on Group Decision and Negotiation / [ed] Kamiński, Bogumił; Kersten, Gregory; Szapiro, Tomasz, Warsaw: Warsaw School of Economics Press , 2015, p. 87-98Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Burns, Tom R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Machado, Nora
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    The Sociology of Creativity: Part I: Theory: The Social Mechanisms of Innovation and Creative Developments in Selectivity Environments2015In: Human Systems Management, ISSN 0167-2533, E-ISSN 1875-8703, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 179-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Creativity is a universal activity, essential in an evolutionary perspective, to adaptation and sustainability. This first part of a three part article on the sociology of creativity has three purposes: (1) to develop the argument that key factors in creative activity are socially based and developed; hence, sociology can contribute significantly to understanding and explaining human creativity; (2) to present a sociological systems approach which enables us to link in a systematic and coherent way the disparate social factors and mechanisms that are involved in creative activity and to describe and explain creativity; and (3) to illustrate a sociological systems theory’s conceptualization of multiple interrelated institutional, cultural, and interaction factors and their role in creativity and innovative development in diverse empirical instances.

    The article introduces and applies a model stressing the social embeddedness of innovative agents and entrepreneurs, either as individuals or groups, as they manipulate symbols, rules, technologies, and materials that are socially derived and developed. Their motivation for doing what they do derives in part from their social roles and positions, in part in response to the incentives and opportunities – many socially constructed – shaping their interaction situations and domains. Their capabilities including their social powers derive from the culturally and institutional frameworks in which they are embedded. In carrying out their actions, agents mobilize resources including technologies through the institutions and networks in which they participate. Following this theoretical part, Parts II and III focus on the concrete conditions and mechanisms characteristic of the “context of innovation” and the “context of receptivity and institutionalization”, respectively. 

  • 7.
    Burns, Tom R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Machado, Nora
    Lisbon University Institute-CIES, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Toward a Universal Theory of the Human Group: Applied in the Comparative Analysis of Groups and Organizations2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A group is conceptualized as a system with three universal subsystems on which any ongoing group depends. The subsystems are bases – necessary for group “functioning” and performance in more or less coherent ways; a group may be able to realize – with its bases in particular contexts -- not only its purposes or goals but system requisites to sustain the group. The group bases consist of: (1) a rule regime (collective culture with a finite set of rule categories) defining group identity and purpose, defining and regulating roles and role relationships, norms and behavioral outputs, its collectively shared places and times for gathering and interacting; (2) an agential base of group members who are socialized (or partially socialized) carriers of and adherents to the group’s identity and rule regime; involvement factors motivate members to adhere to and implement the rule regime; (3) a resource base, technologies and materials, self-produced and/or obtained from the environment -- essential to group functioning and group performances. Group multiple production processes (based on sub-complexes in its rule regime) impact on the group itself (reflexivity) and on its environment. These outputs, among other things, maintain-adapt-develop the group bases (or, possibly, unintentionally undermine/destroy them). Thus, groups are action systems producing goods-services-experiences-events- developments, etc. for themselves and (possibly) for the larger environment on which they depend for goods&services- resources-recruits-legitimation, etc. The model provides a single framework for the systematic descriptions and comparative analysis of a wide diversity of groups, several of which serve as illustrations in the paper.

  • 8.
    Burns, Tom R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Lisbon University Institute, Portugal.
    Machado, Nora
    CIES, Lisbon University Institute, Portugal.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. uppsala university.
    Toward a Universal Theory of the Human Group: Sociological Systems Framework for the Comparative Analysis of Groups and OrganizationsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on a sociological multi-level, dynamic systems approach – actor-system-dynamics (ASD) -- which has been developed and applied in institutional, organizational, and societal analyses, we formulate a general model for the comparative analysis of social groups and organizations. This social systems approach has not been previously applied in the group area. We claim that the approach can be systematically and fruitfully applied to small as well as large groups and organizations as a methodology to understand and analyze their structure, functioning and dynamics.

