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  • 1.
    Essand, Magnus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Ma, Jing
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Jin, Chuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Ramachandran, Mohanraj
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden..
    CAR T-Cells with Induced Secretion of Helicobacter Pylori Neutrophil-Activating Protein (HP-NAP) Yields Improved Anti-Tumor Activity and Reduced Immunosuppression2017In: Molecular Therapy, ISSN 1525-0016, E-ISSN 1525-0024, Vol. 25, no 5 S1, 288-288 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Fotaki, Grammatiki
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Jin, Chuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Karlsson-Parra, Alex
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Allogeneic dendritic cells (AlloDCs) transduced with an infection enhanced adenovirus as adjuvant for cancer immunotherapy2016In: CANCER IMMUNOLOGY RESEARCH, ISSN 2326-6066, Vol. 4, no 1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Fotaki, Grammatiki
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Jin, Chuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University.
    Kerzeli, Iliana Kyriaki
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Ramachandran, Mohanraj
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Karlsson-Parra, Ale
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Tumor antigen-loaded allogeneic dendritic cells augment therapeutic effect of adoptively transferred T-cells by altering tumor immune-microenvironmentManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Jin, Chuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fotaki, Grammatiki
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ramachandran, Mohanraj
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Berith
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Safe engineering of CAR T cells for adoptive cell therapy of cancer using long-term episomal gene transfer2016In: EMBO Molecular Medicine, ISSN 1757-4676, E-ISSN 1757-4684, Vol. 8, no 7, 702-711 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy is a new successful treatment for refractory B-cell leukemia. Successful therapeutic outcome depends on long-term expression of CAR transgene in T cells, which is achieved by delivering transgene using integrating gamma retrovirus (RV) or lentivirus (LV). However, uncontrolled RV/LV integration in host cell genomes has the potential risk of causing insertional mutagenesis. Herein, we describe a novel episomal long-term cell engineering method using non-integrating lentiviral (NILV) vector containing a scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR) element, for either expression of transgenes or silencing of target genes. The insertional events of this vector into the genome of host cells are below detection level. CD19 CAR T cells engineered with a NILV-S/MAR vector have similar levels of CAR expression as T cells engineered with an integrating LV vector, even after numerous rounds of cell division. NILV-S/MAR-engineered CD19 CAR T cells exhibited similar cytotoxic capacity upon CD19(+) target cell recognition as LV-engineered T cells and are as effective in controlling tumor growth in vivo We propose that NILV-S/MAR vectors are superior to current options as they enable long-term transgene expression without the risk of insertional mutagenesis and genotoxicity.

  • 5.
    Jin, Chuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University.
    Ma, Jing
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Ramachandran, Mohanraj
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    CD19 CAR T-cells with induced secretion of Helicobacter Pylori Neutrophil-Activating Protein (HP-NAP) yields improved anti-tumor activity and reduced immunosuppressionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Jin, Chuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Ramachandran, Mohanraj
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Fotaki, Grammatiki
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nilsson, Berith
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Long-term episomal gene transfer for safe engineering of T cells for adoptive cell therapy of cancer2016In: CANCER IMMUNOLOGY RESEARCH, ISSN 2326-6066, Vol. 4, no 1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Jin, Chuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Ramachandran, Mohanraj
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Fotaki, Grammatiki
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Long-term episomal gene transfer for safe engineering of T-cells for adoptive cell therapy of cancer2014In: Human Gene Therapy, ISSN 1043-0342, E-ISSN 1557-7422, Vol. 25, no 11, A50-A50 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Jin, Chuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Prospects to improve chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for solid tumors2016In: Immunotherapy, ISSN 1750-743X, E-ISSN 1750-7448, Vol. 8, no 12, 1355-1361 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adoptive transfer of patient-derived T-cells engineered with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) targeting the pan-B-cell marker CD19 has led to complete remission in patients with B-cell leukemias while response rates are more modest for B-cell lymphomas. This can be attributed to the fact that the semi-solid structure of lymphomas impedes T-cell infiltration and that the immune suppressive microenvironment within these tumors dampens the effect of CAR T-cells. These obstacles are even more pronounced for solid tumors where dense and often highly immunosuppressive structures are found. This article focuses on different aspects of how to improve CAR T-cells for solid tumors, primarily by decreasing their sensitivity to the harsh tumor microenvironment, by altering the immunosuppressive microenvironment inside tumors and by inducing bystander immunity.

  • 9.
    Jin, Chuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hillerdal, Victoria
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Wallgren, AnnaCarin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Karlsson-Parra, Alex
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Allogeneic lymphocyte-licensed DCs expand T cells withimproved antitumor activity and resistance to oxidative stress andimmunosuppressive factors2014In: Molecular Therapy Methods & Clinical Development, ISSN 2329-0501, Vol. 1, 14001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adoptive T-cell therapy of cancer is a treatment strategy where T cells are isolated, activated, in some cases engineered, and expanded ex vivo before being reinfused to the patient. The most commonly used T-cell expansion methods are either anti-CD3/CD28 antibody beads or the “rapid expansion protocol” (REP), which utilizes OKT-3, interleukin (IL)-2, and irradiated allogeneic feeder cells. However, REP-expanded or bead-expanded T cells are sensitive to the harsh tumor microenvironment and often short-lived after reinfusion. Here, we demonstrate that when irradiated and preactivated allosensitized allogeneic lymphocytes (ASALs) are used as helper cells to license OKT3-armed allogeneic mature dendritic cells (DCs), together they expand target T cells of high quality. The ASAL/DC combination yields an enriched Th1-polarizing cytokine environment (interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-12, IL-2) and optimal costimulatory signals for T-cell stimulation. When genetically engineered antitumor T cells were expanded by this coculture system, they showed better survival and cytotoxic efficacy under oxidative stress and immunosuppressive environment, as well as superior proliferative response during tumor cell killing compared to the REP protocol. Our result suggests a robust ex vivo method to expand T cells with improved quality for adoptive cancer immunotherapy.

  • 10.
    Jin, Chuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Karlsson-Parra, Alex
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Allogeneic Lymphocyte-Licensed DCs Expand TCR/CAR-Engineered T Cells, Which Are Insensitive To Oxidative Stress and Immunosuppressive Factors2014In: Molecular Therapy, ISSN 1525-0016, E-ISSN 1525-0024, Vol. 22, S62-S62 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Jin, Chuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Čančer, Matko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nilsson, Berith
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Leja, Justyna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Tat‐PTD‐modified Oncolytic Adenovirus Driven by the SCG3 Promoter and ASH1 Enhancer for Neuroblastoma Therapy2013In: Human Gene Therapy, ISSN 1043-0342, E-ISSN 1557-7422, Vol. 24, no 8, 766-775 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Secretogranin III (SGC3) belongs to the granin family and is highly expressed in endocrine and neural tissues. The human SCG3 promoterhas not yet been characterized. We identified that a 0.5 kb DNA fragment upstream of the SCG3 gene can selectively drivetransgene expression in neuroblastoma cell lines. The strength of transgene expression was further increased and specificity maintained,by addition of the human achaete‐scute complex homolog 1 (ASH1) enhancer. We developed an oncolytic serotype 5‐basedadenovirus, where the SCG3 promoter and ASH1 enhancer drive E1A gene expression. The virus was further modified with a cellpenetratingpeptide (Tat‐PTD) in the virus capsid, which we have previously shown results in increased adenovirus transductionefficiency of many neuroblastoma cell lines. The virus, Ad5PTD(ASH1‐SCG3‐E1A), shows selective and efficient killing of neuroblastomacell lines in vitro, including cisplatin‐, etoposide‐ and doxorubicin‐insensitive neuroblastoma cells. Furthermore, it delays tumorgrowth and thereby prolonged survival for nude mice harboring subcutaneous human neuroblastoma xenograft. In conclusion, wereport a novel oncolytic adenovirus with potential use for neuroblastoma therapy.

  • 12.
    Leja, Justyna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Berith
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Zieba, Agata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hakkarainen, Tanja
    University of Helsinki, Finnish Institute for Molecular Medicine.
    Åkerström, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Giandomenico, Valeria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Oncolytic adenovirus modified with somatostatin motifs for selective infection of neuroendocrine tumor cells2011In: Gene Therapy, ISSN 0969-7128, E-ISSN 1476-5462, Vol. 18, no 11, 1052-1062 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have previously described the oncolytic adenovirus, Ad(CgA-E1A-miR122), herein denoted Ad5(CgA-E1A-miR122) that selectively replicates in and kills neuroendocrine cells, including freshly isolated midgut carcinoid cells from liver metastases. Ad5(CgA-E1A-miR122) is based on human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) and infects target cells by binding to the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR) and integrins on the cell surface. Some neuroendocrine tumor (NET) and neuroblastoma cells express low levels of CAR and are therefore poorly transduced by Ad5. However, they often express high levels of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs). Therefore, we introduced cyclic peptides, which contain four amino acids (FWKT) and mimic the binding site for SSTRs in the virus fiber knob. We show that FWKT-modified Ad5 binds to SSTR2 on NET cells and transduces midgut carcinoid cells from liver metastases about 3-4 times better than non-modified Ad5 while it transduces normal hepatocytes at about 50% of Ad5. Moreover, FWKT-modified Ad5 overcomes neutralization in an ex vivo human blood loop model to greater extent than Ad5, indicating that fiber knob modification may prolong the systematic circulation time. We conclude that modification of adenovirus with the FWKT motif may be beneficial for NET therapy.

  • 13.
    Liljenfeldt, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Chen, Liye
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Mangsbo, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    A Hexon and Fiber-modified Adenovirus Expressing CD40L Improves the Antigen Presentation Capacity of Dendritic Cells2014In: Journal of immunotherapy (1997), ISSN 1524-9557, E-ISSN 1537-4513, Vol. 37, no 3, 155-162 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CD40 ligand (CD40L), a strong stimulator of Th1 immune responses, acts via dendritic cells to trigger T-cell activation. AdCD40L therapy introduces the CD40L gene into the tumor microenvironment with an adenoviral vector and has shown promising results in experimental tumor models, dogs, and patients (phase I-II trials). The transduction efficiency of AdCD40L is dependent on the expression of CAR (coxsackie/adenovirus adhesion receptor), which is commonly downregulated on tumor cells. To enhance transduction efficiency, and therefore the therapeutic efficacy, a double-modified adenovirus was developed. The double-modified Ad5PTDf35(mCD40L) had a protein transduction domain (PTD) inserted into the hexon protein and the virus fiber is switched from serotype 5 to serotype 35. These modifications enable transduction of a wider range of cell types. In comparison with Ad5(mCD40L), Ad5PTDf35(mCD40L) showed increased transduction capacity on a variety of murine cells. Furthermore, antigen presentation was improved after transduction with Ad5PTDf35(mCD40L). This was demonstrated in an antigen presentation assay, both in vitro and in vivo, in which transduced dendritic cells were loaded with suboptimal concentrations of the human gp100 peptide and allowed to interact with gp100-specific transgenic T cells (pmel). Finally, Ad5PTDf35(mCD40L) could delay tumor growth in a murine cancer model at a particle load, wherein therapeutic efficacy of the Ad5(mCD40L) vector was lost. Hence, the Ad5PTDf35(CD40L) vector holds great promise as a second-generation immune stimulatory therapy, as it not only targets tumor cells but also antigen-presenting cells that are, among other cells, present in the tumor microenvironment.

  • 14.
    Lind, Anne-Li
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Freyhult, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Bodolea, Constantin
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj, Napoca, Romania..
    Ekegren, Titti
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Gustafsson, Mats G
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Katila, Lenka
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Gordh, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    A Multiplex Protein Panel Applied to Cerebrospinal Fluid Reveals Three New Biomarker Candidates in ALS but None in Neuropathic Pain Patients2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 2, e0149821Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to develop and apply a novel multiplex panel of solid-phase proximity ligation assays (SP-PLA) requiring only 20 μL of samples, as a tool for discovering protein biomarkers for neurological disease and treatment thereof in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We applied the SP-PLA to samples from two sets of patients with poorly understood nervous system pathologies amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and neuropathic pain, where patients were treated with spinal cord stimulation (SCS). Forty-seven inflammatory and neurotrophic proteins were measured in samples from 20 ALS patients and 15 neuropathic pain patients, and compared to normal concentrations in CSF from control individuals. Nineteen of the 47 proteins were detectable in more than 95% of the 72 controls. None of the 21 proteins detectable in CSF from neuropathic pain patients were significantly altered by SCS. The levels of the three proteins, follistatin, interleukin-1 alpha, and kallikrein-5 were all significantly reduced in the ALS group compared to age-matched controls. These results demonstrate the utility of purpose designed multiplex SP-PLA panels in CSF biomarker research for understanding neuropathological and neurotherapeutic mechanisms. The protein changes found in the CSF of ALS patients may be of diagnostic interest.

  • 15.
    Ramachandran, Mohanraj
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Jin, Chuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Eriksson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Adenovirus Encoded Helicobacter pylori Neutrophil Activating Protein Promotes Maturation of DCs with Th-1 Polarization, Improved Antigen Presentation and Migration2014In: Molecular Therapy, ISSN 1525-0016, E-ISSN 1525-0024, Vol. 22, S242-S243 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Ramachandran, Mohanraj
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Jin, Chuan
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Eriksson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Vector-Encoded Helicobacter pylori Neutrophil-Activating Protein Promotes Maturation of Dendritic Cells with Th1 Polarization and Improved Migration2014In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 193, no 5, 2287-2296 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) is a major virulence factor involved in H. pylori infection. Both HP-NAP protein and oncolytic viruses encoding HP-NAP have been suggested as immunotherapeutic anticancer agents and adjuvants for vaccination but with little known about its mode of action to activate adaptive immunity. Dendritic cells (DCs) are key players in bridging innate and adaptive immune responses, and in this study we aim to evaluate the effect of HP-NAP on DC maturation, migration, and induction of adaptive immune response. Maturation markers CD83, CD80, CD86, HLA-DR, CD40, and CCR7 were upregulated on human DCs after treatment with supernatants from HP-NAP adenovirus-infected cells. HP-NAP-activated DCs had a Th1 cytokine secretion profile, with high IL-12 and relatively low IL-10 secretion, and migrated toward CCL19. Ag-specific T cells were efficiently expanded by Ag-presenting HP-NAP-activated DCs, which is an important property of functionally mature DCs. Furthermore, intradermal injections of HP-NAP-encoding adenovirus in C57BL/6 mice enhanced resident DC migration to draining lymph nodes, which was verified by imaging lymph nodes by two-photon microscopy and by phenotyping migrating cells by flow cytometry. In conclusion, therapeutic effects of HP-NAP are mediated by maturation of DCs and subsequent activation of Ag-specific T cells in addition to provoking innate immunity.

  • 17.
    Ramachandran, Mohanraj
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Dyczynski, Matheus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska Inst, Dept Pathol & Oncol, CCK, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Baskaran, Sathishkumar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zhang, Lei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lulla, Aleksei
    Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Estonia..
    Lulla, Valeria
    Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Estonia..
    Saul, Sirle
    Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Estonia..
    Nelander, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Dimberg, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Merits, Andres
    Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Estonia..
    Leja-Jarblad, Justyna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Safe and effective treatment of experimental neuroblastoma and glioblastoma using systemically administered triple microRNA-detargeted oncolytic Semliki Forest virus2017In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 23, no 6, 1519-1530 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and high-risk neuroblastoma are cancers with poor outcome. Immunotherapy in the form of neurotropic oncolytic viruses is a promising therapeutic strategy for these malignancies. Here we evaluate the oncolytic potential of the neurovirulent and partly interferon (IFN)-β-resistant Semliki Forest virus (SFV)-4 in GBMs and neuroblastomas. To reduce neurovirulence we constructed SFV4miRT, which is attenuated in normal CNS cells through insertion of microRNA target sequences for miR124, miR125, miR134 Experimental Design:Oncolytic activity of SFV4miRT was examined in mouse neuroblastoma and GBM cell lines and in patient-derived human glioblastoma cell cultures (HGCC). In vivo neurovirulence and therapeutic efficacy was evaluated in two syngeneic orthotopic glioma models (CT-2A, GL261) and syngeneic subcutaneous neuroblastoma model (NXS2). The role of IFN-β in inhibiting therapeutic efficacy was investigated.

    RESULTS:

    The introduction of microRNA target sequences reduced neurovirulence of SFV4 in terms of attenuated replication in mouse CNS cells and ability to cause encephalitis when administered intravenously. A single intravenous injection of SFV4miRT prolonged survival and cured 4 of 8 mice (50%) with NXS2 and 3 of 11 mice (27%) with CT-2A, but not for GL261 tumor bearing mice. In vivo therapeutic efficacy in different tumor models inversely correlated to secretion of IFN-β by respective cells upon SFV4 infection in vitro Similarly, killing efficacy of HGCC lines inversely correlated to IFN-β response and interferon-α⁄β receptor (IFNAR)-1 expression.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    SFV4miRT has reduced neurovirulence, while retaining its oncolytic potential. SFV4miRT is an excellent candidate for treatment of GBMs and neuroblastomas with low IFN-β secretion.

  • 18.
    Ramachandran, Mohanraj
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Wanders, Alkwin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Eriksson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    An infection-enhanced oncolytic adenovirus secreting H. pylori neutrophil-activating protein with therapeutic effects on neuroendocrine tumors2013In: Molecular Therapy, ISSN 1525-0016, E-ISSN 1525-0024, Vol. 21, no 11, 2008-2018 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Helicobacter pylori Neutrophil Activating Protein (HP-NAP) is a major virulence factor involved in H. pylori infection. HP-NAP can mediate anti-tumor effects by recruiting neutrophils and inducing Th1-type differentiation in the tumor microenvironment. It therefore holds strong potential as a therapeutic gene. Here, we armed a replication-selective, infection-enhanced adenovirus with secretory HP-NAP, Ad5PTDf35-[Δ24-sNAP], and evaluated its therapeutic efficacy against neuroendocrine tumors. We observed that it could specifically infect and eradicate a wide range of tumor cells lines from different origin in vitro. Insertion of secretory HP-NAP did not affect the stability or replicative capacity of the virus and infected tumor cells could efficiently secrete HP-NAP. Intratumoral administration of the virus in nude mice xenografted with neuroendocrine tumors improved median survival. Evidence of biological HP-NAP activity was observed 24 hours after treatment with neutrophil infiltration in tumors and an increase of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and MIP2-α in the systemic circulation. Furthermore, evidence of Th1-type immune polarization was observed as a result of increase in IL-12/23 p40 cytokine concentrations 72 hours post-virus administration. Our observations suggest that HP-NAP can serve as a potent immunomodulator in promoting anti-tumor immune response in the tumor microenvironment and enhance the therapeutic effect of oncolytic adenovirus.

  • 19.
    Spyrou, Argyris
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Kundu, Soumi
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Haseeb, Lulu
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Olofsson, Tommie
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Natl Board Forens Med, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Dredge, Keith
    Zucero Therapeut Pty Ltd, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Hammond, Edward
    Zucero Therapeut Pty Ltd, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Barash, Uri
    Bruce Rappaport Fac Med, Canc & Vasc Biol Res Ctr, Haifa, Israel..
    Vlodavsky, Israel
    Bruce Rappaport Fac Med, Canc & Vasc Biol Res Ctr, Haifa, Israel..
    Forsling, Karin
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Inhibition of Heparanase in Pediatric Brain Tumor Cells Attenuates their Proliferation, Invasive Capacity, and In Vivo Tumor Growth2017In: Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, ISSN 1535-7163, E-ISSN 1538-8514, Vol. 16, no 8, 1705-1716 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Curative therapy for medulloblastoma and other pediatric embryonal brain tumors has improved, but the outcome still remains poor and current treatment causes long-term complications. Malignant brain tumors infiltrate the healthy brain tissue and, thus despite resection, cells that have already migrated cause rapid tumor regrowth. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), major components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), modulate the activities of a variety of proteins. The major enzyme that degrades HS, heparanase (HPSE), is an important regulator of the ECM. Here, we report that the levels of HPSE in pediatric brain tumors are higher than in healthy brain tissue and that treatment of pediatric brain tumor cells with HPSE stimulated their growth. In addition, the latent, 65 kDa form of HPSE (that requires intracellular enzymatic processing for activation) enhanced cell viability and rapidly activated the ERK and AKT signaling pathways, before enzymatically active HPSE was detected. The HPSE inhibitor PG545 efficiently killed pediatric brain tumor cells, but not normal human astrocytes, and this compound also reduced tumor cell invasion in vitro and potently reduced the size of flank tumors in vivo. Our findings indicate that HPSE in malignant brain tumors affects both the tumor cells themselves and their ECM. In conclusion, HPSE plays a substantial role in childhood brain tumors, by contributing to tumor aggressiveness and thereby represents a potential therapeutic target.

  • 20.
    Wu, Chengjun
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Lund Univ, Div Med Microbiol, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Cao, Xiaofang
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Huijbers, Elisabeth J. M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Vrije Univ Amsterdam Med Ctr, Dept Med Oncol, Angiogenesis Lab, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Akusjärvi, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Johansson, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Svensson, Catharina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    HAdV-2-suppressed growth of SV40 T antigen-transformed mouse mammary epithelial cell-induced tumours in SCID mice2016In: Virology, ISSN 0042-6822, E-ISSN 1096-0341, Vol. 489, 44-50 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human adenovirus (HAdV) vectors are promising tools for cancer therapy, but the shortage of efficient animal models for productive HAdV infections has restricted the evaluation of systemic effects to mainly immunodeficient mice. Previously, we reported a highly efficient replication of HAdV-2 in a non-tumorigenic mouse mammary epithelial cell line, NMuMG. Here we show that HAdV-2 gene expression and progeny formation in NMuMG cells transformed with the SV40 T antigen (NMuMG-T cells) were as efficient as in the parental NMuMG cells. Injection of HAdV-2 into tumours established by NMuMG-T in SCID mice caused reduced tumour growth and signs of intratumoural lesions. HAdV-2 replicated within the NMuMG-T-established tumours, but not in interspersed host-derived tissues within the tumours. The specific infection of NMuMG-T-derived tumours was verified by the lack of viral DNA in kidney, lung or spleen although low levels of viral DNA was occasionally found in liver.

  • 21.
    Yan, Hongji
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Polymer Chemistry.
    Podiyan, Oommen
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Polymer Chemistry.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Polymer Chemistry.
    Qian, Hong
    Varghese, Oommen P.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Polymer Chemistry.
    Chondroitin Sulfate-Coated DNA-Nanoplexes Enhance Transfection Efficiency by Controlling Plasmid Release from Endosomes: A New Insight into Modulating Nonviral Gene Transfection2015In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 25, no 25, 3907-3915 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Degradation of plasmid DNA (pDNA) in the endosome compartment and its release to the cytosol are the major hurdles for efficient gene transfection. This is generally addressed by using transfection reagents that can overcome these limitations. In this article, the first report is presented which suggests that controlling the release of pDNA from endosome is the key for achieving efficient transfection. In this study, chondroitin sulfate (CS)-coated DNA-nanoplexes are developed using a modular approach where CS is coated post-pDNA/PEI nanoplex formation. To ensure good stability of the nanoplexes, imine/enamine chemistry is exploited by reacting aldehyde-modified chondroitin sulfate (CS-CHO) with free amines of pDNA/PEI complex. This supramolecular nanocarrier system displays efficient cellular uptake, and controlled endosomal pDNA release without eliciting any cytotoxicity. On the contrary, burst release of pDNA from endosome (using chloroqine) results in significant reduction in gene expression. Unlike pDNA/PEI-based transfection, the nanoparticle design presented here shows exceptional stability and gene transfection efficiency in different cell lines such as human colorectal cancer cells (HCT116), human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293), and mouse skin-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) using luciferase protein as a reporter gene. This new insight will be valuable in designing next generation of transfection reagents.

  • 22.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Adenovirus for Cancer Therapy: With a Focus on its Surface Modification2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) is widely used as an oncolytic agent for cancer therapy. However, its infectivity is highly dependent on the expression level of coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) on the surface of tumor cells. We engineered Ad5 virus with the protein transduction domain (PTD) from the HIV-1 Tat protein (Tat-PTD) inserted in the hypervariable region 5 (HVR5) of the hexon protein in the virus capsid. Tat-PTD-modified Ad5 shows a dramatically increased transduction level of CAR-negative cells and bypassed fiber-mediated transduction. It also overcomes the fiber-masking problem, which is caused by release of excess fiber proteins from infected cells. To achieve specific viral replication in neuroblastoma and neuroendocrine tumor cells, we identified the secretogranin III (SCG3) promoter and constructed an adenovirus Ad5PTD(ASH1-SCG3-E1A) wherein E1A gene expression is controlled by the SCG3 promoter and the achaete-scute complex homolog 1 (ASH1) enhancer. This virus shows selective and efficient killing of neuroblastoma cell lines in vitro, and delays human neuroblastoma xenograft tumor growth on nude mice. To further enhance the viral oncolytic efficacy, we also switched the fiber 5 to fiber 35 to generate Ad5PTDf35. This vector shows dramatically increased transduction capacity of primary human cell cultures including hematopoietic cells and their derivatives, pancreatic islets and exocrine cells, mesenchymal stem cells and primary tumor cells including primary cancer initiating cells. Ad5PTDf35-based adenovirus could be a useful platform for gene delivery and oncolytic virus development. Viral oncolysis alone cannot completely eradicate tumors. Therefore, we further armed the Ad5PTDf35-D24 virus with a secreted form of Helicobacter pylori Neutrophil Activating Protein (HP-NAP). Expression of HP-NAP recruits neutrophils to the site of infection, activates an innate immune response against tumor cells and provokes a Th1-type adaptive immune response. Established tumor on nude mice could be completely eradicated in some cases after treatment with this virus and the survival of mice was significantly prolonged.

    List of papers
    1. Adenovirus with Hexon Tat-Protein Transduction Domain Modification Exhibits Increased Therapeutic Effect in Experimental Neuroblastoma and Neuroendocrine Tumors
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adenovirus with Hexon Tat-Protein Transduction Domain Modification Exhibits Increased Therapeutic Effect in Experimental Neuroblastoma and Neuroendocrine Tumors
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    2011 (English)In: Journal of Virology, ISSN 0022-538X, E-ISSN 1098-5514, Vol. 85, no 24, 13114-13123 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) is widely used as an oncolytic agent for cancer therapy. However, its infectivity is highly dependent on the expression level of coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) on the surfaces of tumor cells. Furthermore, infected cells overproduce adenovirus fiber proteins, which are released prior to cell lysis. The released fibers block CAR on noninfected neighboring cells, thereby preventing progeny virus entry. Our aim was to add a CAR-independent infection route to Ad5 to increase the infectivity of tumor cells with low CAR expression and prevent the fiber-masking problem. We constructed Ad5 viruses that encode the protein transduction domain (PTD) of the HIV-1 Tat protein (Tat-PTD) in hypervariable region 5 (HVR5) of the hexon protein. Tat-PTD functions as a cell-penetrating peptide, and Tat-PTD-modified Ad5 showed a dramatic increased transduction of CAR-negative cell lines compared to unmodified vector. Moreover, while tumor cell infectivity was severely reduced for Ad5 in the presence of fiber proteins, it was only marginally reduced for Tat-PTD-modified Ad5. Furthermore, because of the sequence alteration in the hexon HVR, coagulation factor X-mediated virus uptake was significantly reduced. Mice harboring human neuroblastoma and neuroendocrine tumors show suppressed tumor growths and prolonged survival when treated with Tat-PTD-modified oncolytic viruses. Our data suggest that modification of Ad5 with Tat-PTD in HVR5 expands its utility as an oncolytic agent.

    Keyword
    adenovirus, cell penetrating peptide, Tat-PTD, neuroblastoma, neuroendocrine
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-165614 (URN)10.1128/JVI.05759-11 (DOI)000297642000029 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, K2008-68X-15270-04-3
    Available from: 2012-01-16 Created: 2012-01-09 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
    2. Tat‐PTD‐modified Oncolytic Adenovirus Driven by the SCG3 Promoter and ASH1 Enhancer for Neuroblastoma Therapy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tat‐PTD‐modified Oncolytic Adenovirus Driven by the SCG3 Promoter and ASH1 Enhancer for Neuroblastoma Therapy
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    2013 (English)In: Human Gene Therapy, ISSN 1043-0342, E-ISSN 1557-7422, Vol. 24, no 8, 766-775 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Secretogranin III (SGC3) belongs to the granin family and is highly expressed in endocrine and neural tissues. The human SCG3 promoterhas not yet been characterized. We identified that a 0.5 kb DNA fragment upstream of the SCG3 gene can selectively drivetransgene expression in neuroblastoma cell lines. The strength of transgene expression was further increased and specificity maintained,by addition of the human achaete‐scute complex homolog 1 (ASH1) enhancer. We developed an oncolytic serotype 5‐basedadenovirus, where the SCG3 promoter and ASH1 enhancer drive E1A gene expression. The virus was further modified with a cellpenetratingpeptide (Tat‐PTD) in the virus capsid, which we have previously shown results in increased adenovirus transductionefficiency of many neuroblastoma cell lines. The virus, Ad5PTD(ASH1‐SCG3‐E1A), shows selective and efficient killing of neuroblastomacell lines in vitro, including cisplatin‐, etoposide‐ and doxorubicin‐insensitive neuroblastoma cells. Furthermore, it delays tumorgrowth and thereby prolonged survival for nude mice harboring subcutaneous human neuroblastoma xenograft. In conclusion, wereport a novel oncolytic adenovirus with potential use for neuroblastoma therapy.

    Keyword
    Tat-PTD, neuroblastoma, cancer therapy, adenovirus
    National Category
    Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
    Research subject
    Clinical Virology; Medical Virology; Molecular Biotechnology; Molecular Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-203651 (URN)10.1089/hum.2012.132 (DOI)000323181200007 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Cancer Society, 10‐0105Swedish Cancer Society, 10‐0552Swedish Research Council, K2013‐55X‐22191‐01‐3
    Note

    De två (2) första författarna delar förstaförfattarskapet.

    Other funds:

    TheSwedish Cancer Society (10‐0105 and 10‐0552), the Swedish ChildrenCancer Foundation (PROJ10/027, NBCNSPDHEL10/013,JIN C. ET AL. 20138PROJ11/062), Gunnar Nilsson’s Cancer Foundation, the SwedishResearch Council (K2013‐55X‐22191‐01‐3) and the Marcus andMarianne Wallenberg’s Foundation.

    Available from: 2013-07-16 Created: 2013-07-16 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    3. Adenovirus Serotype 5 Vectors with Tat-PTD Modified Hexon and Serotype 35 Fiber Show Greatly Enhanced Transduction Capacity of Primary Cell Cultures
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adenovirus Serotype 5 Vectors with Tat-PTD Modified Hexon and Serotype 35 Fiber Show Greatly Enhanced Transduction Capacity of Primary Cell Cultures
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    2013 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 1, e54952- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors represent one of the most efficient gene delivery vectors in life sciences. However, Ad5 is dependent on expression of the coxsackievirus-adenovirus- receptor (CAR) on the surface of target cell for efficient transduction, which limits it's utility for certain cell types. Herein we present a new vector, Ad5PTDf35, which is an Ad5 vector having serotype 35 fiber-specificity and Tat-PTD hexon-modification. This vector shows dramatically increased transduction capacity of primary human cell cultures including T cells, monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, pancreatic islets and exocrine cells, mesenchymal stem cells and tumor initiating cells. Biodistribution in mice following systemic administration (tail-vein injection) show significantly reduced uptake in the liver and spleen of Ad5PTDf35 compared to unmodified Ad5. Therefore, replication-competent viruses with these modifications may be further developed as oncolytic agents for cancer therapy. User-friendly backbone plasmids containing these modifications were developed for compatibility to the AdEasy-system to facilitate the development of surface-modified adenoviruses for gene delivery to difficult-to-transduce cells in basic, pre-clinical and clinical research.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-197480 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0054952 (DOI)000315210400045 ()
    Available from: 2013-03-26 Created: 2013-03-26 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    4. An infection-enhanced oncolytic adenovirus secreting H. pylori neutrophil-activating protein with therapeutic effects on neuroendocrine tumors
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>An infection-enhanced oncolytic adenovirus secreting H. pylori neutrophil-activating protein with therapeutic effects on neuroendocrine tumors
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: Molecular Therapy, ISSN 1525-0016, E-ISSN 1525-0024, Vol. 21, no 11, 2008-2018 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Helicobacter pylori Neutrophil Activating Protein (HP-NAP) is a major virulence factor involved in H. pylori infection. HP-NAP can mediate anti-tumor effects by recruiting neutrophils and inducing Th1-type differentiation in the tumor microenvironment. It therefore holds strong potential as a therapeutic gene. Here, we armed a replication-selective, infection-enhanced adenovirus with secretory HP-NAP, Ad5PTDf35-[Δ24-sNAP], and evaluated its therapeutic efficacy against neuroendocrine tumors. We observed that it could specifically infect and eradicate a wide range of tumor cells lines from different origin in vitro. Insertion of secretory HP-NAP did not affect the stability or replicative capacity of the virus and infected tumor cells could efficiently secrete HP-NAP. Intratumoral administration of the virus in nude mice xenografted with neuroendocrine tumors improved median survival. Evidence of biological HP-NAP activity was observed 24 hours after treatment with neutrophil infiltration in tumors and an increase of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and MIP2-α in the systemic circulation. Furthermore, evidence of Th1-type immune polarization was observed as a result of increase in IL-12/23 p40 cytokine concentrations 72 hours post-virus administration. Our observations suggest that HP-NAP can serve as a potent immunomodulator in promoting anti-tumor immune response in the tumor microenvironment and enhance the therapeutic effect of oncolytic adenovirus.

    Keyword
    Helicobacter pylori, Neutrophil Activating Protein, adenovirus, cancer therapy
    National Category
    Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
    Research subject
    Molecular Medicine; Clinical Virology; Medical Virology; Clinical Immunology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-203649 (URN)10.1038/mt.2013.153 (DOI)000326937000007 ()23817216 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Cancer Society, 10‐0105Swedish Cancer Society, 10‐0552Swedish Research Council, K2013‐55X‐22191‐01‐3
    Note

    De två (2) sista författarna delar sistaförfattarskapet.

    Open access under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License (CC BY-NC-ND). 2013.

    Supported funds:

    The Swedish Children Cancer Foundation(PROJ10/027), Gunnar Nilsson’s Cancer Foundation, Marcus and Marianne Wallenberg’sFoundation

    Available from: 2013-07-16 Created: 2013-07-16 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
  • 23.
    Yu, Di
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jin, Chuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Leja, Justyna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Majdalani, Nadim
    Nilsson, Berith
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Eriksson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Adenovirus with Hexon Tat-Protein Transduction Domain Modification Exhibits Increased Therapeutic Effect in Experimental Neuroblastoma and Neuroendocrine Tumors2011In: Journal of Virology, ISSN 0022-538X, E-ISSN 1098-5514, Vol. 85, no 24, 13114-13123 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) is widely used as an oncolytic agent for cancer therapy. However, its infectivity is highly dependent on the expression level of coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) on the surfaces of tumor cells. Furthermore, infected cells overproduce adenovirus fiber proteins, which are released prior to cell lysis. The released fibers block CAR on noninfected neighboring cells, thereby preventing progeny virus entry. Our aim was to add a CAR-independent infection route to Ad5 to increase the infectivity of tumor cells with low CAR expression and prevent the fiber-masking problem. We constructed Ad5 viruses that encode the protein transduction domain (PTD) of the HIV-1 Tat protein (Tat-PTD) in hypervariable region 5 (HVR5) of the hexon protein. Tat-PTD functions as a cell-penetrating peptide, and Tat-PTD-modified Ad5 showed a dramatic increased transduction of CAR-negative cell lines compared to unmodified vector. Moreover, while tumor cell infectivity was severely reduced for Ad5 in the presence of fiber proteins, it was only marginally reduced for Tat-PTD-modified Ad5. Furthermore, because of the sequence alteration in the hexon HVR, coagulation factor X-mediated virus uptake was significantly reduced. Mice harboring human neuroblastoma and neuroendocrine tumors show suppressed tumor growths and prolonged survival when treated with Tat-PTD-modified oncolytic viruses. Our data suggest that modification of Ad5 with Tat-PTD in HVR5 expands its utility as an oncolytic agent.

  • 24.
    Yu, Di
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Jin, Chuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Ramachandran, Mohanraj
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Xu, Jing
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Nilsson, Berith
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Le Blanc, Katarina
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Adamson, Rachel
    Maitland, Norman
    Fan, Xiaolong
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Adenovirus Serotype 5 Vectors with Tat-PTD Modified Hexon and Serotype 35 Fiber Show Greatly Enhanced Transduction Capacity of Primary Cell Cultures2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 1, e54952- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors represent one of the most efficient gene delivery vectors in life sciences. However, Ad5 is dependent on expression of the coxsackievirus-adenovirus- receptor (CAR) on the surface of target cell for efficient transduction, which limits it's utility for certain cell types. Herein we present a new vector, Ad5PTDf35, which is an Ad5 vector having serotype 35 fiber-specificity and Tat-PTD hexon-modification. This vector shows dramatically increased transduction capacity of primary human cell cultures including T cells, monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, pancreatic islets and exocrine cells, mesenchymal stem cells and tumor initiating cells. Biodistribution in mice following systemic administration (tail-vein injection) show significantly reduced uptake in the liver and spleen of Ad5PTDf35 compared to unmodified Ad5. Therefore, replication-competent viruses with these modifications may be further developed as oncolytic agents for cancer therapy. User-friendly backbone plasmids containing these modifications were developed for compatibility to the AdEasy-system to facilitate the development of surface-modified adenoviruses for gene delivery to difficult-to-transduce cells in basic, pre-clinical and clinical research.

  • 25.
    Yu, Di
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Leja, Justyna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Loskog, Angelica S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Giandomenico, Valeria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Oberg, K
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Preclinical Evaluation of AdVince, an Oncolytic Adenovirus Adapted for Treatment of Liver Metastases from Neuroendocrine Cancer2016In: Neuroendocrinology, ISSN 0028-3835, E-ISSN 1423-0194, Vol. 105, no 1, 54-66 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cancer immunotherapy is becoming a cornerstone in the clinical care of cancer patients due to the breakthrough trials with immune checkpoint blockade antibodies and chimeric antigen receptor T cells. The next breakthrough in cancer immunotherapy is likely to be oncolytic viruses engineered to selectively kill tumor cells and deceive the immune system to believe that the tumor is a foreign entity that needs to be eradicated. We have developed AdVince, an oncolytic adenovirus for treatment of liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumor (NET). AdVince includes the gene promoter from human chromogranin A for selective replication in neuroendocrine cells, miR122 target sequences for reduced liver toxicity, and a cell-penetrating peptide in the capsid for increased infectivity of tumor cells and optimized spread within tumors. This paper describes the preclinical evaluation of AdVince on freshly isolated human gastrointestinal NET cells resected from liver metastases and freshly isolated human hepatocytes as well as in fresh human blood. AdVince selectively replicates in and kills NET cells. Approximately, 73-fold higher concentration of AdVince is needed to induce similar level of cytotoxicity in NET cells as in hepatocytes. AdVince did not activate complement or induce considerable amount of proinflammatory cytokines or chemokines in human blood. The data presented herein indicate that AdVince can be safely evaluated in a phase I/IIa clinical trial for patients with liver-dominant NET.

  • 26.
    Zhang, Lei
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kundu, Soumi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Feenstra, Tjerk
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Li, Xiujuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jin, Chuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Laaniste, Liisi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    El Hassan, Tamador Elsir Abu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Ohlin, K Elisabet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Olofsson, Tommie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Olsson, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Magnusson, Peetra U
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Forsberg, Karin Nilsson
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Smits, Anja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Dieterich, Lothar C
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Dimberg, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pleiotrophin promotes vascular abnormalization in gliomas and correlates with poor survival in patients with astrocytomas.2015In: Science Signaling, ISSN 1945-0877, E-ISSN 1937-9145, Vol. 8, no 406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glioblastomas are aggressive astrocytomas characterized by endothelial cell proliferation and abnormal vasculature, which can cause brain edema and increase patient morbidity. We identified the heparin-binding cytokine pleiotrophin as a driver of vascular abnormalization in glioma. Pleiotrophin abundance was greater in high-grade human astrocytomas and correlated with poor survival. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), which is a receptor that is activated by pleiotrophin, was present in mural cells associated with abnormal vessels. Orthotopically implanted gliomas formed from GL261 cells that were engineered to produce pleiotrophin showed increased microvessel density and enhanced tumor growth compared with gliomas formed from control GL261 cells. The survival of mice with pleiotrophin-producing gliomas was shorter than that of mice with gliomas that did not produce pleiotrophin. Vessels in pleiotrophin-producing gliomas were poorly perfused and abnormal, a phenotype that was associated with increased deposition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in direct proximity to the vasculature. The growth of pleiotrophin-producing GL261 gliomas was inhibited by treatment with the ALK inhibitor crizotinib, the ALK inhibitor ceritinib, or the VEGF receptor inhibitor cediranib, whereas control GL261 tumors did not respond to either inhibitor. Our findings link pleiotrophin abundance in gliomas with survival in humans and mice, and show that pleiotrophin promotes glioma progression through increased VEGF deposition and vascular abnormalization.

1 - 26 of 26
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