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  • 1.
    Burchardt, Steffi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Mineralogy Petrology and Tectonics.
    Koyi, Hemin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Mineralogy Petrology and Tectonics.
    Schmeling, Harro
    Fuchs, Lukas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Mineralogy Petrology and Tectonics.
    Sinking of anhydrite blocks within a Newtonian salt diapir: modelling the influence of block aspect ratio and salt stratification2012In: Geophysical Journal International, ISSN 0956-540X, E-ISSN 1365-246X, Vol. 188, no 3, p. 763-778Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    2-D Finite Differences models are used to analyse the strain produced by gravity-driven sinking of dense rectangular inclusions through homogeneous and vertically stratified Newtonian salt. We systematically modelled the descent of dense blocks of different sizes and initial orientations (aspect ratios) representing the Main Anhydrite fragments documented within, for example, the Gorleben salt diapir. Model results demonstrate that size of the blocks is a governing parameter which dictates the amount of strain produced within the block and in the surrounding host salt. Initial block orientation (aspect ratio), on the other hand, causes fundamental differences in block deformation, while the resulting structures produced in the salt are principally the same in all models with homogeneous salt, covering shear zones and folding of passive markers. In models with vertically stratified salt with different viscosities, block descent takes place along complex paths. This results from greater strain accommodation by the salt formation with the lowest viscosity and an asymmetrical distribution of initial vertical shear stresses around the block. Consequently, in these models, block strain is lower compared with the models with homogeneous salt (for the same viscosity as the high-viscosity salt), and sinking is accompanied by block rotation. The latter causes diapir-scale disturbance of the pre-sinking salt stratigraphy and complex sinking paths of the blocks. In particular, vertically oriented blocks sink into high-viscosity salt and drag with them some low-viscosity salt, while horizontal blocks sink in the low-viscosity salt. The resultant sinking velocities vary strongly depending on the sinking path of the block. Based on model results and observed structural configuration within the Gorleben salt diapir, we conclude that the internal complexity of a salt diapir governs its post-ascent deformation. Salt structure and its interaction with dense blocks should hence be considered in the assessment of the long-term stability of storage sites for hazardous waste.

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  • 2.
    Fuchs, Lukas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Mineralogy Petrology and Tectonics.
    Strain quantifications in different tectonic scales using numerical modelling2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on calculation of finite and progressive deformation in different tectonic scales using 2D numerical models with application to natural cases. Essentially, two major tectonic areas have been covered: a) salt tectonics and b) upper mantle deformation due to interaction between the lithosphere and asthenosphere.

    The focus in salt tectonics lies on deformation within down-built diapirs consisting of a source layer feeding a vertical stem. Three deformation regimes have been identified within the salt: (I) a squeezing channel flow underneath the overburden, (II) a corner flow underneath the stem, and (III) a pure channel flow within the stem. The results of the model show that the deformation pattern within the stem of a diapir (e.g. symmetric or asymmetric) can reveal information on different rates of salt supplies from the source layer (e.g. observed in Klodowa-diapir, Poland). Composite rock salt rheology results in strong localization and amplification of the strain along the salt layer boundaries in comparison to Newtonian rock salt. Flow and fold structures of passive marker lines are directly correlated to natural folds within a salt diapir.

    In case of the upper mantle, focus lies on deformation and resulting lattice preferred orientation (LPO) underneath an oceanic plate. Sensitivity of deformation and seismic anisotropy on rheology, grain size (d), temperature (T), and kinematics (v) has been investigated. The results of the model show that the mechanical lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary is strongly controlled by T and less so by v or d. A higher strain concentration within the asthenosphere (e.g. for smaller potential mantle temperatures, higher plate velocities, or smaller d) indicates a weaker coupling between the plate and the underlying mantle, which becomes stronger with the age of the plate. A Poiseuille flow within the asthenosphere, significantly affects the deformation and LPO in the upper mantle. The results of the model show, that deformation in the upper mantle at a certain distance away from the ridge depends on the absolute velocity in the asthenosphere. However, only in cases of a driving upper mantle base does the seismic anisotropy and delay times reach values within the range of natural data.

    List of papers
    1. Numerical modeling on progressive internal deformation indown-built diapirs
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Numerical modeling on progressive internal deformation indown-built diapirs
    2014 (English)In: Tectonophysics, ISSN 0040-1951, E-ISSN 1879-3266, Vol. 632, p. 111-122Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A two-dimensional finite difference code (FDCON) is used to estimate the finite deformationwithin a down-builtdiapir. The geometry of the down-built diapir is fixed by using two rigid rectangular overburden unitswhich sinkinto a source layer of a constant viscosity. Thus, the model refers to diapirs consisting of a source layerfeeding a vertical stem, and not to other salt structures (e.g. salt sheets or pillows). With this setup westudy the progressive strain in three different deformation regimes within the “salt” material: (I) a squeezedchannel-flow deformation regime and (II) a corner-flow deformation regime within the source layer, and(III) a pure channel-flow deformation regime within the stem. We analyze the evolution of finite deformationin each regime individually, progressive strain for particles passing all three regimes, and total 2Dfinite deformationwithin the salt layer. Model results show that the material which enters the stem bears inherited strainaccumulated from the other two domains. Therefore, finite deformation in the stem differs from the expectedchannel-flow deformation, due to the deformation accumulated within the source layer. The stem displays ahigh deformation zone within its center and areas of decreasing progressive strain between its center and itsboundaries.High deformation zoneswithin the stemcould also be observedwithin natural diapirs (e.g. Klodowa,Polen). The location and structure of the high deformation zone (e.g. symmetric or asymmetric) could revealinformation about different rates of salt supplies from the source layer. Thus, deformation pattern could directlybe correlated to the evolution of the diapir.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2014
    Keywords
    Numerical modeling, Salt tectonics, Progressive and finite deformation, Differential loading
    National Category
    Geosciences, Multidisciplinary Geology
    Research subject
    Earth Science with specialization in Mineral Chemistry, Petrology and Tectonics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-237448 (URN)10.1016/j.tecto.2014.06.005 (DOI)000343378500009 ()
    Available from: 2014-12-02 Created: 2014-12-02 Last updated: 2024-04-18Bibliographically approved
    2. Numerical modeling of the effect of composite rheology on internal deformation in down-built diapirs.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Numerical modeling of the effect of composite rheology on internal deformation in down-built diapirs.
    2015 (English)In: Tectonophysics, ISSN 0040-1951, E-ISSN 1879-3266, Vol. 646, p. 79-95Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A two-dimensional finite difference code (FDCON) is used to estimate the progressive deformation and the effect of a composite rheology, i.e., Newtonian combined with non-Newtonian, on finite deformation patterns within a down-built diapir. The geometry of the diapir is fixed using two rigid rectangular overburden units which sink into a source layer of a certain viscosity. We have analyzed the progressive deformation within the entire salt layer for a composite rheology and compared them to a standard model with Newtonian rheology (ηs = 1018 Pa s). The composite rheology models show a more complex deformation patterns in comparison to the standard model. Deformation is more localized within the source layer, leaving a broader less deformed zone within the middle of the source layer. In comparison to the standard model, ellipticity (R) of the strain ellipse is amplified by a factor of up to three in high deformation regions with a finite deformation f larger than two (f = log10(R)). Initially vertical and horizontal passive marker-lines within the salt layer, are folded during salt movement. Initially horizontally-oriented marker-lines in the source layer show upright folds within the middle of the stem. Within the source layer, initially vertical marker-lines form recumbent folds, which are refolded during their flow from the source layer into the stem. During their refolding, the hinge of the fold migrates outward towards the flank of the diapir. A temporal and spatial hinge migration is observed for sub-horizontal folds that originated in the source layer as they are refolded. We have also studied both the effect of curved versus sharp corners between the source layer and the stem on strain evolution within both the feeding source layer and the down-built diapir. Strain evolution and hinge migration are strongly influenced by the geometry of the corner between the source layer and the stem.

    Keywords
    Numerical modeling; Salt tectonics; Composite rheology; Newtonian and non-Newtonian rheologies; Progressive and finite deformations; Differential loading
    National Category
    Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
    Research subject
    Earth Science with specialization in Mineral Chemistry, Petrology and Tectonics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-240805 (URN)10.1016/j.tecto.2015.01.014 (DOI)000352184200006 ()
    Available from: 2015-01-08 Created: 2015-01-08 Last updated: 2024-04-18Bibliographically approved
    3. Thermo-mechanical modelling of progressive deformation and seismic anisotropy at the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thermo-mechanical modelling of progressive deformation and seismic anisotropy at the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary
    (English)In: Geophysical Journal International, ISSN 0956-540X, E-ISSN 1365-246XArticle in journal (Other academic) Submitted
    Abstract [en]

       Deformation at the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary is strongly governed by its effective viscosity, which depends on temperature, strain rate, and grain size. Moreover, deformation can cause lattice preferred orientation resulting in seismic anisotropy and shear wave splitting. We used a 1D model approach to calculate shear strain and characteristic depths for an oceanic plate as a function of age. We assume a composite rheology (dislocation and diffusion creep) in combination with a half-space cooling model temperature field for constant and variable thermal parameters, and different potential mantle temperatures. Systematically, sensitivity of characteristic depths, deformation pattern, and seismic delay times δt on temperature, plate velocity, steady state grain size, and rheology have been analyzed. Model results show that the characteristic depths are only affected by local variations in the temperature field or a shift in the dominant deformation mechanism. The other parameters, however, do strongly affect the maximum total shear strain. Due to a continuous simple shear of the upper mantle governed by the motion of the plate, anisotropy, thickness of the anisotropic layer, and δt reach relatively large values in comparison to observed data. However, a small amount of dislocation creep (25-40 %), due to a modified rheology or small grain sizes, leads to a significantly thinner anisotropic layer. As a result, δt is reduced by 50 % or more. The change of the characteristics of the anisotropic layer and degree of its anisotropy may reflect and be of significance for the viscous (de)coupling between the lithosphere and asthenosphere.

    National Category
    Geology Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
    Research subject
    Earth Science with specialization in Mineral Chemistry, Petrology and Tectonics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-280694 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-03-14 Created: 2016-03-14 Last updated: 2024-04-18
    4. Thermo-mechanical modelling of progressive deformation at the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary: The effect of a horizontal pressure gradient
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thermo-mechanical modelling of progressive deformation at the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary: The effect of a horizontal pressure gradient
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Geology Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
    Research subject
    Earth Science with specialization in Mineral Chemistry, Petrology and Tectonics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-280695 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-03-14 Created: 2016-03-14 Last updated: 2024-04-18
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  • 3.
    Fuchs, Lukas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Mineralogy Petrology and Tectonics.
    Koyi, Hemin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Mineralogy Petrology and Tectonics.
    Schmeling, Harro
    Goethe-University, Institute of Geoscience, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
    Numerical modeling of the effect of composite rheology on internal deformation in down-built diapirs.2015In: Tectonophysics, ISSN 0040-1951, E-ISSN 1879-3266, Vol. 646, p. 79-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A two-dimensional finite difference code (FDCON) is used to estimate the progressive deformation and the effect of a composite rheology, i.e., Newtonian combined with non-Newtonian, on finite deformation patterns within a down-built diapir. The geometry of the diapir is fixed using two rigid rectangular overburden units which sink into a source layer of a certain viscosity. We have analyzed the progressive deformation within the entire salt layer for a composite rheology and compared them to a standard model with Newtonian rheology (ηs = 1018 Pa s). The composite rheology models show a more complex deformation patterns in comparison to the standard model. Deformation is more localized within the source layer, leaving a broader less deformed zone within the middle of the source layer. In comparison to the standard model, ellipticity (R) of the strain ellipse is amplified by a factor of up to three in high deformation regions with a finite deformation f larger than two (f = log10(R)). Initially vertical and horizontal passive marker-lines within the salt layer, are folded during salt movement. Initially horizontally-oriented marker-lines in the source layer show upright folds within the middle of the stem. Within the source layer, initially vertical marker-lines form recumbent folds, which are refolded during their flow from the source layer into the stem. During their refolding, the hinge of the fold migrates outward towards the flank of the diapir. A temporal and spatial hinge migration is observed for sub-horizontal folds that originated in the source layer as they are refolded. We have also studied both the effect of curved versus sharp corners between the source layer and the stem on strain evolution within both the feeding source layer and the down-built diapir. Strain evolution and hinge migration are strongly influenced by the geometry of the corner between the source layer and the stem.

  • 4.
    Fuchs, Lukas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Mineralogy Petrology and Tectonics.
    Koyi, Hemin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Mineralogy Petrology and Tectonics.
    Schmeling, Harro
    Goethe-University, Institute of Geoscience, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
    Numerical modeling on progressive internal deformation indown-built diapirs2014In: Tectonophysics, ISSN 0040-1951, E-ISSN 1879-3266, Vol. 632, p. 111-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A two-dimensional finite difference code (FDCON) is used to estimate the finite deformationwithin a down-builtdiapir. The geometry of the down-built diapir is fixed by using two rigid rectangular overburden unitswhich sinkinto a source layer of a constant viscosity. Thus, the model refers to diapirs consisting of a source layerfeeding a vertical stem, and not to other salt structures (e.g. salt sheets or pillows). With this setup westudy the progressive strain in three different deformation regimes within the “salt” material: (I) a squeezedchannel-flow deformation regime and (II) a corner-flow deformation regime within the source layer, and(III) a pure channel-flow deformation regime within the stem. We analyze the evolution of finite deformationin each regime individually, progressive strain for particles passing all three regimes, and total 2Dfinite deformationwithin the salt layer. Model results show that the material which enters the stem bears inherited strainaccumulated from the other two domains. Therefore, finite deformation in the stem differs from the expectedchannel-flow deformation, due to the deformation accumulated within the source layer. The stem displays ahigh deformation zone within its center and areas of decreasing progressive strain between its center and itsboundaries.High deformation zoneswithin the stemcould also be observedwithin natural diapirs (e.g. Klodowa,Polen). The location and structure of the high deformation zone (e.g. symmetric or asymmetric) could revealinformation about different rates of salt supplies from the source layer. Thus, deformation pattern could directlybe correlated to the evolution of the diapir.

  • 5.
    Fuchs, Lukas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Solid Earth Geology.
    Koyi, Hemin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Solid Earth Geology.
    Schmeling, Harro
    Goethe-University, Institute of Geoscience, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
    Numerical models of finite deformations within down-built diapirs: effectsof composite rocksalt rheology on deformation patterns2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Fuchs, Lukas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Solid Earth Geology.
    Schmeling, H.
    Koyi, Hemin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Solid Earth Geology.
    Numerical models of salt diapir formation by down-building: the role of sedimentation rate, viscosity contrast, initial amplitude and wavelength2011In: Geophysical Journal International, ISSN 0956-540X, E-ISSN 1365-246X, Vol. 186, no 2, p. 390-400Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Formation of salt diapirs has been described to be due to upbuilding (i. e. Rayleigh-Taylor like instability of salt diapirs piercing through a denser sedimentary overburden) or syndepositional down-building process (i. e. the top of the salt diapir remains at the surface all the time). Here we systematically analyse this second end-member mechanism by numerical modelling. Four parameters are varied: sedimentation rate nu(sed), salt viscosity eta(salt), amplitude delta of the initial perturbation of the sedimentation layer and thewavenumber k of this perturbation. The shape of the resulting salt diapirs strongly depends on these parameters. Small diapirs with subvertical side walls are found for small values of nu(sed) and eta(salt) or large values of delta, whereas taller diapirs with pronounced narrow stems build for larges values of nu(sed) and eta(salt) or small values of delta. Two domains are identified in the four-parameter space, which separates successful down-building models from non-successful models. By applying a simple channel flow law, the domain boundary can be described by the non-dimensional law nu(sedcrit)' = C(1)1/2 delta(0)'rho(sed)'k'(2/)k'(2) + C2, where rho(sed)' is the sediment density scaled by the density contrast Delta rho between sediment and salt, the wavelength is scaled by the salt layer thickness h(salt), and velocity is scaled by eta(salt)/(h(salt)(2)Delta rho g), where eta(salt) is the salt viscosity and g is the gravitational acceleration. From the numerical models, the constants C(1) and C(2) are determined as 0.0283 and 0.1171, respectively.

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  • 7.
    Fuchs, Lukas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Mineralogy Petrology and Tectonics.
    Schmeling, Harro
    Goethe-University, Institute of Geoscience, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
    A new numerical method to calculate inhomogeneous and time dependent large deformations of two-dimensional geodynamic flows with application to diapirism2013In: Geophysical Journal International, ISSN 0956-540X, E-ISSN 1365-246X, Vol. 194, no 2, p. 623-639Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A key to understand many geodynamic processes is studying the associated large deformation fields. Finite deformation can be measured in the field by using geological strain markers giving the logarithmic strain f = log 10(R), where R is the ellipticity of the strain ellipse. It has been challenging to accurately quantify finite deformation of geodynamic models for inhomogeneous and time-dependent large deformation cases. We present a new formulation invoking a 2-D marker-in-cell approach. Mathematically, one can describe finite deformation by a coordinate transformation to a Lagrangian reference frame. For a known velocity field the deformation gradient tensor, F, can be calculated by integrating the differential equation DtFij = LikFkj, where L is the velocity gradient tensor and Dt the Lagrangian derivative. The tensor F contains all information about the minor and major semi-half axes and orientation of the strain ellipse and the rotation. To integrate the equation centrally in time and space along a particle's path, we use the numerical 2-D finite difference code FDCON in combination with a marker-in-cell approach. For a sufficiently high marker density we can accurately calculate F for any 2-D inhomogeneous and time-dependent creeping flow at any point for a deformation f up to 4. Comparison between the analytical and numerical solution for the finite deformation within a Poiseuille–Couette flow shows an error of less than 2 per cent for a deformation up to f = 1.7. Moreover, we determine the finite deformation and strain partitioning within Rayleigh–Taylor instabilities (RTIs) of different viscosity and layer thickness ratios. These models provide a finite strain complement to the RTI benchmark of van Keken et al. Large finite deformation of up to f = 4 accumulates in RTIs within the stem and near the compositional boundaries. Distinction between different stages of diapirism shows a strong correlation between a maximum occurring deformation of f = 1, 3 and 4, and the early, intermediate and late stages of diapirism, respectively. Furthermore, we find that the overall strain of a RTI is concentrated in the less viscous regions. Thus, spatial distributions and magnitudes of finite deformation may be used to identify stages and viscosity ratios of natural cases.

  • 8. Fuchs, Lukas
    et al.
    Schmeling, Harro
    Numerical models of diapiric structures: analysis of the finite straindistribution2012In: Geophysical Research Abstracts, ISSN 1029-7006, E-ISSN 1607-7962, Vol. 14, p. EGU2012-330-1-Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 9.
    Fuchs, Lukas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Solid Earth Geology.
    Schmeling, Harro
    Goethe-University, Institute of Geoscience, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
    Koyi, Hemin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Solid Earth Geology.
    Numerical models of diapiric structures: comparison of the 2D finitedeformation field between Rayleigh-Taylor like and down-built likediapirs2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Fuchs, Lukas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Solid Earth Geology.
    Schmeling, Harro
    Goethe-University, Institute of Geoscience, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
    Koyi, Hemin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Solid Earth Geology.
    Numerical models on thermal and rheological sensitivity of deformation pattern at the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Fuchs, Lukas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Mineralogy Petrology and Tectonics.
    Schmeling, Harro
    Goethe-University, Institute of Geoscience, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
    Koyi, Hemin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Mineralogy Petrology and Tectonics.
    Thermo-mechanical modelling of progressive deformation and seismic anisotropy at the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundaryIn: Geophysical Journal International, ISSN 0956-540X, E-ISSN 1365-246XArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

       Deformation at the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary is strongly governed by its effective viscosity, which depends on temperature, strain rate, and grain size. Moreover, deformation can cause lattice preferred orientation resulting in seismic anisotropy and shear wave splitting. We used a 1D model approach to calculate shear strain and characteristic depths for an oceanic plate as a function of age. We assume a composite rheology (dislocation and diffusion creep) in combination with a half-space cooling model temperature field for constant and variable thermal parameters, and different potential mantle temperatures. Systematically, sensitivity of characteristic depths, deformation pattern, and seismic delay times δt on temperature, plate velocity, steady state grain size, and rheology have been analyzed. Model results show that the characteristic depths are only affected by local variations in the temperature field or a shift in the dominant deformation mechanism. The other parameters, however, do strongly affect the maximum total shear strain. Due to a continuous simple shear of the upper mantle governed by the motion of the plate, anisotropy, thickness of the anisotropic layer, and δt reach relatively large values in comparison to observed data. However, a small amount of dislocation creep (25-40 %), due to a modified rheology or small grain sizes, leads to a significantly thinner anisotropic layer. As a result, δt is reduced by 50 % or more. The change of the characteristics of the anisotropic layer and degree of its anisotropy may reflect and be of significance for the viscous (de)coupling between the lithosphere and asthenosphere.

  • 12.
    Fuchs, Lukas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Mineralogy Petrology and Tectonics.
    Schmeling, Harro
    Goethe-University, Institute of Geoscience, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
    Koyi, Hemin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Mineralogy Petrology and Tectonics.
    Thermo-mechanical modelling of progressive deformation at the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary: The effect of a horizontal pressure gradientManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 13. Schmeling, Harro
    et al.
    Fuchs, Lukas
    Wallner, Herbert
    The role of melt induces lithospheric weakening on the dynamics of continental rifting2010In: Geophysical Research Abstracts, ISSN 1029-7006, E-ISSN 1607-7962, Vol. 12, p. 8974-Article in journal (Refereed)
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