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  • 1. Alwin, J
    et al.
    Krevers, B
    Johansson, Ulla I.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Josephsson, S
    Haraldsson, U
    Boström, C
    Rosshagen, A
    Persson, J
    Health economic and process evaluation of AT interventions for persons with dementia and their relatives: A suggested assessment model2007In: Technology and Disability, ISSN 1055-4181, Vol. 19, no 2-3, 61-71 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is growing interest in assistive technology (AT) as a means of enabling participation in everyday activities for persons with dementia and their relatives. Health economic assessment of AT in dementia is of importance due to the consequences of the disease for both patients and relatives and to the high societal costs for dementia care. The aim of this article is to outline a model for assessment of AT interventions for persons with dementia. The model expands existing assessment models as it also includes evaluation of the intervention process. Methodological challenges and possibilities in making health economic assessments, including outcomes and costs, as well as process evaluation, are discussed in the article.

  • 2. Bertilsson, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Ranner, Maria
    von Koch, Lena
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Ytterberg, Charlotte
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Tham, Kerstin
    A client-centred ADL intervention: three-month follow-up of a randomized controlled trial2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 21, no 5, 377-391 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim was to study a client-centred activities of daily living (ADL) intervention (CADL) compared with the usual ADL intervention (UADL) in people with stroke regarding: independence in ADL, perceived participation, life satisfaction, use of home-help service, and satisfaction with training and, in their significant others, regarding: caregiver burden, life satisfaction, and informal care. Methods: In this multicentre study, 16 rehabilitation units were randomly assigned to deliver CADL or UADL. The occupational therapists who provided the CADL were specifically trained. Eligible for inclusion were people with stroke treated in a stroke unit 3 months after stroke, dependent in two ADL, not diagnosed with dementia, and able to understand instructions. Data were collected at inclusion and three months thereafter. To detect a significant difference between the groups in the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) domain "participation", 280 participants were required. Intention-to-treat analysis was applied. Results: At three months, there was no difference in the outcomes between the CADL group (n = 129) and the UADL group (n = 151), or their significant others (n = 87/n = 93) except in the SIS domain "emotion" in favour of CADL (p = 0.04). Conclusion: The CADL does not appear to bring about short-term differences in outcomes and longer follow-ups are required.

  • 3.
    Bertilsson, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Von Koch, Lena
    Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Neurol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tham, Kerstin
    Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Occupat Therapy, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Client-centred ADL intervention after stroke: Significant others' experiences2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 22, no 5, 377-386 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Client-centredness is a prominent contemporary concept in rehabilitation. However, there is a lack of knowledge on if and how a client-centred rehabilitation approach is incorporated in the everyday life of significant others of people who receive such rehabilitation. Objective: Explore and describe if and how a client-centred ADL intervention (CADL) was integrated in the everyday lives of significant others of people with stroke. Materials and methods: Qualitative longitudinal design, with a grounded theory approach. Seven significant others, who cohabited with persons receiving a CADL intervention, were interviewed during the first year. Findings: One core category was identified: "Taking responsibility and achieving balance with respect to self-esteem in order to get on with everyday life". The integration of the CADL was a process. A key aspect was that as the person with stroke acted upon his/her own desired activity goals the significant others were encouraged to act on their own needs. Conclusions: Enablement is important also for the significant others of people with stroke. One way of enabling significant others to maintain an active lifestyle and find respite in everyday life might be to enable people with stroke to formulate and act upon their desired activity goals.

  • 4.
    Ekstam, Lisa
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Huddinge, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Occupat Therapy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Ytterberg, Charlotte
    Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Huddinge, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Div Neurol, Dept Clin Neurosci, Huddinge, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Div Physiotherapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Huddinge, Sweden..
    The combined perceptions of people with stroke and their carers regarding rehabilitation needs 1 year after stroke: a mixed methods study2015In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 5, no 2, e006784Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to explore the associations between the dyad's (person with stroke and informal caregiver) perception of the person with stroke's rehabilitation needs and stroke severity, personal factors (gender, age, sense of coherence), the use of rehabilitation services, amount of informal care and caregiver burden. Further, the aim was to explore the personal experience of everyday life changes among persons with stroke and their caregivers and their strategies for handling these 1 year after stroke. Design: A mixed methods design was used combining quantitative and qualitative data and analyses. Setting: Data were mainly collected in the participants' homes. Outcome measures: Data were collected through established instruments and open-ended interviews. The dyad's perceptions of the person with stroke's rehabilitation needs were assessed by the persons with stroke and their informal caregivers using a questionnaire based on Ware's taxonomy. The results were combined and classified into three groups: met, discordant (ie, not in agreement) and unmet rehabilitation needs. To assess sense of coherence (SOC) in persons with stroke, the SOC-scale was used. Caregiver burden was assessed using the Caregiver Burden Scale. Data on the use of rehabilitation services were obtained from the computerised register at the Stockholm County Council. Participants: 86 persons with stroke (mean age 73 years, 38% women) and their caregivers (mean age 65 years, 40% women). Results: Fifty-two per cent of the dyads perceived that the person with stroke's need for rehabilitation was met 12 months after stroke. Met rehabilitation needs were associated with less severe stroke, more coping strategies for solving problems in everyday activities and less caregiver burden. Conclusions: Rehabilitation interventions need to focus on supporting the dyads' process of psychological and social adaptation after stroke. Future studies need to explore and evaluate the effects of using a dyadic perspective throughout rehabilitation.

  • 5. Guidetti, Susanne
    et al.
    Ytterberg, Charlotte
    Ekstam, Lisa
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Changes in the impact of stroke between 3 and 12 months post-stroke, assessed with the Stroke Impact Scale2014In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 46, no 10, 963-968 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine data collected using the Stroke Impact Scale 3.0 (SIS) at 3 and 12 months post-stroke, and to explore any clinically meaningful changes in everyday life in relation to age, gender and stroke severity. Design: Prospective longitudinal study. Methods: A total of 204 persons were assessed using the SIS at 3 and 12 months after onset of stroke. Changes in domain scores were calculated over time and in relation to age, gender and stroke severity. Results: The Strength, Hand Function and Participation domains had the highest perceived impact at 3 and 12 months, indicating problems in everyday life. Stroke recovery was perceived to be significantly higher at 12 than at 3 months irrespective of stroke severity, age or gender. The impact on the Strength and Emotion domains was significantly lower at 12 months than at 3 months. Most clinically meaningful changes, both positive and negative ( 15 points), were seen in the Participation domain and in Stroke recovery. Few changes were associated with age, gender or stroke severity. Conclusion: Both positive and negative clinically meaningful changes related to impact of stroke were found between 3 and 12 months post-stroke. Therefore it is important to pay close attention to patients' perceptions of their everyday life situation during rehabilitation and at discharge.

  • 6. Hellman, Therese
    et al.
    Jonsson, Hans
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Tham, Kerstin
    Connecting rehabilitation and everyday life - the lived experiences among women with stress-related ill health2013In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 35, no 21, 1790-1797 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim was to describe and understand how connecting rehabilitation experiences and everyday life was characterised in the lived experiences during the rehabilitation in women with stress-related ill health. Method: Five women were interviewed on three occasions during a rehabilitation programme and once 3 months later. Data were analysed using the Empirical, Phenomenological and Psychological method. Results: The participants experienced connections between their rehabilitation and their previous, present and future everyday life influencing both rehabilitation and everyday life in a back-and-forth process. These connections were experienced in mind or in doing, mostly targeting the private arena in everyday life. Connecting rehabilitation experiences to their working situations was more challenging and feelings of frustration and being left alone were experienced. Conclusions: Although the participants described constructive connections between rehabilitation experiences and the private arena in everyday life, they mostly failed to experience connections that facilitated a positive return to work. Recommended support in the return to work process in rehabilitation comprises the provision of practical work-related activities during rehabilitation; being supportive in a constructive dialogue between the participant and the workplace, and continuing this support in follow-ups after the actual rehabilitation period. Implications for Rehabilitation Rehabilitation for persons with stress-related ill health needs to focus on the private arena as well as the work situation in everyday life. Creative activities may enable experiences that inspire connections in mind and connections targeting the private arena in everyday life. The work situation needs to be thoroughly discussed during rehabilitation for enabling the participants to experience a support in the return to work process. Rehabilitation including practical work-related activities, support in a constructive dialogue between the participant and the manager at the workplace, and continued support in follow-ups targeting the workplace might be beneficial for successfully return to work.

  • 7. Johansson, Annica E M
    et al.
    Haugstad, Tor
    Berg, Marie
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Participation in the workforce after a traumatic brain injury: a matter of control2016In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 38, no 5, 423-432 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: This study sought to explore individual experience in developing a mastery of daily activities and roles after a traumatic brain injury (TBI) with the objective of returning to work.

    METHOD: Eight 30-60-year-old men, employed at the time of injury, were each interviewed three times over a 6-month period. Ten to 21 months after the injuries, four participants had returned to work at least part time. Grounded theory was adapted for analyses.

    RESULTS: A single core category emerged: a desire for control: focusing on high-priority issues. Still, 2 years after injury, the participants were uncertain about their abilities with respect to what was expected of them at work. They felt they would do better as time progressed.

    CONCLUSIONS: The participants' uncertainty about their efficacy cast doubt on their beliefs in improving their skills, balancing daily activities and work. They wondered about the sustainability of their health and efficacy at work. Wanting to control their own improvement, the participants asked for counselling in strategies and techniques to help with their progress. This issue could be taken into account in follow-up rehabilitation programmes. Additionally, the workplace might be the ideal context in which to develop the structures and routines necessary to master life in general. Implications for Rehabilitation Two years after injury, the participants remained uncertain about their abilities with respect to what was expected of them at work. The participants felt they would do better as time progressed. The participants, wanting to control their own improvement, sought counselling to help sort out their priorities and found it could contribute to help with their progress in finding a suitable balance between daily activities and work. A consequence of our main finding, in a multidisciplinary context, is that counselling in structures and routines with respect to work-related tasks should be considered to be an integral part of any rehabilitation programme after TBI.

  • 8. Johansson, Annica E M
    et al.
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Disability pension and everyday life: a period of transition and subjective aspects of future occupational life2011In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 40, no 4, 375-384 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose was to explore and describe the everyday life experiences among people with a disability pension and their expectations for future occupational life.

    PARTICIPANTS: A purposeful sample of 14 men and women were interviewed. Of these, ten people received full-time disability pension and four people were on partial disability pension while working part time.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: A content analysis approach revealed three themes: strategies for handling a changed life situation, adaptations to remaining functional capacity, and expectations on future occupational life. Initially, leaving the work market entailed a period of emotional discomfort. To help handle this discomfort, structures for participation and performance came to signify a balanced everyday life.

    CONCLUSIONS: The central conclusion drawn is that the informants with full-time disability pension reconciled themselves to their situation, changing their conception of what life on a disability pension means, while those informants who worked part-time saw their future role as that of worker. Thus, being employed constitutes one factor that promotes a future work career. Another factor related to work capacity is the need for balance between paid work and domestic work reported by disability pensioners working part-time. This area could serve as a point of departure for work rehabilitation.

  • 9.
    Johansson, Ulla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Bernspang, B
    Life satisfaction related to work re-entry after brain injury: alongitudinal study2003In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 17, no 11, 991-1002 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to assess the subjective life satisfaction after brain injury and its relation to work re-entry.

    METHOD: The research design was a longitudinal study. Thirty-six individuals answered a questionnaire at 3 and 6 years after admittance to a rehabilitation programme. The questionnaire addressed work status, job satisfaction, subjective symptoms of illness and life satisfaction.

    RESULTS: The reported life satisfaction both for life as a whole and for different domains of life was low. No significant difference between follow-ups was found for satisfaction with life as a whole. For the domain IADL activities, the subjects reported a statistically significant lower satisfaction at the second follow-up than at the first. No correlation between work status and subjective satisfaction with life as a whole was found in this population. At the second follow-up, significantly more people were satisfied with IADL in the group that had returned to work.

    CONCLUSIONS: The results from this study indicate that brain injury has a lasting effect on a person's life also many years after onset. The decreasing satisfaction with the ability to perform IADL-activities in along-term perspective should give implications for clinical practice. More research in this area is needed.

  • 10.
    Johansson, Ulla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Högberg, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Bernspång, Birgitta
    Participation in everyday occupations in a late phase of recovery after brain injury.2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 14, no 2, 116-125 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe to what extent individuals of working age, in a late phase after an acquired brain injury, participate in everyday occupations related to home maintenance, work, and leisure. The aim was also to evaluate if participation in different occupations influences their life satisfaction. A sample of 157 people consecutively admitted to a rehabilitation clinic between June 1995 and December 2000 answered a mailed questionnaire. The subjects who were of working age had had a brain injury on average 6 years before this study. The perceived participation was reported using the Reintegration to Normal Living Index (RNL) and life satisfaction according to an expanded version of the LiSat 11. This study showed that in this late phase of recovery after brain injury the subjects still experienced many restrictions in participation in everyday occupations. The area with the lowest reported participation was work activity while most comfort with the situation was reported for self-care. The RNL subscales showed a significant connection with satisfaction with life as a whole. Furthermore an interaction was found between the two subscales "Daily living" and "Perception of self". This study showed restrictions in participation in the community even several years after brain injury, which underlines the need for rehabilitation services long after injury.

  • 11.
    Lannsjö, Marianne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Backheden, M
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    af Geijerstam, JL
    Borg, J
    Does head CT scan pathology predict outcome after mild traumatic brain injury?2013In: European Journal of Neurology, ISSN 1351-5101, E-ISSN 1468-1331, Vol. 20, no 1, 124-129 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    More evidence is needed to forward our understanding of the key determinants of poor outcome after mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). A large, prospective, national cohort of patients was studied to analyse the effect of head CT scan pathology on the outcome.

    Methods:

    Thousand two hundred and sixty-two patients with MTBI [Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score 15] at 39 emergency departments completed a study protocol including acute head CT scan examination and follow-up by the Rivermead Post Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire (RPQ) and the Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOSE) at 3 months after MTBI. Binary logistic regression was used for the assessment of prediction ability.

    Results:

    In 751 men (60%) and 511 women (40%), with a mean age of 30 years (median 21, range 6–94), we observed relevant or suspect relevant pathologic findings on acute CT scan in 52 patients (4%). Patients aged below 30 years reported better outcome both with respect to symptoms and GOSE as compared to patients in older age groups. Men reported better outcome than women as regards symptoms (OR 0.64, CI 0.49–0.85 for 3 symptoms) and global function (OR 0.60, CI 0.39–0.92 for GOSE 1–6).

    Conclusions:

    Pathology on acute CT scan examination had no effect on selfreported symptoms or global function at 3 months after MTBI. Female gender and older age predicted a less favourable outcome. The findings support the view that other factors than brain injury deserve attention to minimize long-term complaints after MTBI.

  • 12.
    Lannsjö, Marianne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Backheden, Magnus
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    af Geijerstam, Jean-Luc
    Borg, Jörgen
    Does Head CT Scan Pathology Predict Outcome After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury?2012In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 26, no 4-5, 396-396 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13. Niemi, Tuuli
    et al.
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    The lived experience of engaging in everyday occupations in persons with mild to moderate aphasia2013In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 35, no 21, 1828-1834 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Impairment of language ability, aphasia, can cause barriers to communication and hence impact on participation in many life situations. This study aimed to describe and explore how persons with aphasia following stroke experience engaging in everyday occupations. Method: Six persons from Southwest Finland who had aphasia due to stroke one to four years previously were interviewed for the study. A modified form of the empirical phenomenological psychological method was used for data analysis. Results: Three main characteristics of experiences of engaging in everyday occupations were identified: (1) encountering new experiences in everyday occupations, (2) striving to handle everyday occupations and (3) going ahead with life. The participants had experienced an altering life-world. Engagement in occupations affected their perceptions of competence and identity, and experiences of belonging and well-being. It was also through engagement in everyday occupations that they had discovered and learnt to handle changes in their everyday life. Conclusion: Aphasia can have a long-term impact on engagement in everyday occupations and participation in society, but conversely, engagement in meaningful occupations can also contribute to adaptation to disability and life changes. Implications for Rehabilitation Aphasia can have a long-term impact on engagement in everyday occupations and participation in society. Health care professionals need to determine what clients with aphasia think about their occupations and life situations in spite of difficulties they may have verbalizing their thoughts. Experiences of engaging in meaningful occupations can help clients with aphasia in reconstructing their life stories, thereby contributing to adaptation to disability and life changes.

  • 14.
    Nilsson, Annika Öst
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Alfred Nobels Alle 23, S-14183 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Alfred Nobels Alle 23, S-14183 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Alfred Nobels Alle 23, S-14183 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Hellman, Therese
    Karolinska Inst, Unit Intervent & Implementat Res Worker Hlth, Solna, Sweden..
    Experiences of the return to work process after stroke while participating in a person-centred rehabilitation programme2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 24, no 5, 349-356 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In Sweden, less than 50% of those getting stroke in working age return to work (RTW). Effective rehabilitation programmes need to be developed and therapeutic aspects understood.Aim: To explore and describe how persons with stroke experience their RTW process while participating in a person-centred rehabilitation programme focusing on RTW.Materials and methods: Seven persons with mild or moderate stroke were interviewed twice during the intervention in the vocational training phase using semi-structured interviews. Data were analysed using grounded theory.Results: Having a coordinator by their side gave support and guidance during the RTW process. Knowledge of stroke, strategies and a straightforward communication created a structure for the RTW process. Expressing one's own wishes increased opportunities to influence and decide which path to follow in order to reach the goal.Conclusion: Straightforward, open and recurring communication facilitated the possibility to adapt to the situation. These aspects increased insight and awareness which facilitated the RTW process.Significance: The findings indicate that a precondition for a fruitful RTW process was that suitable platforms at work were created in which the actors involved could cooperate. This knowledge might also be valuable in the RTW process for people with other diagnosis.

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