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  • 1. Aarsand, Pål
    et al.
    Forsberg [Gottzén], Lucas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Producing children's corporeal privacy: ethnographic video recording as material-discursive practice2010In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 249-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the use of video cameras in participant observation drawing on approximately 300 hours of video data from an ethnographic study of Swedish family life. Departing from Karen Barad’s post-humanistic perspective on scientific practices, the aim is to critically analyse how researchers, research participants and technology produce and negotiate children’s corporeal privacy. Ethnographic videotaping is understood as a material-discursive practice that creates and sustains boundaries between private and public, where videotaping is ideologically connected to a public sphere that may at times ‘intrude’ on children’s corporeal privacy. The limits of corporeal privacy are never fixed, but open for negotiation; ethnographers may therefore unintentionally transgress the boundary and thus be faced with ethical dilemmas. The fluidity of privacy calls for ethical reflexivity before, during and after fieldwork, and researchers must be sensitive to when ethical issues are at hand and how to deal with them.

  • 2. Aarsand Simonsen, Pål
    et al.
    Forsberg [Gottzén], Lucas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    De öppna och stängda dörrarnas moral: Dilemman i deltagande observation med video2009In: Den västentliga vardagen: Några diskursanalytiska perspektiv på tal, text och bild / [ed] Anna Sparrman, Jakob Cromdal, Ann-Carita Evaldsson & Viveka Adelswärd, Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag, 2009, p. 148-168Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3. Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Forsberg [Gottzén], Lucas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Generationspositioner och förhandlingar vid middagsbordet2010In: Barnets familjer ur barnkulturella perspektiv / [ed] Ann Banér, Stockholm: Centrum för barnkulturforskning , 2010, p. 23-38Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4. Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Gottzén, Lucas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Generational positions at family dinner: Food morality and social order2011In: Language in society (London. Print), ISSN 0047-4045, E-ISSN 1469-8013, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 405-426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article concerns generation and food morality, drawing on video recordings of dinners in Swedish middle-class families. A detailed analysis of affect displays during one family dinner extends prior work on food morality (Ochs, Pontecorvo, & Fasulo 1996; Grieshaber 1997; Bourdieu 2003; Wiggins 2004), documenting ways in which participants may shift between distinct generational positions with respect to affects and food morality (from “irresponsible child” to caretaker positions). In our recordings, an elder sibling is shifting between a series of contrasting affective stances (Ochs & Schieffelin 1989; M. Goodwin 2006; Stivers 2008), linked to generational positions along an implicit age continuum: positioning himself, at one end of the continuum, as his young brother's accomplice, and at the other as an adult, a serious guardian of food morality. This study shows that generational positions are not fixed, but are positions adopted as parts of language socialization and interactional events.

  • 5.
    Forsberg [Gottzén], Lucas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Engagerat föräldraskap som norm och praktik2010In: Sosiologi i dag, ISSN 0332-6330, E-ISSN 1893-4617, Vol. 40, no 1-2, p. 78-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This ethnographic study explores parenthood ideals and practices among eight Swedish middle-class couples. A pivotal term in the analysis is involved par- enthood, which is understood as a cultural norm prescribing that parents are responsible for their children, that they should spend much time with them, and develop close relationships to them. The study shows that children and their activities structure parents’ daily routines and that childcare is prioritized over the parents’ own leisure activities. A distinction is made between parents’ time with and time for their children. While ‘time with children’ refers to un- divided time spent with children, ‘time for children’ refers to childcare and household work that is carried out for the children’s sake. Even though both types of time could be regarded as child centered, parents ideally spend time with their children; however, facing time pressure they argue it is hard to live up to this ideal in ev eryday life. It is also argued that par ental involvement has different meanings for men and women in that the majority of the women assume primary responsibility for household work and childcare.

  • 6.
    Forsberg [Gottzén], Lucas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Homework as serious family business: Power and subjectivity in negotiations about school assignments in Swedish families2007In: British Journal of Sociology of Education, ISSN 0142-5692, E-ISSN 1465-3346, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 209-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most previous research on parental involvement in children's homework has focused on the pedagogical advantages or disadvantages of school assignments while neglecting the practice in its social context, family life. By studying parent–child homework negotiations in Swedish families, this paper examines how family members position themselves and each other in relation to Swedish discourses on homework and parental involvement. The study shows that parents want their children to do homework independently. It is hard for the parents to take up another subject position than that of a ‘responsible parent’ who helps the child with homework or controls that it is done. Thereby, the child is simultaneously positioned as ‘irresponsible’ whether that is the case or not.

  • 7.
    Forsberg [Gottzén], Lucas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Involving parents through school letters: mothers, fathers and teachers negotiating children’s education and rearing2007In: Ethnography and Education, ISSN 1745-7823, E-ISSN 1745-7831, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 273-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article explores home–school relations by analyzing how Swedish teachers and parents negotiate responsibility for children's education and rearing through school letters. It draws on participant observations using a video camera in families, interviews with parents, and analysis of school letters written by teachers to parents. The division of public and private responsibility for children is negotiated in terms of expertise. Teachers position themselves as ‘educational experts’, and are able to prescribe how parents are supposed to be involved in children's education. Teachers construct parents as ‘rearing experts’, and ask them to take responsibility for their children's behavior in school by disciplining them at home. The prescribed parental subject is adopted by parents, particularly mothers, as they position themselves as involved parents.

  • 8.
    Forsberg [Gottzén], Lucas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Managing time and childcare in dual-earner families : Unforseen consequences of household strategies2009In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 162-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article documents how dual-earner families employ different household strategies when managing time and childcare in everyday life. In particular, the focus is the unforeseen consequences of household strategies, that is, novel emerging problems, cultural ideals and subjectivities. In this ethnographic study of eight middle-class couples in Sweden, I analyse three household strategies: delegating, alternating and multitasking. While parents apparently use these strategies to juggle the multiple demands of everyday life in a time-efficient way, they also comply with a norm of involved parenthood. Thus, when employing household strategies, the parents balance between enacting themselves as involved parents and running the risk of being understood as uninvolved.

  • 9.
    Forsberg [Gottzén], Lucas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Masculinity studies as fetish and the need of a feminist imagination 2010In: Norma, ISSN 1890-2138, E-ISSN 1890-2146, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 1-5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Forsberg [Gottzén], Lucas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Negotiating involved fatherhood: household work, childcare and spending time with children2007In: Norma, ISSN 1890-2138, E-ISSN 1890-2146, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 109-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent research shows that Swedish fathers to a great extent endorse an ideal of gender equality and the discourse on the ‘new’, involved fatherhood that for several decades has been dominating Swedish family politics is now also more or less hegemonic among Swedish men. At the same time, research argues that there is a discrepancy between ideology and practice. Parenthood still means different things for men and women since women, for instance, continue to take the main responsibility for childcare and household work. Drawing on an ethnographic study, this article analyses how eight Swedish middle class men construct themselves as involved fathers and how they negotiate their involvement in household work, childcare and close relations with their children. The article shows that even though the discourse on paternal involvement may be dominant, it is nevertheless contested. The men mostly constructed their involvement as being gender-equal, but at times they resisted it through articulating discourses on child- centredness, kinship and gendered division of labour. Thus, they reiterated themselves as involved fathers, but not always necessarily in line with the official dual-carer discourse.

  • 11. Franzén, Anna Gradin
    et al.
    Gottzén, Lucas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    The beauty of blood?: Self-injury and ambivalence in an Internet community2011In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 279-294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article analyzes how young self-injuring women and men construct themselves as ‘cutters.’ The study draws on observations of a Swedish Internet community connected to self-injurious behavior and departs from a poststructuralist framework in order to analyze how members position themselves and others in relation to cultural discourses on self-injury. Two main discourses are identified in the Web community: the ‘normalizing’ and the ‘pathologizing’ discourses, which give contrasting versions of self-injury, self-cutters, and their scarred bodies. Within the normalizing discourse, self-injurious behavior is regarded as a legitimate practice for dealing with mental health problems, ‘cutters’ are resilient, and their blood and scars are beautiful. In contrast, within the pathologizing discourse self-injurious behavior is understood as morally reprehensible, self-cutters are pathological, and their bodies are repulsive. In the Web community, members invoke both discourses, which leads to ambivalent subject positions. This study shows that the seemingly contradictory subject positions of the two discourses in fact are interdependent on each other as members draw on both the normalizing and the pathologizing discourses in order to become ‘authentic cutters.’

  • 12.
    Gottzén, Lucas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Att (inte) bli en kvinnomisshandlare2012In: Andra män: Maskulinitet, normskapande och jämställdhet / [ed] Lucas Gottzén & Rickard Jonsson, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2012, p. 149-165Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Gottzén, Lucas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Encountering violent men: strange and familiar2013In: Men, masculinities and methodologies / [ed] Barbara Pini & Bob Pease, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, p. 197-208Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Gottzén, Lucas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Fäders engagemang i barns idrott2012In: Familjeliv och lärande / [ed] Lisetlott Aarsand Assarsson & Pål Aarsand, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012, p. 207-224Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Gottzén, Lucas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Hjältar och monster: Samhällsvetenskapliga perspektiv på män och våld2013Report (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Gottzén, Lucas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Involved fatherhood?: Exploring the educational work of middle‐class men2011In: Gender and Education, ISSN 0954-0253, E-ISSN 1360-0516, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 619-634Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper explores middle‐class fathers’ educational work by studying how they and their partners are involved in their children’s education at home, in school, and how they investigate school options and make decisions about educational issues. Drawing on data from an ethnographic study of 30 dual‐earner couples in the Greater Los Angeles area, this article analyses how fathers position themselves in relation to discourses on parental involvement in education. In order to demonstrate the variety of ways fathers are involved three case studies are presented. It is illustrated how the men, by drawing on a discourse on involved fatherhood, position themselves in line with an ideal of parental involvement in education. Fathers who are doing less educational work than their spouses offer accounts for not taking a greater educational responsibility by drawing on a breadwinner discourse or by depicting mothers as gatekeepers of father involvement.

  • 17.
    Gottzén, Lucas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Men, myths, and masculinity politics2011In: Norma, ISSN 1890-2138, E-ISSN 1890-2146, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 105-109Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Gottzén, Lucas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Metaphors of masculinity: Hierarchies and assamblages2011In: GEXcel Work in progress report volume XV: Proceedings GEXcel theme 9: Gendered sexualed transnationalisations, deconstructing the dominant: Transforming men, “centres” and knowledge/policy/practice / [ed] Alp Biricik & Jeff Hearn, Linköping: Gexcel , 2011, p. 229-239Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Gottzén, Lucas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Money talks: Children’s consumption and becoming in the family2012In: Children, childhood, and everyday life: Children's perspectives / [ed] Mariane Hedegaard, Karin Aronsson, Charlotte Højholt & Oddbjørg Skjær Ulvik, Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing, 2012, p. 91-107Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Gottzén, Lucas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Män, våld och jämställdhet2013Report (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Gottzén, Lucas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Placing Nordic men and masculinities2013In: Norma, ISSN 1890-2138, E-ISSN 1890-2146, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-6Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Gottzén, Lucas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Preben Z. Møller: "Kampen om voldtekt: Ekte voldtektsmenn og hvem som helst"2013In: Sosiologi i dag, ISSN 0332-6330, E-ISSN 1893-4617, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 103-105Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Gottzén, Lucas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Skam, maskulinitet och respons på mäns våld mot kvinnor2013In: Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift, ISSN 1104-1420, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 75-92Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Gottzén, Lucas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Skolan och det engagerade föräldraskapet: självstyrningens dynamik2011In: Föräldraskapets politik: från 1900-tal till 2000-tal / [ed] Helena Bergman, Maria Eriksson & Roger Klinth, Stockholm: Dialogos Förlag, 2011, p. 151-171Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Gottzén, Lucas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Jonsson, Rickard
    Andra män: Maskulinitet, normskapande och jämställdhet2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Gottzén, Lucas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Jonsson, Rickard
    Goda män och Andra män2012In: Andra män: maskulinitet, normskapande och jämställdhet / [ed] Lucas Gottzén & Rickard Jonsson, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2012, p. 7-23Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Gottzén, Lucas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Korkmaz, Sibel
    Killars våld mot tjejer i nära relation2013In: Unga och våld: En analys av maskulinitet och förebyggande verksamheter, Stockholm: Norstedts Juridik AB, 2013, p. 70-99Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Gottzén, Lucas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Kremer-Sadlik, Tamar
    University of California, Los Angeles.
    Fatherhood and youth sports: A balancing act between care and expectations2012In: Gender & Society, ISSN 0891-2432, E-ISSN 1552-3977, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 639-664Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Youth sports have been recognized as an arena for men to meet increased cultural expectations of being involved in their children’s lives. Indeed, in contrast to other child care practices, many men are eager to take part in their children’s organized sports. Drawing on an ethnographic study of middle-class families in the United States, this study examines how men juggle two contrasting cultural models of masculinity when fathering through sports—a performance-oriented orthodox masculinity that historically has been associated with sports and a caring, inclusive masculinity that promotes the nurturing of one’s children. Through a detailed analysis of how fathers’ sports involvement unfolds on the ground, we show how men, in order to portray themselves as “good” fathers, attempt to strike a balance between pushing their children to excel and supporting them regardless of their performance. We propose that although men may value inclusive masculinity when fathering through youth sports, at the same time they exercise orthodox masculinity in other domestic domains

  • 29.
    Gottzén, Lucas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Mellström, Ulf
    Karlstads universitet.
    Maskulinitetsforkningen i förändring2013In: Norma, ISSN 1890-2138, E-ISSN 1890-2146, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 107-111Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Hearn, Jeff
    et al.
    Tema Genus, Linköping University.
    Nordberg, Marie
    Gender Studies, Karlstad University.
    Andersson, Kjerstin
    Tema Barn, Linköping University.
    Balkmar, Dag
    Tema Genus, Linköping University.
    Gottzén, Lucas
    Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University.
    Klinth, Roger
    Pedagogics and Didactics, Linköping University.
    Pringle, Keith
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Sandberg, Linn
    Tema Barn, Linköping University.
    Hegemonic masculinity and beyond: 40 years of research in Sweden2012In: Men and Masculinities, ISSN 1097-184X, E-ISSN 1552-6828, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 31-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the status of the concept of hegemonic masculinity in research on men and boys in Sweden, and how it has been used and developed. Sweden has a relatively long history of public debate, research, and policy intervention in gender issues and gender equality. This has meant, in sheer quantitative terms, a relatively sizeable corpus of work on men, masculinities, and gender relations. There is also a rather wide diversity of approaches, theoretically and empirically, to the analysis of men and masculinities. The Swedish national context and gender equality project is outlined. This is followed by discussion of three broad phases in studies on men and masculinities in Sweden: the 1960s and 1970s before the formulation of the concept of hegemonic masculinity; the 1980s and 1990s when the concept was important for a generation of researchers developing studies in more depth; and the 2000s with a younger generation committed to a variety of feminist and gender critiques other than those associated with hegemonic masculinity. The following sections focus specifically on how the concept of hegemonic masculinity has been used, adapted, and indeed not used, in particular areas of study: boys and young men in family and education; violence; and health. The article concludes with review of how hegemonic masculinity has been used in Swedish contexts, as: gender stereotype, often out of the context of legitimation of patriarchal relations; "Other" than dominant, white middle-class "Swedish," equated with outmoded, nonmodern, working-class, failing boy, or minority ethnic masculinities; a new masculinity concept and practice, incorporating some degree of gender equality; and reconceptualized and problematized as a modern, heteronormative, and subject-centered concept. 

  • 31. Wingard, Leah
    et al.
    Forsberg [Gottzén], Lucas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Parent involvement in children’s homework in American and Swedish dual-earner families2009In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 41, no 8, p. 1576-1595Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyzes parent involvement by employing ethnographic methods and discourse analysis of parent–child talk about homework. We juxtapose what is often presented as a straightforward and unproblematic concept of parent involvement in education policy and research with actual instances of the day-to-day practices and reported experiences of parent involvement in children's homework in the U.S. and Sweden. Our analyses show that parent involvement may be either parent or child initiated, and varies widely according to how much homework the child is assigned, the child's orientation to homework and a number of other factors. Analyses demonstrate that parents become involved in two main ways: 1. through anticipating and planning the activity of homework and 2. by directly participating in the accomplishment of the homework task itself. We additionally highlight in the paper that there is an inherent tension between a parent's responsibility for homework and the child's responsibility for homework, and that parent involvement can cause tension in communication in the parent–child relationship.

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