uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 20 of 20
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Eroukhmanoff, Fabrice
    et al.
    Section for Animal Ecology, Ecology Building, Lund University.
    Outomuro, David
    Biología de Organismos y Sistemas, University of Oviedo.
    Ocharan, Francisco J.
    Biología de Organismos y Sistemas, University of Oviedo.
    Svensson, Erik I.
    Patterns of Phenotypic Divergence in Wing Covariance Structure of Calopterygid Damselflies2009In: Evolutionary biology, ISSN 0071-3260, E-ISSN 1934-2845, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 214-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Comparing species differences in covariance patterns of traits subject to divergent selection pressures can increase our understanding to the mechanisms of phenotypic divergence. Different species of calopterygid damselflies have diverged in the melanized wing patch of males. This trait serves multiple ecological functions and has behavioral consequences in terms of sexual selection, interspecific interactions, reproductive isolation. We compared the phenotypic variance-covariance matrices (P) of wing traits among nine populations of four European species of calopterygid damselflies. We found modest divergence in covariance structure among populations of the same species, but strong divergence between species. Interestingly, the orientation of the first eigenvector of P (P (max) ) differed more between closely related species than between distantly related species, although this pattern was absent when overall covariance structures were compared. We also found that distantly related species but geographically closer had converged towards a similar covariance structure. Finally, divergence in covariance structure was correlated with divergence in wing patch length, but not with other wing traits. This last finding suggests that divergent selection on wing patch length might have affected the stability of P. These results indicate that P might not only reflect ancestral developmental pathways but might also be influenced by current ecology.

  • 2.
    Outomuro, David
    Biología de Organismos y Sistemas, University of Oviedo.
    The larval life history of Calopteryx virgo meridionalis Sélys, 1873 (Odonata: Calopterygidae) in northern Spain and the voltinism of the south-western European Calopteryx Leach, 18152011In: Entomologia generalis, ISSN 0171-8177, Vol. 33, p. 125-135Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Outomuro, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Population and Conservation Biology.
    Adams, Dean C.
    Johansson, Frank
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Population and Conservation Biology.
    The Evolution of Wing Shape in Ornamented-Winged Damselflies (Calopterygidae, Odonata)2013In: Evolutionary biology, ISSN 0071-3260, E-ISSN 1934-2845, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 300-309Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flight has conferred an extraordinary advantage to some groups of animals. Wing shape is directly related to flight performance and evolves in response to multiple selective pressures. In some species, wings have ornaments such as pigmented patches that are sexually selected. Since organisms with pigmented wings need to display the ornament while flying in an optimal way, we might expect a correlative evolution between the wing ornament and wing shape. We examined males from 36 taxa of calopterygid damselflies that differ in wing pigmentation, which is used in sexual displays. We used geometric morphometrics and phylogenetic comparative approaches to analyse whether wing shape and wing pigmentation show correlated evolution. We found that wing pigmentation is associated with certain wing shapes that probably increase the quality of the signal: wings being broader where the pigmentation is located. Our results also showed correlated evolution between wing pigmentation and wing shape in hind wings, but not in front wings, probably because hind wings are more involved in signalling than front wings. The results imply that the evolution of diversity in wing pigmentations and behavioural sexual displays might be an important driver of speciation due to important pre-copulatory selective pressures.

  • 4.
    Outomuro, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Population and Conservation Biology.
    Adams, Dean C.
    Johansson, Frank
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Population and Conservation Biology.
    Wing shape allometry and aerodynamics in calopterygid damselflies: a comparative approach2013In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1471-2148, E-ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 13, p. 118-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Wing size and shape have important aerodynamic implications on flight performance. We explored how wing size was related to wing shape in territorial males of 37 taxa of the damselfly family Calopterygidae. Wing coloration was also included in the analyses because it is sexually and naturally selected and has been shown to be related to wing shape. We studied wing shape using both the non-dimensional radius of the second moment of wing area (RSM) and geometric morphometrics. Lower values of the RSM result in less energetically demanding flight and wider ranges of flight speed. We also re-analyzed previously published data on other damselflies and dragonflies. Results: The RSM showed a hump-shaped relationship with wing size. However, after correcting for phylogeny using independent contrast, this pattern changed to a negative linear relationship. The basal genus of the study family, Hetaerina, was mainly driving that change. The obtained patterns were specific for the study family and differed from other damselflies and dragonflies. The relationship between the RSM and wing shape measured by geometric morphometrics was linear, but relatively small changes along the RSM axis can result in large changes in wing shape. Our results also showed that wing coloration may have some effect on RSM. Conclusions: We found that RSM showed a complex relationship with size in calopterygid damselflies, probably as a result of other selection pressures besides wing size per se. Wing coloration and specific behavior (e.g. courtship) are potential candidates for explaining the complexity. Univariate measures of wing shape such as RSM are more intuitive but lack the high resolution of other multivariate techniques such as geometric morphometrics. We suggest that the relationship between wing shape and size are taxa-specific and differ among closely-related insect groups.