    A group is considered a system with three universal subsystems on which any human social organization, including small groups, depends and which motivate, shape and regulate group activities and productions. The subsystems  are bases or group  requisites  – necessary for group “functioning” and performance in more or less orderly or coherent ways; on this basis a group may be able to  realize its purposes or goals(as well as possibly some members’ personal goals) and maintain and reproduce the group. The group bases consist of: first, a rule regime (collective culture)defining group identity and purpose, shaping and regulating roles and role relationships, normative patterns and behavioral outputs;  second, an agential base of group members who are  socialized or partially socialized carriers of and adherents to the group’s identity and rule regime; of relevance here are involvement/participation factors motivating member to adhere to, accept, and implement key components of the rule regime; third, there is a resource base, technologies and materials, self-produced and/or obtained from the environment, which are essential to group functioning and  key group performances.

    Section I briefly presents the framework and outlines the group systems model, characterized by its three universal bases or subsystems and its finite universal production functions and their outputs as well as the particular context(s) in which groups function. For illustrative purposes, the section identifies three major ideal-type modalities of group formation: informal self-organization by agents, group construction by external agents, and group formation through more or less formal multi-agent negotiation.

    The general systems model presented in Section II characterizes a social group not only by its three universal bases but by its finite universal production functions (elaborated in Section IV) and its outputs as well as by its shared places (situations for interaction) and times for gathering and interacting. Group productions impact on the group itself (reflexivity) and on its environment. These outputs, among other things, maintain/adapt/develop the  group bases (or possibly unintentionally undermine/destroy them) Thus, groups can be understood as action and interaction systems producing goods, services, incidents and events, experiences, developments, etc. for themselves and possibly for the larger environment on which they depend for resources, recruits, goods and services, and legitimation. The model provides a single perspective for the systematic description and comparative analysis of a wide diversity of groups (Sections III and IV).

    A major distinctive feature in our systems approach is the conceptualization of rules and rule regimes (Sections II, III, IV, and V). Finite universal rule categories (ten distinct categories) are specified; they characterize every functioning social group or organization. A rule regime, while an abstraction is carried, applied, adapted, and transformed by concrete human agents, who interact, exchange, exercise power, and struggle within the group, in large part based on the rule regime which they maintain and adapt as well as transform.

                    The paper emphasizes not only the systemic character of all functioning groups – universally their three bases and their output functions together with feedback dynamics -- but also the differentiating character of any given group’s distinct rule configuration (Section IV). For illustrative purposes Section IV presents a selection of  rule configurations characterizing several ideal types of groups, a military unit, a terrorist group, a recreational or social group, a research group, a corporate entity Section V considers the dynamics of groups in terms of modification and transformation of group bases and their production functions. The group system model enables us to systematically identify and explicate the internal and external factors that drive group change and transformation, exposing the complex interdependencies and dynamic potentialities of group systems. Section VI sums up the work and points out its scope and limitations.

    The group systems model offers a number of promising contributions: (1) a universal systems model identifies the key subsystems and their interrelationships as well as their role in group production functions/outputs and performances; (2) the work conceptualizes and applies rules and rule complexes and their derivatives in roles, role relationships, norms, group procedures and production functions; (3) it identifies the universal categories of rules making up a rule regime, a major subsystem for any functioning group; (4) the model conceptualizes particular “group rule configurations” – rule regimes with specified rules in the universal rule categories—for any given group;  groups are identifiable and differentiable by their rule configurations (as well as by their resource and agency bases); (5) it conceptualizes the notion of the degree of coherence (alternatively, degree of incoherence) of rule configurations characteristic of any given group and offers an explanation of why group attention is focused on the coherence of rules in certain group areas; (6) the systems model suggests an interpretation of Erving Goffman’s “frontstage backstage” distinction in terms of alternative, differentiated rule regimes which are to a greater or lesser extent incoherent with respect to one another; moreover, the participants who are privy to the differentiation navigate using a shared rule complex to translate coherently and consistently from one regime to the other, using appropriate discourses; (7) incoherence, contradiction, conflict and struggle relating to rule regimes are considered part and parcel of group functioning and development; (8)group stability and change are explicated in terms of internal mechanisms (e.g., governance, innovation, and conflict) as well as external mechanisms (resource availability, legal and other institutional developments, population conditions), pointing up the complex systemic interdependencies and dynamic potentialities of group systems; (9) given the multi-level dynamic systems framework (i.e., ASD) that has been applied in a range of special areas (economic, political, technological, environmental, bio-medical, among others) its applicataion in the field of groups is a promising step toward achieving greater synthesis in sociology and social science. 

