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  • 1.
    Ameur, Adam
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zaghlool, Ammar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Halvardson, Jonatan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wetterbom, Anna
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Cavelier, Lucia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Genetics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Feuk, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Total RNA sequencing reveals nascent transcription and widespread co-transcriptional splicing in the human brain2011In: Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, ISSN 1545-9993, E-ISSN 1545-9985, Vol. 18, no 12, p. 1435-1440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transcriptome sequencing allows for analysis of mature RNAs at base pair resolution. Here we show that RNA-seq can also be used for studying nascent RNAs undergoing transcription. We sequenced total RNA from human brain and liver and found a large fraction of reads (up to 40%) within introns. Intronic RNAs were abundant in brain tissue, particularly for genes involved in axonal growth and synaptic transmission. Moreover, we detected significant differences in intronic RNA levels between fetal and adult brains. We show that the pattern of intronic sequence read coverage is explained by nascent transcription in combination with co-transcriptional splicing. Further analysis of co-transcriptional splicing indicates a correlation between slowly removed introns and alternative splicing. Our data show that sequencing of total RNA provides unique insight into the transcriptional processes in the cell, with particular importance for normal brain development.

  • 2. Berger, Itai
    et al.
    Dor, Talya
    Halvardson, Jonatan
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Edvardson, Simon
    Shaag, Avraham
    Feuk, Lars
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Elpeleg, Orly
    Intractable epilepsy of infancy due to homozygous mutation in the EFHC1 gene2012In: Epilepsia, ISSN 0013-9580, E-ISSN 1528-1167, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 1436-1440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: 

    The molecular etiology of primary intractable epilepsy in infancy is largely unknown. We studied a nonconsanguineous Moroccan-Jewish family, where three of their seven children presented with intractable seizures and died at 18-36 months.

    Methods: 

    Homozygous regions were searched using 250 K DNA single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. The sequence of 50 Mb exome of a single patient was determined using SOLiD 5500XL deep sequencing analyzer.

    Key Findings:

    A single homozygous 11.3 Mb genomic region on chromosome 6 was linked to the disease in this family. This region contained 110 genes encoding a total of 1,000 exons. Whole exome sequencing revealed a single pathogenic homozygous variant within the critical region. The mutation, Phe229Leu in the EFHC1 gene was previously shown, in a carrier state, to be associated with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

    Significance: 

    Although heterozygosity for the Phe229Leu mutation is known to be associated with a relatively benign form of epilepsy in adolescence; homozygosity for the same mutation is associated with lethal epilepsy of infancy. Given the considerable carrier rate of this mutation worldwide, the sequence of the EFHC1 gene should be determined in all patients with primary intractable epilepsy in infancy.

  • 3.
    Danielsson, Marcus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Halvardson, Jonatan
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Davies, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Moghadam, Behrooz Torabi
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Mattisson, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Rychlicka-Buniowska, Edyta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Faculty of Pharmacy and 3P Medicine Laboratory, International Research Agendas Programme, Medical University of Gdańsk, Gdańsk, Poland.
    Jaszczyński, Janusz
    Department of Urology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre and Institute of Oncology, Kraków Branch, Kraków, Poland.
    Heintz, Julia
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Lannfelt, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Giedraitis, Vilmantas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Ingelsson, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Dumanski, Jan P.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Faculty of Pharmacy and 3P Medicine Laboratory, International Research Agendas Programme, Medical University of Gdańsk, Gdańsk, Poland.
    Forsberg, Lars A.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Beijer Laboratory of Genome Research, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Longitudinal changes in the frequency of mosaic chromosome Y loss in peripheral blood cells of aging men varies profoundly between individuals2019In: European Journal of Human Genetics, ISSN 1018-4813, E-ISSN 1476-5438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mosaic loss of chromosome Y (LOY) is the most common somatic genetic aberration and is associated with increased risk for all-cause mortality, various forms of cancer and Alzheimer's disease, as well as other common human diseases. By tracking LOY frequencies in subjects from which blood samples have been serially collected up to five times during up to 22 years, we observed a pronounced intra-individual variation of changes in the frequency of LOY within individual men over time. We observed that in some individuals the frequency of LOY in blood clearly progressed over time and that in other men, the frequency was constant or showed other types of longitudinal development. The predominant method used for estimating LOY is calculation of the median Log R Ratio of probes located in the male specific part of chromosome Y (mLRRY) from intensity data generated by SNP-arrays, which is difficult to interpret due to its logarithmic and inversed scale. We present here a formula to transform mLRRY-values to percentage of LOY that is a more comprehensible unit. The formula was derived using measurements of LOY from matched samples analysed using SNP-array, whole genome sequencing and a new AMELX/AMELY-based assay for droplet digital PCR. The methods described could be applied for analyses of the vast amount of SNP-array data already generated in the scientific community, allowing further discoveries of LOY associated diseases and outcomes.