  • 5.
    Outomuro, David
    et al.
    Biología de Organismos y Sistemas, University of Oviedo.
    Bokma, Folmer
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Johansson, Frank
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Population and Conservation Biology.
    Hind wing shape evolves faster than front wing shape in Calopteryx damselflies2012In: Evolutionary biology, ISSN 0071-3260, E-ISSN 1934-2845, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 116-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wing shape has been shown in a variety of species to be influenced by natural and sexual selection. In damselflies, front- and hind wings can beat independently, and functional differentiation may occur. Males of Calopteryx damselflies show species-specific nuptial flights that differ in colour signalling with the hind wings. Therefore, hind wing shape and colour may evolve in concert to improve colour display, independent of the front wings. We predicted that male hind wing shape evolves faster than front wing shape, due to sexual selection. Females do not engage in sexual displays, so we predicted that females do not show differences in divergence between front- and hind wing shape. We analysed the nonallometric component of wing shape of five European Calopteryx taxa using geometric morphometrics. We found a higher evolutionary divergence of hind wing shape in both sexes. Indeed, we found no significant differences in rate of evolution between the sexes, despite clear sexspecific differences in wing shape. We suggest that evolution of hind wing shape in males is accelerated by sexual selection on pre-copulatory displays and that this acceleration is reflected in females due to genetic correlations that somehow link the rates of wing shape evolution in the two sexes, but not the wing shapes themselves.

  • 6.
    Outomuro, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics.
    Cordero Rivera, Adolfo
    Nava-Bolanos, Angela
    Cordoba-Aguilar, Alex
    Does allometry of a sexually selected ornamental trait vary with sexual selection intensity?: A multi-species test in damselflies2014In: Ecological Entomology, ISSN 0307-6946, E-ISSN 1365-2311, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 399-403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    <list list-type="1"> Ornaments may show hyperallometry in certain taxa, i.e. large individuals have proportionally larger ornaments than small ones. One hypothesis suggests that higher sexual selection intensity leads to steeper hyperallometric patterns. This study tested whether an ornamental trait subject to both intra- and intersexual selection showed steeper allometric slopes than when subject solely to intrasexual selection. The study employed the sexually selected male wing pigmentation of 14 calopterygid species (damselflies) that differ in sexual selection intensity (intrasexual selection versus intra- and intersexual selection). Hyperallometry was not a uniform pattern in the study species. Furthermore, the allometric slopes did not differ between sexual selection intensities. The allometry of ornamental traits is therefore highly variable even among related species. Other selection pressures-probably species-specific and at a local scale-acting on wing pigmentation might explain the diversity of allometric patterns.

  • 7.
    Outomuro, David
    et al.
    Biología de Organismos y Sistemas, University of Oviedo.
    Cordero-Rivera, Adolfo
    Univ Vigo, Dept Ecol & Biol Anim, E-36005 Pontevedra, Spain.
    Allometry of secondary, primary and non-sexual traits in the beautiful demoiselle (Calopteryx virgo)2012In: Canadian Journal of Zoology, ISSN 0008-4301, E-ISSN 1480-3283, Vol. 90, p. 1094-1101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The static allometry between the size of a trait and the body size results from the net selection forces acting on the evolution of both the trait and the body size. An increased knowledge of the functional significance of traits is necessary to understand observed allometric patterns. We studied several traits of males of the beautiful demoiselle (Calopteryx virgo meridionalis Selys, 1873), for which there is a good functional knowledge of the genitalic traits and ornaments. We found positive allometry for the wing spot size (considered a secondary sexual trait) and for the distal width (but not length) of the anal appendages, which are used for grasping the female prior to copulation. Regarding the male secondary genitalia, the length but not the width of the big horns of the aedeagus showed an isometric pattern. The aedeagus shaft length showed a negative allometric pattern, while its distal width did not show a significant regression. The slopes of the regressions were higher when using wing length than when using body length as estimators of body size, with the exception of wing spot length. Results are discussed based on the functional significance of the study traits, as well as the pre- and post-copulatory selective pressures acting on them.

