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  • 1.
    Bhandage, Amol
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Jin, Zhe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Korol, Sergiy V
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Tafreshiha, Atieh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Gohel, Priya
    Stockholm Univ, Wenner Gren Inst, Dept Mol Biosci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hellgren, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Espes, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Birnir, Bryndis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Expression of calcium release-activated and voltage-gated calcium channels genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells is altered in pregnancy and in type 1 diabetes2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 12, article id e0208981Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Calcium (Ca2+) is an important ion in physiology and is found both outside and inside cells. The intracellular concentration of Ca2+ is tightly regulated as it is an intracellular signal molecule and can affect a variety of cellular processes. In immune cells Ca2+ has been shown to regulate e.g. gene transcription, cytokine secretion, proliferation and migration. Ca2+ can enter the cytoplasm either from intracellular stores or from outside the cells when Ca2+ permeable ion channels in the plasma membrane open. The Ca2+ release-activated (CRAC) channel is the most prominent Ca2+ ion channel in the plasma membrane. It is formed by ORAI1-3 and the channel is opened by the endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ sensor proteins stromal interaction molecules (STIM) 1 and 2. Another group of Ca-2(+) channels in the plasma membrane are the voltage-gated Ca2+ (Ca-V) channels. We examined if a change in immunological tolerance is accompanied by altered ORAI, STIM and Ca-V gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in pregnant women and in type 1 diabetic individuals. Our results show that in pregnancy and type 1 diabetes ORAI1-3 are up-regulated whereas STIM1 and 2 are down-regulated in pregnancy but only STIM2 in type 1 diabetes. Expression of L-, P/Q-, R- and T-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels was detected in the PBMCs where the Ca(V)2.3 gene was up-regulated in pregnancy and type 1 diabetes whereas the Ca(V)2.1 and Ca(V)3.2 genes were up-regulated only in pregnancy and the Ca(V)1.3 gene in type 1 diabetes. The results are consistent with that expression of ORAI, STIM and Ca-V genes correlate with a shift in immunological status of the individual in health, as during pregnancy, and in the autoimmune disease type 1 diabetes. Whether the changes are in general protective or in type 1 diabetes include some pathogenic components remains to be clarified.

  • 2.
    Bhandage, Amol K.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Jin, Zhe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Korol, Sergiy V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology. Uppsala University.
    Shen, Qiujin
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Pei, Yu
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Deng, Qiaolin
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Espes, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Birnir, Bryndis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    GABA Regulates Release of Inflammatory Cytokines From Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and CD4+ T Cells and Is Immunosuppressive in Type 1 Diabetes2018In: EBioMedicine, ISSN 0360-0637, E-ISSN 2352-3964, Vol. 30, p. 283-294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an extracellular signaling molecule in the brain and in pancreatic islets. Here, we demonstrate that GABA regulates cytokine secretion from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and CD4+ T cells. In anti-CD3 stimulated PBMCs, GABA (100nM) inhibited release of 47 cytokines in cells from patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D), but only 16 cytokines in cells from nondiabetic (ND) individuals. CD4+ T cells from ND individuals were grouped into responder or non-responder T cells according to effects of GABA (100nM, 500nM) on the cell proliferation. In the responder T cells, GABA decreased proliferation, and inhibited secretion of 37 cytokines in a concentration-dependent manner. In the non-responder T cells, GABA modulated release of 8 cytokines. GABA concentrations in plasma from T1D patients and ND individuals were correlated with 10 cytokines where 7 were increased in plasma of T1D patients. GABA inhibited secretion of 5 of these cytokines from both T1D PBMCs and ND responder T cells. The results identify GABA as a potent regulator of both Th1- and Th2-type cytokine secretion from human PBMCs and CD4+ T cells where GABA generally decreases the secretion.

  • 3.
    Carlbom, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Espes, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Eriksson, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Molecular Imaging.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Jansson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Pancreatic perfusion and subsequent response to glucose in healthy individuals and patients with type 1 diabetes2016In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 59, no 9, p. 1968-1972Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to investigate pancreatic perfusion and its response to a glucose load in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus compared with non-diabetic ('healthy') individuals.

    METHODS: Eight individuals with longstanding type 1 diabetes and ten sex-, age- and BMI-matched healthy controls underwent dynamic positron emission tomography scanning with (15)O-labelled water before and after intravenous administration of glucose. Perfusion in the pancreas was measured. Portal and arterial hepatic perfusion were recorded as references.

    RESULTS: Under fasting conditions, total pancreatic perfusion was on average 23% lower in the individuals with diabetes compared with healthy individuals. Glucose increased total pancreatic and portal hepatic blood perfusion in healthy individuals by 48% and 38%, respectively. In individuals with diabetes there was no significant increase in either total pancreatic or portal hepatic perfusion.

    CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Individuals with type 1 diabetes have reduced basal pancreatic perfusion and a severely impaired pancreatic and splanchnic perfusion response to intravenous glucose stimulation.

  • 4.
    Carlbom, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Espes, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Martinell, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Eriksson, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    [(11)C]5-Hydroxy-Tryptophan PET for Assessment of Islet Mass During Progression of Type 2 Diabetes2017In: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 66, no 5, p. 1286-1292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [(11)C]5-hydroxy-tryptophan ([(11)C]5-HTP) PET of the pancreas has been shown to be a surrogate imaging biomarker of pancreatic islet mass. The change in islet mass in different stages of type 2 diabetes (T2D) as measured by non-invasive imaging is currently unknown. Here, we describe a cross-sectional study where subjects at different stages of T2D development with expected stratification of pancreatic islet mass were examined in relation to non-diabetic individuals. The primary outcome was the [(11)C]5-HTP uptake and retention in pancreas, as a surrogate marker for the endogenous islet mass.We found that metabolic testing indicated a progressive loss of beta cell function, but that this was not mirrored by a decrease in [(11)C]5-HTP tracer accumulation in the pancreas. This provides evidence of retained islet mass despite decreased beta cell function. The results herein indicates that beta cell dedifferentiation, and not necessarily endocrine cell loss, constitute a major cause of beta cell failure in T2D.

  • 5.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Espes, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Sedigh, Amir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Transplantation Surgery.
    Rotem, Avi
    Zimermann, Baruch
    Grinberg, Helena
    Goldman, Tali
    Barkai, Uriel
    Avni, Yuval
    Westermark, Gunilla T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Carlbom, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Antaros Medical AB, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Olerud, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Transplantation of macroencapsulated human islets within the bioartificial pancreas βAir to patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus2018In: American Journal of Transplantation, ISSN 1600-6135, E-ISSN 1600-6143, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 1735-1744Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Macroencapsulation devices provide the dual possibility to immunoprotect transplanted cells while also being retrievable; the latter bearing importance for safety in future trials with stem-cell derived cells. However, macroencapsulation entails a problem with oxygen supply to the encapsulated cells. The βAir device solves this with an incorporated refillable oxygen tank. This phase 1 study evaluated the safety and efficacy of implanting the βAir device containing allogeneic human pancreatic islets to patients with type 1 diabetes. Four patients were transplanted with 1-2 βAir devices, each containing 155000-180000 IEQ (i.e. 1800-4600 IEQ per kg body weight), and monitored for 3-6 months, followed by the recovery of devices. Implantation of the βAir device was safe and successfully prevented immunization and rejection of the transplanted tissue. However, although beta cells survived in the device, only minute levels of circulating C-peptide were observed with no impact on metabolic control. Fibrotic tissue with immune cells was formed in capsule surroundings. Recovered devices displayed a blunted glucose-stimulated insulin response, and amyloid formation in the endocrine tissue. We conclude that the βAir device is safe and can support survival of allogeneic islets for several months, although the function of the transplanted cells was limited.

  • 6.
    Elksnis, Andris
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Martinell, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Eriksson, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Espes, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Heterogeneity of Metabolic Defects in Type 2 Diabetes and Its Relation to Reactive Oxygen Species and Alterations in Beta-Cell Mass2019In: Frontiers in Physiology, ISSN 1664-042X, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 10, article id 107Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a complex and heterogeneous disease which affects millions of people worldwide. The classification of diabetes is at an interesting turning point and there have been several recent reports on sub-classification of T2D based on phenotypical and metabolic characteristics. An important, and perhaps so far underestimated, factor in the pathophysiology of T2D is the role of oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS). There are multiple pathways for excessive ROS formation in T2D and in addition, beta-cells have an inherent deficit in the capacity to cope with oxidative stress. ROS formation could be causal, but also contribute to a large number of the metabolic defects in T2D, including beta-cell dysfunction and loss. Currently, our knowledge on beta-cell mass is limited to autopsy studies and based on comparisons with healthy controls. The combined evidence suggests that beta-cell mass is unaltered at onset of T2D but that it declines progressively. In order to better understand the pathophysiology of T2D, to identify and evaluate novel treatments, there is a need for in vivo techniques able to quantify beta-cell mass. Positron emission tomography holds great potential for this purpose and can in addition map metabolic defects, including ROS activity, in specific tissue compartments. In this review, we highlight the different phenotypical features of T2D and how metabolic defects impact oxidative stress and ROS formation. In addition, we review the literature on alterations of beta-cell mass in T2D and discuss potential techniques to assess beta-cell mass and metabolic defects in vivo.

  • 7.
    Eriksson, Olof
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Espes, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Selvaraju, Ram K
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Jansson, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Antoni, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    Biglarnia, Alireza
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Transplantation Surgery.
    Eriksson, Jan W
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Sundin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Eriksson, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    The Positron Emission Tomography ligand [11C]5-Hydroxy-Tryptophan can be used as a surrogate marker for the human endocrine pancreas2014In: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 63, no 10, p. 3428-3437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In humans a well-developed serotonin system is localized to the pancreatic islets while being absent in exocrine pancreas. Assessment of pancreatic serotonin biosynthesis could therefore be used to estimate the human endocrine pancreas. Proof of concept was tested in a prospective clinical trial by comparisons of type 1 diabetic (T1D) patients, with extensive reduction of beta cells, with healthy volunteers (HV).C-peptide negative (i.e. insulin-deficient) T1D subjects (n=10) and HV (n=9) underwent dynamic Positron Emission Tomography with the radiolabeled serotonin precursor [(11)C]5-Hydroxy-Tryptophan ([(11)C]5-HTP).A significant accumulation of [(11)C]5-HTP was obtained in the pancreas of the HV, with large inter-individual variation. A substantial and highly significant reduction (66%) in the pancreatic uptake of [(11)C]5-HTP in T1D subjects was observed, and this was most evident in the corpus and caudal regions of the pancreas where beta-cells normally are the major constituent of the islets.[(11)C]5-HTP retention in the pancreas was reduced in T1D compared to non-diabetic subjects. Accumulation of [(11)C]5-HTP in the pancreas of both HV and subjects with T1D were in agreement with previously reported morphological observations on the beta cell volume implying that [(11)C]5-HTP retention is a useful non-invasive surrogate marker for the human endocrine pancreas.

  • 8.
    Eriksson, Olof
    et al.
    Univ Turku, Turku PET Ctr, FI-20521 Turku, Finland.;Abo Akad Univ, Dept Biosci, Turku, Finland..
    Mikkola, Kirsi
    Univ Turku, Turku PET Ctr, FI-20521 Turku, Finland..
    Espes, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Tuominen, Lauri
    Univ Turku, Turku PET Ctr, FI-20521 Turku, Finland.;Univ Turku, Dept Psychiat, FI-20521 Turku, Finland..
    Virtanen, Kirsi
    Univ Turku, Turku PET Ctr, FI-20521 Turku, Finland..
    Forsbaeck, Sarita
    Univ Turku, Turku PET Ctr, FI-20521 Turku, Finland..
    Haaparanta-Solin, Merja
    Univ Turku, Turku PET Ctr, FI-20521 Turku, Finland..
    Hietala, Jarmo
    Univ Turku, Turku PET Ctr, FI-20521 Turku, Finland.;Univ Turku, Dept Psychiat, FI-20521 Turku, Finland..
    Solin, Olof
    Univ Turku, Turku PET Ctr, FI-20521 Turku, Finland.;Abo Akad Univ, Accelerator Lab, Turku, Finland..
    Nuutila, Pirjo
    Univ Turku, Turku PET Ctr, FI-20521 Turku, Finland.;Turku Univ Hosp, Dept Endocrinol, FIN-20520 Turku, Finland..
    The Cannabinoid Receptor-1 Is an Imaging Biomarker of Brown Adipose Tissue2015In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine, ISSN 0161-5505, E-ISSN 1535-5667, Vol. 56, no 12, p. 1937-1941Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, the existence of significant deposits of brown adipose tissue (BAT) in human adults was confirmed. Its role in the human metabolism is unknown but could be substantial. Inhibition of the cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1) by the antagonist rimonabant (SR141716) has been associated with activation of BAT thermogenesis and weight loss in mice and rats. The role of peripheral and central CB1 in the activation of BAT merits further investigation. Here we developed a technique for quantifying CB1 in BAT by PET. Methods: Sections of rat BAT and subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT) were stained for CB1 and uncoupling protein-1 by immunofluorescent staining. Binding of the radiolabeled CB1 antagonist (3R,5R)-5-(3-(18F-fluoromethoxy)phenyl)-3-(((R)-1-phenylethyl)amino)-1-(4-(trifluoromethyl)-phenyl)pyrrolidin-2-one (F-18-FMPEP-d(2)) to BAT in vivo and in vitro was assessed in rats by PET. Results: We found that CB1 was colocalized with uncoupling protein-1 in BAT, but neither protein was found in WAT. Binding of the radiotracer to BAT sections (but not WAT) in vitro was high and displaceable by pretreatment with rimonabant. Deposits of BAT in rats had significant binding of F-18-FMPEP-d(2) in vivo, indicating high CB1 density. WAT deposits were negative for F-18-FMPEP-d(2), consistent with the immunofluorescent staining and in vitro results. Conclusion: F-18-FMPEP-d(2) PET can quantify CB1 density noninvasively in vivo in rats. CB1 is therefore a promising surrogate imaging biomarker for assessing the presence of BAT deposits as well as for elucidating the mechanism of CB1 antagonist-mediated weight loss.

