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  • 1.
    Christersson, Albert
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Nysjö, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Berglund, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Malmberg, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Sintorn, Ida-Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Nyström, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Larsson, Sune
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Comparison of 2D radiography and a semi-automatic CT-based 3D method for measuring change in dorsal angulation over time in distal radius fractures2016In: Skeletal Radiology, ISSN 0364-2348, E-ISSN 1432-2161, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 763-769Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The aim of the present study was to compare the reliability and agreement between a computer tomography-based method (CT) and digitalised 2D radiographs (XR) when measuring change in dorsal angulation over time in distal radius fractures. Materials and methods Radiographs from 33 distal radius fractures treated with external fixation were retrospectively analysed. All fractures had been examined using both XR and CT at six times over 6 months postoperatively. The changes in dorsal angulation between the first reference images and the following examinations in every patient were calculated from 133 follow-up measurements by two assessors and repeated at two different time points. The measurements were analysed using Bland-Altman plots, comparing intra- and inter-observer agreement within and between XR and CT. Results The mean differences in intra- and inter-observer measurements for XR, CT, and between XR and CT were close to zero, implying equal validity. The average intra- and inter-observer limits of agreement for XR, CT, and between XR and CT were +/- 4.4 degrees, +/- 1.9 degrees and +/- 6.8 degrees respectively. Conclusions For scientific purpose, the reliability of XR seems unacceptably low when measuring changes in dorsal angulation in distal radius fractures, whereas the reliability for the semi-automatic CT-based method was higher and is therefore preferable when a more precise method is requested.

  • 2.
    Clement, Alice M.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Nysjö, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Strand, Robin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Ahlberg, Per E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Brain – Endocast relationship in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri, elucidated from tomographic data (Sarcopterygii: Dipnoi)2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 10, article id e0141277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the brains of the three extant lungfish genera have been previously described, the spatial relationship between the brain and the neurocranium has never before been fully described nor quantified. Through the application of virtual microtomography (mu CT) and 3D rendering software, we describe aspects of the gross anatomy of the brain and labyrinth region in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri and compare this to previous accounts. Unexpected characters in this specimen include short olfactory peduncles connecting the olfactory bulbs to the telencephalon, and an oblong telencephalon. Furthermore, we illustrate the endocast (the mould of the internal space of the neurocranial cavity) of Neoceratodus, also describing and quantifying the brain-endocast relationship in a lungfish for the first time. Overall, the brain of the Australian lungfish closely matches the size and shape of the endocast cavity housing it, filling more than four fifths of the total volume. The forebrain and labyrinth regions of the brain correspond very well to the endocast morphology, while the midbrain and hindbrain do not fit so closely. Our results cast light on the gross neural and endocast anatomy in lungfishes, and are likely to have particular significance for palaeoneurologists studying fossil taxa.

  • 3.
    Hast, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Nysjö, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Optimal RANSAC - Towards a Repeatable Algorithm for Finding the Optimal Set2013In: Journal of WSCG, ISSN 1213-6972, E-ISSN 1213-6964, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 21-30Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Khonsari, R H
    et al.
    Friess, M
    Nysjö, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Odri, G
    Malmberg, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Nyström, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Messo, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.
    Hirsch, Jan M
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.
    Cabanis, E A M
    Kunzelmann, K H
    Salagnac, J M
    Corre, P
    Ohazama, A
    Sharpe, P T
    Charlier, P
    Olszewski, R
    Shape and volume of craniofacial cavities in intentional skull deformations2013In: American Journal of Physical Anthropology, ISSN 0002-9483, E-ISSN 1096-8644, Vol. 151, no 1, p. 110-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intentional cranial deformations (ICD) have been observed worldwide but are especially prevalent in preColombian cultures. The purpose of this study was to assess the consequences of ICD on three cranial cavities (intracranial cavity, orbits, and maxillary sinuses) and on cranial vault thickness, in order to screen for morphological changes due to the external constraints exerted by the deformation device. We acquired CT-scans for 39 deformed and 19 control skulls. We studied the thickness of the skull vault using qualitative and quantitative methods. We computed the volumes of the orbits, of the maxillary sinuses, and of the intracranial cavity using haptic-aided semi-automatic segmentation. We finally defined 3D distances and angles within orbits and maxillary sinuses based on 27 anatomical landmarks and measured these features on the 58 skulls. Our results show specific bone thickness patterns in some types of ICD, with localized thinning in regions subjected to increased pressure and thickening in other regions. Our findings confirm that volumes of the cranial cavities are not affected by ICDs but that the shapes of the orbits and of the maxillary sinuses are modified in circumferential deformations. We conclude that ICDs can modify the shape of the cranial cavities and the thickness of their walls but conserve their volumes. These results provide new insights into the morphological effects associated with ICDs and call for similar investigations in subjects with deformational plagiocephalies and craniosynostoses.