  • 8.
    Outomuro, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Population and Conservation Biology.
    Dijkstra, K. -DB.
    Johansson, Frank
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Population and Conservation Biology.
    Habitat variation and wing coloration affect wing shape evolution in dragonflies2013In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1010-061X, E-ISSN 1420-9101, Vol. 26, no 9, p. 1866-1874Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Habitats are spatially and temporally variable, and organisms must be able to track these changes. One potential mechanism for this is dispersal by flight. Therefore, we would expect flying animals to show adaptations in wing shape related to habitat variation. In this work, we explored variation in wing shape in relation to preferred water body (flowing water or standing water with tolerance for temporary conditions) and landscape (forested to open) using 32 species of dragonflies of the genus Trithemis (80% of the known species). We included a potential source of variation linked to sexual selection: the extent of wing coloration on hindwings. We used geometric morphometric methods for studying wing shape. We also explored the phenotypic correlation of wing shape between the sexes. We found that wing shape showed a phylogenetic structure and therefore also ran phylogenetic independent contrasts. After correcting for the phylogenetic effects, we found (i) no significant effect of water body on wing shape; (ii) male forewings and female hindwings differed with regard to landscape, being progressively broader from forested to open habitats; (iii) hindwings showed a wider base in wings with more coloration, especially in males; and (iv) evidence for phenotypic correlation of wing shape between the sexes across species. Hence, our results suggest that natural and sexual selection are acting partially independently on fore- and hindwings and with differences between the sexes, despite evidence for phenotypic correlation of wing shape between males and females.

  • 9.
    Outomuro, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Johansson, Frank
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    A potential pitfall in studies of biological shape: Does size matter?2017In: Journal of Animal Ecology, ISSN 0021-8790, E-ISSN 1365-2656, Vol. 86, no 6, p. 1447-1457Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. The number of published studies using geometric morphometrics (GM) for analysing biological shape has increased steadily since the beginning of the 1990s, covering multiple research areas such as ecology, evolution, development, taxonomy and palaeontology. Unfortunately, we have observed that many published studies using GM do not evaluate the potential allometric effects of size on shape, which normally require consideration or assessment. This might lead to misinterpretations and flawed conclusions in certain cases, especially when size effects explain a large part of the shape variation. 2. We assessed, for the first time and in a systematic manner, how often published studies that have applied GM consider the potential effects of allometry on shape. 3. We reviewed the 300 most recent published papers that used GM for studying biological shape. We also estimated how much of the shape variation was explained by allometric effects in the reviewed papers. 4. More than one-third (38%) of the reviewed studies did not consider the allometric component of shape variation. In studies where the allometric component was taken into account, it was significant in 88% of the cases, explaining up to 87.3% of total shape variation. We believe that one reason that may cause the observed results is a misunderstanding of the process that superimposes landmark configurations, i.e. the Generalized Procrustes Analysis, which removes isometric effects of size on shape, but not allometric effects. 5. Allometry can be a crucial component of shape variation. We urge authors to address, and report, size effects in studies of biological shape. However, we do not propose to always remove size effects, but rather to evaluate the research question with and without the allometric component of shape variation. This approach can certainly provide a thorough understanding of how much size contributes to the observed shaped variation.