  • 9.
    Burns, Tom
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Roszkowska, Ewa
    University of Bialystok.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Machado, Nora
    Linking Group Theory to Social Science Game Theory: Interaction Grammars, Group Subcultures and Games for Comparative Analysis2017In: Social Sciences, Vol. 6, p. 1-36Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Burns, Tom
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Roszkowska, Ewa
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Machado, Nora
    SOCIAL SCIENCE APPROACHES TO REFORMULATING GAME THEORY: Models, Comparisons, and Implications of an Alternative Development2018Report (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Burns, Tom
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Roszkowska, Ewa
    University of Bialystok.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Machado, Nora
    Sociological Approaches to Game Theory: Goffman’s Interaction Theory and Social Science Game Theory – Models, Comparisons, and Implications.2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Burns, Tom
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Roszkowska, Ewa
    University of Bialystok.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Machado, Nora
    SOCIOLOGICAL GAME THEORY: AGENCY, SOCIAL STRUCTURES AND INTERACTION PROCESSES2018In: Optimum: Economic Studies, Vol. 79, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Burns, Tom
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Roszkowska, Ewa
    University of Bialystok.
    Machado, Nora
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    SOCIOLOGICAL APPROACHES TO REFORMULATING GAME THEORY: Norms, Roles, Institutions and Socio-cultural Formations in Cognitive Structuring and Action Determination Processe2018In: Social SciencesArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    A Refinement of Collaborative Circles Theory: Resource Mobilization and Innovation in an Emerging Sport2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    A Refinement of Collaborative Circles Theory: Resource Mobilization and Innovation in an Emerging Sport2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    A Refinement of Collaborative Circles Theory: Resource Mobilization and Innovation in an Extreme Sport2013In: Social psychology quarterly, ISSN 0190-2725, E-ISSN 1939-8999, Vol. 76, no 1, p. 25-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Farrell's (2001) theory of collaborative circles provides a useful frame for analyzing the interpersonal dynamics that enable creative collaboration in small groups, but it leaves contextual factors of collaboration undertheorized. Using ethnographic data on freestyle BMXers in Greenville, North Carolina, this article demonstrates how resource mobilization theory's conception of resources can specify the enabling and constraining aspects of a circle's environment in atheoretically satisfying way. Specifically, I find that the enabling interpersonal dynamics found by Farrell rely on distinct arrangements of material, moral, and what I term locational resources. During the formation stage, a welcoming skatepark and moral support from the local community afforded the group the space and time it needed to unite, articulate a common vision, and produce dramatic innovations in their sport. During the separation stage, increased resources from the commercialization of freestyle BMX influenced both the separation of the circle and the production of the scene that followed.

  • 17.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    A Refinement of the Theory of Collaborative Circles through the Introduction of the Concept of Resources2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    A Refinement of the Theory of Collaborative Circles through the Introduction of the Concept of Resources2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Blowin’Up: Rap Dreams in South Central2017In: Contemporary Sociology, ISSN 0094-3061, E-ISSN 1939-8638, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 451-453Article, book review (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Review of Blowin’ Up: Rap Dreams in South Central, by Jooyoung Lee. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2016.

