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  • 1.
    Gavali, Hamid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Mani, Kevin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Tegler, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Kawati, Rafael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Covaciu, Lucian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Wanhainen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Editor's Choice - Prolonged ICU Length of Stay after AAA Repair: Analysis of Time Trends and Long-term Outcome2017In: European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, ISSN 1078-5884, E-ISSN 1532-2165, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 157-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate the frequency and outcome of prolonged intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay (LOS) after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair in the endovascular era.

    Methods: All patients operated on for AAA between 1999 and 2013 at Uppsala University hospital were identified. Data were retrieved from the Swedish Vascular registry, the Swedish Intensive Care registry, the National Population registry, and case records. Prolonged ICU LOS was defined as >= 48 h during the primary hospital stay. Patients surviving >= 48 h after AAA surgery were included in the analysis.

    Results: A total of 725 patients were identified, of whom 707 (97.5%) survived >= 48 h; 563 (79.6%) underwent intact AAA repair and 144 (20.4%) ruptured AAA repair. A total of 548 patients (77.5%) required < 48 h of intensive care, 115 (16.3%) 2-6 days and 44 (6.2%) >= 7 days. The rate of prolonged ICU LOS declined considerably over time, from 41.4% of all AAA repairs in 1999 to 7.3% in 2013 (p < .001) whereas the use of endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) increased from 6.9% in 1999 to 78.0% in 2013 (p < .001). The 30 day survival rate was 98.2% for those with < 48 h ICU stay versus 93.0% for 2-6 days versus 81.8% for >= 7 days (p < .001); the corresponding 90 day survival was 97.1% versus 86.1% versus 63.6% (p < .001) respectively. For patients surviving 90 days after repair, there was no difference in long-term survival between the groups.

    Conclusion: During the period of progressively increasing use of EVAR, a simultaneous significant reduction in frequency of prolonged ICU LOS occurred. Although prolonged ICU LOS was associated with a high short-term mortality, long-term outcome among those surviving the initial 90 days was less affected.

  • 2.
    Tegler, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Molecular Imaging Studies of Pathophysiology2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The pathological process behind abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) formation is poorly understood and difficult to study. The aim of the thesis was to study the pathophysiology of AAA formation with positron emission tomography (PET) technology, a molecular imaging technique, allowing in vivo studies of pathophysiological changes.

    In study I 18F-FDG, a glucose analogue, was tested. It had previously been reported as a useful tracer studying inflammation in AAAs. These studies included, however, foremost large, symptomatic, and inflammatory AAAs. In the present study on five small and seven large asymptomatic AAAs, no increase in 18F-FDG uptake could be revealed in vivo.

    In study II 11C-PK11195, a macrophage tracer, and 11C-D-deprenyl, an unspecific inflammatory tracer, previously never tested on asymptomatic AAAs, were tested in vivo on five and 10 AAA-patients respectively, without signs of increased levels of inflammatory activity in the aorta.

    In study III several tracers were screened in vitro through autoradiography on AAA tissue. [18F]fluciclatide, targeting the integrin αVβ3 receptor upregulated in angiogenesis, was the only tracer with an increased uptake.

    In study IV [18F]fluciclatide-autoradiography was performed on AAA tissue from five patients and non-aneurysmal aortic tissue obtained from five age and sex matched organ donors. The study showed a 56% increased specific uptake in AAA, although not significant (P=0.136). Immunohistochemical revealed inflammatory cell foci in close relation to the vessels.

    In conclusion, PET has potential to elucidate the pathophysiology of AAA formation. For the large group of small asymptomatic AAAs, 18F-FDG is not suitable, as the chronic inflammation in asymptomatic AAA is not sufficiently metabolically active. Furthermore, 11C-PK11195 and 11C-D-deprenyl were unable to show the chronic inflammation seen in asymptomatic AAA.

    The interesting finding with uptake of [18F]fluciclatide showed that angiogenesis may be imaged in large asymptomatic AAAs in vitro, through the integrin αVβ3 receptor. Thus, it is likely that future studies of the role of angiogenesis in AAA formation in vivo, in small AAAs, could use this target site. The development of an integrin αVβ3 receptor tracer, preferably with higher affinity, is in progress for further in vitro and in vivo studies.