  • 10.
    Outomuro, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Johansson, Frank
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Bird predation selects for wing shape and coloration in a damselfly2015In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1010-061X, E-ISSN 1420-9101, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 791-799Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wing shape is related to flight performance, which is expected to be under selection for improving flight behaviours such as predator avoidance. Moreover, wing conspicuousness, usually involved in sexual selection processes, is also relevant in terms of predation risk. In this study, we examined how predation by a passerine bird, the white wagtail Motacilla alba, selects wing shape and wing colour patch size in males of the banded demoiselle Calopteryx splendens. The wing colour patch is intra- and intersexually selected in the study species. In a field study, we compared wings of live damselflies to wings of predated damselflies which are always discarded after predation. Based on aerodynamic theory and a previous study on wing shape of territorial tactics in damselflies, we predicted an overall short and broad wing, with a concave front margin shape to be selected by predation. This shape would be expected to improve escaping ability. Moreover, we predicted that wing patch size should be negatively selected by predation. We found that selection operated differently on fore- and hindwings. In contrast to our predictions, predation favoured a slender general forewing shape. However, the predicted wing shape was favoured in hindwings. We also found selection favouring a narrower wing colour patch. Our results suggest different roles of fore- and hindwings in flight, as previously suggested for Calopteryx damselflies and shown for butterflies and moths. Forewings would be more involved in sustained flight and hindwings in flight manoeuvrability. Our results differ somehow from a recently published work in the same study system, but using another population, suggesting that selection can fluctuate across space, despite the simplicity of this predator-prey system.

  • 11.
    Outomuro, David
    et al.
    Biología de Organismos y Sistemas, University of Oviedo.
    Johansson, Frank
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    The effects of latitude, body size, and sexual selection on wing shape in a damselfly2011In: Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4066, E-ISSN 1095-8312, Vol. 102, no 2, p. 263-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Under natural selection, wing shape is expected to evolve to optimize flight performance. However, other selective factors besides flight performance may influence wing shape. One such factor could be sexual selection in wing sexual ornaments, which may lead to alternative variations in wing shape that are not necessarily related to flight performance. In the present study, we investigated wing shape variations in a calopterygid damselfly along a latitudinal gradient using geometric morphometrics. Both sexes show wing pigmentation, which is a known signal trait at intra- and interspecific levels. Wing shape differed between sexes and, within the same sex, the shape of the hind wing differed from the front wing. Latitude and body size explained a high percentage of the variation in wing shape for female front and hind wings, and male front wings. In male hind wings, wing pigmentation explained a high amount of the variation in wing shape. On the other hand, the variation in shape explained by pigmentation was very low in females. We suggest that the conservative morphology of front wings is maintained by natural selection operating on flight performance, whereas the sex-specific differences in hind wings most likely could be explained by sexual selection. The observed sexual dimorphism in wing shape is likely a result of different sex-specific behaviours. (C) 2011 The Linnean Society of London, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2011, 102, 263-274.

  • 12.
    Outomuro, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology. Univ Cincinnati, Dept Biol Sci, Cincinnati, OH 45221 USA.
    Johansson, Frank
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Wing morphology and migration status, but not body size, habitat or Rapoport's rule predict range size in North-American dragonflies (Odonata: Libellulidae)2019In: Ecography, ISSN 0906-7590, E-ISSN 1600-0587, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 309-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding why species range sizes vary is important for predicting the impact of environmental change on biodiversity. Here we use a multi-variable approach in a phylogenetic comparative context to understand how four morphological, two ecological, and two eco-geographical variables are associated with range size, latitudinal range and longitudinal range in 81 species of North-American libellulid dragonflies. Our results show that: 1) migratory species and species with a more expanded basal hindwing lobe have a larger range size; 2) opposite to Rapoport's rule, latitudinal range is negatively correlated with mid-range latitude; 3) longitudinal range is predicted by wing morphology and migration; 4) body size and larval habitat are not correlated with range size, latitudinal range or longitudinal range. These results suggest that dispersal-related traits, such as wing shape and migratory status, are important factors in predicting the range size of libellulid dragonflies. In addition, the reverse Rapoport's rule suggests that more northern-centred species might be more specialized than more southern-centred species. We suggest that the variables predicting range size are likely imposed by taxon-specific morphological, ecological, physiological and behavioural traits. Taxon-specific knowledge is thus necessary to understand the dynamics of range sizes and is important to implement successful restoration and conservation plans of threatened species.