  • 20.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    From Play to Sport: Internal and External Conditions of a Collaborative Circle among Extreme Sport Athletes2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    From Play to Sport: The Commodification of BMX Subculture2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Music and Politics: The Case of Racist Music2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Music and Social Movements: The Case of White Power Music2010In: / [ed] Organizer: Prof. Bert Klandermans, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Music matters to social movements and in a number of ways, but can we use it to advance our understanding of emotions and the body2013Other (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Pro Town USA and its Freestyle BMX Circle2013In: Social psychology quarterly, ISSN 0190-2725, E-ISSN 1939-8999, (Snaps)Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Pro-Town USA: The Building of a Lifestyle Sport Community2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Review: Blowin' Up: Rap Dreams in South Central2017In: Contemporary Sociology, ISSN 0094-3061, E-ISSN 1939-8638, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 451-453Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Subcultures and Small Groups: A Social Movement Theory Approach2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation uses social movement theory to analyze the emergence, activities and development of subcultures and small groups. The manuscript is comprised of an Introduction followed by three journal articles and one book chapter.  The introduction discusses: 1) the concept of theoretical extension whereby a theory developed for one purpose is adapted to another; 2) it identifies the social movement theories used to analyze subcultures and small groups; 3) it describes the data used in the analyses included here. The data for this work derives from two distinct research projects conducted by the author between 2002 and 2012 and relies on multiple sources of qualitative data. Data collection techniques used include fieldwork, archival research, and secondary data. Paper I uses resource mobilization (RM) theory to analyze the origin, development, and function of White Power music in relation to the broader White Power Movement (WPM). The research identifies three roles played by White Power music: (1) recruit new adherents, (2) frame issues and ideology for the construction of collective identity, (3) obtain financial resources. Paper II gives an overview of the subculture of Freestyle BMX, discussing its origins and developments—both internationally as a wider subcultural phenomenon, and locally, through a three-year ethnographic case study of a subcultural BMX scene known as “Pro Town USA.” Paper III conceptualizes BMX as a social movement using RM theory to identify and explain three different forms of commercialization within this lifestyle sport in “Pro Town.” The work sheds light on the complex process of commercialization within lifestyle sports by identifying three distinct forms of commercialization: paraphernalia, movement, and mass market, and analyses different impacts that each had on the on the development of the local scene.  Findings reveal that lifestyle-sport insiders actively collaborate in each form of commercialization, especially movement commercialization which has the potential to build alternative lifestyle-sport institutions and resist adverse commercial influences. Paper IV refines the small group theory of collaborative circles by: (1) further clarifying its concepts and relationships, (2) integrating the concepts of flow and idioculture, and (3) introducing a more nuanced concept of resources from RM. The paper concludes by demonstrating that circle development was aided by specific locational, human, moral, and material resources as well as by complementary social-psychological characteristics of its members. 

    List of papers
    1. White Power Music and the Mobilization of Racist Social Movements
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>White Power Music and the Mobilization of Racist Social Movements
    2008 (English)In: Music and Arts in Action, ISSN 1754-7105, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 4-20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    At the end of the 1970s a racist rock music movement known as White Power music emerged in Great Britain in connection with political parties of the extreme right and remains a vibrant force in racist social movements today. Throughout the 1990s, White Power music expanded significantly from its origins in a clandestine network of punk-inspired live shows and record promotions into a multi-million dollar, international enterprise of web-pages, radio stations and independent record labels promoting White Power musicians performing a wider range of musical genres. In this article, we view White Power music as a cultural resource created and produced by racist movements and used as a tool to further key movement goals.  Specifically, we examine White Power music’s role when used to 1) recruit new adherents, especially youth, 2) frame issues and ideology to cultivate a White Power collective identity, and 3) obtain financial resources. In doing so we rely upon in-depth interviews with White Power musicians and promoters as well as representatives of watchdog and monitoring organizations. Interviews were conducted by the lead author from 2002-2004 or accessed through transcripts of similar interviews made available by another researcher.  This research also relies upon an extensive examination of White Power music, lyrics, newsletters and websites. We conclude that White Power music continues to play a significant role in the mobilization of racist political and social movements by drawing in new youth, cultivating a racist collective identity, and generating substantial sums of money to finance a range of racist endeavours.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Exeter, UK: MAiA - Music and Arts in Action, Department of Sociology & Philosophy, The University of Exeter, 2008
    Keywords
    white power music, right-wing social movements, resource mobilization, youth recruitment, collective identity, issue framing, racism
    National Category
    Sociology
    Research subject
    Sociology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-131585 (URN)
    Projects
    Dissertation Project
    Available from: 2010-10-07 Created: 2010-10-05 Last updated: 2012-05-14Bibliographically approved
    2. From Greenville to "Pro Town, USA": The Mobilization and Commercialization of a Local Lifestyle Sport Scene
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>From Greenville to "Pro Town, USA": The Mobilization and Commercialization of a Local Lifestyle Sport Scene
    2009 (English)In: On the Edge: Leisure,Consumption and the Representation of Adventure Sportseditors, / [ed] Joan Ormrod & Belinda Wheaton, University of Brighton: Leisure Studies Association , 2009, p. 113-129Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    University of Brighton: Leisure Studies Association, 2009
    Keywords
    lifestyle sport, commericialition, scene, resource mobilization theory
    National Category
    Sociology
    Research subject
    Sociology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-132783 (URN)978-1905369157 (ISBN)
    Available from: 2010-10-26 Created: 2010-10-26 Last updated: 2012-05-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Commercialization and Lifestyle Sport: Lessons from Twenty Years of Freestyle BMX in ProTown, USA
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Commercialization and Lifestyle Sport: Lessons from Twenty Years of Freestyle BMX in ProTown, USA
    2010 (English)In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445, Vol. 13, no 7-8, p. 1135-1151Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Recent research on lifestyle sport and commercialization reveals a problematic and complex relationship. The analysis presented here examines the development and impact of commercialization on a unique and influential local BMX scene over a 20-year period. Three forms of commercialization - paraphernalia, movement and mass market - are identified and their varying influences on the mobilization and development of this lifestyle sport are analysed. Findings reveal that lifestyle-sport insiders actively collaborate in each form of commercialization, especially movement commercialization which has the potential to build alternative lifestyle-sport institutions and resist adverse commercial influences. This research conceptualizes freestyle BMX as a social movement within the resource-mobilization perspective and relies upon a combination of direct and participant observation recorded through field notes and augmented by 25 in-depth interviews. The combination of analytical tools and methodological approach can help shed further light on the complex dynamics of commercialization in lifestyle sports.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Abingdon: Taylor and Francis, 2010
    Keywords
    Lifestyle sports, commercialization, resource mobilization theory
    National Category
    Sociology
    Research subject
    Sociology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-132782 (URN)10.1080/17430431003780070 (DOI)
    Available from: 2010-10-26 Created: 2010-10-26 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    4. A Refinement of Collaborative Circles Theory: Resource Mobilization and Innovation in an Extreme Sport
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Refinement of Collaborative Circles Theory: Resource Mobilization and Innovation in an Extreme Sport
    2013 (English)In: Social psychology quarterly, ISSN 0190-2725, E-ISSN 1939-8999, Vol. 76, no 1, p. 25-51Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Farrell's (2001) theory of collaborative circles provides a useful frame for analyzing the interpersonal dynamics that enable creative collaboration in small groups, but it leaves contextual factors of collaboration undertheorized. Using ethnographic data on freestyle BMXers in Greenville, North Carolina, this article demonstrates how resource mobilization theory's conception of resources can specify the enabling and constraining aspects of a circle's environment in atheoretically satisfying way. Specifically, I find that the enabling interpersonal dynamics found by Farrell rely on distinct arrangements of material, moral, and what I term locational resources. During the formation stage, a welcoming skatepark and moral support from the local community afforded the group the space and time it needed to unite, articulate a common vision, and produce dramatic innovations in their sport. During the separation stage, increased resources from the commercialization of freestyle BMX influenced both the separation of the circle and the production of the scene that followed.