  • 5.
    Khonsari, Roman H.
    et al.
    Assistance Publique – Hôpitaux de Paris, Hôpital Necker Enfants-Malades, Service de Chirurgie Maxillo-faciale et Plastique, Université Paris-Descartes, Paris, France.
    Way, Benjamin
    The Craniofacial Unit, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom.
    Nysjö, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction.
    Odri, Guillaume A.
    Assistance Publique – Hôpitaux de Paris, Hôpital Lariboisière, Service de Chirurgie Orthopédique, Université Paris-Diderot, Paris, France.
    Olszewski, Raphaël
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Saint-Luc University Hospital, Catholic University of Leuven, Brussels, Belgium.
    Evans, Robert D.
    The Craniofacial Unit, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom.
    Dunaway, David J.
    The Craniofacial Unit, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom.
    Nyström, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction.
    Britto, Jonathan A.
    The Craniofacial Unit, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom.
    Fronto-facial advancement and bipartition in Crouzon-Pfeiffer and Apert syndromes: Impact of fronto-facial surgery upon orbital and airway parameters in FGFR2 syndromes2016In: Journal of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 1010-5182, E-ISSN 1878-4119, Vol. 44, no 10, p. 1567-1575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A major concern in FGFR2 craniofaciosynostosis is oculo-orbital disproportion, such that orbital malformation provides poor accommodation and support for the orbital contents and peri-orbita, leading to insufficient eyelid closure, corneal exposure and eventually to functional visual impairment. Fronto-facial monobloc osteotomy followed by distraction osteogenesis aims to correct midfacial growth deficiencies in Crouzon–Pfeiffer syndrome patients. Fronto-facial bipartition osteotomy followed by distraction is a procedure of choice in Apert syndrome patients. These procedures modify the shape and volume of the orbit and tend to correct oculo-orbital disproportion. Little is known about the detailed 3D shape of the orbital phenotype in CPS and AS, and about how this is modified by fronto-facial surgery.

    Twenty-eight patients with CMS, 13 patients with AS and 40 control patients were included. CT scans were performed before and after fronto-facial surgery. Late post-operative scans were available for the Crouzon–Pfeiffer syndrome group. Orbital morphology was investigated using conventional three-dimensional cephalometry and shape analysis after mesh-based segmentation of the orbital contents.

    We characterized the 3D morphology of CPS and AS orbits and showed how orbital shape is modified by surgery. We showed that monobloc-distraction in CPS and bipartition-distraction in AS specifically address the morphological characteristics of the two syndromes.

  • 6.
    Levasseur, Julie
    et al.
    Univ Bourgogne, Hop Francois Mitterand, Ctr Hosp Univ Dijon Bourgogne, Serv Chirurg Maxillofaciale Stomatol Chirurg Plas, Dijon, France..
    Nysjö, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Sandy, Ronak
    Aalborg Univ Hosp, Dept Oral & Maxillofacial Surg, Aalborg, Denmark..
    Britto, Jonathan A.
    Great Ormond St Hosp NHS Trust, Dept Plast Surg, London, England..
    Garcelon, Nicolas
    Univ Paris 05, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Inst Imagine, Paris, France.;Univ Paris 05, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Ctr Rech Cordeliers, INSERM, Paris, France..
    Haber, Samer
    Univ Paris 05, Hop Univ Necker, Hop Paris, Serv Chirurg Maxillofaciale & Plast, Paris, France..
    Picard, Arnaud
    Univ Nantes, CHU Hotel Dieu, Serv Chirurg Maxillofaciale & Stomatol, Nantes, France..
    Corre, Pierre
    Univ Nantes, CHU Hotel Dieu, Serv Chirurg Maxillofaciale & Stomatol, Nantes, France..
    Odri, Guillaume A.
    Univ Paris Diderot, Hop Univ Lariboisi, Hop Paris, Serv Chirurg Orthopol, Paris, France..
    Khonsari, Roman H.
    Univ Paris 05, Hop Univ Necker, Hop Paris, Serv Chirurg Maxillofaciale & Plast, Paris, France..
    Orbital volume and shape in Treacher Collins syndrome2018In: Journal of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 1010-5182, E-ISSN 1878-4119, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 305-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Orbito-palpebral reconstruction is a challenge in Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS). This study investigates orbital phenotypes in TCS using cephalometry and orbital shape analysis. Eighteen TCS and 52 control patients were included in this study, using the Dr Warehouse database. Orbital cephalometry was based on 20 landmarks, 10 planes, 16 angles, and 22 distances. Orbits were segmented. Registration-based, age-specific mean models were generated using semi-automatic segmentation, and aligned and compared using color-coded distance maps - mean absolute distance (MAD), Hausdorff distance (HD), and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Symmetry was assessed by mirroring and DSC computing. Central orbital depth ( COD) and medial orbital depth ( MOD) allowed 100% of orbits to be classified. COD and lateral orbital depth (LOD) were different from the controls. Average MAD between TCS and controls was <= 1.5 mm, while for HD it was > 1.5 mm, and for DSC <1. TCS orbits were more asymmetrical than controls, and orbital volumes were smaller when age was considered as a confounding factor, and had a trend for normalization with age. This report emphasizes the importance of combining different morphometric approaches in the phenotype characterization of non-trivial structures such as the orbit, and supports composite skeletal and soft-tissue strategies for the management of the peri-orbital region.

  • 7.
    Nilsson, Johanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Zealand University Hospital, Køge, Denmark.
    Nysjö, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Carlsson, Anders-Petter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Zealand University Hospital, Køge, Denmark.
    Thor, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.
    Comparison analysis of orbital shape and volume in unilateral fractured orbits2018In: Journal of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 1010-5182, E-ISSN 1878-4119, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 381-387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Facial fractures often result in changes of the orbital volume. These changes can be measured in three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) scans for preoperative planning and postoperative evaluation. The aim of this study was to analyze the orbital volume and shape before and after surgical treatment of unilateral orbital fractures using semi-automatic image segmentation and registration techniques. The orbital volume in 21 patients was assessed by a semi-automatic model-based segmentation method. The fractured orbit was compared relative to the contralateral orbit. The same procedure was performed for the postoperative evaluation. Two observers performed the segmentation procedure, and the inter- and intraobserver variability was evaluated. The interobserver variability (mean volume difference ± 1.96 SD) was −0.6 ± 1.0 ml in the first trial and 0.7 ± 0.8 ml in the second trial. The intra-observer variability was −0.2 ± 0.7 ml for the first observer and 1.1 ± 0.9 ml for the second observer. The average volume overlap (Dice similarity coefficient) between the fractured and contralateral side increased after surgery, while the mean and maximum surface distance decreased, indicating that the surgery contributed to a re-establishment of size and shape. In conclusion, our study shows that the semi-automatic segmentation method has precision for detecting volume differences down to 1.0 ml. The combination of semi-automatic segmentation and 3D shape analysis provides a powerful tool for planning and evaluating treatment of orbital fractures.

  • 8.
    Nysjö, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Interactive 3D Image Analysis for Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery Planning and Orthopedic Applications2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Modern medical imaging devices are able to generate highly detailed three-dimensional (3D) images of the skeleton. Computerized image processing and analysis methods, combined with real-time volume visualization techniques, can greatly facilitate the interpretation of such images and are increasingly used in surgical planning to aid reconstruction of the skeleton after trauma or disease. Two key challenges are to accurately separate (segment) bone structures or cavities of interest from the rest of the image and to interact with the 3D data in an efficient way. This thesis presents efficient and precise interactive methods for segmenting, visualizing, and analysing 3D computed tomography (CT) images of the skeleton. The methods are validated on real CT datasets and are primarily intended to support planning and evaluation of cranio-maxillofacial (CMF) and orthopedic surgery.

