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  • 1.
    Lee, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Delivering Food Satisfaction?: The Case of Stockholm Market Halls2011In: Revue d'histoire Nordique, ISSN 1778-9605, no 12, p. 69-90Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Lee, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Dreams of modernity – the rise of the market hall2014In: Fortid, ISSN 1504-1913, E-ISSN 1891-1668, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 76-81Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the attempt to create a full-scale market hall system in Stockholm 1865–1929. The initial ambition was to instill the much-admired international models, but the Swedish development followed its own path. The main problem for the municipal authorities was to secure a safe and sufficient food supply for the inhabitants of the rapidly growing city. A modern, rational food supply was seen as emblematic of a modern, rational city – which was something the provincial yet ambitious capital aspired to be. However, the ways to achieve a rational food trade worthy of a modern city were reinterpreted and reevaluated over the sixty-year period examined. 

  • 3.
    Lee, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Imagining the ideal kitchen as a machine-age room2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the changing materialities, ideas, and practices of the kitchen as a hub for distribution, rationalization and consumption, where science, economics, and culture interact in intricate ways. This paper investigates how home economists and architects collaborated in creating new rational kitchens that would render housework more efficient. It also considers how their efforts were discussed in ladies journals in order to grasp how this was presented to the consumer.

     

    The case at hand will be Sweden, which during the 19th century was a country undergoing rapid modernization and urbanization. More specifically, this paper will use Stockholm as a case, since it was the biggest city and most subject to private and public interventions. Whereas the home had previously been considered a private responsibility, the lack of adequate housing now hampered the urban development. This lead to demands for more public intervention to create a well-functioning urban infrastructure, and new scientific knowledge on hygiene as well as engineering also meant that the housing issue came to the forefront.

     

    The kitchen is particularly interesting since so many novel technologies and facilities were introduced here. In a sense, it can be defined as a hub for consumption. Here, the household materializes financial resources through food consumption, and through artifacts such as the stove, pantry, furniture and fixtures. The kitchen is also a place where ideas and ideals of ​​what everyday life should entail are manifested. It thus serves as a lens through which we can discern the contemporary discourse on how the ideal society should be constructed. 

  • 4.
    Lee, Jenny
    Uppsala University, University Administration.
    Kunskapens nya världar: Mötet mellan pedagogik och teknik vid Uppsala Learning Lab2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Lee, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Local food in an era of large-scale retailing2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Lee, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Sowing Vegetables and Reaping Morality – Ideals on the Benefits of Kitchen Gardening2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The history of the kitchen garden and its relation to the kitchen itself, the provisioning of food in urban settings, is the topic of this paper. The aim is to trace out how the home production of fruits and vegetables relate to the larger system of production, distribution and consumption of fresh produce. The paper thus seeks to answer how the need for domestic food production was affected by commercial production of fresh produce, by new means of distribution and retailing with extending supply zones as well as by the development of the kitchen technology such as refrigeration and deep freezing. These fundamental changes of the food system, had consequences for the ideals of the kitchen garden. In the decades around the turn of the century 1900, kitchen gardens and allotment gardens were seen as a solution not only to the times of dearth, but also to the moral hazards of urban living.

     

    By growing his own garden, the worker was supposed to derive nourishment for both soul and body. Growing vegetables was also a respectable endeavour for the middle and upper classes: the garden cities allowing them to plant kitchen gardens of various size and ambition. Growing vegetables became anathema to modern, rational life. When pursued, it was more as a pastime. Gardening went from necessity to pleasure, from survival to gastronomic delight. However, recent revival of interest in growing your own food also says something about the qualms engendered by the modern food system. Here the morality of home food production again stands out. 

  • 7.
    Lee, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Torg och saluhallar: drömmar om en modern stad2011In: Andra Stockholm: liv, plats och identitet i storstaden / [ed] Bo Larsson och Birgitta Svensson, Stockholm: Stockholmia förlag, 2011, p. 179-201Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Lee, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Urban Meat Geographies in Stockholm2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper will look at the history and geography of the meat trade in Stockholm and how it was transformed between 1846 and 1936. In 1864 previous regulations of the meat trade were abolished and the number of private slaughterhouses multiplied exponentially. At the same time, the city itself rapidly expanded. Over the decades, issues of food control and hygiene provoked discussions on how the meat trade was to be organized to best fulfil the needs of the capital. Private and public solutions were pitted against one another, as were control and economy. After long and heated debates a law of compulsory meat control was passed in 1897. Fifteen years later the city inaugurated its first public abattoir at the outskirts of the city, and private slaughterhouses were made illegal. The wholesale meat trade, however, continued to be scattered over several different places around town. In 1936, a wholesale market for meat was opened next to the abattoir, which, by the standards of the time, was considered a large-scale and highly rational facility. This again altered the food geography of the city and it mirrors other changes as well. How the means of transport had evolved. How urban sensibilities to animal presence in the city had changed. How the nature of the food supply chains themselves had transformed with the urban foodshed extending far beyond what had hitherto been possible.

  • 9.
    Lee, Jenny
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Torell, Ulrika
    Nordiska museet.
    Promoting packaging and selling self-service: The rapid modernization of the Swedish food retail trade2013In: The Food Industries of Europe in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. / [ed] Derek Oddy & Alain Drouard, Farnham: Ashgate, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Lee, Jenny
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Torell, Ulrika
    The Silent Revolution: How packaging transformed the consumption landscapes and self- service triumphed in Sweden2011Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 10 of 10
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