  • 13.
    Outomuro, David
    et al.
    Biología de Organismos y Sistemas, University of Oviedo.
    Ocharan, Francisco J.
    Biología de Organismos y Sistemas, University of Oviedo.
    Wing pigmentation in Calopteryx damselflies: a role in thermoregulation?2011In: Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4066, E-ISSN 1095-8312, Vol. 103, no 1, p. 36-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Body melanization may show adaptive variation related to thermoregulation ability, and it is to be expected that the degree of melanization will change among populations or closely related species across environmental gradients of solar radiation and/or environmental temperature. Some melanized secondary sexual traits may also play a role in sexual selection, leading to interpopulation variation, which would not be predicted by thermoregulation pressures alone. We studied the relationships between the interpopulation variation in wing pigmentation level (i.e. melanized secondary sexual trait) of two closely related species of Calopteryx damselfly, and both solar radiation and maximum environmental temperature estimates. Wing pigmentation differs between these species, is gender specific and is used in species' discrimination. Only Calopteryx virgo meridionalis males showed a significant negative partial correlation between wing pigmentation degree and temperature. However, C. virgo meridionalis females showed a positive significant partial correlation between wing pigmentation degree and solar radiation. Wing pigmentation in Calopteryx xanthostoma males was not related to solar radiation or temperature. Thus, thermoregulation pressures poorly explained the observed variations in wing pigmentation between populations, although they might have an adaptive significance at the species' level. As wing pigmentation showed important latitudinal variation, several other selection pressures which might act on melanized traits are briefly discussed. (C) 2011 The Linnean Society of London, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2011, 103, 36-44.

  • 14.
    Outomuro, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Saul
    Karlsson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics.
    Johansson, Frank
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Male wing shape differs between condition-dependent alternative reproductive tactics in territorial damselflies2014In: Animal Behaviour, ISSN 0003-3472, E-ISSN 1095-8282, Vol. 91, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Territorial contests between males without weaponry are based on costly displays and can result in condition-dependent alternative reproductive tactics that maximize male fitness. Physiological and morphological traits such as fat content, body size or the expression of secondary sexual traits have been shown to contribute to male territory-holding potential. When territorial contests are based on flight displays, wing morphology is expected to contribute to the territory-holding potential of a male through its effects on flight performance. We explored whether wing shape contributed to the territory-holding potential of males of three species of Calopteryx damselflies. Males of these species show two distinct, condition-dependent behavioural tactics: territorial and nonterritorial. Previous studies have shown that territorial males have higher fitness than nonterritorial males. We used mark-recapture to determine male tactics within the populations and compared wing shape, size and wing coloured spot size (a secondary sexual trait) between tactics. Territorial males of all three species had shorter and slightly broader hindwings than nonterritorial males. In two species, forewings of territorial males were longer and broader than forewings of nonterritorial males. Wing size and wing spot size did not differ between tactics. We suggest that the wing shape of territorial males might confer better flight manoeuvrability, which would be advantageous for territorial contests. Therefore, wing shape is likely to be an important trait contributing to territory-holding potential in condition-dependent alternative reproductive tactics based on flight displays. (C) 2014 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 15.
    Outomuro, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Söderquist, Linus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Johansson, Frank
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Ödeen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Nordström, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology. Flinders Univ S Australia, Anat & Histol Ctr Neurosci, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia..
    The price of looking sexy: visual ecology of a three-level predator–prey system2017In: Functional Ecology, ISSN 0269-8463, E-ISSN 1365-2435, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 707-718Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Colour signals and colour vision play a pivotal role in intraspecific communication and predator-prey interactions. However, the costs of expressing conspicuous sexual signals at multiple trophic levels have been largely overlooked. Sexual signals can also experience character displacement in sympatric populations of closely related species, leading to potential changes in conspicuousness. We here investigate a bird-damselfly-fruit fly predator-prey system, where two closely related damselfly species have conspicuous, sexually selected wing coloration. The damselflies can occur in sympatry and allopatry, and reproductive character displacement in the coloration size has been previously reported. We quantify the damselfly wing reflectance from replicated sympatric and allopatric populations, and use receptor noise models to investigate the visual discriminability of the wing coloration for the bird, damselfly and fly vision systems, against natural backgrounds. We perform electroretinograms to study damselfly eye sensitivity. We also estimate damselfly predation risk in natural populations. We find that the chromatic component of wing coloration makes males highly discriminable to the predator, but not to the prey. However, female wing coloration is predominantly cryptic for the predator and prey, and interestingly, also for male damselflies. A female being cryptic to conspecifics likely reduces male harassment. The estimates of predation risk partially support the discriminability results. We also show that there is no difference in colour vision sensitivity between the two damselfly species and sexes, and no difference in wing coloration or its discriminability between sympatric and allopatric populations. Our results suggest that sexually selected traits can be antagonistically selected by predators and prey and that this antagonistic selection can be sex-dependent: males are paying a large cost in terms of conspicuousness, while females remain mostly cryptic. Our study thus emphasizes the need for investigating visual communication at multitrophic levels since the degree of colour discriminability can differ between predators, prey and the focal species.