    Keywords
    collaboration, small groups, collaborative circles, social psychology, theoretical extension
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Research subject
    Sociology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-172983 (URN)10.1177/0190272512470147 (DOI)000317866400002 ()
    Projects
    Dissertation
    Available from: 2012-04-17 Created: 2012-04-17 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
  • 29.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Theory-Building: A Refinement of Collaborative Circles Theory through an Ethnographic Study of Pro-Town USA2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    White Power Music and Extreme Right Wing Politics2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    White Power Music and Racist Mobilization2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32. Corte, Ugo
    White Power Music and the Mobilization of Racist Social Movements2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Corte, Ugo
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Irwin, Katherine
    Univ Hawaii Manoa, Sociol, Honolulu, HI 96822 USA..
    The Form and Flow of Teaching Ethnographic Knowledge: Hands-on Approaches for Learning Epistemology2017In: Teaching sociology, ISSN 0092-055X, E-ISSN 1939-862X, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 209-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A glance across ethnographic methods terrain reveals multiple controversies and divisive critiques. When training graduate students, these debates and controversies can be consequential. We offer suggestions for teaching graduate ethnographic methods courses that, first, help students understand some of the common epistemological debates in the field and, second, provide them with hands-on activities to practice working within different knowledge traditions. Our ultimate goal is to offer graduate students a way to think productively about some common differences and controversies in the field. We formulate a metaphor that we call form and flow, and we see the first (or tough-minded, normal, and traditional approaches) and the latter (or tender-minded and disruptive styles) as patterns or movements within and across ethnographic traditions. Once students can grasp the different claims in these approaches and practice working within these traditions, we argue that they can become better prepared for their place in a diverse discipline.