    List of papers
    1. Inflammation in the walls of asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms is not associated with increased metabolic activity detectable by 18-fluorodeoxglucose positron-emission tomography
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inflammation in the walls of asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms is not associated with increased metabolic activity detectable by 18-fluorodeoxglucose positron-emission tomography
    Show others...
    2012 (English)In: Journal of Vascular Surgery, ISSN 0741-5214, E-ISSN 1097-6809, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 802-807Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    We hypothesized that the general inflammation observed in the wall of large, asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) could be detected in vivo by 18-fluorodeoxglucose (FDG) positron-emission tomography (PET) and, if so, that this method could be used to study if active inflammation is an early pathogenetic finding in small AAAs detected by screening.

    METHODS:

    In this prospective clinical study, 12 men were examined with FDG-PET computed tomography. Seven had large asymptomatic AAAs (range, 52-66 mm) that required surgery, and five had small AAAs (range, 34-40 mm) under surveillance. In the surgery group, biopsy specimens were taken from the aneurysm wall for histologic examinations.

    RESULTS:

    Compared with normal segments of the aorta, liver, and blood and compared with healthy controls matched for age and sex, no increased FDG uptake, measured as standardized uptake value, was detected in any of the large or small AAAs. The SUVmean difference between infrarenal aorta and blood was -0.3 for cases and -0.1 for controls (P = .06). The corresponding differences between the infrarenal aorta and liver was -0.8 and -0.8 (P = .91) and between infrarenal aorta and suprarenal aorta was -0.2 and -0.1 for cases and controls, respectively (P = .20). The histologic examination of the aneurysm walls showed high inflammatory cell infiltration with T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, and macrophages.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The chronic inflammation observed in the wall of asymptomatic AAAs was not sufficiently metabolically active to result in an increased glucose metabolism detectable by FDG-PET by means of this standard protocol. To study the importance of inflammation in the pathogenesis of AAAs in vivo, PET tracers other than FDG need to be developed.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-181755 (URN)10.1016/j.jvs.2012.02.024 (DOI)000308085500029 ()22854268 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2012-09-28 Created: 2012-09-28 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    2. 4D-PET/CT with [11C]-PK11195 and [11C]-D-deprenyl does not identify the chronic inflammation in asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>4D-PET/CT with [11C]-PK11195 and [11C]-D-deprenyl does not identify the chronic inflammation in asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, ISSN 1078-5884, E-ISSN 1532-2165, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 351-356Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relevance of inflammation in the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in vivo with two novel positron emission tomography (PET) tracers: [11C]-PK11195 which targets the translocator protein (18 kDa) expressed on macrophages and [11C]-d-deprenyl with a yet unknown target receptor expressed in chronic inflammation.

    Design

    Prospective clinical study.

    Materials/methods

    Five patients were examined with [11C]-PK11195-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and 10 with [11C]-d-deprenyl-PET/CT. Nine large AAAs (54–66 mm) scheduled for repair and six small AAA (35–44 mm). All 15 patients were male and the AAAs were all asymptomatic. Regional activity was measured as standardised uptake values (SUVs) and retention index was calculated. Biopsies were taken from the aneurysm wall for histological examinations, in the nine patients operated on.

    Results

    No aortic uptake was recorded on the visual inspection, neither with [11C]-PK11195 nor with [11C]-d-deprenyl. For [11C]-PK11195 the median SUV of the AAA wall was 0.9 (range 0.8–1.0) and for [11C]-d-deprenyl, 0.7 (range 0.4–1.2). No increased uptake was seen in the aneurysmal infrarenal aorta compared with the non-aneurysmal suprarenal aorta. Histological examination of the aneurysm wall showed high inflammatory cell infiltration with lymphocytes and macrophages.

    Conclusions

    The chronic inflammation observed in the vessel wall was not detectable with [11C]-PK11195 and [11C]-d-deprenyl. In order to study the relevance of the inflammation in the pathogenesis of AAA in vivo other PET tracers need to be investigated.

    Keywords
    AAA, PET, 11C-PK1195, 11C-D-deprenyl, pathophysiology
    National Category
    Surgery Physiology Other Medical Biotechnology
    Research subject
    Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-197429 (URN)10.1016/j.ejvs.2013.01.011 (DOI)000316924900007 ()23394769 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2013-03-25 Created: 2013-03-25 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
    3. Autoradiography screening of potential positron emission tomography tracers for asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Autoradiography screening of potential positron emission tomography tracers for asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 119, no 3, p. 229-235Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The aetiology and early pathophysiological mechanisms of aortic aneurysm formation are still unknown and challenging to study in vivo. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a potentially valuable instrument for non-invasive in vivo pathophysiological studies. No specific tracer to identify the pathophysiological process of aneurysmal dilatation is yet available, however. The aim of this study was to explore if different PET tracers could be useful to image aneurysmal disease. Methods and results. Human aneurysmal aortic tissue, collected during elective resection of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) of asymptomatic patients, was investigated in vitro by means of autoradiography with [Ga-68]CRP-binder targeting C-reactive protein, [C-11]DAA1106 targeting translocator protein (18 kDa), [C-11]D-deprenyl with unknown target receptor, [C-11] deuterium-L-deprenyl targeting astrocytes, [F-18]fluciclatide targeting integrin alpha(V)beta(3), [Ga-68]IMP461 and bi-specific antibody TF2 052107 targeting carcinoembryonic antigen, [F-18]F-metomidate targeting mitochondrial cytochrome P-450 species in the adrenal cortex, and [F-18]vorozole targeting aromatase. Of the investigated tracers, only [F-18]fluciclatide exhibited specific binding, whereas the other PET tracers failed to show specific uptake in the investigated tissue and are probably not useful for the intended purpose. Conclusion. It seems likely that alpha(V)beta(3) integrin expression in AAA can be visualized with PET and that the alpha(V)beta(3) selective tracer, [F-18]fluciclatide, may be suitable for in vivo molecular imaging of asymptomatic AAA. Additional evaluation of [F-18]fluciclatide and alpha(V)beta(3) integrin expression in AAA will be performed in vitro as well as in vivo.

    Keywords
    AAA, PET tracers, pathophysiology
    National Category
    Surgery Physiology Other Medical Biotechnology
    Research subject
    Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-197428 (URN)10.3109/03009734.2014.894157 (DOI)000340110800003 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, K2013-64X-20406-07-3
    Available from: 2013-03-25 Created: 2013-03-25 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
    4. [18F]fluciclatide- Autoradiography study of angiogenesis in abdominal aortic aneurysm
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>[18F]fluciclatide- Autoradiography study of angiogenesis in abdominal aortic aneurysm
    Show others...
    2013 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Keywords
    AAA, PET, 18F-Fluciclatide, integrin alfaVbeta3, angiogenesis, pathophysiology
    National Category
    Surgery Physiology Other Medical Biotechnology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-197432 (URN)
    Available from: 2013-03-25 Created: 2013-03-25 Last updated: 2018-01-11
  • 3.
    Tegler, Gustaf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Ericson, Katharina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Wanhainen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Inflammation in the walls of asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms is not associated with increased metabolic activity detectable by 18-fluorodeoxglucose positron-emission tomography2012In: Journal of Vascular Surgery, ISSN 0741-5214, E-ISSN 1097-6809, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 802-807Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    We hypothesized that the general inflammation observed in the wall of large, asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) could be detected in vivo by 18-fluorodeoxglucose (FDG) positron-emission tomography (PET) and, if so, that this method could be used to study if active inflammation is an early pathogenetic finding in small AAAs detected by screening.

    METHODS:

    In this prospective clinical study, 12 men were examined with FDG-PET computed tomography. Seven had large asymptomatic AAAs (range, 52-66 mm) that required surgery, and five had small AAAs (range, 34-40 mm) under surveillance. In the surgery group, biopsy specimens were taken from the aneurysm wall for histologic examinations.

    RESULTS:

    Compared with normal segments of the aorta, liver, and blood and compared with healthy controls matched for age and sex, no increased FDG uptake, measured as standardized uptake value, was detected in any of the large or small AAAs. The SUVmean difference between infrarenal aorta and blood was -0.3 for cases and -0.1 for controls (P = .06). The corresponding differences between the infrarenal aorta and liver was -0.8 and -0.8 (P = .91) and between infrarenal aorta and suprarenal aorta was -0.2 and -0.1 for cases and controls, respectively (P = .20). The histologic examination of the aneurysm walls showed high inflammatory cell infiltration with T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, and macrophages.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The chronic inflammation observed in the wall of asymptomatic AAAs was not sufficiently metabolically active to result in an increased glucose metabolism detectable by FDG-PET by means of this standard protocol. To study the importance of inflammation in the pathogenesis of AAAs in vivo, PET tracers other than FDG need to be developed.