    Two interactive methods for segmenting the orbit (eye-socket) are introduced. The first method implements a deformable model that is guided and fitted to the orbit via haptic 3D interaction, whereas the second method implements a user-steered volumetric brush that uses distance and gradient information to find exact object boundaries.

    The thesis also presents a semi-automatic method for measuring 3D angulation changes in wrist fractures. The fractured bone is extracted with interactive mesh segmentation, and the angulation is determined with a technique based on surface registration and RANSAC.

    Lastly, the thesis presents an interactive and intuitive tool for segmenting individual bones and bone fragments. This type of segmentation is essential for virtual surgery planning, but takes several hours to perform with conventional manual methods. The presented tool combines GPU-accelerated random walks segmentation with direct volume rendering and interactive 3D texture painting to enable quick marking and separation of bone structures. It enables the user to produce an accurate segmentation within a few minutes, thereby removing a major bottleneck in the planning procedure.

    List of papers
    1. Visualization and Haptics for Interactive Medical Image Analysis: Image Segmentation in Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery Planning
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Visualization and Haptics for Interactive Medical Image Analysis: Image Segmentation in Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery Planning
    2011 (English)In: Visual Informatics: Sustaining Research and Innovations / [ed] H. Badioze Zaman, et al. (Eds.), Berlin Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag , 2011, p. 1-12Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A central problem in cranio-maxillofacial (CMF) surgery is to restore the normal anatomy of the skeleton after defects, e.g., trauma to the face. With careful pre-operative planning, the precision and predictability of the craniofacial reconstruction can be significantly improved. In addition, morbidity can be reduced thanks to shorter operation time. An important component in surgery planning is to be able to accurately measure the extent of anatomical structures. Of particular interest are the shape and volume of the orbits (eye sockets). These properties can be measured in 3D CT images of the skull, provided that an accurate segmentation of the orbits is available. Here, we present a system for interactive segmentation of the orbit in CT images. The system utilizes 3D visualization and haptic feedback to facilitate efficient exploration and manipulation of 3D data.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Berlin Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag, 2011
    Series
    Lecture Notes in Computer Science ; 7066
    National Category
    Medical Image Processing
    Research subject
    Computerized Image Analysis; Computerized Image Processing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-161227 (URN)10.1007/978-3-642-25191-7_1 (DOI)978-3-642-25190-0 (ISBN)
    Conference
    2nd International Visual Informatics Conference (IVIC 2011)
    Available from: 2011-11-10 Created: 2011-11-09 Last updated: 2016-09-06
    2. Towards User-Guided Quantitative Evaluation of Wrist Fractures in CT Images
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards User-Guided Quantitative Evaluation of Wrist Fractures in CT Images
    Show others...
    2012 (English)In: Computer Vision and Graphics: ICCVG 2012 / [ed] Bolc, Leonard; Tadeusiewicz, Ryszard; Chmielewski, Leszek J; Wojciechowski, Konrad, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2012, p. 204-211Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The wrist is the most common location for long-bone fractures in humans. To evaluate the healing process of such fractures, it is of interest to measure the fracture displacement, particularly the angle between the joint line and the long axis of the fractured long bone. We propose to measure this angle in 3D computed tomography (CT) images of fractured wrists. As a first step towards this goal, we here present a fast and precise semi-automatic method for determining the long axis of the radius bone in CT images. To facilitate user interaction in 3D, we utilize stereo graphics, head tracking, 3D input, and haptic feedback.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2012
    Series
    Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 0302-9743 ; 7594
    National Category
    Medical Image Processing
    Research subject
    Computerized Image Analysis
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-185557 (URN)10.1007/978-3-642-33564-8_25 (DOI)000313005700025 ()978-3-642-33563-1 (ISBN)
    Conference
    ICCVG 2012, September 24-26, 2012, Warsaw, Poland
    Available from: 2012-11-26 Created: 2012-11-26 Last updated: 2016-09-06Bibliographically approved
    3. Shape and volume of craniofacial cavities in intentional skull deformations
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Shape and volume of craniofacial cavities in intentional skull deformations
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: American Journal of Physical Anthropology, ISSN 0002-9483, E-ISSN 1096-8644, Vol. 151, no 1, p. 110-119Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Intentional cranial deformations (ICD) have been observed worldwide but are especially prevalent in preColombian cultures. The purpose of this study was to assess the consequences of ICD on three cranial cavities (intracranial cavity, orbits, and maxillary sinuses) and on cranial vault thickness, in order to screen for morphological changes due to the external constraints exerted by the deformation device. We acquired CT-scans for 39 deformed and 19 control skulls. We studied the thickness of the skull vault using qualitative and quantitative methods. We computed the volumes of the orbits, of the maxillary sinuses, and of the intracranial cavity using haptic-aided semi-automatic segmentation. We finally defined 3D distances and angles within orbits and maxillary sinuses based on 27 anatomical landmarks and measured these features on the 58 skulls. Our results show specific bone thickness patterns in some types of ICD, with localized thinning in regions subjected to increased pressure and thickening in other regions. Our findings confirm that volumes of the cranial cavities are not affected by ICDs but that the shapes of the orbits and of the maxillary sinuses are modified in circumferential deformations. We conclude that ICDs can modify the shape of the cranial cavities and the thickness of their walls but conserve their volumes. These results provide new insights into the morphological effects associated with ICDs and call for similar investigations in subjects with deformational plagiocephalies and craniosynostoses.