  • 34.
    Edwards, Bob
    et al.
    East Carolina University, USA.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Commercialization and Lifestyle Sport: Lessons from Twenty Years of Freestyle BMX in Pro-Town, USA2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Edwards, Bob
    et al.
    Department of Sociology, East Carolina University (ECU), USA.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Commercialization and Lifestyle Sport: Lessons from Twenty Years of Freestyle BMX in ProTown, USA2010In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445, Vol. 13, no 7-8, p. 1135-1151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent research on lifestyle sport and commercialization reveals a problematic and complex relationship. The analysis presented here examines the development and impact of commercialization on a unique and influential local BMX scene over a 20-year period. Three forms of commercialization - paraphernalia, movement and mass market - are identified and their varying influences on the mobilization and development of this lifestyle sport are analysed. Findings reveal that lifestyle-sport insiders actively collaborate in each form of commercialization, especially movement commercialization which has the potential to build alternative lifestyle-sport institutions and resist adverse commercial influences. This research conceptualizes freestyle BMX as a social movement within the resource-mobilization perspective and relies upon a combination of direct and participant observation recorded through field notes and augmented by 25 in-depth interviews. The combination of analytical tools and methodological approach can help shed further light on the complex dynamics of commercialization in lifestyle sports.

  • 36. Edwards, Bob
    et al.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Commercialization in lifestyle sport: lessons from 20 years of freestyle BMX in Pro-Town, USA2012In: The Consumption and Representation of Lifestyle Sports / [ed] Belinda Wheaton, London: Routledge, 2012Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Fine, Gary Alan
    et al.
    Northwestern Univ, Sociol, Evanston, IL USA..
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Group Pleasures: Collaborative Commitments, Shared Narrative, and the Sociology of Fun2017In: Sociological theory, ISSN 0735-2751, E-ISSN 1467-9558, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 64-86Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a consequence of their size and fragility, small groups depend on cohesion. Central to group continuation are occasions of collective hedonic satisfaction that encourage attachment. These times are popularly labeled fun. While groupness can be the cause of fun, we emphasize the effects of fun, as understood by participants. Shared enjoyment, located in temporal and spatial affordances, creates conditions for communal identification. Such moments serve as commitment devices, building affiliation, modeling positive relations, and moderating interpersonal tension. Further, they encourage retrospective narration, providing an appealing past, an assumed future, and a sense of groupness. The rhetoric of fun supports interactional smoothness in the face of potential ruptures. Building on the authors' field observations and other ethnographies, we argue that both the experience and recall of fun bolster group stability. We conclude by suggesting that additional research must address the role of power and boundary building in the fun moment.

  • 38. Knox, David
    et al.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Work it out/see a counsellor: Advice from spouses in the separation process2007In: Journal of Divorce and Remarriage, ISSN 1050-2556, E-ISSN 1540-4811, Vol. 48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fifty-nine spouses going through the process of separation completed an Internet survey on their experience. Not only was the process of separation difficult for the majority of both women and men (over three-fourths evaluated their adjustment as “still healing” or “terrible” with some “suicidal”), the advice from over two-thirds of both women and men to those contemplating separation/divorce was to avert a divorce by “working it out” or “seeing a counselor.” When this was not possible, the spouses (more men than women) recommended a cooling off period. Clearly, one effect of involvement in the process of separation was a reevaluation of the desirability of initiating a separation to the degree that they would alert others contemplating separation/divorce to rethink their situation and to attempt reconciliation. Implications and limitations of the research are identified.

  • 39.
    Parker, John N.
    et al.
    Barrett, The Honors College, Arizona State University.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    From Groups to Fields: Creativity in Art and Science2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Parker, John N.
    et al.
    Arizona State University, Tempe.
    Corte, Ugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, Helsinki.
    Placing Collaborative Circles in Strategic Action Fields: Explaining Differences between Highly Creative Groups2017In: Sociological theory, ISSN 0735-2751, E-ISSN 1467-9558, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 261-287Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative circles theory explains how innovative small groups develop and win acceptance of their creative work but assumes a single type of circle and would benefit from considering how circles are affected by the strategic action fields in which they operate. We do so by synthesizing research on art, science, philosophy, and social movements to identify five field characteristics that influence circles and their creative potentials (i.e., attention space, consensus, social control, resources, and organizational and geographical contexts). We then use primary and secondary data on science circles (the Resilience Alliance and Phage Group), combined with previous research on circles and group creativity, to show how field-level differences explain systematic variations in the structure and dynamics of art and science circles. We close by arguing that there exists of a family of circles operating in different fields, formulating a refined definition of circles, and postulating four propositions informing future research.

1 - 40 of 40
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf