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  • 1.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    A Morphology of Russia?: The Russian Civilisational Turn and its Cyclical Idea of History2016In: Philosophical and Cultural Interpretations of Russian Modernisation / [ed] Arto Mustajoki, Katja Lehtisaari, Routledge, 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    A Past of One's Own: The Post-Soviet Historiography of Russian Philosophy2013In: Ab Imperio, ISSN 2166-4072, Vol. 3, p. 315-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyzes the historiography of Russian philosophy as it appears in post-Soviet Russian university textbooks. How is a national tradition in philosophy – a discipline that otherwise operates with a universal truth-claim not bound by its cultural settings – created and defended in these texts? Particular emphasis is placed on their rejection of the alleged Eurocentrism of Western historiography, their dependence (nevertheless) on Western notions of philosophy, and their idea of Russian philosophy as "native philosophy" (otechestvennaia filosofiia) with an independent "integral history." The article concludes that this material presents us with an example of cultural nationalism in academic writing.

  • 3.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    A Russian Thinker or a Thinker in Russia?: Some Tendencies in the Post-Soviet Reception of Nikolaj Berdjaev2011In: Scando-Slavica, ISSN 0080-6765, E-ISSN 1600-082X, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 25-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the different ways in which the émigré philosopher Nikolaj Berdjaev has been read and responded to in post-Soviet Russia. It sets out to analyse how Russian scholars relate to the topic of Russian thought, i.e., the metaphilosophical notions that underlie their interpretations, and it discovers a wide range of approaches to Berdjaev's texts: affirmative, corrective, constructivist and dialogical. Behind this variety of interpretations, however, a particularly Russian background, whether of Berdjaev or of the interpreters themselves, has been repeatedly thematised, though currently younger scholars often seek to abandon the formerly prevailing emphasis on national identity in their interpretations. The article thus aims to deepen our understanding of post-Soviet academic and more specifically philosophical culture today.

  • 4.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Between Ideology and Nauka: Russia's First Visions of an Indigenous Philosophy2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Between Ideology and Science: Russia’s First Visions of an Indigenous Philosophy2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Between Universalism and Nationalism: Soviet Historiography of National Philosophies2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Between Universalism and Nationalism: The Historiography of National Philosophies as a Challenge to the Marxist-Leninist Metaphilosophy of Soviet Philosophical Culture2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Contemporary Humanities in Russia: Views from the Inside and Outside2014Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Creating its Own Platos: The Transfer and Adaptation of Philosophy in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Russia2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Cyclical History and the Post-Soviet Condition2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    University of Bergen.
    Den aktuelle Fedotov: Fortid, notid og framtid i postsovjetisk humaniora2008In: Terminal Øst: totalitære og posttotalitære diskurser / [ed] Ingunn Lunde, Susanna Witt, Bergen: Spartacus, 2008, p. 300-314Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Department of Russian Studies, Univ. of Bergen.
    Desire, Death, and Imitation: Narrative Patterns in the Late Tolstoy2002Book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Det slavofile russlandsbildet2012In: Kirke og kultur, ISSN 0023-186X, E-ISSN 1504-3002, no 2, p. 169-185Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Digitizing Everything?: Online Libraries on the Runet2014In: Digital Russia: The Language, Culture and Politics of New Media Communication / [ed] Michael Gorham, Ingunn Lunde, Martin Paulsen, New York: Routledge, 2014, p. 215-230Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Does Philosophy Have a National Past?: The Representation of Russian Philosophy in Post-Soviet Historiography2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Dostojevskij som filosof2014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Ein unik sivilisasjon: Russlandsførestellingar før og no2012In: Nytt Norsk Tidsskrift, ISSN 0800-336X, E-ISSN 1504-3053, no 3, p. 237-247Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The article explores the so-called “civilizational nationalism” that is becoming increasingly popular in post-Soviet Russia, as seen most recently in an article Vladimir Putin published in January 2012. Here he adopts the rhetoric of “Russia as a unique civilization” that had previously been developed by Russian public intellectuals and academics. Having outlined the general features of this ideology, the article provides a more detailed discussion of one of the most significant theoreticians of this nationalism, Aleksandr Panarin. His views are compared, in turn, with those of Nikolai Danilevskii, the nineteenth-century writer who introduced “civilization” into Russian public discourse. Despite the many similarities, for instance a shared critique of Eurocentrism, it is demonstrated that nineteenth-century ideas of a Russian civilization differ significantly from the post-Soviet ones, above all in the former’s temporal orientation towards the future. Post-Soviet civilizational nationalism, in contrast, locates Russian civilization first and foremost in the past.

  • 18.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Eit evig Russland: Oleg Platonov, Institutt for russisk sivilisasjon og nasjonaliseringa av russisk tenking2016In: Nordisk Østforum, ISSN 0801-7220, E-ISSN 1891-1773, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 98-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the Russian nationalist Oleg Platonov and his Institute for Russian Civilization, a project established for publishing both contemporary works and the classics of Russian intellectual history. Special attention is given to how Platonov, who is otherwise known for his extreme anti-Westernism and anti-Semitism, within the framework of this project actively disseminates not only his own idea of a unique and self-sufficient Russian civilization, but also numerous classics of Russian thought, in particular of the Slavophile current. Various Russian thinkers are presented here as the embodiment of “Russian national thought” and the expression of an alleged “ideology of the Russian people”. On the basis of this analysis, the article reviews Platonov’s contribution to contemporary Russian nationalism more generally and its tendency to make the marginal mainstream.

  • 19.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Har den russiske filosofien ei fortid?: Nokre trekk ved den postsovjetiske filosofihistoriografien2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Metaphysics, Aesthetics, or Epistemology?: The Conceptual History of tvorchestvo in Nineteenth-Century Russian Thought2018In: Slavic and East European Journal, ISSN 0037-6752, E-ISSN 2325-7687, Vol. 62, no 1 (Spring 2018), p. 4-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyzes the history of the Russian concept of tvorchestvo (“creation,” “creativity”) from its emergence and early usages in the early nineteenth century, in particular in the writings of Nikolai Nadezhdin, Nikolai Stankevich and Vissarion Belinskii, and up to and including the philosophy of Vladimir Solov’ev. While the concept later on became a key term and pivotal philosophical issue for thinkers such as Nikolai Berdiaev and Sergei Bulgakov, this article focuses on its early history, and more specifically on how it was coined in the translation of the ideas of Schelling, while subsequently becoming independent of the Schellingian origins. More specifically, while it initially was a metaphysical concept, corresponding to Schilling’s idea of “productivity” (of nature as well as of the human being), thinkers like Nadezhdin and Belinskii used it as an aesthetic concept, referring to the creative genius, while Solov’ev in turn applied it in order to emphasize the active role we play in cognition and perception (epistemology). The article demonstrates the importance of cultural transfer in the creation of a Russian philosophical discourse in the nineteenth century and expolores how processes of transfer and translation generate new philosophical issues.

  • 21.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Modernity and National Identity in the Historiography of Russian Philosophy (Late Imperial Period)2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Nikolai Berdiaev and the "boundless spaces" of Russia2017In: Nordlit, ISSN 0809-1668, E-ISSN 1503-2086, Vol. 39, p. 4-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article analyses the ways in which the Russian philosopher Nikolai Berdiaev understood Russian space and geography, beginning with the texts that he wrote during the First World War and ending with his book The Russian Idea (1946). It was characteristic of Berdiaev to extensively recycle passages from his own texts, not least those that put forth the claim that there was a correspondence between Russia’s vast and wide-open spaces and the "Russian soul." However, the article argues that Berdiaev’s seemingly similar phrases had different meanings in different contexts. In the 1910s, his perspective was predominantly critical, if speculative, positing that the acquisition of large territories had prevented the Russian "self-organization" in thought and culture. After the 1917 revolutions and his own emigration in 1922, by contrast, Berdiaev gradually became more essentialist in his approach to Russian space, seeing the vast territories as perfectly matching the strivings and quests of the Russian people. The article contextualises Berdiaev’s understanding of space both in relation to nineteenth-century traditions of interpreting Russian geography and to the political upheavals that took place during his lifetime.

  • 23.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Onlajn-biblioteka i klassitsjeskij russkij kanon v postsovjetskoj Rossii: Zametsjanija o Fundamental'noj elektronnoj biblioteke "Russkaja literatura i fol'klor"2011In: Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie, ISSN 0869-6365, E-ISSN 2309-9968, Vol. 109, p. 323-337Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Philosophy, Modernity and National Identity: The Quest for a Russian Philosophy at the Turn of the Twentieth Century2014In: Slavonic and East European Review, ISSN 0037-6795, E-ISSN 2222-4327, Vol. 92, no 4, p. 622-652Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the huge interest among Russian philosophers and intellectuals at the turn of the twentieth century in the history of Russian philosophy, an interest that was, it is argued, new. In the early twentieth century, a Russian philosophical past was created not so much by means of comprehensive narratives, but rather in works on individual thinkers. This article analyses the studies of Vladimir Solov'ev, Hryhorii Skovoroda, Petr Chaadaev and the Slavophiles, whose writings were presented as the foundational texts of Russian philosophy. At the same time, these thinkers were evaluated in varying ways and celebrated for different reasons, with interpretations of the past often serving as starting points for the interpreters' own philosophical projects. While Russian philosophy was conceived of as a fact of the past, it was also perceived as a task for the future. Thus, the material analysed in this article presents us with different and competing ideas not just of what Russian philosophy really is, but also of Russia, of Russian national identity and of Russian modernity.

  • 25.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Provincialising Europe?: Soviet Historiography of Philosophy and the Question of Eurocentrism2018In: Rivista di storia della filosofia (1984), ISSN 0393-2516, E-ISSN 1972-5558, no 2, p. 277-293Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    University of Bergen.
    Reformulating Russia: The Cultural and Intellectual Historiography of Russian First Wave Émigré Writers2011Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Georgii Fedotov’s Saints of Ancient Russia, Georgii Florovskii’s The Ways of Russian Theology, Nikolai Berdiaev’s The Russian Idea and Vasilii Zenkovskii’s History of Russian Philosophy—these are among the most well-known and widely-read historical studies of Russian thought and culture. Having left their homeland after the Bolshevik Revolution, these four authors aimed to present their readers with a common past and thus with a common identity, and their historical works emerged out of the need for reorientation in a post-revolutionary, émigré situation. At the same time, they were to elaborate highly contrasting versions of the Russian past. By means of in-depth narrative and contextual analyses, Reformulating Russia provides a detailed examination of the visions of Russia contained in these four works.

  • 27.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    [Review of] Katja Richters: The Post-Soviet Russian Orthodox Church: Politics, Culture and Greater Russia2014In: Gosudarstvo, tserkov’ i religiia v Rossii i za rubezhom, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 325-331Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    [Review of] M.V. Kovalev: Russian historians-emigrants in Prague (1920 - 1940)2014In: Slavic Review: American quarterly of Russian, Eurasian and East European studies, ISSN 0037-6779, E-ISSN 2325-7784, Vol. 73, no 4, p. 954-955Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    [Review of] Vera Zvereva: Setevye razgovory: Kul'turnye kommunikatsii v Runete. Bergen: University of Bergen, 2012, 279 pp. (Slavica Bergensia 10).2013In: Zeitschrift für slavische Philologie, ISSN 0044-3492, Vol. 69, no 1, p. 227-230Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Russian History and European Ideas: The Historical Vision of Vasilii Kliuchevskii2012In: The Borders of Europe: Hegemony, aesthetics and border poetics / [ed] Helge Vidar Holm, Sissel Lægreid, Torgeir Skorgen, Aarhus: Aarhus Universitetsforlag, 2012, p. 71-91Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    "Russia's Thousand-Year-Old History": The Claim for a Past in Contemporary Russian Conservatism2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Russisk fortid og framtid2012Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Institutt for framandspråk, Universitetet i Bergen.
    Russlands dialektiske forhold til Europa: Vasilij Zenkovskij som idéhistorikar2009In: Nordisk Østforum, ISSN 0801-7220, E-ISSN 1891-1773, no 1, p. 48-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, I explore Vasilii Zenkovskii’s contributions to the historiography of Russian intellectual history in his two monographs Russian Thinkers and Europe (1922) and The History of Russian Philosophy (1948–1950). These works are examined with particular reference to the problem of «Russia and Europe». I discuss not just Zenkovskii’s own interpretation of this theme as a central topic in the history of Russian thought, but also how his historical narratives are further contributions to this question. Zenkovskii’s own histories are read as a response to previous discussions of Russia’s relationship with Europe as well as an attempt to reframe this theme in a new, post-revolutionary situation. More specifically, I analyse the way in which Zenkovskii creates a particular dialectical idea of the relationship between Russia and Europe and of the border between them.

  • 34.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Semiotikk som indre eksil: Om binære modellars rolle i russisk kultur2005In: Nordlit, ISSN 0809-1668, E-ISSN 1503-2086, Vol. 18, p. 105-132Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The article consists of a critical discussion Jurij Lotman and BorisUspenskij's (in)famous theory of Russian culture possessing anunderlying dual (binary) structure and of a contextualisation of theirideas in relation to both their contemporary Soviet situation andpossible historical predecessors.

  • 35.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Smuta: Cyclical visions of history in contemporary Russian thought and the question of hegemony2018In: Studies in East European thought, ISSN 0925-9392, E-ISSN 1573-0948Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the post-Soviet context, various cyclical models of recurrent Russian “Times of Troubles” (smuty) have become increasingly popular. This perspective emerged first in Soviet dissident circles (Alexander Yanov, Aleksandr Akhiezer), who used it as a means to expose as mistaken the Soviet belief in continual historical progress on Russian soil. In post-Soviet Russia this critical approach has been continued by members of the “Akhezier circle,” the economist Egor Gaidar, and others. Meanwhile it was given an affirmative, conservative reinterpretation by Aleksandr Panarin, according to whom Russia has always managed to overcome its phases of devastating Westernization and state collapse. This idea of Russian history has become influential; even Vladimir Putin has talked about Russia as a strong state able to survive various “Times of Troubles” from the early seventeenth century to the early post-Soviet period. It also figures prominently among members of the neoconservative Izborsk Club. This article analyzes different conceptions of Russian history as cyclical and their prominent place in the prevailing civilizational discourse of post-Soviet Russia. By means of postcolonial perspectives, this discourse is seen on the one hand as an attempt to question and reject Western hegemony, attempts that on the other hand nevertheless seem unable to liberate themselves from a normative dependence on the West.

  • 36.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Universitetet i Bergen.
    Tekst og historie: Døme og føredøme frå russiskfaget2007In: Jostein 70: Post-festum-skrift / [ed] Ingunn Lunde, Bergen: Universitetet i Bergen, 2007, p. 69-72Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 37.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    The Christian Justification of the Nation: Russian Liberal Nationalism and the Question of Religion vs. Modernity2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    The Christian Justification of the Nation: The Religious and The Secular in Russian Liberal Nationalism2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    The Online Library and the Classic Literary Canon in Post- Soviet Russia: Some Observations on "The Fundamental Electronic Library of Russian Literature and Folklore"2009In: Digital Icons: Studies in Russian, Eurasian and Central European New Media, ISSN 2040-462X, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 83-99Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    The ‘Russian Idea’ and ‘Russian Civilization’: The Transformation of Two Utopian Concepts in Post-Soviet Russia2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Towards a Canon of Russian Philosophy: The Historiography of Gershenzon, Ern and Berdiaev2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Trubetskoi's Idealist Grounding of the Religious Meaning of Life2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Будущее прошлого: к истории понятия "русская идея"2014In: Studies in russian intellectual history : ИССЛЕДОВАНИЯПО ИСТОРИИРУССКОЙ МЫСЛИ: ЕЖЕГОДНИК 2010 – 2011 / [ed] Modest A. Kolerov and Nikolay S. Plotnikov, Moscow: Modest Kolerov , 2014, 10, p. 404-440Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Lunde, Ingunn
    Univ Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Special Issue: The Russian Revolution 100 Years On2018In: Scando-Slavica, ISSN 0080-6765, E-ISSN 1600-082X, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 2-6Article in journal (Other academic)
1 - 44 of 44
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