    National Category
    Surgery Medical Image Processing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-198978 (URN)10.1002/ajpa.22263 (DOI)000318040200011 ()23553676 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2013-04-30 Created: 2013-04-30 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    4. Precise 3D Angle Measurements in CT Wrist Images
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Precise 3D Angle Measurements in CT Wrist Images
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: Image Analysis and Processing – ICIAP 2013: Part II, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, p. 479-488Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The clinically established method to assess the displacement of a distal radius fracture is to manually measure two reference angles,the dorsal angle and the radial angle, in consecutive 2D X-ray images of the wrist. This approach has the disadvantage of being sensitive to operator errors since the measurements are performed on 2D projections of a 3D structure. In this paper, we present a semi-automatic system for measuring relative changes in the dorsal angle in 3D computed tomography (CT) images of fractured wrists. We evaluate the proposed 3D measurement method on 28 post-operative CT images of fractured wrists and compare it with the radiographic 2D measurement method used in clinical practice. The results show that our proposed 3D measurement method has a high intra- and inter-operator precision and is more precise and robust than the conventional 2D measurement method.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013
    Series
    Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 0302-9743 ; 8157
    Keywords
    Wrist fractures, CT, angle measurements, bone segmentation, interactive mesh segmentation, surface registration
    National Category
    Medical Image Processing
    Research subject
    Computerized Image Analysis; Computerized Image Processing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-211749 (URN)10.1007/978-3-642-41184-7_49 (DOI)000329811200049 ()978-3-642-41183-0 (ISBN)
    Conference
    17th International Conference on Image Analysis and Processing (ICIAP), Naples, Italy, September 9-13, 2013
    Available from: 2013-11-30 Created: 2013-11-30 Last updated: 2016-09-06Bibliographically approved
    5. Optimal RANSAC - Towards a Repeatable Algorithm for Finding the Optimal Set
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Optimal RANSAC - Towards a Repeatable Algorithm for Finding the Optimal Set
    2013 (English)In: Journal of WSCG, ISSN 1213-6972, E-ISSN 1213-6964, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 21-30Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    National Category
    Computer Vision and Robotics (Autonomous Systems)
    Research subject
    Computerized Image Processing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-200593 (URN)
    Conference
    International Conferences in Central Europe on Computer Graphics, Visualization and Computer Vision
    Available from: 2013-05-31 Created: 2013-05-31 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
    6. BoneSplit - A 3D Texture Painting Tool for Interactive Bone Separation in CT Images
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>BoneSplit - A 3D Texture Painting Tool for Interactive Bone Separation in CT Images
    2015 (English)In: Journal of WSCG, ISSN 1213-6972, E-ISSN 1213-6964, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 157-166Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We present an efficient interactive tool for separating collectively segmented bones and bone fragments in 3D computed tomography (CT) images. The tool, which is primarily intended for virtual cranio-maxillofacial (CMF) surgery planning, combines direct volume rendering with an interactive 3D texture painting interface to enable quick identification and marking of individual bone structures. The user can paint markers (seeds) directly on the rendered bone surfaces as well as on individual CT slices. Separation of the marked bones is then achieved through the random walks segmentation algorithm, which is applied on a graph constructed from the collective bone segmentation. The segmentation runs on the GPU and can achieve close to real-time update rates for volumes as large as 512^3. Segmentation editing can be performed both in the random walks segmentation stage and in a separate post-processing stage using a local 3D editing tool. In a preliminary evaluation of the tool, we demonstrate that segmentation results comparable with manual segmentations can be obtained within a few minutes.

    National Category
    Medical Image Processing
    Research subject
    Computerized Image Processing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268818 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-12-09 Created: 2015-12-09 Last updated: 2018-05-30Bibliographically approved
    7. Comparison of 2D radiography and a semi-automatic CT-based 3D method for measuring change in dorsal angulation over time in distal radius fractures
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of 2D radiography and a semi-automatic CT-based 3D method for measuring change in dorsal angulation over time in distal radius fractures
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Skeletal Radiology, ISSN 0364-2348, E-ISSN 1432-2161, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 763-769Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The aim of the present study was to compare the reliability and agreement between a computer tomography-based method (CT) and digitalised 2D radiographs (XR) when measuring change in dorsal angulation over time in distal radius fractures. Materials and methods Radiographs from 33 distal radius fractures treated with external fixation were retrospectively analysed. All fractures had been examined using both XR and CT at six times over 6 months postoperatively. The changes in dorsal angulation between the first reference images and the following examinations in every patient were calculated from 133 follow-up measurements by two assessors and repeated at two different time points. The measurements were analysed using Bland-Altman plots, comparing intra- and inter-observer agreement within and between XR and CT. Results The mean differences in intra- and inter-observer measurements for XR, CT, and between XR and CT were close to zero, implying equal validity. The average intra- and inter-observer limits of agreement for XR, CT, and between XR and CT were +/- 4.4 degrees, +/- 1.9 degrees and +/- 6.8 degrees respectively. Conclusions For scientific purpose, the reliability of XR seems unacceptably low when measuring changes in dorsal angulation in distal radius fractures, whereas the reliability for the semi-automatic CT-based method was higher and is therefore preferable when a more precise method is requested.

    National Category
    Orthopaedics Medical Image Processing
    Research subject
    Computerized Image Processing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-297776 (URN)10.1007/s00256-016-2350-6 (DOI)000374476200003 ()26922189 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2016-02-27 Created: 2016-06-28 Last updated: 2018-05-14Bibliographically approved
    8. Rapid and Precise Orbit Segmentation through Interactive 3D Painting
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rapid and Precise Orbit Segmentation through Interactive 3D Painting
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present an efficient interactive tool for segmenting and measuring the volume of the bony orbit (eye-socket) in computed tomography (CT) images. The tool implements a 3D painting interface that allows the user to quickly segment or "paint" the fat and soft-tissue content of the orbit by sweeping a volumetric brush over the image. The brush modifies and updates the segmentation result in real-time and takes distance and gradient information into account to fill out and find the exact boundaries of the orbit. A smooth and consistent delineation of the anterior boundary is obtained by fitting a thin-plate spline to user-selected landmarks. We evaluate the tool on 10 CT images of intact and fractured orbits and show that it achieves high intra- and inter-operator precision (mean spatial overlap 95%, less than 1 ml volume variability) and produces segmentation results that are similar to manually corrected reference segmentations, but only requires a few minutes of interaction time.

    Keywords
    interactive segmentation, volume rendering, computed tomography, orbit
    National Category
    Medical Image Processing
    Research subject
    Computerized Image Processing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-301179 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-08-19 Created: 2016-08-19 Last updated: 2016-09-06
  • 9.
    Nysjö, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Christersson, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Malmberg, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Sintorn, Ida-Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Nyström, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Towards User-Guided Quantitative Evaluation of Wrist Fractures in CT Images2012In: Computer Vision and Graphics: ICCVG 2012 / [ed] Bolc, Leonard; Tadeusiewicz, Ryszard; Chmielewski, Leszek J; Wojciechowski, Konrad, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2012, p. 204-211Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The wrist is the most common location for long-bone fractures in humans. To evaluate the healing process of such fractures, it is of interest to measure the fracture displacement, particularly the angle between the joint line and the long axis of the fractured long bone. We propose to measure this angle in 3D computed tomography (CT) images of fractured wrists. As a first step towards this goal, we here present a fast and precise semi-automatic method for determining the long axis of the radius bone in CT images. To facilitate user interaction in 3D, we utilize stereo graphics, head tracking, 3D input, and haptic feedback.

  • 10.
    Nysjö, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Christersson, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Sintorn, Ida-Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Nyström, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Larsson, Sune
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Malmberg, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Precise 3D Angle Measurements in CT Wrist Images2013In: Image Analysis and Processing – ICIAP 2013: Part II, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, p. 479-488Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The clinically established method to assess the displacement of a distal radius fracture is to manually measure two reference angles,the dorsal angle and the radial angle, in consecutive 2D X-ray images of the wrist. This approach has the disadvantage of being sensitive to operator errors since the measurements are performed on 2D projections of a 3D structure. In this paper, we present a semi-automatic system for measuring relative changes in the dorsal angle in 3D computed tomography (CT) images of fractured wrists. We evaluate the proposed 3D measurement method on 28 post-operative CT images of fractured wrists and compare it with the radiographic 2D measurement method used in clinical practice. The results show that our proposed 3D measurement method has a high intra- and inter-operator precision and is more precise and robust than the conventional 2D measurement method.

  • 11.
    Nysjö, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Hast, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Teaching OpenGL and Computer Graphics with Programmable Shaders2015In: SIGRAD, 2015, p. 1-3Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Nysjö, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Malmberg, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Sintorn, Ida-Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Nyström, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    BoneSplit - A 3D Texture Painting Tool for Interactive Bone Separation in CT Images2015In: Journal of WSCG, ISSN 1213-6972, E-ISSN 1213-6964, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 157-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present an efficient interactive tool for separating collectively segmented bones and bone fragments in 3D computed tomography (CT) images. The tool, which is primarily intended for virtual cranio-maxillofacial (CMF) surgery planning, combines direct volume rendering with an interactive 3D texture painting interface to enable quick identification and marking of individual bone structures. The user can paint markers (seeds) directly on the rendered bone surfaces as well as on individual CT slices. Separation of the marked bones is then achieved through the random walks segmentation algorithm, which is applied on a graph constructed from the collective bone segmentation. The segmentation runs on the GPU and can achieve close to real-time update rates for volumes as large as 512^3. Segmentation editing can be performed both in the random walks segmentation stage and in a separate post-processing stage using a local 3D editing tool. In a preliminary evaluation of the tool, we demonstrate that segmentation results comparable with manual segmentations can be obtained within a few minutes.

  • 13.
    Nysjö, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Nilsson, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.
    Malmberg, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Thor, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.
    Nyström, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Rapid and Precise Orbit Segmentation through Interactive 3D PaintingManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present an efficient interactive tool for segmenting and measuring the volume of the bony orbit (eye-socket) in computed tomography (CT) images. The tool implements a 3D painting interface that allows the user to quickly segment or "paint" the fat and soft-tissue content of the orbit by sweeping a volumetric brush over the image. The brush modifies and updates the segmentation result in real-time and takes distance and gradient information into account to fill out and find the exact boundaries of the orbit. A smooth and consistent delineation of the anterior boundary is obtained by fitting a thin-plate spline to user-selected landmarks. We evaluate the tool on 10 CT images of intact and fractured orbits and show that it achieves high intra- and inter-operator precision (mean spatial overlap 95%, less than 1 ml volume variability) and produces segmentation results that are similar to manually corrected reference segmentations, but only requires a few minutes of interaction time.

  • 14.
    Nyström, Ingela
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Centre for Image Analysis. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Nysjö, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Centre for Image Analysis. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Malmberg, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Centre for Image Analysis. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Visualization and Haptics for Interactive Medical Image Analysis: Image Segmentation in Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery Planning2011In: Visual Informatics: Sustaining Research and Innovations / [ed] H. Badioze Zaman, et al. (Eds.), Berlin Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag , 2011, p. 1-12Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A central problem in cranio-maxillofacial (CMF) surgery is to restore the normal anatomy of the skeleton after defects, e.g., trauma to the face. With careful pre-operative planning, the precision and predictability of the craniofacial reconstruction can be significantly improved. In addition, morbidity can be reduced thanks to shorter operation time. An important component in surgery planning is to be able to accurately measure the extent of anatomical structures. Of particular interest are the shape and volume of the orbits (eye sockets). These properties can be measured in 3D CT images of the skull, provided that an accurate segmentation of the orbits is available. Here, we present a system for interactive segmentation of the orbit in CT images. The system utilizes 3D visualization and haptic feedback to facilitate efficient exploration and manipulation of 3D data.

  • 15.
    Nyström, Ingela
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Nysjö, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Thor, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.
    Malmberg, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    BoneSplit – A 3D painting tool for interactive bone segmentation in CT images2017In: Pattern Recognition and Information Processing: PRIP 2016, Springer, 2017, p. 3-13Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Schold Linnér, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Morén, Max
    Smed, Karl-Oskar
    Nysjö, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Strand, Robin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    LatticeLibrary and BccFccRaycaster: Software for processing and viewing 3D data on optimal sampling lattices2016In: SoftwareX, ISSN 2352-7110, Vol. 5, p. 16-24Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17. Smektala, Tomasz
    et al.
    Nysjö, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Thor, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.
    Homik, Aleksandra
    Sporniak-Tutak, Katarzyna
    Safranow, Krzysztof
    Dowgierd, Krzysztof
    Olszewski, Raphael
    Three-Dimensional Eyeball and Orbit Volume Modification After LeFort III Midface Distraction2015In: The Journal of craniofacial surgery (Print), ISSN 1049-2275, E-ISSN 1536-3732, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 1652-1655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of our study was to evaluate orbital volume modification with LeFort III midface distraction in patients with craniosynostosis and its influence on eyeball volume and axial diameter modification. Orbital volume was assessed by the semiautomatic segmentation method based on deformable surface models and on 3-dimensional (3D) interaction with haptics. The eyeball volumes and diameters were automatically calculated after manual segmentation of computed tomographic scans with 3D slicer software. The mean, minimal, and maximal differences as well as the standard deviation and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for intraobserver and interobserver measurements reliability were calculated. The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare measured values before and after surgery. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Intraobserver and interobserver ICC for haptic-aided semiautomatic orbital volume measurements were 0.98 and 0.99, respectively. The intraobserver and interobserver ICC values for manual segmentation of the eyeball volume were 0.87 and 0.86, respectively. The orbital volume increased significantly after surgery: 30.32% (mean, 5.96  mL) for the left orbit and 31.04% (mean, 6.31  mL) for the right orbit. The mean increase in eyeball volume was 12.3%. The mean increases in the eyeball axial dimensions were 7.3%, 9.3%, and 4.4% for the X-, Y-, and Z-axes, respectively. The Wilcoxon signed rank test showed that preoperative and postoperative eyeball volumes, as well as the diameters along the X- and Y-axes, were statistically significant. Midface distraction in patients with syndromic craniostenosis results in a significant increase (P < 0.05) in the orbit and eyeball volumes. The 2 methods (haptic-aided semiautomatic segmentation and manual 3D slicer segmentation) are reproducible techniques for orbit and eyeball volume measurements.

  • 18.
    Svensson, Lennart
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Nysjö, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Brun, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Nyström, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Sintorn, Ida-Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Rigid registration for MET image exploration using CUDA2012In: Proceedings SSBA 2012, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 18 of 18
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