  • 16.
    Outomuro, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics.
    Söderquist, Linus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics.
    Nilsson-Örtman, Viktor
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, ON M5S 3B2, Canada;Evolutionary Ecology Unit, Biology Department, Lund University, SE223-62 Lund, Sweden.
    Cortázar-Chinarro, María
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics.
    Lundgren, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics.
    Johansson, Frank
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics.
    Antagonistic natural and sexual selection on wing shape in a scrambling damselfly2016In: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 70, no 7, p. 1582-1595Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wings are a key trait underlying the evolutionary success of birds, bats, and insects. For over a century, researchers have studiedthe form and function of wings to understand the determinants of flight performance. However, to understand the evolutionof flight, we must comprehend not only how morphology affects performance, but also how morphology and performanceaffect fitness. Natural and sexual selection can either reinforce or oppose each other, but their role in flight evolution remainspoorly understood. Here, we show that wing shape is under antagonistic selection with regard to sexual and natural selectionin a scrambling damselfly. In a field setting, natural selection (survival) favored individuals with long and slender forewings andshort and broad hindwings. In contrast, sexual selection (mating success) favored individuals with short and broad forewings andnarrow-based hindwings. Both types of selection favored individuals of intermediate size. These results suggest that individualsface a trade-off between flight energetics and maneuverability and demonstrate how natural and sexual selection can operate insimilar directions for some wing traits, that is, wing size, but antagonistically for others, that is, wing shape. Furthermore, theyhighlight the need to study flight evolution within the context of species’ mating systems and mating behaviors.

  • 17.
    Outomuro, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Söderquist, Linus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Saul
    Johansson, Frank
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    A preliminary study on female-limited colour polymorphism in Lestes sponsa2014In: INT J ODONATOL, ISSN 1388-7890, Vol. 17, no 2-3, p. 89-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Female-limited colour polymorphisms are widespread in Odonata, usually showing an androchrome and one or more gynochromes. Androchromes have been hypothesized to function as male mimics with a consequent decrease of male harassment, although males may also learn to recognize the different female colour morphs. In the Eurasian damselfly Lestes sponsa, the occurrence of two female colour morphs (androchrome and gynochrome) has been known since the beginning of the twentieth century, although this has been generally overlooked. In this work, we studied a Swedish population of L. sponsa by counting the number of females of each morph during nine consecutive days, as well as the number of tandems. Androchromes showed blue pruinescence at similar body parts as males, although more limited at the tip of the abdomen. Moreover, androchromes also showed bright blue coloured eyes as males. We found no indication that androchromes might be a result of age changes in female coloration. The androchrome morph accounted for 19% of the female population. Androchromes did not form tandems at a lower frequency than expected in the population, given the frequency of presence of each morph. Therefore our results suggest that either androchromes in this species do not function as male mimics, or that the population has reached equilibrium with equal fitness for each morph. Other aspects of male harassment and learned mate-recognition, as well as female morph behaviour, would shed light on the evolutionary and ecological significance of female morphs in this species.

  • 18.
    Outomuro, David
    et al.
    Biología de Organismos y Sistemas, University of Oviedo.
    Torralba-Burrial, Antonio
    Biología de Organismos y Sistemas, University of Oviedo.
    Ocharan, Francisco J.
    Biología de Organismos y Sistemas, University of Oviedo.
    Distribution of the Iberian Calopteryx damselflies and its relation with bioclimatic belts: Evolutionary and biogeographic implications2010In: Journal of Insect Science, ISSN 1536-2442, E-ISSN 1536-2442, Vol. 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using bioclimatic belts as habitat and distribution predictors, the present study examines the implications of the potential distributions of the three Iberian damselflies, Calopteryx Leach (Odonata: Calopterygidae), with the aim of investigating the possible consequences in specific interactions among the species from a sexual selection perspective and of discussing biogeographical patterns. To obtain the known distributions, the literature on this genus was reviewed, relating the resulting distributions to bioclimatic belts. Specific patterns related to bioclimatic belts were clearly observed in the Mediterranean region. The potential distribution maps and relative frequencies might involve latitudinal differences in relative abundances, C. virgo meridionalis Selys being the most abundant species in the Eurosiberian region, C. xanthostoma (Charpentier) in the northern half of the Mediterranean region and C. haemorrhoidalis (Vander Linden) in the rest of this region. These differences might explain some previously described latitudinal differences in secondary sexual traits in the three species. Changes in relative abundances may modulate interactions among these species in terms of sexual selection and may produce sexual character displacement in this genus. C. virgo meridionalis distribution and ecological requirements explain its paleobiogeography as a species which took refuge in Iberia during the Wurm glaciation. Finally, possible consequences in species distributions and interactions are discussed within a global climate change context.

  • 19.
    Outomuro, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology. Univ Los Andes, Dept Ciencias Biol, Lab Zool & Ecol Acuat, Bogota, Colombia.
    Ángel-Giraldo, Pedro
    Univ Los Andes, Dept Ciencias Biol, Lab Zool & Ecol Acuat, Bogota, Colombia.
    Corral-Lopez, Alberto
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Ethol Zool, Svante Arrhenius Vag 18B, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Realpe, Emilio
    Univ Los Andes, Dept Ciencias Biol, Lab Zool & Ecol Acuat, Bogota, Colombia.
    Multitrait aposematic signal in Batesian mimicry2016In: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 70, no 7, p. 1596-1608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Batesian mimics can parasitize Müllerian mimicry rings mimicking the warning color signal. The evolutionary success of Batesian mimics can increase adding complexity to the signal by behavioral and locomotor mimicry. We investigated three fundamental morphological and locomotor traits in a Neotropical mimicry ring based on Ithomiini butterflies and parasitized by Polythoridae damselflies: wing color, wing shape, and flight style. The study species have wings with a subapical white patch, considered the aposematic signal, and a more apical black patch. The main predators are VS-birds, visually more sensitive to violet than to ultraviolet wavelengths (UVS-birds). The white patches, compared to the black patches, were closer in the bird color space, with higher overlap for VS-birds than for UVS-birds. Using a discriminability index for bird vision, the white patches were more similar between the mimics and the model than the black patches. The wing shape of the mimics was closer to the model in the morphospace, compared to other outgroup damselflies. The wing-beat frequency was similar among mimics and the model, and different from another outgroup damselfly. Multitrait aposematic signals involving morphology and locomotion may favor the evolution of mimicry rings and the success of Batesian mimics by improving signal effectiveness toward predators.

  • 20. Sniegula, Szymon
    et al.
    Prus, Monika A.
    Golab, Maria J.
    Outomuro, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Do males with higher mating success invest more in armaments?: An across-populations study in damselflies2017In: Ecological Entomology, ISSN 0307-6946, E-ISSN 1365-2311, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 526-530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Males with higher mating success would be expected to invest more in traits that facilitate mating, leading to steeper allometry of those traits with respect to body size. Across-population studies following latitudinal variation in male mating success are an excellent study system to address this question.

    2. Males of the damselfly Lestes sponsa were used to investigate whether the allometric patterns of the length and width of the anal appendages, used for grasping the female prior tomating, corresponded to male mating success. Across a large latitudinal gradient, it was hypothesised that there is a larger investment in the grasping apparatus, i.e. a steeper allometric slope, following higher mating success.

    3. Behavioural observations in field enclosures showed the highest mating success at high latitude, while there were no significant differences in mating success between the central and low latitudes. Positive allometry was found for the length of the anal appendages in high-latitude males, while central-and low-latitude males showed no significant regressions of the traits on body size.

    4. These results partially support the hypothesis, as high-latitude, more successful males invested more in the length ( but not the width) of the grasping apparatus than did central-and low-latitude males. Therefore, higher mating success might be facilitated by larger investment in armaments. Intraspecific studies on allometric patterns of traits that participate in mating success might offer new insights into the role of those traits in the reproductive behaviour of a species.

1 - 20 of 20
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf