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  • 1.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Göranzon, Helen
    Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Energi- och metabolism2006In: Näringslära för högskolan, Liber AB, Stockholm , 2006, p. 166-193Chapter in book (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 2.
    Fjellström, C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Göranzon, H
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Food from Nature in Official Representation: The Housekeeping Clergyman's Wife of Yesterday and Today.2000Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Lange, Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Göranzon, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Fleig, Lena
    Free Univ Berlin, Dept Hlth Psychol, Berlin, Germany.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Adolescents' sources for food safety knowledge and trust2018In: British Food Journal, ISSN 0007-070X, E-ISSN 1758-4108, Vol. 120, no 3, p. 549-562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate where students in a Swedish compulsory school acquire their knowledge of food safety and how trustworthy they deem them to be. Design/methodology/approach A survey of students' self-reported sources of and trust in food safety knowledge was performed. A student response system was used for data collection, and the students were asked to answer questions presented on a PowerPoint presentation using a small wireless handheld device: a clicker. A questionnaire with 24 questions was used, and the responses were collected at 18 different schools with a total of 529 participants attending school Year 9. Findings Mothers were reported as being the most important source of food safety knowledge (38 per cent), especially among girls, and were also given high credibility (36 per cent). Boys reported trusting home and consumer studies (HCS), fathers and media to a higher extent. Girls reported cooking at home more often but, for all students, it was more common to rarely or never cook at home, which is why HCS teaching can be seen as valuable for many students. HCS teaching needs to be improved in order to raise its credibility. About half of the students (51 per cent) reported to have the highest trust for their source of knowledge. Research limitations/implications The students could only choose one source of knowledge and trust, although it is usual to learn from many different sources. Practical implications HCS teaching needs to get higher credibility among students as a counterweight against other sources. Social implications Educated consumers could influence their health. Originality/value Limited research has been performed on food safety knowledge among adolescents.

  • 4.
    Lange, Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Göranzon, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Self-reported food safety knowledge and behaviour among Home and Consumer Studies students2016In: Food Control, ISSN 0956-7135, E-ISSN 1873-7129, Vol. 67, p. 265-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Home and Consumer Studies (HCS) should be a suitable place for food safety education as it includes plenty of practical cooking and is compulsory for all students in the Swedish school system. A study among HCS teachers however reveals shortcomings in food safety teaching. A survey regarding food safety knowledge and behaviour among HCS students in school Year 9 was performed at different schools with a new system to collect questionnaire data. A Student Response System was used at the participating schools. The students were to answer the questions by using a small handheld wireless control, a clicker, in the response program Turning Point 2008. The questionnaire included a total of 26 questions and all questions were shown at PowerPoint slides and read out loud to the students. Some trivial questions were asked at the beginning to ensure the method. A total of 529 students from 18 different schools in different parts of Sweden participated in the survey conducted between September 2013 and January 2014. The survey results were evaluated and analysed using SPSS by performing cross-tabulation and chi-square tests. This study reveals that the students' self-reported food safety knowledge and behaviour are inadequate. Important risk areas need to be highlighted in HCS teaching. Boys reported to be significantly more at risk in terms of food safety regarding the handling of risk foods, reheating and cleaning. Especially for boys who reported seldom cook at home HCS would be extra valuable. This study also indicates the importance of reflection in relation to the hygiene routines which are common in the HCS context. The outcome of this study is that students might leave school without even basic food safety knowledge.

  • 5.
    Lange, Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Göranzon, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    'Teaching Young Consumers': food safety in home and consumer studies from a teacher's perspective2014In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 357-366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Swedish compulsory school, the subject home and consumer studies (HCS) is an opportunity to create conscious consumers for the future. In Sweden, it has been estimated that half a million cases of foodborne infections occur each year, which has an impact on public health. The numbers of foodborne infections are affected by actions connected to the four Cs in food safety: cooking, cleaning, chilling and cross-contamination. As foodborne infections in many cases are suspected to occur in private households, it is of research interest to study food safety teaching in HCS. The aim of this study was to investigate food safety as a part of HCS education and to provide insights regarding self-reported food safety attitude, knowledge and behaviour among HCS teachers in Swedish compulsory schools. A web-based questionnaire was distributed online in April 2012. A total of 335 teachers across the country participated, representing about one in five HCS teachers in Sweden. A majority of the responding teachers stated food safety as an important part of HCS education. The study indicates that food safety teaching can be done in different ways depending on factors such as working years, formal HCS education and daily routines in the classroom. The food safety routines relevant to a specific learning situation might determine the didactic choices, and thus some other important issues within the framework of the four Cs i.e. cold food storage, heating, storing leftovers, best before date, cooling and cross-contamination might be neglected. When it comes to teaching food safety, there is no guarantee that the four Cs in food safety will be covered. Issues connected to cleaning seemed to occur more frequently in HCS teaching rather than the broader aspects of food safety.

  • 6.
    Lange, Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Palojoki, Päivi
    University of Helsinki.
    Göranzon, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Food safety teaching influenced by frames, traditions and subjective selections2017In: International Journal of Home Economics, ISSN 1999-561X, E-ISSN 1999-561X, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 79-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, Home and consumer studies (HCS) are mandatory for all students in compulsory school. This means that schools have the possibility to educate all future consumers in Sweden. Qualitative interviews were performed with ten HCS teachers. A thematic content analysis was performed on the transcribed interviews. Three themes were found, which all had the potential to influence the teachers' didactic choices. Frame control includes different frames within the school, for example, budget, lesson time, syllabus, which could imply limitations on the teaching. HCS teaching was characterised by many similarities and routines, which were often performed without reflection, and these were included in the theme Traditional HCS learning environment. The third theme Subjective selections were characterised by the teachers' individual experiences, knowledge and risk perception. The result indicates that important food safety risk areas risked being neglected or minimalised in the HCS teaching due to limiting frames, non-reflective HCS teaching traditions, or the teachers' lack of knowledge and risk awareness. This could have consequences for what is transferred to the students and thereby influence the student's learning process in relation to food safety.

  • 7.
    Persson Osowski, Christine
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Olsson, Ulf
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Institutionen för ekonomi.
    Göranzon, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Agreement between child and parent reports of 10- to 12-year-old children’s meal pattern and intake of snack foods2012In: Journal of human nutrition and dietetics (Print), ISSN 0952-3871, E-ISSN 1365-277X, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 50-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:  Dietary assessment in children is associated with misreporting, which is a problem with both child and parent reports. Therefore, it is of interest to study how children and parents report children's eating, respectively, although comparative studies are rare. The aim of the present article was to study the meal patterns and intake of certain snack foods of 10- to 12-year-old children as reported by the children and their parents, respectively, and to determine whether there was agreement between the child and parent reports. An additional aim was to study what factors might influence rater agreement.

    Methods:  School children aged 10-12 years and their parents were given parallel questionnaires regarding the children's meal pattern. Matched pairs (n = 147) were analysed for agreement. Descriptive statistics were used to study all variables. Rater agreement and whether agreement depends on the age and the sex of the child, the sex of the parent and household type were analysed using ordinal regression models. Correlations between the child and parent assessments were estimated as polychoric correlations.

    Results:  There was a general agreement between child and parent reports, except with respect to sweets and chocolate, where children reported less frequent consumption than the parents did (P = 0.0001). The sex of the child was a significant factor regarding consumption of in-between meals (P = 0.0001) and soft drinks (P = 0.01). Most children had breakfast, school lunch and dinner every day, whereas it was less common to report daily consumption of in-between meals.

    Conclusions:  There was a general agreement between children's and parents' reports, and most children were reported to have a regular meal pattern.

  • 8.
    Persson Osowski, Christine
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Göranzon, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Children's understanding of food and meals in the foodscape at school2012In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 54-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children come into contact with food in different places and contexts, i.e. ‘foodscapes’. The aim of the paper was to study what knowledge children construct regarding food and meals in the foodscape at school and how they do so, focusing on the school meal context. Observations, interviews and focus group interviews were used. The children appropriated ideas and understandings from the adult world and society as a whole and used it among their peers in the school meal situation. This included the adoption of institutional commensality, the telling of stories about food, and the classification of foods in dichotomies.

  • 9.
    Persson Osowski, Christine
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Göranzon, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Perceptions and memories of the free school meal in Sweden2010In: Food, Culture and Society, ISSN 1528-9796, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 555-572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present article was to gain a deeper understanding of the free school meal as an embedded phenomenon in the Swedish culture. This was achieved by studying perceptions and memories of the Swedish school meal. One hundred and ninety-two informants took part in the study by responding to an ethnological questionnaire. The results showed that the school meal was seen as a second-class meal with regard to the staff, environment and to some extent the food. The school meal was also seen as part of the Swedish welfare state, as it represents universal and equal social benefits for everyone. One interpretation of this is that the informants liked the idea of having a free public school meal, but that the meal does not live up to their expectations, that is, a meal with the same values as one served at home.

  • 10.
    Persson Osowski, Christine
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Göranzon, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Teachers' interaction with children in the school meal situation: The example of pedagogic meals in Sweden2013In: Journal of nutrition education and behavior, ISSN 1499-4046, E-ISSN 1878-2620, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 420-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: School meals are also a teaching occasion in which children learn about food and meals, which is referred to as "pedagogic meals" in Sweden. The aim of the present article was to study how the pedagogic meal is practiced in preschool and school settings, with focus on how teachers acted when interacting with the children. 

    Design: Observations, interviews, and focus group interviews. 

    Setting: School canteens. 

    Participants: Three schools. 

    Phenomenon of Interest: Teaching in the school meal situation. 

    Analysis: Social constructionism, new social studies of childhood. 

    Results: The teachers took on 3 different roles. The sociable teacher role entailed turning the school lunch into a social occasion, the educating teacher role involved educating the children, and the evasive teacher role was not associated with the definition of a pedagogic meal. The teacher roles, which ranged from adult-oriented to child-oriented, and which varied in the level of interaction with the children, were summarized in a framework named the Adult-to Child-oriented Teacher Role Framework for School Meals (ACTS). 

    Conclusions and Implications: To realize the potential of pedagogic meals, teachers must be educated and become aware of the effects of their behaviors. In this situation, the ACTS framework can constitute a useful tool.

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