  • 4.
    Forsberg, Lars A.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala Univ, Beijer Lab Genome Res, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Halvardson, Jonatan
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Rychlicka-Buniowska, Edyta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Danielsson, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Moghadam, Behrooz Torabi
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Mattisson, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Rasi, Chiara
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Davies, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Lind, Lars
    Giedraitis, Vilmantas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Lannfelt, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Kilander, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Ingelsson, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Dumanski, Jan P.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Med Univ Gdansk, Fac Pharm, Gdansk, Poland.
    Mosaic loss of chromosome Y in leukocytes matters2019In: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 4-7Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Halvardson, Jonatan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Sequence based analysis of neurodevelopmental disorders2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis the main focus is the use of methods and applications of next generation sequencing in order to study three of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders: intellectual disability, epilepsy and schizophrenia. A large fraction of the genes in our genome produce several distinct transcript isoforms through the process of splicing and there is an increasing amount of evidence pinpointing mutations affecting splicing as a mechanism of disease.  In Paper I we used exome capture of RNA in combination with sequencing in order to enrich for coding sequences. We show that this approach enables us to detect lowly expressed transcript and splice events that would have been missed in regular RNA sequencing using the same coverage.  In Paper II we selectively depleted the different transcripts of Quaking (QKI), a gene previously associated to schizophrenia. Using RNA sequencing we show that the effects of depletion differ between transcripts and that the QKI gene is a potential regulator of the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP), a gene implicated in several diseases in the central nervous system.

    De-novo mutations are frequently reported to be causative in neurodevelopmental disorders with a strong genetic component, such as epilepsy and intellectual disability. In Paper III we used exome sequencing in family trios where the child was diagnosed with both intellectual disability and epilepsy, focusing on finding de-novo mutations. We identified several previously unknown disease causing mutations in genes previously known to cause disease and used previously published interaction and mutation data to prioritize novel candidate genes. The most interesting result from this study are the implication of the HECW2 gene as a candidate gene in intellectual disability and epilepsy. In Paper IV we used RNA sequencing of post mortem brain tissue in a large cohort of schizophrenics and controls.  In this study we could show that the immune system and more specifically the complement system was dysregulated in a large fraction of patients. Further, using co-expression network we also found some evidence suggesting genes involved in axon development and maintenance.

     

    List of papers
    1. Exome RNA sequencing reveals rare and novel alternative transcripts
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exome RNA sequencing reveals rare and novel alternative transcripts
    2013 (English)In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 41, no 1, p. e6-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    RNA sequencing has become an important method to perform hypothesis-free characterization of global gene expression. One of the limitations of RNA sequencing is that most sequence reads represent highly expressed transcripts, whereas low level transcripts are challenging to detect. To combine the benefits of traditional expression arrays with the advantages of RNA sequencing, we have used whole exome enrichment prior to sequencing of total RNA. We show that whole exome capture can be successfully applied to cDNA to study the transcriptional landscape in human tissues. By introducing the exome enrichment step, we are able to identify transcripts present at very low levels, which are below the level of detection in conventional RNA sequencing. Although the enrichment increases the ability to detect presence of transcripts, it also lowers the accuracy of quantification of expression levels. Our results yield a large number of novel exons and splice isoforms, suggesting that conventional RNA sequencing methods only detect a small fraction of the full transcript diversity. We propose that whole exome enrichment of RNA is a suitable strategy for genome-wide discovery of novel transcripts, alternative splice variants and fusion genes.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-180350 (URN)10.1093/nar/gks816 (DOI)000312889900006 ()22941640 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2012-09-04 Created: 2012-09-04 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    2. RNA-binding protein QKI regulates Glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in human astrocytes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>RNA-binding protein QKI regulates Glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in human astrocytes
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: Human Molecular Genetics, ISSN 0964-6906, E-ISSN 1460-2083, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 1373-1382Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Linkage, association and expression studies previously pointed to the human QKI, KH domain containing, RNA-binding (QKI) as a candidate gene for schizophrenia. Functional studies of the mouse orthologue Qk focused mainly on its role in oligodendrocyte development and myelination, while its function in astroglia remained unexplored. Here, we show that QKI is highly expressed in human primary astrocytes and that its splice forms encode proteins targeting different subcellular localizations. Uncovering the role of QKI in astrocytes is of interest in light of growing evidence implicating astrocyte dysfunction in the pathogenesis of several disorders of the central nervous system. We selectively silenced QKI splice variants in human primary astrocytes and used RNA sequencing to identify differential expression and splice variant composition at the genome-wide level. We found that an mRNA expression of Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), encoding a major component of astrocyte intermediate filaments, was down-regulated after QKI7 splice variant silencing. Moreover, we identified a potential QKI-binding site within the 3 untranslated region of human GFAP. This sequence was not conserved between mice and humans, raising the possibility that GFAP is a target for QKI in humans but not rodents. Haloperidol treatment of primary astrocytes resulted in coordinated increases in QKI7 and GFAP expression. Taken together, our results provide the first link between QKI and GFAP, two genes with alterations previously observed independently in schizophrenic patients. Our findings for QKI, together with its well-known role in myelination, suggest that QKI is a hub regulator of glia function in humans.