  • 4.
    Tegler, Gustaf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Estrada, Sergio
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Hall, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Wanhainen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Antoni, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    Autoradiography screening of potential positron emission tomography tracers for asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms2014In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 119, no 3, p. 229-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The aetiology and early pathophysiological mechanisms of aortic aneurysm formation are still unknown and challenging to study in vivo. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a potentially valuable instrument for non-invasive in vivo pathophysiological studies. No specific tracer to identify the pathophysiological process of aneurysmal dilatation is yet available, however. The aim of this study was to explore if different PET tracers could be useful to image aneurysmal disease. Methods and results. Human aneurysmal aortic tissue, collected during elective resection of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) of asymptomatic patients, was investigated in vitro by means of autoradiography with [Ga-68]CRP-binder targeting C-reactive protein, [C-11]DAA1106 targeting translocator protein (18 kDa), [C-11]D-deprenyl with unknown target receptor, [C-11] deuterium-L-deprenyl targeting astrocytes, [F-18]fluciclatide targeting integrin alpha(V)beta(3), [Ga-68]IMP461 and bi-specific antibody TF2 052107 targeting carcinoembryonic antigen, [F-18]F-metomidate targeting mitochondrial cytochrome P-450 species in the adrenal cortex, and [F-18]vorozole targeting aromatase. Of the investigated tracers, only [F-18]fluciclatide exhibited specific binding, whereas the other PET tracers failed to show specific uptake in the investigated tissue and are probably not useful for the intended purpose. Conclusion. It seems likely that alpha(V)beta(3) integrin expression in AAA can be visualized with PET and that the alpha(V)beta(3) selective tracer, [F-18]fluciclatide, may be suitable for in vivo molecular imaging of asymptomatic AAA. Additional evaluation of [F-18]fluciclatide and alpha(V)beta(3) integrin expression in AAA will be performed in vitro as well as in vivo.

  • 5.
    Tegler, Gustaf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Savicheva, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Wanhainen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Detection of aortic graft infection by 18-fluorodeoxyglocose positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography2007In: Journal of Vascular Surgery, ISSN 0741-5214, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 828-830Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Functional in vivo molecular imaging is provided with 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), which can detect cells with high glucose turnover. FDG-PET is an established imaging tool in oncology but has also been used in infectious and inflammatory diseases. PET combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) shows the metabolic activity with precise anatomic localization. More than 2000 scanners have now been installed worldwide, and with better availability, this hybrid method has the potential to become an important imaging tool in the management of suspected aortic graft infections, especially in patients with low-grade graft infection. We report a patient with a suspected aortic graft infection that was confirmed and anatomically localized by FDG-PET/CT. An extra-anatomic bypass and extirpation of the aortic graft was performed. The perioperative location of the graft infection coincided exactly with the place of FDG uptake shown on PET/CT. The patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery and did well during 6 months of follow-up.

  • 6.
    Tegler, Gustaf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    Ericson, Katharina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Wanhainen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    4D-PET/CT with [11C]-PK11195 and [11C]-D-deprenyl does not identify the chronic inflammation in asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms2013In: European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, ISSN 1078-5884, E-ISSN 1532-2165, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 351-356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relevance of inflammation in the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in vivo with two novel positron emission tomography (PET) tracers: [11C]-PK11195 which targets the translocator protein (18 kDa) expressed on macrophages and [11C]-d-deprenyl with a yet unknown target receptor expressed in chronic inflammation.

    Design

    Prospective clinical study.

    Materials/methods

    Five patients were examined with [11C]-PK11195-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and 10 with [11C]-d-deprenyl-PET/CT. Nine large AAAs (54–66 mm) scheduled for repair and six small AAA (35–44 mm). All 15 patients were male and the AAAs were all asymptomatic. Regional activity was measured as standardised uptake values (SUVs) and retention index was calculated. Biopsies were taken from the aneurysm wall for histological examinations, in the nine patients operated on.

    Results

    No aortic uptake was recorded on the visual inspection, neither with [11C]-PK11195 nor with [11C]-d-deprenyl. For [11C]-PK11195 the median SUV of the AAA wall was 0.9 (range 0.8–1.0) and for [11C]-d-deprenyl, 0.7 (range 0.4–1.2). No increased uptake was seen in the aneurysmal infrarenal aorta compared with the non-aneurysmal suprarenal aorta. Histological examination of the aneurysm wall showed high inflammatory cell infiltration with lymphocytes and macrophages.

    Conclusions

    The chronic inflammation observed in the vessel wall was not detectable with [11C]-PK11195 and [11C]-d-deprenyl. In order to study the relevance of the inflammation in the pathogenesis of AAA in vivo other PET tracers need to be investigated.

  • 7.
    Tegler, Gustaf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Wallgren, AnnaCarin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Estrada, Sergio
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Wanhainen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    Antoni, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    [18F]fluciclatide- Autoradiography study of angiogenesis in abdominal aortic aneurysm2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
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