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  • 1.
    Asif, Sana
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Asawa, Kenta
    Department of Bioengineering, The University of Tokyo, 7‐3‐1 Hongo, Bunkyo‐ku, Tokyo, 113–8656 Japan.
    Yuuki, Inoue
    Department of Bioengineering, The University of Tokyo, 7‐3‐1 Hongo, Bunkyo‐ku, Tokyo, 113–8656 Japan.
    Ishihara, Kazuhiko
    Department of Bioengineering, The University of Tokyo, 7‐3‐1 Hongo, Bunkyo‐ku, Tokyo, 113–8656 Japan.
    Lindell, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Holmgren, Robin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Ryden, Anneli
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Almas Allé 8, 750 07 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jensen-Waern, Marianne
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Almas Allé 8, 750 07 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Teramura, Yuji
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Department of Bioengineering, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Linnaeus Center of Biomaterials Chemistry, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Validation of an MPC polymer coating to attenuate surface- induced cross-talk between the complement and coagulation systems in whole blood in in vitro and in vivo models2019In: Macromolecular Bioscience, ISSN 1616-5187, E-ISSN 1616-5195, Vol. 19, no 5, article id 1800485Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Artificial surfaces that come into contact with blood induce an immediate activation of the cascade systems of the blood, leading to a thrombotic and/or inflammatory response that can eventually cause damage to the biomaterial or the patient, or to both. Heparin coating has been used to improve hemocompatibility, and another approach is 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC)-based polymer coatings. Here, the aim is to evaluate the hemocompatibility of MPC polymer coating by studying the interactions with coagulation and complement systems using human blood in vitro model and pig in vivo model. The stability of the coatings is investigated in vitro and MPC polymer-coated catheters are tested in vivo by insertion into the external jugular vein of pigs to monitor the catheters' antithrombotic properties. There is no significant activation of platelets or of the coagulation and complement systems in the MPC polymer-coated one, which was superior in hemocompatibility to non-coated matrix surfaces. The protective effect of the MPC polymer coat does not decline after incubation in human plasma for up to 2 weeks. With MPC polymer-coated catheters, it is possible to easily draw blood from pig for 4 days in contrast to the case for non-coated catheters, in which substantial clotting is seen.

  • 2.
    Asif, Sana
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Asawa, Kenta
    Yuuki, Inoue
    Kazuhiko, Ishihara2
    Lindell, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.
    Holmgren, Robin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Ryden, Anneli
    Wearn, Marinne Jensen
    Teramura, Yuji
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics.
    Validation of an MPC polymer coating to reduce surface-induced cascade system activation in whole blood in in vitroand in vivo modelsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT

    Background: Artificial surfaces that come into contact with blood (e.g., when used in various forms of biomedical device) induce an immediate activation of the cascade systems of the blood, the coagulation and complement systems. These reactions may lead to a thrombotic and/or inflammatory response that can eventually cause damage to the biomaterial or the patient, or to both. Multiple strategies to dampen these reactions have been employed, with heparin conjugation to the material surface being the most successfulthus far. Another approach to improving hemocompatibility is to use 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC)-based polymer coatings.

    Experimental: In the present study, we evaluated the effectiveness of MPC polymer coating and compared it to a commercially available heparin coating in various in vitromodels using fresh human blood with the aim to replace the costly heparin-coated equipment with the more economic MPC. We then investigated the stability of the various coatings in human plasma in vitrofor 2 weeks. Finally, we inserted MPC polymer-coated catheters into the external jugular vein of pigs and monitored the catheters’ antithrombotic properties for 4 days.

    Results: 1) There was no significant activation of platelets and of the coagulation and complement systems on the MPC polymer-coated or the commercially available heparin surface. 2) Both coats were superior in hemocompatibility to non-coated matrix surfaces. 3) The protective effect of the MPC polymer coat did not decline after incubation in plasma for up to 2 weeks. 4) With MPC polymer-coated catheters, it was possible to easily draw blood from experimental animals for 4 days, in contrast to the case for heparin-flushed commercially available non-coated catheters, in which substantial clotting was seen.

  • 3.
    Asif, Sana
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Ekdahl, Kristina N
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Linnæus Center of Biomaterials Chemistry, Linnæus University, SE-391 82 Kalmar, Sweden.
    Fromell, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Gustafson, Elisabet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Paediatric Surgery.
    Barbu, Andreea
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Le Bland, Katarina
    Division of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, and Hematology and Regenerat ive Medicine Centre at Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, SE-141 86 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Teramura, Yuji
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Department of Bioengineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan.
    Heparinization of cell surfaces with short pepetide-conjugated PEG-lipid regulates thromboinflammation in thransplantation of human MSCs and hepatocytes2016In: Acta Biomaterialia, ISSN 1742-7061, E-ISSN 1878-7568, Vol. 35, p. 194-205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Infusion of therapeutic cells into humans is associated with immune responses, including thromboinflammation, which result in a large loss of transplanted cells\ To address these problems, heparinization of the cell surfaces was achieved by a cell-surface modification technique using polyethylene glycol conjugated phospholipid (PEG-lipid) derivatives. A short heparin-binding peptide was conjugated to the PEG-lipid for immobilization of heparin conjugates on the surface of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and human hepatocytes. Here three kinds of heparin-binding peptides were used for immobilizing heparin conjugates and examined for the antithrombogenic effects on the cell surface. The heparinized cells were incubated in human whole blood to evaluate their hemocompatibility by measuring blood parameters such as platelet count, coagulation markers, complement markers, and Factor Xa activity. We found that one of the heparin-binding peptides did not show cytotoxicity after the immobilization with heparin conjugates. The degree of binding of the heparin conjugates on the cell surface (analyzed by flow cytometer) depended on the ratio of the active peptide to control peptide. For both human MSCs and hepatocytes in whole-blood experiments, no platelet aggregation was seen in the heparin conjugate-immobilized cell group vs. the controls (non-coated cells or control peptide). Also, the levels of thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT), C3a, and sC5b-9 were significantly lower than those of the controls, indicating a lower activation of coagulation and complement. Factor Xa analysis indicated that the heparin conjugate was still active on the cell surface at 24 h post-coating. It is possible to immobilize heparin conjugates onto hMSC and human hepatocyte surfaces and thereby protect the cell surfaces from damaging thromboinflammation. Statement of Signigficance We present a promising approach to enhance the biocompatibility of therapeutic cells. Here we used short peptide-conjugated PEG-lipid for cell surface modification and heparin conjugates for the coating of human hepatocytes and MSCs. We screened the short peptides to find higher affinity for heparinization of cell surface and performed hemocompatibility assay of heparinized human hepatocytes and human MSCs in human whole blood. Using heparin-binding peptide with higher affinity, not only coagulation activation but also complement activation was significantly suppressed. Thus, it was possible to protect human hepatocytes and human MSCs from the attack of thromboinflammatory activation, which can contribute to the improvement graft survival.

  • 4.
    Azuma, Tomoyuki
    et al.
    Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Bunkyo Ku, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 1138656, Japan..
    Ohmori, Ryuichi
    Shibaura Inst Technol, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Coll Engn, Koto Ku, 3-7-5 Toyosu, Tokyo 1358548, Japan..
    Teramura, Yuji
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Bunkyo Ku, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 1138656, Japan..
    Ishizaki, Takahiro
    Shibaura Inst Technol, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Coll Engn, Koto Ku, 3-7-5 Toyosu, Tokyo 1358548, Japan..
    Takai, Madoka
    Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Bunkyo Ku, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 1138656, Japan..
    Nano-structural comparison of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine- and ethylene glycol-based surface modification for preventing protein and cell adhesion2017In: Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, ISSN 0927-7765, E-ISSN 1873-4367, Vol. 159, p. 655-661Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polymer brush, owing to its precisely controllable nanostructure, has great potential for surface modification in the biomedical field. In this study, we evaluated the bio-inertness of polymer brush, monomer monolayers, and polymer-coated surfaces based on their structures, to identify the most effective bio-inert modification. We focused on two well-known bio-inert materials, 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) and ethylene glycol (EG). The amount of adsorbed proteins on the surface was found to be dependent on the monomer unit density in the case of MPC, whereas this correlation was not observed in the case of EG. Cell adhesion was suppressed on the brush structure of both MPC and EG units, regardless of their density. The brush structure of MPC and EG units showed better anti-protein and anti-cell-adhesion than monolayers and polymer-coated surfaces. Thus, the steric repulsion was not only important in EG units-based surface, but also in MPC-based surface. In addition, multiple polymer layers formed by MPC-based polymer coating also displayed similar properties. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 5.
    Azuma, Tomoyuki
    et al.
    Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Bunkyo Ku, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 1138656, Japan..
    Teramura, Yuji
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Bunkyo Ku, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 1138656, Japan.
    Hoshi, Toru
    Nihon Univ, Dept Mat & Appl Chem, Coll Sci & Technol, Tokyo 1018308, Japan..
    Takai, Madoka
    Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Bunkyo Ku, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 1138656, Japan..
    Enhancement of Cell Adhesion on a Phosphorylcholine-Based Surface through the Interaction with DNA Mediated by Ca2+ Ions2016In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 120, no 48, p. 12272-12278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    2-Methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) has a PC group and is one of the most well-known bioinert polymers. In this study, we evaluated the interaction between MPC and DNA, which specifically interacts with the phospholipid head group via Ca2+ ions. A MPC monolayer and poly(MPC) brush were fabricated to observe the effect of the structure on the interaction between MPC and DNA via Ca2+ ions. The poly(MPC) brush, which shows higher MPC unit density, more efficiently interacted with DNA via Ca2+ ions. Also, serum protein could interact with the poly(MPC) brush via DNA, although the brush itself hardly interacted with serum proteins. Cell adhesion was significantly provoked on poly(MPC)/DNA compared with poly(MPC) because serum protein adsorption was induced on poly(MPC)/DNA.

  • 6.
    Azuma, Tomoyuki
    et al.
    Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Bunkyo Ku, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 1138656, Japan..
    Teramura, Yuji
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Bunkyo Ku, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 1138656, Japan..
    Takai, Madoka
    Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Bunkyo Ku, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 1138656, Japan..
    Cellular Response to Non-contacting Nanoscale Sublayer: Cells Sense Several Nanometer Mechanical Property2016In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 8, no 17, p. 10710-10716Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cell adhesion is influenced not only from the surface property of materials but also from the mechanical properties of the nanometer sublayer just below the surface. In this study, we fabricated a well-defined diblock polymer brush composed of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) and 2-aminoethyl methacrylate (AEMA). The underlying layer of poly(MPC) is a highly viscous polymer, and the surface layer of poly(AEMA) is a cell-adhesive cationic polymer. The adhesion of L929 mouse fibroblasts was examined on the diblock polymer brush to see the effect of a non contacting underlying polymer layer on the cell-adhesion behavior. Cells could sense the viscoelasticity of the underlying layers at the nanometer level, although the various fabricated diblock polymer brushes had the same surface property and the functional group. Thus, we found a new factor which could control cell spread at the nanometer level, and this insight would be important to design nanoscale biomaterials and interfaces.

  • 7.
    Ekdahl, Kristina N.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Linnaeus Univ, Linnaeus Ctr Biomat Chem, SE-39182 Kalmar, Sweden..
    Huang, Shan
    Linnaeus Univ, Linnaeus Ctr Biomat Chem, SE-39182 Kalmar, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Teramura, Yuji
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Bunkyo Ku, 7-3-1Hongo, Tokyo 1138656, Japan .
    Complement inhibition in biomaterial- and biosurface-induced thromboinflammation2016In: Seminars in Immunology, ISSN 1044-5323, E-ISSN 1096-3618, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 268-277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Therapeutic medicine today includes a vast number of procedures involving the use of biomaterials, transplantation of therapeutic cells or cell clusters, as well as of solid organs. These treatment modalities are obviously of great benefit to the patient, but also present a great challenge to the innate immune system, since they involve direct exposure of non-biological materials, cells of non-hematological origin as well as endothelial cells, damaged by ischemia-perfusion in solid organs to proteins and cells in the blood. The result of such an exposure may be an inappropriate activation of the complement and contact/kallikrein systems, which produce mediators capable of triggering the platelets and PMNs and monocytes, which can ultimately result in thrombotic and inflammatory (i.e., a thrombo-inflammatory) response to the treatment modality. In this concept review, we give an overview of the mechanisms of recognition within the innate immunity system, with the aim to identify suitable points for intervention. Finally, we discuss emerging and promising techniques for surface modification of biomaterials and cells with specific inhibitors in order to diminish thromboinflammation and improve clinical outcome.

  • 8. Engberg, Anna E.
    et al.
    Nilsson, Per H.
    Huang, Shan
    Fromell, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Hamad, Osama A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Mollnes, Tom Eirik
    Rosengren-Holmberg, Jenny P.
    Sandholm, Kerstin
    Teramura, Yuji
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Ekdahl, Kristina N.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Prediction of inflammatory responses induced by biomaterials in contact with human blood using protein fingerprint from plasma2015In: Biomaterials, ISSN 0142-9612, E-ISSN 1878-5905, Vol. 36, p. 55-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inappropriate complement activation is often responsible for incompatibility reactions that occur when biomaterials are used. Complement activation is therefore a criterion included in legislation regarding biomaterials testing. However, no consensus is yet available regarding appropriate complement-activation-related test parameters. We examined protein adsorption in plasma and complement activation/cytokine release in whole blood incubated with well-characterized polymers. Strong correlations were found between the ratio of C4 to its inhibitor C4BP and generation of 10 (mainly pro-inflammatory) cytokines, including IL-17, IFN-gamma, and IL-6. The levels of complement activation products correlated weakly (C3a) or not at all (C5a, sC5b-9), confirming their poor predictive values. We have demonstrated a direct correlation between downstream biological effects and the proteins initially adhering to an artificial surface after contact with blood. Consequently, we propose the C4/C4BP ratio as a robust, predictor of biocompatibility with superior specificity and sensitivity over the current gold standard.

  • 9.
    Klapper, Yvonne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Hamad, Osama A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Teramura, Yuji
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Leneweit, Gero
    Nienhaus, G. Ulrich
    Ricklin, Daniel
    Lambris, John D.
    Ekdahl, Kristina Nilsson
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Mediation of a non-proteolytic activation of complement component C3 by phospholipid vesicles2014In: Biomaterials, ISSN 0142-9612, E-ISSN 1878-5905, Vol. 35, no 11, p. 3688-3696Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Liposomes are becoming increasingly important as drug delivery systems, to target a drug to specific cells and tissues and thereby protecting the recipient from toxic effects of the contained drug. Liposome preparations have been described to activate complement. In this study, we have investigated complement activation triggered by neutral dimyristoyl-phosphocholine (DMPC) liposomes in human plasma and whole-blood systems. Incubation in plasma led to the generation of complement activation products (C3a and sC5b-9). Unexpectedly, investigations of surface-bound C3 revealed contact activated, conformationally changed C3 molecules on the liposomes. These changes were characterized by Western blotting with C3 monoclonal antibodies, and by incubating liposomes with purified native C3 and factors I and H. Quartz crystal microbalance analysis confirmed binding of C3 to planar DMPC surfaces. In addition, we demonstrated that DMPC liposomes bound to or were phagocytized by granulocytes in a complement-dependent manner, as evidenced by the use of complement inhibitors. In summary, we have shown that C3 is activated both by convertase-dependent cleavage, preferentially in the fluid phase, by mechanisms which are not well elucidated, and also by contact activation into C3(H2O) on the DMPC surface. In particular, this contact activation has implications for the therapeutic regulation of complement activation during liposome treatment. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 10. Klapper, Yvonne
    et al.
    Hamad, Osama
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Teramura, Yuji
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Leneweit, Gero
    Nienhaus, Gerd Ulrich
    Ekdahl, Kristina Nilsson
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Investigation of complement activation by neutral liposomes2012In: Immunobiology, ISSN 0171-2985, E-ISSN 1878-3279, Vol. 217, no 11, p. 1179-1180Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11. Moll, Guido
    et al.
    Alm, Jessica J.
    Davies, Lindsay C.
    von Bahr, Lena
    Heldring, Nina
    Stenbeck-Funke, Lillemor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Hamad, Osama A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Hinsch, Robin
    Ignatowicz, Lech
    Locke, Matthew
    Lonnies, Helena
    Lambris, John D.
    Teramura, Yuji
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nilsson-Ekdahl, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Le Blanc, Katarina
    Do Cryopreserved Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Display Impaired Immunomodulatory and Therapeutic Properties?2014In: Stem Cells, ISSN 1066-5099, E-ISSN 1549-4918, Vol. 32, no 9, p. 2430-2442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have recently reported that therapeutic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have low engraftment and trigger the instant blood mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR) after systemic delivery to patients, resulting in compromised cell function. In order to optimize the product, we compared the immunomodulatory, blood regulatory, and therapeutic properties of freeze-thawed and freshly harvested cells. We found that freeze-thawed MSCs, as opposed to cells harvested from continuous cultures, have impaired immunomodulatory and blood regulatory properties. Freeze-thawed MSCs demonstrated reduced responsiveness to proinflammatory stimuli, an impaired production of anti-inflammatory mediators, increased triggering of the IBMIR, and a strong activation of the complement cascade compared to fresh cells. This resulted in twice the efficiency in lysis of thawed MSCs after 1 hour of serum exposure. We found a 50% and 80% reduction in viable cells with freshly detached as opposed to thawed in vitro cells, indicating a small benefit for fresh cells. In evaluation of clinical response, we report a trend that fresh cells, and cells of low passage, demonstrate improved clinical outcome. Patients treated with freshly harvested cells in low passage had a 100% response rate, twice the response rate of 50% observed in a comparable group of patients treated with freeze-thawed cells at higher passage. We conclude that cryobanked MSCs have reduced immunomodulatory and blood regulatory properties directly after thawing, resulting in faster complement-mediated elimination after blood exposure. These changes seem to be paired by differences in therapeutic efficacy in treatment of immune ailments after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  • 12. Moll, Guido
    et al.
    Hult, Annika
    von Bahr, Lena
    Alm, Jessica J.
    Heldring, Nina
    Hamad, Osama A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Stenbeck-Funke, Lillemor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Larsson, Stella
    Teramura, Yuji
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Roelofs, Helene
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Fibbe, Willem E.
    Olsson, Martin L.
    Le Blanc, Katarina
    Do ABO Blood Group Antigens Hamper the Therapeutic Efficacy of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells?2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 1, p. e85040-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Investigation into predictors for treatment outcome is essential to improve the clinical efficacy of therapeutic multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). We therefore studied the possible harmful impact of immunogenic ABO blood groups antigens - genetically governed antigenic determinants - at all given steps of MSC-therapy, from cell isolation and preparation for clinical use, to final recipient outcome. We found that clinical MSCs do not inherently express or upregulate ABO blood group antigens after inflammatory challenge or in vitro differentiation. Although antigen adsorption from standard culture supplements was minimal, MSCs adsorbed small quantities of ABO antigen from fresh human AB plasma (ABP), dependent on antigen concentration and adsorption time. Compared to cells washed in non-immunogenic human serum albumin (HSA), MSCs washed with ABP elicited stronger blood responses after exposure to blood from healthy O donors in vitro, containing high titers of ABO antibodies. Clinical evaluation of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients found only very low titers of anti-A/B agglutination in these strongly immunocompromised patients at the time of MSC treatment. Patient analysis revealed a trend for lower clinical response in blood group O recipients treated with ABP-exposed MSC products, but not with HSA-exposed products. We conclude, that clinical grade MSCs are ABO-neutral, but the ABP used for washing and infusion of MSCs can contaminate the cells with immunogenic ABO substance and should therefore be substituted by non-immunogenic HSA, particularly when cells are given to immunocompentent individuals.

  • 13. Moll, Guido
    et al.
    Rasmusson-Duprez, Ida
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    von Bahr, Lena
    Connolly-Andersen, Anne-Marie
    Elgue, Graciela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Funke, Lillemor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Hamad, Osama A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Lonnies, Helena
    Magnusson, Peetra U.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Sanchez, Javier
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Teramura, Yuji
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nilsson-Ekdahl, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Ringden, Olle
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Le Blanc, Katarina
    Are Therapeutic Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Compatible with Human Blood?2012In: Stem Cells, ISSN 1066-5099, E-ISSN 1549-4918, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 1565-1574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are tested in numerous clinical trials. Questions have been raised concerning fate and function of these therapeutic cells after systemic infusion. We therefore asked whether culture-expanded human MSCs elicit an innate immune attack, termed instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR), which has previously been shown to compromise the survival and function of systemically infused islet cells and hepatocytes. We found that MSCs expressed hemostatic regulators similar to those produced by endothelial cells but displayed higher amounts of prothrombotic tissue/stromal factors on their surface, which triggered the IBMIR after blood exposure, as characterized by formation of blood activation markers. This process was dependent on the cell dose, the choice of MSC donor, and particularly the cell-passage number. Short-term expanded MSCs triggered only weak blood responses in vitro, whereas extended culture and coculture with activated lymphocytes increased their prothrombotic properties. After systemic infusion to patients, we found increased formation of blood activation markers, but no formation of hyperfibrinolysis marker D-dimer or acute-phase reactants with the currently applied dose of 1.0-3.0 x 10(6) cells per kilogram. Culture-expanded MSCs trigger the IBMIR in vitro and in vivo. Induction of IBMIR is dose-dependent and increases after prolonged ex vivo expansion. Currently applied doses of low-passage clinical-grade MSCs elicit only minor systemic effects, but higher cell doses and particularly higher passage cells should be handled with care. This deleterious reaction can compromise the survival, engraftment, and function of these therapeutic cells. 

  • 14.
    N.Ekdahl, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Linnaeus Univ, Linnaeus Ctr Biomat Chem, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Fromell, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Mohlin, Camilla
    Linnaeus Univ, Linnaeus Ctr Biomat Chem, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Teramura, Yuji
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Tokyo, Japan.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    A human whole-blood model to study the activation of innate immunity system triggered by nanoparticles as a demonstrator for toxicity2019In: Science and Technology of Advanced Materials, ISSN 1468-6996, E-ISSN 1878-5514, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 688-698Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this review article, we focus on activation of the soluble components of the innate immune system triggered by nonbiological compounds and stress variances in activation due to the difference in size between nanoparticles (NPs) and larger particles or bulk material of the same chemical and physical composition. We then discuss the impact of the so-called protein corona which is formed on the surface of NPs when they come in contact with blood or other body fluids. For example, NPs which bind inert proteins, proteins which are prone to activate the contact system (e.g., factor XII), which may lead to clotting and fibrin formation or the complement system (e.g., IgG or C3), which may result in inflammation and vascular damage. Furthermore, we describe a whole blood model which we have developed to monitor activation and interaction between different components of innate immunity: blood protein cascade systems, platelets, leukocytes, cytokine generation, which are induced by NPs. Finally, we describe our own studies on innate immunity system activation induced by three fundamentally different species of NPs (two types of engineered NPs and diesel NPs) as demonstrator of the utility of an initial determination of the composition of the protein corona formed on NPs exposed to ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) plasma and subsequent analysis in our whole blood model. [GRAPHICS] .

  • 15.
    Nilsson, Bo
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Asif, Sana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Ekdahl N., Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Linnaeus Univ, Linnaeus Ctr Biomat Chem, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Manell, Elin
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Fac Vet Med & Anim Sci, Dept Clin Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Biglarnia, Alireza
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Transplantat, Malmo, Sweden.
    Jensen-Waern, Marianne
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Fac Vet Med & Anim Sci, Dept Clin Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Teramura, Yuji
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Tokyo, Japan.
    A protective role of complement regulators linked to a PEG phospholipid construct in reducing ischemic reperfusion injury in transplantation2017In: Molecular Immunology, ISSN 0161-5890, E-ISSN 1872-9142, Vol. 89, p. 208-208Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Nilsson, Bo
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Teramura, Yuji
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Ekdahl, Kristina N.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    The role and regulation of complement activation as part of the thromboinflammation elicited in cell therapies2014In: Molecular Immunology, ISSN 0161-5890, E-ISSN 1872-9142, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 185-190Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cell therapies in which the cells come into direct contact with blood and other body fluids are emerging treatment procedures for patients with various diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, liver insufficiency, and graft-versus-host disease. However, despite recent progress, these procedures are associated with tissue loss caused by thromboinflammatory reactions. These deleterious reactions involve the activation of the complement and coagulation cascades and platelet and leukocyte activation, ultimately resulting in clot formation and damage to the implanted cells. In this concept review, we discuss the basic mechanisms underlying the thrombininflammatory process, with special reference to the engagement of complement and emerging strategies for the therapeutic regulation of these reactions that include the use of selective systemic inhibitors and various procedures to coat the surfaces of the cells. The coating procedures may also be applied to other treatment modalities in which similar mechanisms are involved, including whole organ transplantation, treatment with biomaterials in contact with blood, and extracorporeal procedures.

  • 17.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Lambris, John
    University of Pennsylvania.
    Elwing, Hans
    Götebors universitet.
    Ricklin, Daniel
    University of Pennsylvania.
    Nilsson, Per H.
    Linneuniversitetet.
    Teramura, Yuji
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Nicholls, Ian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Innate immunity activation on biomaterial surfaces: a mechanistic model and coping strategie2011In: Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews, ISSN 0169-409X, E-ISSN 1872-8294, Vol. 63, no 12, p. 1042-1050Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When an artificial biomaterial (e.g., a stent or implantable pump) is exposed to blood, plasma proteins immediately adhere to the surface, creating a new interface between the biomaterial and the blood. The recognition proteins within the complement and contact activation/coagulation cascade systems of the blood will be bound to, or inserted into, this protein film and generate different mediators that will activate polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes, as well as platelets. Under clinical conditions, the ultimate outcome of these processes may be thrombotic and inflammatory reactions, and consequently the composition and conformation of the proteins in the initial layer formed on the surface will to a large extent determine the outcome of a treatment involving the biomaterial, affecting both the functionality of the material and the patient's life quality. This review presents models of biomaterial-induced activation processes and describes various strategies to attenuate potential adverse reactions by conjugating bioactive molecules to surfaces or by introducing nanostructures.

  • 18.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Linnæus Center of Biomaterials Chemistry, Linnæus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Teramura, Yuji
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Department of Bioengineering, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Hamad, Osama A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Asif, Sana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Dührkop, Claudia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Fromell, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Gustafson, Elisabet K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Surgery.
    Hong, Jaan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Kozarcanin, Huda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Magnusson, Peetra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Huber-Lang, Markus
    Department of Orthopedic Trauma, Hand, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany.
    Garred, Peter
    Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology, Section 7631, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Dangerous liaisons: complement, coagulation, and kallikrein/kinin cross-talk act as a linchpin in the events leading to thromboinflammation2016In: Immunological Reviews, ISSN 0105-2896, E-ISSN 1600-065X, Vol. 274, no 1, p. 245-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innate immunity is fundamental to our defense against microorganisms. Physiologically, the intravascular innate immune system acts as a purging system that identifies and removes foreign substances leading to thromboinflammatory responses, tissue remodeling, and repair. It is also a key contributor to the adverse effects observed in many diseases and therapies involving biomaterials and therapeutic cells/organs. The intravascular innate immune system consists of the cascade systems of the blood (the complement, contact, coagulation, and fibrinolytic systems), the blood cells (polymorphonuclear cells, monocytes, platelets), and the endothelial cell lining of the vessels. Activation of the intravascular innate immune system in vivo leads to thromboinflammation that can be activated by several of the system's pathways and that initiates repair after tissue damage and leads to adverse reactions in several disorders and treatment modalities. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge in the field and discuss the obstacles that exist in order to study the cross-talk between the components of the intravascular innate immune system. These include the use of purified in vitro systems, animal models and various types of anticoagulants. In order to avoid some of these obstacles we have developed specialized human whole blood models that allow investigation of the cross-talk between the various cascade systems and the blood cells. We in particular stress that platelets are involved in these interactions and that the lectin pathway of the complement system is an emerging part of innate immunity that interacts with the contact/coagulation system. Understanding the resulting thromboinflammation will allow development of new therapeutic modalities.

  • 19. Nilsson, Per H.
    et al.
    N. Ekdahl, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Magnusson, Peetra U.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Qu, Hongchang
    Iwata, Hiroo
    Ricklin, Daniel
    Hong, Jaan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Lambris, John D.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Teramura, Yuji
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Autoregulation of thromboinflammation on biomaterial surfaces by a multicomponent therapeutic coating2013In: Biomaterials, ISSN 0142-9612, E-ISSN 1878-5905, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 985-994Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Activation of the thrombotic and complement systems is the main recognition and effector mechanisms in the multiple adverse biological responses triggered when biomaterials or therapeutic cells come into blood contact. We have created a surface which is auto-protective to human innate immunity by combining three fundamentally different strategies, all developed by us previously, which have been shown to induce substantial, but incomplete hemocompatibility when used separately. In summary, we have conjugated a factor H-binding peptide; and an ADP-degrading enzyme; using a PEG linker on both material and cellular surfaces. When exposed to human whole blood, factor H was specifically recruited to the modified surfaces and inhibited complement attack. In addition, activation of platelets and coagulation was efficiently attenuated, by degrading ADP. Thus, by inhibiting thromboinflammation using a multicomponent approach, we have created a hybrid surface with the potential to greatly reduce incompatibility reactions involving biomaterials and transplantation.

  • 20.
    Noiri, Makoto
    et al.
    Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Sch Engn, Bunkyo Ku, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 1138656, Japan.
    Asawa, Kenta
    Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Sch Engn, Bunkyo Ku, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 1138656, Japan.
    Okada, Naoya
    Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Sch Engn, Bunkyo Ku, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 1138656, Japan.
    Kodama, Tomonobu
    Jikei Univ Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, Tokyo, Japan.
    Murayama, Yuichi
    Jikei Univ Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, Tokyo, Japan.
    Inoue, Yuuki
    Univ Tokyo, Sch Engn, Dept Mat Engn, Bunkyo Ku, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 1138656, Japan.
    Ishihara, Kazuhiko
    Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Sch Engn, Bunkyo Ku, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 1138656, Japan;Univ Tokyo, Sch Engn, Dept Mat Engn, Bunkyo Ku, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 1138656, Japan.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Linnaeus Univ, Linnaeus Ctr Biomat Chem, SE-39182 Kalmar, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Teramura, Yuji
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Sch Engn, Bunkyo Ku, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 1138656, Japan.
    Modification of human MSC surface with oligopeptide-PEG-lipids for selective binding to activated endothelium2019In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part A, ISSN 1549-3296, E-ISSN 1552-4965, Vol. 107, no 8, p. 1779-1792Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Promising cell therapies using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is proposed for stroke patients. Therefore, we aimed to efficiently accumulate human MSC (hMSC) to damaged brain area to improve the therapeutic effect using poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-conjugated phospholipid (PEG-lipid) carrying an oligopeptide as a ligand, specific for E-selectin which is upregulated on activated endothelial cells under hypoxia-like stroke. Here we synthesized E-selectin-binding oligopeptide (ES-bp) conjugated with PEG spacer having different molecular weights from 1 to 40 kDa. We found that ES-bp can be immobilized onto the hMSC surface through PEG-lipid without influence on cell growth and differentiation into adipocytes and osteocytes, respectively. It is also possible to control the immobilization of ES-bp on hMSC surface (<10(8) ES-bp per cell). Immobilized ES-bp can be continuously immobilized at the outside of cell membrane when PEG-lipids with PEG 5 and 40 kDa were used. In addition, the modified hMSC can specifically attach onto E-selectin-immobilized surface as a model surface of activated endothelium in human blood, indicating the sufficient number of immobilized ES-bp onto hMSC. Thus, this technique is one of the candidates for hMSC accumulation to cerebral infarction area.

  • 21.
    Noiri, Makoto
    et al.
    Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Bunkyo Ku, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 1138656, Japan.
    Kushiro, Keiichiro
    Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Bunkyo Ku, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 1138656, Japan.
    Togo, Shodai
    Saitama Univ, Dept Chem, Sakura Ku, Saitama 3388570, Japan.
    Sato, Ken
    Saitama Univ, Dept Chem, Sakura Ku, Saitama 3388570, Japan.
    Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.
    Saitama Univ, Dept Chem, Sakura Ku, Saitama 3388570, Japan.
    Takai, Madoka
    Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Bunkyo Ku, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 1138656, Japan.
    Teramura, Yuji
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Bunkyo Ku, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 1138656, Japan.
    Influence of cell adhesive molecules attached onto PEG-lipid-modified fluid surfaces on cell adhesion2019In: Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, ISSN 0927-7765, E-ISSN 1873-4367, Vol. 175, p. 375-383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The involvement of intercellular interactions in various biological events indicates the importance of studying cell-cell interactions using fluid model surfaces. Here, we propose a fluid surface composed of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) and poly(ethylene glycol)-conjugated phospholipid (PEG-lipid) derivatives, which can be an alternative to supported lipid membranes. The modification of SAM surfaces with PEG-lipids carrying functional peptides resulted in the formation of the fluid surfaces with different mobility, which was quantitatively determined by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). Different types of fluid surfaces with calculated diffusion coefficients between 0.9 ± 0.25 and 0.16 ± 0.03 μm2/sec for PEG-lipids derivatives were fabricated, onto which arginylglycylaspartate (RGD) peptides were immobilized for cell adhesion, and compared to solid surfaces with the same surface density of RGD peptides. The fluid surfaces revealed that cell adhesions of epithelial cells (MCF-10 A) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) could not be established on the surfaces with higher fluidity, while cells could adhere onto surfaces with lower fluidity, where the lateral diffusion of PEG-lipids was approximately 20 times lower, and solid surfaces. Interestingly, cells that adhered onto the surface with lower fluidity proliferated at a normal rate while maintaining their round morphology, which was a different shape from that observed on solid surfaces. Thus, the scaffold fluidity greatly influenced cell adhesion behaviors, demonstrating that it is an important parameter for designing novel biomimetic scaffolds for biomedical applications.

  • 22.
    Ogasawara, Hiroyuki
    et al.
    Tohoku Univ, Grad Sch Med, Dept Surg, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan.
    Teramura, Yuji
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Tokyo, Japan.
    Imura, Takehiro
    Tohoku Univ, Div Transplantat & Regenerat Med, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan.
    Inagaki, Akiko
    Tohoku Univ, Div Transplantat & Regenerat Med, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan.
    Saito, Yoshikatsu
    Tohoku Univ, Grad Sch Med, Dept Surg, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan.
    Matsumura, Muneyuki
    Tohoku Univ, Grad Sch Med, Dept Surg, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan.
    Fukuoka, Kengo
    Tohoku Univ, Grad Sch Med, Dept Surg, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan.
    Fathi, Ibrahim
    Tohoku Univ, Div Transplantat & Regenerat Med, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan.
    Miyagi, Shigehito
    Tohoku Univ, Grad Sch Med, Dept Surg, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan.
    Nilsson, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Ohashi, Kazuo
    Osaka Univ, Grad Sch Pharmaceut Sci, Osaka, Japan.
    Unno, Michiaki
    Tohoku Univ, Grad Sch Med, Dept Surg, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan.
    Kamei, Takashi
    Tohoku Univ, Grad Sch Med, Dept Surg, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan.
    Satomi, Susumu
    Tohoku Univ, Grad Sch Med, Dept Surg, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Gustafson, Elisabet K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Surgery.
    Goto, Masafumi
    Tohoku Univ, Grad Sch Med, Dept Surg, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan;Tohoku Univ, Div Transplantat & Regenerat Med, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan.
    The Optimization of the Hepatocyte Surface Modification Procedures in Terms of Heparin and Apyrase for Improving Hepatocyte Engraftment2018In: Transplantation, ISSN 0041-1337, E-ISSN 1534-6080, Vol. 102, p. S727-S727Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Ohgaki, Ryuichi
    et al.
    Osaka University, Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Bio-system Pharmacology.
    Teramura, Yuji
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. The University of Tokyo, Department of Bioengineering.
    Hayashi, Daichi
    Osaka University, Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Bio-system Pharmacology.
    Quan, Lili
    Osaka University, Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Bio-system Pharmacology.
    Okuda, Suguru
    Osaka University, Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Bio-system Pharmacology.
    Nagamori, Shushi
    Osaka University, Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Bio-system Pharmacology.
    Takai, Madoka
    The University of Tokyo, Department of Bioengineering.
    Kanai, Yoshikatsu
    Osaka University, Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Bio-system Pharmacology.
    Ratiometric fluorescence imaging of cell surface pH by poly(ethylene glycol)-phospholipid conjugated with fluorescein isothiocyanate2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 17484Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Various physiological and pathological processes are accompanied with the alteration of pH at extracellular juxtamembrane region. Accordingly, the methods to analyze the cell surface pH have been demanded in biological and medical sciences. In this study, we have established a novel methodology for cell surface pH imaging using poly(ethylene glycol)-phospholipid (PEG-lipid) as a core structure of ratiometric fluorescent probes. PEG-lipid is a synthetic amphiphilic polymer originally developed for the cell surface modification in transplantation therapy. Via its hydrophobic alkyl chains of the phospholipid moiety, PEG-lipid is, when applied extracellularly, spontaneously inserted into the plasma membrane and retained at the surface of the cells. We have demonstrated that the PEG-lipid conjugated with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-PEG-lipid) can be used as a sensitive and reversible cell-surfacea-nchored pH probe between weakly alkaline and acidic pH with an excellent spatiotemporal resolution. The remarkably simple procedure for cell-surface labeling with FITC-PEG-lipid would also be advantageous when considering its application to high-throughput in vitro assay. This study further indicates that various probes useful for the investigation of juxtamembrane environments could also be developed by using PEG-lipid as the core structure for bio-membrane anchoring.

  • 24. Takemoto, Naohiro
    et al.
    Liu, Xibao
    Takii, Kento
    Teramura, Yuji
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Iwata, Hiroo
    Transplantation of Co-aggregates of Sertoli Cells and Islet Cells Into Liver Without Immunosuppression2014In: Transplantation, ISSN 0041-1337, E-ISSN 1534-6080, Vol. 97, no 3, p. 287-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Transplantation of islets of Langerhans (islets) was used to treat insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. However, islet grafts must be maintained by administration of immunosuppressive drugs, which can lead to complications in the long term. An approach that avoids immunosuppressive drug use is desirable. Methods Co-aggregates of Sertoli cells and islet cells from BALB/c mice that were prepared by the hanging drop method were transplanted into C57BL/6 mouse liver through the portal vein as in human clinical islet transplantation. Results The core part of the aggregates contained mainly Sertoli cells, and these cells were surrounded by islet cells. The co-aggregates retained the functions of both Sertoli and islet cells. When 800 co-aggregates were transplanted into seven C57BL/6 mice via the portal vein, six of seven recipient mice demonstrated quasi-normoglycemia for more than 100 days. Conclusions The hanging drop method is suitable for preparing aggregates of Sertoli and islet cells for transplantation. Notably, transplantation of these allogeneic co-aggregates into mice with chemically induced diabetes via the portal vein resulted in long-term graft survival without systemic immunosuppression.

  • 25. Takemoto, Naohiro
    et al.
    Teramura, Yuji
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Iwata, Hiroo
    Immobilization of Sertoli cells on islets of Langerhans2013In: BIOMATER SCI-UK, ISSN 2047-4830, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 315-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sertoli cells play a crucial role in creating the immunoprivileged environment of the testis. We examined the survival of islets of Langerhans after co-transplantation with Sertoli cells. Sertoli cells near islets should protect the graft from rejection. In this study, conjugates of single stranded oligonucleotides, poly(ethylene glycol) and phospholipids (ssDNA-PEG-DPPE) were used to immobilize Sertoli cells on islets. The 20-mer of deoxyadenylic acid (oligo(dA)(20)) and 20-mer of deoxythymidylic acid (oligo(dT)(20)) were presented as ssDNAs on the surfaces of Sertoli cells and islets, respectively, through the hydrophobic interaction between a lipid unit of the conjugates and the cell membrane. The Sertoli cells were immobilized on the islets through hybridization between oligo(dA)(20) and oligo(dT)(20). When Sertoli cell-immobilized islets were infused into the liver of mice through the portal vein, the Sertoli cells remained around the islets.

  • 26.
    Teramura, Yuji
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Department of Bioengineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan.
    Asif, Sana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Linnæus Center of Biomaterials Chemistry, Linnæus University, SE-391 82 Kalmar, Sweden.
    Gustafson, Elisabet K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Surgery.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Cell Adhesion Induced Using Surface Modification with Cell-Penetrating Peptide-Conjugated Poly(ethylene glycol)-Lipid: A New Cell Glue for 3D Cell-Based Structures2017In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 244-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We synthesized a novel material, cell-penetrating peptide-conjugated poly(ethylene glycol)-lipid (CPP-PEG-lipid), that can induce the adhesion of floating cells. Firm cell adhesion with spreading could be induced by cell surface modification with the CPP-PEG-lipids. Cell adhesion was induced by CPPs but not by any other cationic short peptides we tested. Here, we demonstrated adherence using the floating cell line CCRF-CEM as well as primary human T cells, B cells, erythrocytes, and hepatocytes. As compared to cells grown in suspension, adherent cells were more rapidly induced to attach to substrates with the cell-surface modification. The critical factor for attachment was localization of CPPs at the cell membrane by PEG-lipids with PEG > 20 kDa. These cationic CPPs on PEG chains were able to interact with substrate surfaces such as polystyrene (PS) surfaces, glass surfaces, and PS microfibers that are negatively charged, inducing firm cell adhesion and cell spreading. Also, as opposed to normal cationic peptides that interact strongly with cell membranes, CPPs were less interactive with the cell surfaces because of their cell-penetrating property, making them more available for adhering cells to the substrate surface. No effects on cell viability or cell proliferation were observed after the induction of cell adhesion. With this technique, cells could be easily immobilized onto PS microfibers, an important step in fabricating 3D cell-based structures. Cells immobilized onto 3D PS microfibers were alive, and human hepatocytes showed normal production of urea and albumin on the microfibers. This method is novel in inducing firm cell adhesion via a one-step treatment.

  • 27.
    Teramura, Yuji
    et al.
    Department of Bioengineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Japan.
    Asif, Sana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Cell Surface Engineering for Regulation of Immune Reactions in Cell Therapy2015In: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0065-2598, E-ISSN 2214-8019, Vol. 865, p. 189-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transplantation of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans (islets) is a promising cell therapy for treating insulin-dependent type 1 diabetes mellitus. Islet transplantation is a minimally-invasive technique involving relatively simple surgery. However, after intraportal transplantation, the transplanted islets are attacked by the recipient's immune system, because they activate a number of systems, including coagulation, complement response, inflammation, immune rejection, and recurrence of autoimmune disease. We have developed a surface modification and microencapsulation technique that protects cells and islets with biomaterials and bioactive substances, which may be useful in clinical settings. This approach employs amphiphilic polymers, which can interact with lipid bilayer membranes, without increasing cell volume. Molecules attached to these polymers can protect transplanted cells and islets from attack by the host immune system. We expect that this surface modification technique will improve graft survival in clinical islet transplantation.

  • 28.
    Teramura, Yuji
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nilsson, Per H.
    Ekdahl, Kristina N.
    Magnusson, Peetra U.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Qu, Hongchang
    Ricklin, Daniel
    Hong, Jaan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Lambris, John D.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Autoregulation of thromboinflammation on biomaterials and cells by a novel therapeutic coating technique2012In: Immunobiology, ISSN 0171-2985, E-ISSN 1878-3279, Vol. 217, no 11, p. 1140-1140Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Teramura, Yuji
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Podiyan, Oommen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Polymer Chemistry.
    Olerud, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Polymer Chemistry.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Microencapsulation of cells, including islets, within stable ultra-thin membranes of maleimide-conjugated PEG-lipid with multifunctional crosslinkers2013In: Biomaterials, ISSN 0142-9612, E-ISSN 1878-5905, Vol. 34, no 11, p. 2683-2693Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The encapsulation of islets of Langerhans (islets) and insulin-secreting cells within a semi-permeable membrane has been suggested as a safe and simple technique for islet transplantation to attenuate early graft loss and avoid immunosuppressive therapy. The total volume of these implants tends, however, to increase upon encapsulation of the islets and cells within the polymer membrane, limiting transport between encapsulated cells and the surrounding tissue. Ultra-thin membranes could potentially overcome these diffusion limitations to provide for clinically applicable implants. Here we propose a method to encapsulate islets and cells within a stable ultra-thin polymer membrane using poly(ethylene glycol)-conjugated phospholipid bearing a maleimide group (Mal-PEG-lipids) and multiple interactive polymers (e.g., 4-arm PEG-Mal and 8-arm PEG-SH). When Mal-PEG-lipids were added to islet and cell suspensions, spontaneous incorporation into a cell surface occurred from the micelles at an equilibrium state. The addition of 4-arm PEG-Mal and 8-arm PEG-SH to the mixture induced a substantial increase in the membrane thickness because a number of Mal-PEG-lipid micelles were involved in the membrane formation at the micrometer level. No appreciable increase in islet volume was observed after microencapsulation by this method. Microencapsulation of islets with the polymer membranes, which showed semi-permeability, did not impair insulin release in response to glucose stimulation, even after 7 days. The polymer membrane structure surrounding the islets and cells was well maintained for at least 30 days. In addition, the membrane formed showed much lower thrombogenicity and inhibited complement activation upon exposure to human whole blood and serum.

  • 30.
    Ueki, Takayuki
    et al.
    Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Tokyo, Japan..
    Yoshihara, Akifumi
    Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Tokyo, Japan..
    Teramura, Yuji
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Tokyo, Japan.
    Takai, Madoka
    Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Tokyo, Japan..
    Fast and selective cell isolation from blood sample by microfiber fabric system with vacuum aspiration2016In: Science and Technology of Advanced Materials, ISSN 1468-6996, E-ISSN 1878-5514, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 807-815Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are tumor cells which are found in the blood of cancer patients, CTCs are potential tumor markers, so a rapid isolation of CTCs is desirable for clinical applications. In this paper, a three-dimensional polystyrene (PS) microfiber fabric with vacuum aspiration system was developed for capturing CTCs within a short time. Various microfiber fabrics with different diameters were prepared by the electrospinning method and optimized for contact frequency with cells. Vacuum aspiration utilizing these microfiber fabrics could filter all cells within seconds without mechanical damage. The microfiber fabric with immobilized anti-EpCAM antibodies was able to specifically capture MCF-7 cells that express EpCAM on their surfaces. The specificity of the system was confirmed by monitoring the ability to isolate MCF-7 cells from a mixture containing CCRF-CEM cells that do not express EpCAM. Furthermore, the selective capture ability of the microfiber was retained even when the microfiber was exposed to the whole blood of pigs spiked with MCF-7 cells. The specific cell capture ratio of the vacuum aspiration system utilizing microfiber fabric could be improved by increasing the thickness of the microfiber fabric through electrospinning time.

  • 31.
    Yoshihara, Akifumi
    et al.
    Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Bunkyo Ku, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 1138656, Japan..
    Sekine, Ryota
    Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Bunkyo Ku, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 1138656, Japan..
    Ueki, Takayuki
    Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Bunkyo Ku, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 1138656, Japan..
    Kondo, Yasuhito
    Gunma Prefectural Text Ind Lab, 5-46-1 Aioicho, Kiryu, Gumma 3760011, Japan..
    Sunaga, Yoshiyuki
    Yanase Sangyosya, Midori Ku, 2703-1 Kasakakechosika, Gunma 3792313, Japan..
    Nakaji-Hirabayashi, Tadashi
    Univ Toyama, Grad Sch Sci & Engn, Dept Appl Chem, Toyama 9308555, Japan.;Univ Toyama, Frontier Res Core Life Sci, Toyama 9308555, Japan..
    Teramura, Yuji
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Bunkyo Ku, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 1138656, Japan. .
    Takai, Madoka
    Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Bunkyo Ku, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 1138656, Japan..
    Rapid and highly efficient capture and release of cancer cells using polymeric microfibers immobilized with enzyme-cleavable peptides2018In: Acta Biomaterialia, ISSN 1742-7061, E-ISSN 1878-7568, Vol. 67, p. 32-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are tumor cells present in the blood. CTCs have attracted much attention as a new tumor marker, because their analysis provides useful information for monitoring cancer progress. In this study, we developed cell-capture and release methods using three-dimensional (3D) microfiber fabrics without damaging the cells. Using functional peptides containing sequences from a polystyrene-binding site and a cleavable site for collagenase type IV, immobilized antibodies on the peptides were able to specifically capture MCF-7 cells in a few minutes and release the captured cells from 3D microfiber fabrics incorporating a vacuum system. The efficiency of cell capture was around 80% and that of the cell release was over 90%. The released cells proliferated normally in culture medium, suggesting that our system will be applicable for the culture and analysis of CTCs. Statement of Significance In this paper, we report cell-capture and release methods using enzyme-cleavable peptides immobilized on microfiber fabrics which has microporous polymeric three-dimensional structures. Detachment and collection of the selectively captured cancer cells are required for ex vivo culture and their further analysis, whereas the cell detachment methods developed so far might cause cell damage, even if cell viability is high enough. Therefore, specific attachment and gentle detachment from the device are required for the accurate analysis of cells. In this study, for capture and release of cancer cells we designed the peptide cleavable by collagenase type IV, which has no target molecule in cells. Our system will be useful for further CTC analysis and might lead to more accurate cancer diagnosis.

1 - 31 of 31
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