    National Category
    Natural Sciences Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-198376 (URN)10.1093/hmg/dds553 (DOI)000316297000009 ()
    Available from: 2013-04-15 Created: 2013-04-15 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    3. Identification of new candidate genes in intellectual disability and epilepsy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identification of new candidate genes in intellectual disability and epilepsy
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Basic Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-287406 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-04-24 Created: 2016-04-24 Last updated: 2018-01-10
    4. Transcriptome sequencing implicate alterations of complement factor levels in schizophrenia.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transcriptome sequencing implicate alterations of complement factor levels in schizophrenia.
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Basic Medicine
    Research subject
    Medical Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-287405 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-04-24 Created: 2016-04-24 Last updated: 2018-01-10
  • 6.
    Halvardson, Jonatan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zaghlool, Ammar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Feuk, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Exome RNA sequencing reveals rare and novel alternative transcripts2013In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 41, no 1, p. e6-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    RNA sequencing has become an important method to perform hypothesis-free characterization of global gene expression. One of the limitations of RNA sequencing is that most sequence reads represent highly expressed transcripts, whereas low level transcripts are challenging to detect. To combine the benefits of traditional expression arrays with the advantages of RNA sequencing, we have used whole exome enrichment prior to sequencing of total RNA. We show that whole exome capture can be successfully applied to cDNA to study the transcriptional landscape in human tissues. By introducing the exome enrichment step, we are able to identify transcripts present at very low levels, which are below the level of detection in conventional RNA sequencing. Although the enrichment increases the ability to detect presence of transcripts, it also lowers the accuracy of quantification of expression levels. Our results yield a large number of novel exons and splice isoforms, suggesting that conventional RNA sequencing methods only detect a small fraction of the full transcript diversity. We propose that whole exome enrichment of RNA is a suitable strategy for genome-wide discovery of novel transcripts, alternative splice variants and fusion genes.

  • 7.
    Halvardson, Jonatan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zhao, Jin J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zaghlool, Ammar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wentzel, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Georgii-Hemming, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Månsson, Else
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Pediat, Orebro, Sweden.
    Ederth Sävmarker, Helena
    Gavle Cent Hosp, Dept Pediat, Gavle, Sweden.
    Brandberg, Göran
    Pediat Clin, Falun, Sweden.
    Soussi Zander, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Thuresson, Ann-Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Feuk, Lars
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Mutations in HECW2 are associated with intellectual disability and epilepsy2016In: Journal of Medical Genetics, ISSN 0022-2593, E-ISSN 1468-6244, Vol. 53, no 10, p. 697-704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: De novo mutations are a frequent cause of disorders related to brain development. We report the results of screening patients diagnosed with both epilepsy and intellectual disability (ID) using exome sequencing to identify known and new causative de novo mutations relevant to these conditions.

    METHODS: Exome sequencing was performed on 39 patient-parent trios to identify de novo mutations. Clinical significance of de novo mutations in genes was determined using the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics standard guidelines for interpretation of coding variants. Variants in genes of unknown clinical significance were further analysed in the context of previous trio sequencing efforts in neurodevelopmental disorders.

    RESULTS: In 39 patient-parent trios we identified 29 de novo mutations in coding sequence. Analysis of de novo and inherited variants yielded a molecular diagnosis in 11 families (28.2%). In combination with previously published exome sequencing results in neurodevelopmental disorders, our analysis implicates HECW2 as a novel candidate gene in ID and epilepsy.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our results support the use of exome sequencing as a diagnostic approach for ID and epilepsy, and confirm previous results regarding the importance of de novo mutations in this patient group. The results also highlight the utility of network analysis and comparison to previous large-scale studies as strategies to prioritise candidate genes for further studies. This study adds knowledge to the increasingly growing list of causative and candidate genes in ID and epilepsy and highlights HECW2 as a new candidate gene for neurodevelopmental disorders.

  • 8.
    Johansson, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Lundin, Elin
    Science for Life Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Qian, Xiaoyan
    Science for Life Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Mirzazadeh, Mohammadreza
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Halvardson, Jonatan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Darj, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Feuk, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Science for Life Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Jazin, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Spatial sexual dimorphism of X and Y homolog gene expression in the human central nervous system during early male development2016In: Biology of Sex Differences, ISSN 2042-6410, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Renewed attention has been directed to the functions of the Y chromosome in the central nervous system during early human male development, due to the recent proposed involvement in neurodevelopmental diseases. PCDH11Y and NLGN4Y are of special interest because they belong to gene families involved in cell fate determination and formation of dendrites and axon.

    Methods

    We used RNA sequencing, immunocytochemistry and a padlock probing and rolling circle amplification strategy, to distinguish the expression of X and Y homologs in situ in the human brain for the first time. To minimize influence of androgens on the sex differences in the brain, we focused our investigation to human embryos at 8–11 weeks post-gestation.

    Results

    We found that the X- and Y-encoded genes are expressed in specific and heterogeneous cellular sub-populations of both glial and neuronal origins. More importantly, we found differential distribution patterns of X and Y homologs in the male developing central nervous system.

    Conclusions

    This study has visualized the spatial distribution of PCDH11X/Y and NLGN4X/Y in human developing nervous tissue. The observed spatial distribution patterns suggest the existence of an additional layer of complexity in the development of the male CNS.

  • 9.
    Johansson, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Pottmeier, Philipp
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Suciu, Pascalina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Ahmed, Tauseef
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Zaghlool, Ammar
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Halvardson, Jonatan
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Darj, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration. Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Publ Hlth & Gen Practice, Trondheim, Norway.
    Feuk, Lars
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Peuckert, Christiane
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Stockholms Univ, Dept Mol Biol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jazin, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Novel Y-Chromosome Long Non-Coding RNAs Expressed in Human Male CNS During Early Development2019In: Frontiers in Genetics, ISSN 1664-8021, E-ISSN 1664-8021, Vol. 10, article id 891Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global microarray gene expression analyses previously demonstrated differences in female and male embryos during neurodevelopment. In particular, before sexual maturation of the gonads, the differences seem to concentrate on the expression of genes encoded on the X- and Y-chromosomes. To investigate genome-wide differences in expression during this early developmental window, we combined high-resolution RNA sequencing with qPCR to analyze brain samples from human embryos during the first trimester of development. Our analysis was tailored for maximum sensitivity to discover Y-chromosome gene expression, but at the same time, it was underpowered to detect X-inactivation escapees. Using this approach, we found that 5 out of 13 expressed game to log pairs showed unbalanced gene dosage, and as a consequence, a male-biased expression. In addition, we found six novel non-annotated long non-coding RNAs on the Y-chromosome with conserved expression patterns in newborn chimpanzee. The tissue specific and time-restricted expression of these long non-coding RNAs strongly suggests important functions during central nervous system development in human males.

  • 10.
    Lindholm Carlström, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Halvardson, Jonatan
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Etemadikhah, Mitra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wetterberg, Lennart
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci CNS, K8, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gustavson, Karl-Henrik
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Feuk, Lars
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Linkage and exome analysis implicate multiple genes in non-syndromic intellectual disability in a large Swedish family2019In: BMC Medical Genomics, ISSN 1755-8794, E-ISSN 1755-8794, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Non-syndromic intellectual disability is genetically heterogeneous with dominant, recessive and complex forms of inheritance. We have performed detailed genetic studies in a large multi-generational Swedish family, including several members diagnosed with non-syndromic intellectual disability. Linkage analysis was performed on 22 family members, nine affected with mild to moderate intellectual disability and 13 unaffected family members.

    Methods

    Family members were analyzed with Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 and the genetic data was used to detect copy number variation and to perform genome wide linkage analysis with the SNP High Throughput Linkage analysis system and the Merlin software. For the exome sequencing, the samples were prepared using the Sure Select Human All Exon Kit (Agilent Technologies, Santa Clara, CA, USA) and sequenced using the Ion Proton (TM) System. Validation of identified variants was performed with Sanger sequencing.