  • 9.
    Espes, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Engraftment of Pancreatic Islets in Alternative Transplantation Sites and the Feasibility of in vivo Monitoring of Native and Transplanted Beta-Cell Mass2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Islet transplantation is a possible curative treatment for type 1 diabetes (T1D). Currently the liver dominates as implantation site, despite the many challenges encountered at this site.

    Acute hypoxia in islets transplanted to muscle and omentum, two possible alternative sites, was prevailing. However, it was rapidly reversed at both implantation sites, in contrast to when islets were transplanted intraportally. At the intramuscular site hypoxia was further relieved by co-transplantation of an oxygen carrier, polymerized hemoglobin, which also improved the functional outcome. The complement system was activated after islet transplantation to muscle, but did not hamper graft function.

    Both mouse and human islets transplanted to omentum become well re-vascularized and have a functional blood flow and oxygenation comparable with that of endogenous islets. Animals transplanted with islets to the omentum had a superior graft function compared with animals receiving intraportal islet grafts.

    Alloxan-diabetic animals were cured with a low number of islets both when the islets were implanted in the omentum and muscle. The islet grafts responded adequately to both glucose and insulin and displayed a favorable mRNA gene expression profile.

    A challenge in diabetes research and in islet transplantation is that there are no established techniques for quantifying beta-cell mass in vivo. By using radiolabeled Exendin-4, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, beta-cell mass after transplantation to muscle of mice was quantified. The results may well be translated to the clinical setting.

    By comparing the pancreatic accumulation of [11C]5-hydroxy tryptophan ([11C]5-HTP) as detected by positron emission tomography (PET) in T1D patients with that of healthy controls, a 66% decrease was observed. This may in fact represent the loss of beta-cells, taking into account that other cells within the islets of Langerhans are largely unaffected in T1D. 

    In conclusion, the data presented support the use of alternative implantation sites for islet transplantation. In addition to improving the functional outcome this may enable more transplantations since the number of transplanted islets may be reduced. The techniques investigated for quantifying transplanted and endogenous beta-cell mass may greatly improve our knowledge of the pathophysiology of T1D and become a valuable tool for evaluation of beta-cell mass.

    List of papers
    1. Cotransplantation of Polymerized Hemoglobin Reduces β-Cell Hypoxia and Improves β-Cell Function in Intramuscular Islet Grafts
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cotransplantation of Polymerized Hemoglobin Reduces β-Cell Hypoxia and Improves β-Cell Function in Intramuscular Islet Grafts
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    2015 (English)In: Transplantation, ISSN 0041-1337, E-ISSN 1534-6080, Vol. 99, no 10, p. 2077-2082Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Muscle is a promising alternative site for islet transplantation that facilitates rapid restoration of islet vascularization. However, the development of fibrosis suggests massive cellular death after transplantation. This study tested the hypothesis that islet graft function is limited by hypoxia-related death early after intramuscular transplantation, but that this can be overcome by cotransplantation of an oxygen carrier, that is, polymerized bovine hemoglobin (PolyHb). Methods. Two hundred islets were transplanted with or without different doses of PolyHb intramuscularly to nondiabetic C57BL/6 and diabetic C57BL/6 nu/nu mice. beta-cell hypoxia and apoptosis were evaluated by immunohistochemistry after injection of the biochemical marker pimonidazole or by staining for caspase-3, respectively. Blood glucose concentrations were monitored for 30 days after islet transplantation and animals were then subjected to an intravenous glucose tolerance test. Results. Substantial hypoxia was observed in control islet grafts during the first 4 days after transplantation. Cotransplantation of PolyHb resulted in a dose-dependent reduction of beta-cell hypoxia, but beta-cell apoptosis was only reduced by cotransplantation of low-dose PolyHb (0.03 mg/g body weight) due to the inflammatory effects of higher PolyHb concentrations. Cotransplantation of low-dose PolyHb resulted in improved islet graft function 30 days after transplantation in diabetic mice, with a glucose tolerance comparable to transplantation of 50% more islets. Conclusion. We conclude that cotransplantation of islets with PolyHb can be used to effectively bridge the critical hypoxic phase immediately after transplantation, improve islet graft function, and reduce the number of islets needed for successful intramuscular transplantation.

    National Category
    Cell and Molecular Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-275353 (URN)10.1097/TP.0000000000000815 (DOI)000369086800016 ()26426924 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2016-02-10 Created: 2016-02-03 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
    2. Activation of Complement C3 Does NotHamper the Outcome of Experimental Intramuscular Islet Transplantation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Activation of Complement C3 Does NotHamper the Outcome of Experimental Intramuscular Islet Transplantation
    2016 (English)In: Transplantation, ISSN 0041-1337, E-ISSN 1534-6080, Vol. 100, no 3, p. E6-E7Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
    Keywords
    Islet transplantation, complement C3, alternative implantation sites
    National Category
    Cell and Molecular Biology
    Research subject
    Medical Cell Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-282949 (URN)10.1097/TP.0000000000001083 (DOI)000371582400001 ()26900812 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2016-04-08 Created: 2016-04-08 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
    3. Restoration of Islet Vascularity and Oxygenation in Mouse and Human Islets Experimentally Transplanted to the Omentum: A Basis for Superior Function when Compared to Intraportally Transplanted Islets
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Restoration of Islet Vascularity and Oxygenation in Mouse and Human Islets Experimentally Transplanted to the Omentum: A Basis for Superior Function when Compared to Intraportally Transplanted Islets
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: American Journal of Transplantation, ISSN 1600-6135, E-ISSN 1600-6143Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    Keywords
    Islet transplantation, omentum, engraftment
    National Category
    Cell and Molecular Biology
    Research subject
    Medical Cell Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-282948 (URN)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 55X-15043
    Available from: 2016-04-08 Created: 2016-04-08 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
    4. Function and Gene Expression of Islets Experimentally Transplanted to Muscle or Omentum
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Function and Gene Expression of Islets Experimentally Transplanted to Muscle or Omentum
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Keywords
    Islet transplantation, muscle, omentum, engraftment, gene expression, laser capture microdissection
    National Category
    Cell and Molecular Biology
    Research subject
    Medical Cell Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-282952 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-04-08 Created: 2016-04-08 Last updated: 2018-01-10
    5. Quantification of Beta-Cell Mass in Intramuscular Islet Grafts using Radiolabeled Exendin-4
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quantification of Beta-Cell Mass in Intramuscular Islet Grafts using Radiolabeled Exendin-4
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    2016 (English)In: Transplantation Direct, ISSN 2373-8731, Vol. 2, no 8, article id e93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is an increasing interest in alternative implantation sites to the liver for islet transplantation. Intramuscular implantation has even been tested clinically. Possibilities to monitor [beta]-cell mass would be of huge importance not only for the understanding of islet engraftment but also for the decision of changing the immunosuppressive regime. We have therefore evaluated the feasibility of quantifying intramuscular [beta]-cell mass using the radiolabeled glucagon like peptide-1 receptor agonist DO3A-VS-Cys40-Exendin-4.

    Methods: One hundred to 400 islets were transplanted to the abdominal muscle of nondiabetic mice. After 3 to 4 weeks, 0.2 to 0.5 MBq [177Lu]DO3A-VS-Cys40-Exendin-4 was administered intravenously. Sixty minutes postinjection abdominal organs and graft bearing muscle were retrieved, and the radioactive uptake measured in a well counter within 10 minutes. The specific uptake in native and transplanted islets was assessed by autoradiography. The total insulin-positive area of the islet grafts was determined by immunohistochemistry.

    Results: Intramuscular islet grafts could easily be visualized by this tracer, and the background uptake was very low. There was a linear correlation between the radioactivity uptake and the number of transplanted islets, both for standardized uptake values and the total radiotracer uptake in each graft (percentage of injected dose). The quantified total insulin area of surviving [beta] cells showed an even stronger correlation to both standardized uptake values (R = 0.96, P = 0.0002) and percentage of injected dose (R = 0.88, P = 0.0095). There was no correlation to estimated [alpha] cell mass.

    Conclusions: [177Lu]DO3A-VS-Cys40-Exendin-4 could be used to quantify [beta]-cell mass after experimental intramuscular islet transplantation. This technique may well be transferred to the clinical setting by exchanging Lutetium-177 radionuclide to a positron emitting Gallium-68.

    Keywords
    Islet transplantation, beta-cell mass, exendin-4, Lutetium-177
    National Category
    Cell and Molecular Biology
    Research subject
    Medical Cell Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-282942 (URN)10.1097/TXD.0000000000000598 (DOI)000390130200004 ()27819034 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 55X-15043
    Available from: 2016-04-08 Created: 2016-04-08 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
    6. The Positron Emission Tomography ligand [11C]5-Hydroxy-Tryptophan can be used as a surrogate marker for the human endocrine pancreas
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Positron Emission Tomography ligand [11C]5-Hydroxy-Tryptophan can be used as a surrogate marker for the human endocrine pancreas
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    2014 (English)In: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 63, no 10, p. 3428-3437Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In humans a well-developed serotonin system is localized to the pancreatic islets while being absent in exocrine pancreas. Assessment of pancreatic serotonin biosynthesis could therefore be used to estimate the human endocrine pancreas. Proof of concept was tested in a prospective clinical trial by comparisons of type 1 diabetic (T1D) patients, with extensive reduction of beta cells, with healthy volunteers (HV).C-peptide negative (i.e. insulin-deficient) T1D subjects (n=10) and HV (n=9) underwent dynamic Positron Emission Tomography with the radiolabeled serotonin precursor [(11)C]5-Hydroxy-Tryptophan ([(11)C]5-HTP).A significant accumulation of [(11)C]5-HTP was obtained in the pancreas of the HV, with large inter-individual variation. A substantial and highly significant reduction (66%) in the pancreatic uptake of [(11)C]5-HTP in T1D subjects was observed, and this was most evident in the corpus and caudal regions of the pancreas where beta-cells normally are the major constituent of the islets.[(11)C]5-HTP retention in the pancreas was reduced in T1D compared to non-diabetic subjects. Accumulation of [(11)C]5-HTP in the pancreas of both HV and subjects with T1D were in agreement with previously reported morphological observations on the beta cell volume implying that [(11)C]5-HTP retention is a useful non-invasive surrogate marker for the human endocrine pancreas.

    National Category
    Other Basic Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-224960 (URN)10.2337/db13-1877 (DOI)000342527300029 ()24848067 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-05-25 Created: 2014-05-25 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
  • 10.
    Espes, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Engström, Joakim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Reinius, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism.
    Severe diabetic ketoacidosis in combination with starvation and anorexia nervosa at onset of type 1 diabetes: A case report2013In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 118, no 2, p. 130-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We here report a case of diabetic ketoacidosis at onset of type 1 diabetes after a prolonged period of starvation due to anorexia nervosa. A 53-year-old female with a history of anorexia nervosa was admitted to the psychiatric clinic due to psychotic behaviour and inability to take care of herself. Twenty-four hours after admission she was transferred to the clinic of internal medicine due to altered mental status, and laboratory screening revealed a pH of 6.895 and blood glucose concentration of 40 mmol/L. Due to the unusual combination of prolonged starvation and diabetic ketoacidosis we implemented some modifications of existing treatment guidelines and some special considerations regarding nutrition in order to prevent a re-feeding syndrome.

  • 11.
    Espes, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Eriksson, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Lau, Joey
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Striated Muscle as Implantation Site for Transplanted Pancreatic Islets2011In: Journal of Transplantation, ISSN 2090-0007, E-ISSN 2090-0015, Vol. 2011, p. 352043-Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Islet transplantation is an attractive treatment for selected patients with brittle type 1 diabetes. In the clinical setting, intraportal transplantation predominates. However, due to extensive early islet cell death, the quantity of islets needed to restore glucose homeostasis requires in general a minimum of two donors. Moreover, the deterioration of islet function over time results in few insulin-independent patients after five-year followup. Specific obstacles to the success of islet transplantation include site-specific concerns for the liver such as the instant blood mediated inflammatory reaction, islet lipotoxicity, low oxygen tension, and poor revascularization, impediments that have led to the developing interest for alternative implantation sites over recent years. Within preclinical settings, several alternative sites have now been investigated and proven favorable in various aspects. Muscle is considered a very promising site and has physiologically properties and technical advantages that could make it optimal for islet transplantation.

  • 12.
    Espes, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lau, J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Quach, My
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Ullsten, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. La Jolla Inst Allergy & Immunol, La Jolla, CA USA..
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Rapid Restoration of Vascularity and Oxygenation in Mouse and Human Islets Transplanted to Omentum May Contribute to Their Superior Function Compared to Intraportally Transplanted Islets2016In: American Journal of Transplantation, ISSN 1600-6135, E-ISSN 1600-6143, Vol. 16, no 11, p. 3246-3254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transplantation of islets into the liver confers several site-specific challenges, including a delayed vascularization and prevailing hypoxia. The greater omentum has in several experimental studies been suggested as an alternative implantation site for clinical use, but there has been no direct functional comparison to the liver. In this experimental study in mice, we characterized the engraftment of mouse and human islets in the omentum and compared engraftment and functional outcome with those in the intraportal site. The vascularization and innervation of the islets transplanted into the omentum were restored within the first month by paralleled ingrowth of capillaries and nerves. The hypoxic conditions in the islets early posttransplantation were transient and restricted to the first days. Newly formed blood vessels were fully functional, and the blood perfusion and oxygenation of the islets became similar to that of endogenous islets. Furthermore, islet grafts in the omentum showed at 1 month posttransplantation functional superiority to intraportally transplanted grafts. We conclude that in contrast to the liver the omentum provides excellent engraftment conditions for transplanted islets. Future studies in humans will be of great interest to investigate the capability of this site to also harbor larger grafts without interfering with islet functionality.

  • 13.
    Espes, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Lau, Joey
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Increased circulating levels of betatrophin in individuals with long-standing type 1 diabetes2014In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 50-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims/hypothesis The hormone betatrophin was recently described as a potent stimulator of beta cell proliferation in mice. Insulin resistance, but not insulin deficiency, caused upregulation of betatrophin expression. If these findings were found to be fully applicable in humans, this would open up the possibility of future betatrophin treatment in type 1 diabetes. The present study measured for the first time betatrophin concentrations in humans and tested the hypothesis that there would be no difference in circulating betatrophin concentrations between patients with type 1 diabetes and healthy individuals. Methods Betatrophin concentrations in plasma of 33 patients with type 1 diabetes and 24 age-matched healthy controls were measured by ELISA. The study participants were characterised for blood lipids, BMI, plasma glucose and HbA(1c), and, for the diabetic patients, their insulin requirements and any residual C-peptide concentrations. Results Plasma betatrophin concentrations were normally similar to 300 pg/ml, but were approximately doubled in patients with type 1 diabetes. In the patients, there were no correlations between betatrophin and age, blood lipids, BMI, glucose control or insulin requirement, whereas in controls betatrophin levels increased with age. BMI, blood pressure and triacylglycerol, LDL-cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol levels were similar in patients and healthy controls. Conclusions/interpretation Circulating concentrations of betatrophin are increased in type 1 diabetes in contrast with what was recently described in an insulin-deficient mouse model. However, increased betatrophin concentrations do not protect against loss of C-peptide. Betatrophin treatment in type 1 diabetes would therefore probably not be successful without the use of supraphysiological doses or a combination with immune regulatory treatment.

  • 14.
    Espes, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lau, Joey
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Increased levels of irisin in people with long-standing Type1 diabetes2015In: Diabetic Medicine, ISSN 0742-3071, E-ISSN 1464-5491, Vol. 32, no 9, p. 1172-1176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundIrisin stimulates browning of white adipose tissue and improves metabolic control in mice. Betatrophin, another recently described hormone, improves metabolic control in mice by inducing -cell proliferation. Invitro, irisin stimulates the expression of betatrophin in rat adipocytes. There is a great interest in developing drugs that target or use these hormones for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. We have previously reported on increased levels of betatrophin in people with Type1 diabetes, but the levels of irisin are currently unknown. AimTo characterize the levels of irisin in Type1 diabetes and investigate a potential correlation with betatrophin. MethodsIrisin and betatrophin were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) in 45 individuals with Type1 diabetes and in 25 healthy controls. ResultsIrisin levels were increased in people with Type1 diabetes, and especially in women. Negative correlations between irisin levels and age at onset of Type1 diabetes and plasma triacylglycerol levels were observed. Interestingly, in women with Type1 diabetes a negative correlation between irisin and insulin doses was also observed. When computing correlations for all study participants, a positive correlation between irisin and total betatrophin was observed, but not between irisin and full-length betatrophin. ConclusionWe report on increased circulating levels of irisin in people with Type1 diabetes, especially in women. For women with Type1 diabetes, the levels of irisin correlated with lower insulin requirements. Further studies are clearly needed to determine the role of irisin in Type1 diabetes.

  • 15.
    Espes, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Lau, Joey
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Towards the clinical translation of stem cell therapy for type 1 diabetes2017In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 177, no 4, p. R159-R168Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Insulin-producing cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have for long been a promising, but elusive treatment far from clinical translation into type 1 diabetes therapy. However, the field is now on the verge of moving such insulin-producing cells into clinical trials. Although stem cell therapies provide great opportunities, there are also potential risks such as teratoma formation associated with the treatment. Many considerations are needed on how to proceed with clinical translation, including whether to use hESCs or iPSCs, and whether encapsulation of tissue will be needed. This review aims to give an overview of the current knowledge of stem cell therapy outcomes in animal models of type 1 diabetes and a proposed road map towards the clinical setting with special focus on the potential risks and hurdles which needs to be considered. From a clinical point of view, transplantation of insulin-producing cells derived from stem cells must be performed without immune suppression in order to be an attractive treatment option. Although costly and highly labour intensive, patient-derived iPSCs would be the only solution, if not clinically successful encapsulation or tolerance induction protocols are introduced.

  • 16.
    Espes, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Lau, Joey
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Quach, My
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Restored Vascular Density and Blood Fow in Mouse and Human Islets Experimentally Transplanted to The Greater Omentum2013In: Transplantation, ISSN 0041-1337, E-ISSN 1534-6080, Vol. 96, no 6, p. S18-S18Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Espes, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lau, Joey
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Franzén, Petra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Quach, My
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Function and Gene Expression of Islets Experimentally Transplanted to Muscle or OmentumManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Espes, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Lau, Joey
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Quach, My
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Banerjee, Uddyalok
    Ohio State Univ, William G Lowrie Dept Chem & Biomol Engn, Columbus, OH 43210 USA.
    Palmer, Andre F.
    Ohio State Univ, William G Lowrie Dept Chem & Biomol Engn, Columbus, OH 43210 USA.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Cotransplantation of Polymerized Hemoglobin Reduces β-Cell Hypoxia and Improves β-Cell Function in Intramuscular Islet Grafts2015In: Transplantation, ISSN 0041-1337, E-ISSN 1534-6080, Vol. 99, no 10, p. 2077-2082Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Muscle is a promising alternative site for islet transplantation that facilitates rapid restoration of islet vascularization. However, the development of fibrosis suggests massive cellular death after transplantation. This study tested the hypothesis that islet graft function is limited by hypoxia-related death early after intramuscular transplantation, but that this can be overcome by cotransplantation of an oxygen carrier, that is, polymerized bovine hemoglobin (PolyHb). Methods. Two hundred islets were transplanted with or without different doses of PolyHb intramuscularly to nondiabetic C57BL/6 and diabetic C57BL/6 nu/nu mice. beta-cell hypoxia and apoptosis were evaluated by immunohistochemistry after injection of the biochemical marker pimonidazole or by staining for caspase-3, respectively. Blood glucose concentrations were monitored for 30 days after islet transplantation and animals were then subjected to an intravenous glucose tolerance test. Results. Substantial hypoxia was observed in control islet grafts during the first 4 days after transplantation. Cotransplantation of PolyHb resulted in a dose-dependent reduction of beta-cell hypoxia, but beta-cell apoptosis was only reduced by cotransplantation of low-dose PolyHb (0.03 mg/g body weight) due to the inflammatory effects of higher PolyHb concentrations. Cotransplantation of low-dose PolyHb resulted in improved islet graft function 30 days after transplantation in diabetic mice, with a glucose tolerance comparable to transplantation of 50% more islets. Conclusion. We conclude that cotransplantation of islets with PolyHb can be used to effectively bridge the critical hypoxic phase immediately after transplantation, improve islet graft function, and reduce the number of islets needed for successful intramuscular transplantation.

  • 19.
    Espes, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Lau, Joey
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Quach, My
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Restoration of Islet Vascularity and Oxygenation in Mouse and Human Islets Experimentally Transplanted to the Omentum: A Basis for Superior Function when Compared to Intraportally Transplanted Islets2016In: American Journal of Transplantation, ISSN 1600-6135, E-ISSN 1600-6143Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Espes, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Lau, Joey
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Quach, My
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Palmer, Andre F.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Hypoxia in Islets After Intramuscular Transplantation can be Overcome by Co-Implantation of Polymerized Hemoglobin2013In: Transplantation, ISSN 0041-1337, E-ISSN 1534-6080, Vol. 96, no 6, p. S44-S44Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Espes, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Manell, Elin
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rydén, Anneli
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Carlbom, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Weis, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Jensen-Waern, Marianne
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jansson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Eriksson, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pancreatic perfusion and its response to glucose as measured by simultaneous PET/MRI2019In: Acta Diabetologica, ISSN 0940-5429, E-ISSN 1432-5233, Vol. 56, no 10, p. 1113-1120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: Perfusion of the pancreas and the islets of Langerhans is sensitive to physiological stimuli and is dysregulated in metabolic disease. Pancreatic perfusion can be assessed by both positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but the methods have not been directly compared or benchmarked against the gold-standard microsphere technique.

    METHODS: Pigs (n = 4) were examined by [15O]H2O PET and intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) MRI technique simultaneously using a hybrid PET/MRI scanner. The pancreatic perfusion was measured both at basal conditions and after intravenous (IV) administration of up to 0.5 g/kg glucose.

    RESULTS: Pancreatic perfusion increased by 35%, 157%, and 29% after IV 0.5 g/kg glucose compared to during basal conditions, as assessed by [15O]H2O PET, IVIM MRI, and microspheres, respectively. There was a correlation between pancreatic perfusion as assessed by [15O]H2O PET and IVIM MRI (r = 0.81, R2 = 0.65, p < 0.01). The absolute quantification of pancreatic perfusion (ml/min/g) by [15O]H2O PET was within a 15% error of margin of the microsphere technique.

    CONCLUSION: Pancreatic perfusion by [15O]H2O PET was in agreement with the microsphere technique assessment. The IVIM MRI method has the potential to replace [15O]H2O PET if the pancreatic perfusion is sufficiently large, but not when absolute quantitation is required.

  • 22.
    Espes, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Martinell, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Increased Circulating Betatrophin Concentrations in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes2014In: International Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 1687-8337, E-ISSN 1687-8345, Vol. 2014, p. 323407-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Betatrophin has recently been described as a key hormone to stimulate beta-cell mass expansion in response to insulin resistance and obesity in mice. The finding has generated an interest in the development of antidiabetic drugs with betatrophin as the active component. However, the circulating levels of betatrophin in patients with type 2 diabetes are not well known. Betatrophin concentrations in plasma of 27 type 2 diabetes patients and 18 gender-, age-, and BMI-matched controls were measured. Study participants were characterized with regard to BMI, waist and hip circumference, blood pressure, and fasting plasma blood lipids, creatinine, glucose, HbA1c, and C-peptide. HOMA2 indices were calculated. Betatrophin was 40% higher in patients with type 2 diabetes (893 +/- 80 versus 639 +/- 66 pg/mL). Betatrophin positively correlated with age in the controls and with HbA1c in the type 2 diabetes patients. All study participants were insulin resistant with mean HOMA2B IR in both groups exceeding 2 and HOMA2% S < 50%. Control individuals had impaired fasting glucose concentrations. In this report on betatrophin concentrations in type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance, elevated betatrophin levels were measured in the patients with type 2 diabetes. Future studies are clearly needed to delineate the exact role, if any, of betatrophin in regulating human beta-cell mass.

  • 23.
    Espes, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Martinell, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Liljebäck, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Betatrophin in Diabetes Mellitus: the Epidemiological Evidence in Humans2015In: Current Diabetes Reports, ISSN 1534-4827, E-ISSN 1539-0829, Vol. 15, no 12, article id 104Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing worldwide, and while numerous treatments exist, none of the current pharmacologic therapies is curative. Pharmacologic approaches that increase beta cell mass may present an avenue for actual cure. There have been numerous reports on factors that can induce beta cell proliferation in rodents, whereas there are still very limited data on the occurrence of beta cell proliferation in humans. The recent discovery of the hormone betatrophin, which in mice counteracted glucose intolerance induced by insulin resistance by potently stimulating beta cell proliferation, has boosted the hope for a new target for drug development for the treatment of diabetes mellitus in humans. With the encouraging preclinical findings as a background, this review presents the available clinical data on betatrophin and discusses its possible role in humans.

  • 24.
    Espes, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Pekna, Marcela
    Deptartment of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Activation of Complement C3 Does NotHamper the Outcome of Experimental Intramuscular Islet Transplantation2016In: Transplantation, ISSN 0041-1337, E-ISSN 1534-6080, Vol. 100, no 3, p. E6-E7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Espes, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Selvaraju, Ramkumar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Velikyan, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Krajcovic, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Eriksson, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry. Turku PET center, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Technology, Åbo Akademi, Turku, Finland.
    Quantification of Beta-Cell Mass in Intramuscular Islet Grafts using Radiolabeled Exendin-42016In: Transplantation Direct, ISSN 2373-8731, Vol. 2, no 8, article id e93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is an increasing interest in alternative implantation sites to the liver for islet transplantation. Intramuscular implantation has even been tested clinically. Possibilities to monitor [beta]-cell mass would be of huge importance not only for the understanding of islet engraftment but also for the decision of changing the immunosuppressive regime. We have therefore evaluated the feasibility of quantifying intramuscular [beta]-cell mass using the radiolabeled glucagon like peptide-1 receptor agonist DO3A-VS-Cys40-Exendin-4.

    Methods: One hundred to 400 islets were transplanted to the abdominal muscle of nondiabetic mice. After 3 to 4 weeks, 0.2 to 0.5 MBq [177Lu]DO3A-VS-Cys40-Exendin-4 was administered intravenously. Sixty minutes postinjection abdominal organs and graft bearing muscle were retrieved, and the radioactive uptake measured in a well counter within 10 minutes. The specific uptake in native and transplanted islets was assessed by autoradiography. The total insulin-positive area of the islet grafts was determined by immunohistochemistry.

    Results: Intramuscular islet grafts could easily be visualized by this tracer, and the background uptake was very low. There was a linear correlation between the radioactivity uptake and the number of transplanted islets, both for standardized uptake values and the total radiotracer uptake in each graft (percentage of injected dose). The quantified total insulin area of surviving [beta] cells showed an even stronger correlation to both standardized uptake values (R = 0.96, P = 0.0002) and percentage of injected dose (R = 0.88, P = 0.0095). There was no correlation to estimated [alpha] cell mass.

    Conclusions: [177Lu]DO3A-VS-Cys40-Exendin-4 could be used to quantify [beta]-cell mass after experimental intramuscular islet transplantation. This technique may well be transferred to the clinical setting by exchanging Lutetium-177 radionuclide to a positron emitting Gallium-68.

  • 26.
    Espes, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Singh, Kailash
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Sandler, Stellan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Increased Interleukin-35 Levels in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes With Remaining C-Peptide2017In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 40, no 8, p. 1090-1095Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE Many patients with long-standing type 1 diabetes have remaining functional β-cells. This study investigated immunological differences between patients with or without measurable remaining endogenous insulin production after ≥10 years duration of disease.

    RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Patients (n = 113; ≥18 years of age) with type 1 diabetes and with disease duration of ≥10 years were recruited at Uppsala University Hospital. Residual β-cell function was determined with an ultrasensitive C-peptide ELISA. Circulating cytokines, including interleukin-35 (IL-35), were determined in plasma. Additional blood samples were collected from 14 of the identified C-peptide–positive patients and 12 of the C-peptide–negative patients, as well as from 15 healthy control subjects, and were used for immediate investigation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    RESULTS The blood concentration of the cytokine IL-35 was markedly lower in C-peptide–negative patients, and this was associated with a simultaneous decrease in the proportion of IL-35+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), IL-35+ regulatory B cells, and IL-35–producing CD8+Foxp3+ cells. IL-35 has previously been shown to maintain the phenotype of Tregs, block the differentiation of T-helper 17 cells, and thereby dampen immune assaults to β-cells. We found that the proportions of IL-17a+ cells among the Tregs, CD4+ T cells, and CD8+ T cells were lower in the C-peptide–positive patients.

    CONCLUSIONS Patients with remaining endogenous β-cell function after >10 years duration of type 1 diabetes differ immunologically from other patients with long-standing type 1 diabetes. In particular, they have a much higher IL-35 production.

  • 27.
    Jansson, Leif
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Barbu, Andreea
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Bodin, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Drott, Carl Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Espes, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Gao, Xiang
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Grapensparr, Liza
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Kallskog, Örjan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Lau, Joey Börjesson
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Liljebäck, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Palm, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Quach, My
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Sandberg, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Strömberg, Victoria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Ullsten, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Pancreatic islet blood flow and its measurement2016In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 121, no 2, p. 81-95Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pancreatic islets are richly vascularized, and islet blood vessels are uniquely adapted to maintain and support the internal milieu of the islets favoring normal endocrine function. Islet blood flow is normally very high compared with that to the exocrine pancreas and is autonomously regulated through complex interactions between the nervous system, metabolites from insulin secreting beta-cells, endothelium derived mediators, and hormones. The islet blood flow is normally coupled to the needs for insulin release and is usually disturbed during glucose intolerance and overt diabetes. The present review provides a brief background on islet vascular function and especially focuses on available techniques to measure islet blood perfusion. The gold standard for islet blood flow measurements in experimental animals is the microsphere technique, and its advantages and disadvantages will be discussed. In humans there are still no methods to measure islet blood flow selectively, but new developments in radiological techniques hold great hopes for the future.

  • 28.
    Korol, Sergiy V
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Jin, Zhe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Jin, Yang
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Bhandage, Amol K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Tengholm, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Gandasi, Nikhil R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Barg, Sebastian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Espes, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Laver, Derek
    University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australia.
    Birnir, Bryndis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Functional Characterization of Native, High-Affinity GABAA Receptors in Human Pancreatic β Cells2018In: EBioMedicine, ISSN 0360-0637, E-ISSN 2352-3964, Vol. 30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In human pancreatic islets, the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an extracellular signaling molecule synthesized by and released from the insulin-secreting β cells. The effective, physiological GABA concentration range within human islets is unknown. Here we use native GABAA receptors in human islet β cells as biological sensors and reveal that 100-1000nM GABA elicit the maximal opening frequency of the single-channels. In saturating GABA, the channels desensitized and stopped working. GABA modulated insulin exocytosis and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. GABAA receptor currents were enhanced by the benzodiazepine diazepam, the anesthetic propofol and the incretin glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) but not affected by the hypnotic zolpidem. In type 2 diabetes (T2D) islets, single-channel analysis revealed higher GABA affinity of the receptors. The findings reveal unique GABAA receptors signaling in human islets β cells that is GABA concentration-dependent, differentially regulated by drugs, modulates insulin secretion and is altered in T2D.

  • 29.
    Liljebäck, Hanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Espes, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Unsurpassed Intrahepatic Islet Engraftment: the Quest for New Sites for Beta Cell Replacement2019In: Cell Medicine, ISSN 2155-1790, E-ISSN 2155-1790, Vol. 11, article id 2155179019857662Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The liver is currently the site of choice for clinical islet transplantation, even though many alternative implantation sites have lately been proposed as more ideal for graft survival. The suggested sites, for example intramuscular space, omentum, bone marrow, and spleen, are sometimes difficult to compare due to differences in animal model, islet isolation procedure, and islet quality. In addition, the variation in transplanted islet mass is vast. The aim of this commentary is to review alternative implantation sites tested experimentally as well as in clinical islet transplantation. Although many sites have been investigated, none have convincingly proved better suited for clinical islet transplantation than intraportal injection to the liver, regardless of whether it is autologous or allogeneic transplantation. However, in order to fully evaluate upcoming bioengineering techniques, such as scaffolds containing insulin-producing cells derived from stem cells, the need of an alternative site has arisen to enable cellular monitoring, which currently cannot be achieved within the liver.

  • 30.
    Lundin, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Cell Biol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Espes, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Luo, Zhenkang
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Blixt, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Mejia Cordova, Mariela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Sandler, Stellan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Singh, Kailash
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Role of regulatory B cells in clinical and experimental type 1 diabetes2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 349-349Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Martinell, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Espes, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Increased Circulating Betatrophin Concentrations in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes2014In: Typ1 ?Typ x Språk: - Engelska Svenska Norska Arabiska Bokmål Bulgariska Danska Engelska Esperanto Estniska Finska Franska Färöiska Grönländska (Kalaallit oqaasi) Hebreiska Hindi Indonesiska Iriska Isländska Italienska Japanska Katalanska Kinesiska Koreanska Kroatiska Kurdiska Latin Lettiska Litauiska Madurese Makedonska Mongoliskt språk Nederländska Norska Nygrekiska (1453-) Nynorsk Odefinierat språk Persiska Polska Portugisiska Rumänska Ryska Samiskt språk Sanskrit Serbiska Slovakiska Slovenska Spanska Svenska Tjeckiska Turkiska Tyska Ukrainska Ungerska Urdu Vietnamesiska / [ed] Prof Ulf Eriksson, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To test the hypothesis of a Betatrophin deficiency in patients with diabetes by measuring circulating Betatrophin in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and non-diabetic, insulin resistant controls.

     

    Material and methods

    ELISA measured Betatrophin concentration in plasma of 27 patients with T2D and 18 matched controls. The participants were characterized by weight, height, waist-and hip (circumference and ratio), blood pressure, blood lipids, P-creatinine, fP-glucose, HbA1c, fC-peptide and family history of diabetes. Inputting fP-glucose and fC-peptide into the HOMA2 model assessed the beta-cell function, insulin sensitivity and insulin resistance.

     

    Results

    Betatrophin concentrations were approximately 40% higher in the patients with T2D and also correlated positively to HbA1c. In the control group, Betatrophin concentration increased with age. All T2D patients and controls were insulin resistant with mean insulin resistance in both groups well exceeding 2 and the insulin sensitivity being less than 50%.

     

    Conclusion

    In this first study to report on betatrophin concentrations in type 2 diabetes and insulin resistant patients, elevated betatrophin levels were measured in the diabetic individuals. There is no obvious betatrophin deficiency to substitute in these patients.

     

  • 32.
    Martinell, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Singh, Kailash
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Zhengkang, Luo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Espes, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Stålhammar, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Sandler, Stellan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Characterization of Cellular Immunology in LADA PatientsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Patients with latent autoimmune diabetes mellitus in adults (LADA) have antibodies against the insulin-producing b-cells but at disease onset they are not insulin-dependent. This study presents cellular immunological differences between LADA, type 1, type 2 diabetes and healthy controls.

    Research Design and Methods: All patients and matched (by age, gender and body mass index) healthy controls were recruited from the County of Uppsala, Sweden. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from freshly collected blood to determine proportions of innate, adaptive and regulatory immune cells by using flow cytometry.

    Results: Included were 14 patients with LADA, 16 with type 1 diabetes, 16 with type 2 diabetes and 13 healthy controls. The proportion of CD11c+CD123- antigen presenting cells (APCs) was lower, whilst proportions of CD11c+CD123+ APCs and Interleukin (IL)-35+ tolerogenic APCs were higher in LADA patients compared to patients with type 1 diabetes. The proportion of CD3-CD56highCD16+ Natural Killer (NK) cells was higher in LADA patients than in both healthy controls and type 2 diabetes patients. IL-35+ Treg cell numbers were similar to those observed in both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes patients, but a lower frequency of IL-35+ regulatory T (Treg) cells was observed in LADA patients than in healthy controls. The proportion of regulatory B (Breg) cells in LADA patients was higher than in healthy controls, type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients and IL-35+ Breg cell numbers were higher than in type 1 diabetes patients.

    Conclusions: LADA patients present a mixed cellular immunological pattern compared to type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients. Numbers of APCs, IL-35+ tolerogenic APCs and IL-35+ Breg cells in LADA patients are similar to those observed in type 2 diabetes patients, whereas the changes in NK cells are similar to those observed in type 1 diabetes patients. 

  • 33.
    Selvaraju, Ram Kumar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Velikyan, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Espes, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism.
    Todorov, I.
    Wu, Z.
    Shively, J.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Kandeel, F.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Eriksson, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Pancreatic uptake of [68Ga]DO3A-Exendin4 is mediated by the GLP-1 receptor2012In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 39, no S2, p. S195-S195Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Singh, Kailash
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Kadesjö, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Lindroos, Julia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Hjort, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Lundberg, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Espes, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Sandler, Stellan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Thorvaldson, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Interleukin-35 administration counteracts established murine type 1 diabetes - possible involvement of regulatory T cells2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, article id 12633Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-35 is produced by regulatory T (Treg) cells to suppress autoimmune and inflammatory responses. The role of IL-35 in type 1 diabetes (T1D) remains to be answered. To elucidate this, we investigated the kinetics of Treg cell response in the multiple low dose streptozotocin induced (MLDSTZ) T1D model and measured the levels of IL-35 in human T1D patients. We found that Treg cells were increased in MLDSTZ mice. However, the Treg cells showed a decreased production of anti-inflammatory (IL-10, IL-35, TGF-beta) and increased pro-inflammatory (IFN-gamma, IL-2, IL-17) cytokines, indicating a phenotypic shift of Treg cells under T1D condition. IL-35 administration effectively both prevented development of, and counteracted established MLDSTZ T1D, seemingly by induction of Eos expression and IL-35 production in Treg cells, thus reversing the phenotypic shift of the Treg cells. IL-35 administration reversed established hyperglycemia in NOD mouse model of T1D. Moreover, circulating IL-35 levels were decreased in human T1D patients compared to healthy controls. These findings suggest that insufficient IL-35 levels play a pivotal role in the development of T1D and that treatment with IL-35 should be investigated in treatment of T1D and other autoimmune diseases.

  • 35.
    Singh, Kailash
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Martinell, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Luo, Zhengkang
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Espes, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Stålhammar, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Sandler, Stellan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Cellular immunological changes in patients with LADA are a mixture of those seen in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes2019In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 197, no 1, p. 64-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is currently scarce knowledge of the immunological profile of patients with latent autoimmune diabetes mellitus in the adult (LADA) when compared with healthy controls (HC) and patients with classical type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D). The objective of this study was to investigate the cellular immunological profile of LADA patients and compare to HC and patients with T1D and T2D. All patients and age-matched HC were recruited from Uppsala County. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from freshly collected blood to determine the proportions of immune cells by flow cytometry. Plasma concentrations of the cytokine interleukin (IL)-35 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The proportion of CD11c(+)CD123(-) antigen-presenting cells (APCs) was lower, while the proportions of CD11c(+)CD123(+) APCs and IL-35(+) tolerogenic APCs were higher in LADA patients than in T1D patients. The proportion of CD3(-)CD56(high)CD16(+) natural killer (NK) cells was higher in LADA patients than in both HC and T2D patients. The frequency of IL-35(+) regulatory T cells and plasma IL-35 concentrations in LADA patients were similar to those in T1D and T2D patients, but lower than in HC. The proportion of regulatory B cells in LADA patients was higher than in healthy controls, T1D and T2D patients, and the frequency of IL-35(+) regulatory B cells was higher than in T1D patients. LADA presents a mixed cellular immunological pattern with features overlapping with both T1D and T2D.

  • 36.
    Singh, Kailash
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Sandler, Stellan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Espes, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    The Increased Circulating Plasma Levels of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Do Not Correlate to Metabolic Control2017In: Journal of Diabetes Research, ISSN 2314-6745, E-ISSN 2314-6753, article id 6192896Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. To characterize the plasma levels of vascular endothelial growth factor ( VEGF) in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) and its relation to both present and historical metabolic control and microvascular complications.

    Methods. Plasma levels of VEGF and routine clinical parameters were analyzed in 115 patients with long-standing T1D and 45 healthy controls (HC). All patients were under clinical routine diabetes treatment at Uppsala University Hospital.

    Results. The plasma levels of VEGF were increased by 37% in patients with T1D when compared to HC (18.2 +/- 0.8 versus 13.2 +/- 1.0 pg/ml, p < 0.001). The levels of VEGF correlated to insulin needs and BMI but not to present or historical metabolic control. The levels of VEGF were similar in patients with T1D and microvascular complications (microalbuminuria and retinopathy) when compared with patients without microvascular complications. Historical HbA1c levels were found to be the best predictor for present metabolic control.

    Conclusion. Circulating plasma levels of VEGF do not correlate to present or historical metabolic control in long-standing T1D and the levels are not affected by the presence of microvascular complications.

  • 37.
    Velikyan, Irina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Molecular Imaging. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Bulenga, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Molecular Imaging.
    Selvaraju, Ram Kumar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Espes, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Rosenström, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Molecular Imaging.
    Rat organ distribution of [Lu-177]-DO3A-VS-Cys(40)-Exendin-4 for the estimation of human dosimetry: potential for radiotherapy2015In: Journal of labelled compounds & radiopharmaceuticals, ISSN 0362-4803, E-ISSN 1099-1344, Vol. 58, p. S16-S16Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Velikyan, Irina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Molecular Imaging. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Selvaraju, Ram Kumar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Bulenga, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Espes, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Eriksson, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology. Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Estrada, Sergio
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Molecular Imaging.
    Dosimetry of [Ga-68]Ga-DO3A-VS-Cys(40)-Exendin-4 in rodents, pigs, non-human primates and human2015In: Journal of labelled compounds & radiopharmaceuticals, ISSN 0362-4803, E-ISSN 1099-1344, Vol. 58, p. S95-S95Article in journal (Other academic)
1 - 38 of 38
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