    Results

    The linkage analysis results indicate that intellectual disability in this family is genetically heterogeneous, with suggestive linkage found on chromosomes 1q31-q41, 4q32-q35, 6p25 and 14q24-q31 (LOD scores of 2.4, simulated p-value of 0.000003 and a simulated genome-wide p-value of 0.06). Exome sequencing was then performed in 14 family members and 7 unrelated individuals from the same region. The analysis of coding variation revealed a pathogenic and candidate variants in different branches of the family. In three patients we find a known homozygous pathogenic mutation in the Homo sapiens solute carrier family 17 member 5 (SLC17A5), causing Salla disease. We also identify a deletion overlapping KDM3B and a duplication overlapping MAP3K4 and AGPAT4, both overlapping variants previously reported in developmental disorders.

    Conclusions

    DNA samples from the large family analyzed in this study were initially collected based on a hypothesis that affected members shared a major genetic risk factor. Our results show that a complex phenotype such as mild intellectual disability in large families from genetically isolated populations may show considerable genetic heterogeneity.

  • 11.
    Radomska, Katarzyna J.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Halvardson, Jonatan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Reinius, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Carlström, Eva Lindholm
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Emilsson, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Feuk, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jazin, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    RNA-binding protein QKI regulates Glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in human astrocytes2013In: Human Molecular Genetics, ISSN 0964-6906, E-ISSN 1460-2083, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 1373-1382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Linkage, association and expression studies previously pointed to the human QKI, KH domain containing, RNA-binding (QKI) as a candidate gene for schizophrenia. Functional studies of the mouse orthologue Qk focused mainly on its role in oligodendrocyte development and myelination, while its function in astroglia remained unexplored. Here, we show that QKI is highly expressed in human primary astrocytes and that its splice forms encode proteins targeting different subcellular localizations. Uncovering the role of QKI in astrocytes is of interest in light of growing evidence implicating astrocyte dysfunction in the pathogenesis of several disorders of the central nervous system. We selectively silenced QKI splice variants in human primary astrocytes and used RNA sequencing to identify differential expression and splice variant composition at the genome-wide level. We found that an mRNA expression of Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), encoding a major component of astrocyte intermediate filaments, was down-regulated after QKI7 splice variant silencing. Moreover, we identified a potential QKI-binding site within the 3 untranslated region of human GFAP. This sequence was not conserved between mice and humans, raising the possibility that GFAP is a target for QKI in humans but not rodents. Haloperidol treatment of primary astrocytes resulted in coordinated increases in QKI7 and GFAP expression. Taken together, our results provide the first link between QKI and GFAP, two genes with alterations previously observed independently in schizophrenic patients. Our findings for QKI, together with its well-known role in myelination, suggest that QKI is a hub regulator of glia function in humans.

  • 12.
    Schuster, Jens
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Halvardson, Jonatan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Lorenzo, Laureanne Pilar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Ameur, Adam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Sobol, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Raykova, Doroteya
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Annerén, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Feuk, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Dahl, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Degree of Variability in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines: Impact for Human Disease Modeling2015In: Cellular Reprogramming, ISSN 2152-4971, E-ISSN 2152-4998, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 327-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology has become an important tool for disease modeling. Insufficient data on the variability among iPSC lines derived from a single somatic parental cell line have in practice led to generation and analysis of several, usually three, iPSC sister lines from each parental cell line. We established iPSC lines from a human fibroblast line (HDF-K1) and used transcriptome sequencing to investigate the variation among three sister lines (iPSC-K1A, B, and C). For comparison, we analyzed the transcriptome of an iPSC line (iPSC-K5B) derived from a different fibroblast line (HDF-K5), a human embryonic stem cell (ESC) line (ESC-HS181), as well as the two parental fibroblast lines. All iPSC lines fulfilled stringent criteria for pluripotency. In an unbiased cluster analysis, all stem cell lines (four iPSCs and one ESC) clustered together as opposed to the parental fibroblasts. The transcriptome profiles of the three iPSC sister lines were indistinguishable from each other, and functional pathway analysis did not reveal any significant hits. In contrast, the expression profiles of the ESC line and the iPSC-K5B line were distinct from that of the sister lines iPSC-K1A, B, and C. Differentiation to embryoid bodies and subsequent analysis of germ layer markers in the five stem cell clones confirmed that the distribution of their expression profiles was retained. Taken together, our observations stress the importance of using iPSCs of different parental origin rather than several sister iPSC lines to distinguish disease-associated mechanisms from genetic background effects in disease modeling.

  • 13. Spiegel, Konen
    et al.
    Pines, Ophry
    Ta-Shma, Asaf
    Burak, Efrat
    Shaag, Avraham
    Halvardson, Jonatan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Edvardson, Shimon
    Mahajna, Muhammad
    Zenvirt, Shamir
    Saada, Ann
    Shalev, Stavit
    Feuk, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Elpeleg, Orly
    Infantile Cerebellar-Retinal Degeneration Associated with a Mutation in Mitochondrial Aconitase, ACO22012In: American Journal of Human Genetics, ISSN 0002-9297, E-ISSN 1537-6605, Vol. 90, no 3, p. 518-523Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Degeneration of the cerebrum, cerebellum, and retina in infancy is part of the clinical spectrum of lysosomal storage disorders, mitochondrial respiratory chain defects, carbohydrate glycosylation defects, and infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy. We studied eight individuals from two unrelated families who presented at 2-6 months of age with truncal hypotonia and athetosis, seizure disorder, and ophthalmologic abnormalities. Their course was characterized by failure to acquire developmental milestones and culminated in profound psychomotor retardation and progressive visual loss, including optic nerve and retinal atrophy. Despite their debilitating state, the disease was compatible with survival of up to 18 years. Laboratory investigations were normal, but the oxidation of glutamate by muscle mitochondria was slightly reduced. Serial brain MRI displayed progressive, prominent cerebellar atrophy accompanied by thinning of the corpus callosum, dysmyelination, and frontal and temporal cortical atrophy. Homozygosity mapping followed by whole-exome sequencing disclosed a Ser112Arg mutation in ACO2, encoding mitochondrial aconitase, a component of the Krebs cycle. Specific aconitase activity in the individuals' lymphoblasts was severely reduced. Under restrictive conditions, the mutant human ACO2 failed to complement a yeast ACO1 deletion strain, whereas the wild-type human ACO2 succeeded, indicating that this mutation is pathogenic. Thus, a defect in mitochondrial aconitase is associated with an infantile neurodegenerative disorder affecting mainly the cerebellum and retina. In the absence of noninvasive biomarkers, determination of the ACO2 sequence or of aconitase activity in lymphoblasts are warranted in similarly affected individuals, based on clinical and neuroradiologic grounds.

  • 14. Spiegel, Ronen
    et al.
    Saada, Ann
    Halvardson, Jonatan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Soiferman, Devorah
    Shaag, Avraham
    Edvardson, Simon
    Horovitz, Yoseph
    Khayat, Morad
    Shalev, Stavit A.
    Feuk, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Elpeleg, Orly
    Deleterious mutation in FDX1L gene is associated with a novel mitochondrial muscle myopathy2014In: European Journal of Human Genetics, ISSN 1018-4813, E-ISSN 1476-5438, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 902-906Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Isolated metabolic myopathies encompass a heterogeneous group of disorders, with mitochondrial myopathies being a subgroup, with depleted skeletal muscle energy production manifesting either by recurrent episodes of myoglobinuria or progressive muscle weakness. In this study, we investigated the genetic cause of a patient from a consanguineous family who presented with adolescent onset autosomal recessive mitochondrial myopathy. Analysis of enzyme activities of the five respiratory chain complexes in our patients' skeletal muscle showed severely impaired activities of iron sulfur (Fe-S)-dependent complexes I, II and III and mitochondrial aconitase. We employed exome sequencing combined with homozygosity mapping to identify a homozygous mutation, c.1A > T, in the FDX1L gene, which encodes the mitochondrial ferredoxin 2 (Fdx2) protein. The mutation disrupts the ATG initiation translation site resulting in severe reduction of Fdx2 content in the patient muscle and fibroblasts mitochondria. Fdx2 is the second component of the Fe-S cluster biogenesis machinery, the first being IscU that is associated with isolated mitochondrial myopathy. We suggest adding genetic analysis of FDX1L in cases of mitochondrial myopathy especially when associated with reduced activity of the respiratory chain complexes I, II and III.

  • 15. Thompson, Deborah J
    et al.
    Genovese, Giulio
    Halvardson, Jonatan
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Ulirsch, Jacob C
    Wright, Daniel J
    Terao, Chikashi
    Davidsson, Olafur B
    Day, Felix R
    Sulem, Patrick
    Jiang, Yunxuan
    Danielsson, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Davies, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Dennis, Joe
    Dunlop, Malcolm G
    Easton, Douglas F
    Fisher, Victoria A
    Zink, Florian
    Houlston, Richard S
    Ingelsson, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Kar, Siddhartha
    Kerrison, Nicola D
    Kinnersley, Ben
    Kristjansson, Ragnar P
    Law, Philip J
    Li, Rong
    Loveday, Chey
    Mattisson, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    McCarroll, Steven A
    Murakami, Yoshinori
    Murray, Anna
    Olszewski, Pawel
    Rychlicka-Buniowska, Edyta
    Scott, Robert A
    Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur
    Tomlinson, Ian
    Moghadam, Behrooz Torabi
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Turnbull, Clare
    Wareham, Nicholas J
    Gudbjartsson, Daniel F
    Kamatani, Yoichiro
    Hoffmann, Eva R
    Jackson, Steve P
    Stefansson, Kari
    Auton, Adam
    Ong, Ken K
    Machiela, Mitchell J
    Loh, Po-Ru
    Dumanski, Jan P.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Chanock, Stephen J
    Forsberg, Lars A.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Perry, John R B
    Genetic predisposition to mosaic Y chromosome loss in blood2019In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 575, p. 652-657Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mosaic loss of chromosome Y (LOY) in circulating white blood cells is the most common form of clonal mosaicism1-5, yet our knowledge of the causes and consequences of this is limited. Here, using a computational approach, we estimate that 20% of the male population represented in the UK Biobank study (n = 205,011) has detectable LOY. We identify 156 autosomal genetic determinants of LOY, which we replicate in 757,114 men of European and Japanese ancestry. These loci highlight genes that are involved in cell-cycle regulation and cancer susceptibility, as well as somatic drivers of tumour growth and targets of cancer therapy. We demonstrate that genetic susceptibility to LOY is associated with non-haematological effects on health in both men and women, which supports the hypothesis that clonal haematopoiesis is a biomarker of genomic instability in other tissues. Single-cell RNA sequencing identifies dysregulated expression of autosomal genes in leukocytes with LOY and provides insights into why clonal expansion of these cells may occur. Collectively, these data highlight the value of studying clonal mosaicism to uncover fundamental mechanisms that underlie cancer and other ageing-related diseases.

  • 16.
    Thuresson, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Zander, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zhao, Jin James
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Halvardson, Jonatan
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Maqbool, Khurram
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Månsson, Else
    Stenninger, Eric
    Holmlund, Ulrika
    Öhrner, Ylva
    Feuk, Lars
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Whole genome sequencing of consanguineous families reveals novel pathogenic variants in intellectual disability2019In: Clinical Genetics, ISSN 0009-9163, E-ISSN 1399-0004, Vol. 95, no 3, p. 436-439Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Zaghlool, Ammar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ameur, Adam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nyberg, Linnea
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Halvardson, Jonatan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Grabherr, Manfred
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Cavelier, Lucia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Feuk, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Efficient cellular fractionation improves RNA sequencing analysis of mature and nascent transcripts from human tissues2013In: BMC Biotechnology, ISSN 1472-6750, E-ISSN 1472-6750, Vol. 13, p. 99-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The starting material for RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) studies is usually total RNA or polyA+ RNA. Both forms of RNA represent heterogeneous pools of RNA molecules at different levels of maturation and processing. Such heterogeneity, in addition to the biases associated with polyA+ purification steps, may influence the analysis, sensitivity and the interpretation of RNA-seq data. We hypothesize that subcellular fractions of RNA may provide a more accurate picture of gene expression. Results: We present results for sequencing of cytoplasmic and nuclear RNA after cellular fractionation of tissue samples. In comparison with conventional polyA+ RNA, the cytoplasmic RNA contains a significantly higher fraction of exonic sequence, providing increased sensitivity in expression analysis and splice junction detection, and in improved de novo assembly of RNA-seq data. Conversely, the nuclear fraction shows an enrichment of unprocessed RNA compared with total RNA-seq, making it suitable for analysis of nascent transcripts and RNA processing dynamics. Conclusion: Our results show that cellular fractionation is a more rapid and cost effective approach than conventional polyA+ enrichment when studying mature RNAs. Thus, RNA-seq of separated cytosolic and nuclear RNA can significantly improve the analysis of complex transcriptomes from mammalian tissues.

  • 18.
    Zaghlool, Ammar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Halvardson, Jonatan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Zhao, Jin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Kalushkova, Antonia
    Konska, Katarzyna
    Helena, Jernberg-Wiklund
    Thuresson, Ann-Charlotte
    Feuk, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Mutation in the chromatin-remodeling factor BAZ1A is associated with intellectual disabilityManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Exome sequencing has led to the identification of mutations in several genes involved in chromatin remodeling in syndromic forms of intellectual disability. Here, we used exome sequencing to identify a single non-synonymous de novo mutation in BAZ1A, encoding the ATP-utilizing chromatin assembly and remodeling factor 1 (ACF1), in a patient with unexplained intellectual disability. ACF1 has been previously reported to bind to the promoter of vitamin D receptor (VDR) regulated genes and suppress their expression in the absence of vitamin D. We found that the mutation in BAZ1A affects the expression of many genes, mainly involved in extra cellular matrix organization, synaptic function and vitamin D3 metabolism. The differential expression of CYP24A, SYNGAP1 and COL1A2 correlates with the clinical diagnosis of the patient. We therefore propose that BAZ1A represents yet another chromatin remodeling gene involved in causing an intellectual disability syndrome.

  • 19.
    Zhao, Jin James
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Halvardson, Jonatan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Knaus, Alexej
    Georgii-Hemming, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska Institute.
    Baeck, Peter
    Länssjukhuset i Kalmar.
    Krawitz, Peter
    Thuresson, Ann-Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Feuk, Lars
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Reduced cell surface levels of GPI-linked markers in a new case with PIGG loss of function2017In: Human Mutation, ISSN 1059-7794, E-ISSN 1098-1004, Vol. 38, no 10, p. 1394-1401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) is a glycolipid that tethers more than 150 different proteins to the cell surface. Aberrations in biosynthesis of GPI anchors cause congenital disorders of glycosylation with clinical features including intellectual disability (ID), seizures, and facial dysmorphism. Here, we present two siblings with ID, cerebellar hypoplasia, cerebellar ataxia, early-onset seizures, and minor facial dysmorphology. Using exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous nonsense variant (NM_001127178.1:c.1640G>A, p.Trp547*) in the gene Phosphatidylinositol Glycan Anchor Biosynthesis, Class G (PIGG) in both the patients. Variants in several other GPI anchor synthesis genes lead to a reduced expression of GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) that can be measured by flow cytometry. No significant differences in GPI-APs could be detected in patient granulocytes, consistent with recent findings. However, fibroblasts showed a reduced global level of GPI anchors and of specific GPI-linked markers. These findings suggest that fibroblasts might be more sensitive to pathogenic variants in GPI synthesis pathway and are well suited to screen for GPI-anchor deficiencies. Based on genetic and functional evidence, we confirm that pathogenic variants in PIGG cause an ID syndrome, and we find that loss of function of PIGG is associated with GPI deficiency.

  • 20.
    Zhao, Jin James
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Halvardson, Jonatan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zander, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zaghlool, Ammar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Georgii-Hemming, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp Solna, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Månsson, Else
    Örebro Univ Hosp, Dept Pediat, Örebro, Sweden.
    Brandberg, Göran
    Pediat Clin, Falun, Sweden.
    Sävmarker, Helena Ederth
    Gävle Cent Hosp, Dept Pediat, Gävle, Sweden.
    Frykholm, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kuchinskaya, Ekaterina
    Linköping Univ, Dept Clin Genet, Linköping, Sweden.; Linköping Univ, Dept Clin Med, Linköping, Sweden..
    Thuresson, Ann-Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Feuk, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Exome sequencing reveals NAA15 and PUF60 as candidate genes associated with intellectual disability2018In: American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics, ISSN 1552-4841, E-ISSN 1552-485X, Vol. 177, no 1, p. 10-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intellectual Disability (ID) is a clinically heterogeneous condition that affects 2-3% of population worldwide. In recent years, exome sequencing has been a successful strategy for studies of genetic causes of ID, providing a growing list of both candidate and validated ID genes. In this study, exome sequencing was performed on 28 ID patients in 27 patient-parent trios with the aim to identify de novo variants (DNVs) in known and novel ID associated genes. We report the identification of 25 DNVs out of which five were classified as pathogenic or likely pathogenic. Among these, a two base pair deletion was identified in the PUF60 gene, which is one of three genes in the critical region of the 8q24.3 microdeletion syndrome (Verheij syndrome). Our result adds to the growing evidence that PUF60 is responsible for the majority of the symptoms reported for carriers of a microdeletion across this region. We also report variants in several genes previously not associated with ID, including a de novo missense variant in NAA15. We highlight NAA15 as a novel candidate ID gene based on the vital role of NAA15 in the generation and differentiation of neurons in neonatal brain, the fact that the gene is highly intolerant to loss of function and coding variation, and previously reported DNVs in neurodevelopmental disorders.

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