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  • 1.
    Brodin, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Berglund, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Hadziosmanovic, Nermin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Bergh, Torbjorn
    Olovsson, Matts
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Holte, Jan
    Antimullerian hormone predicts pregnancy and live-birth rates after assisted reproduction and reflect oocyte quality besides oocyte quantity2012In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 91, p. 35-35Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Brodin, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Hadziosmanovic, Nermin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Berglund, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Olovsson, Matts
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Holte, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Antimüllerian hormone levels are strongly associated with live-birth rates after assisted reproduction2013In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 98, no 3, p. 1107-1114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Previous studies have suggested that antimullerian hormone (AMH) levels are positively associated with in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcome through their relationship with oocyte yield and not by reflecting oocyte or embryo quality. Objective: The aim was to investigate whether AMH levels are associated with pregnancy and live-birth rates and whether the results may also reflect qualitative aspects of oocytes and embryos. Design: The study was a prospective cohort study between April 2008 and June 2011. Setting: The study was done at a university-affiliated private infertility center. Patients: The study cohort consisted of 892 consecutive women undergoing 1230 IVF-intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles. Intervention(s): AMH levels, analyzed using the DSL ELISA kit, were statistically adjusted for repeated treatments and age and analyzed for associations with treatment outcome. Main Outcome Measures: Pregnancy rates, live-birth rates, and stimulation outcome parameters were measured. Results: AMH was log-normally distributed with a mean (SD) of 2.3 (2.5) ng/mL. Live-birth rates per started cycle (mean [95% confidence interval]) increased log-linearly from 10.7% [7.2-14.1] for AMH < 0.84 ng/mL (25th percentile) to 30.8% [25.7-36.0] for AMH > 2.94 ng/mL (75th percentile), P-trend < .0001, being superior in women with polycystic ovaries. These findings were significant also after adjustments were made for age and oocyte yield. AMH was also associated with ovarian response variables and embryo scores. Conclusions: AMH is strongly associated with live-birth rates after IVF-intracytoplasmic sperm injection. AMH may therefore serve as a prognostic factor for the chance of a pregnancy and live birth. Treatment outcome was superior in patients with polycystic ovaries. The findings also indicate that AMH may partially comprise information about oocyte quality.

  • 3.
    Brodin, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Carl von Linne Clin, S-75183 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hadziosmanovic, Nermin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Berglund, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Olovsson, Matts
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Uppsala Univ, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Holte, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Uppsala Univ, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Uppsala, Sweden.;Carl von Linne Clin, S-75183 Uppsala, Sweden.;Ctr Reprod Biol Uppsala CRU, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Comparing four ovarian reserve markers: associations with ovarian response and live births after assisted reproduction2015In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 94, no 10, p. 1056-1063Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. We compared the ability of four different ovarian reserve tests (ORTs) to predict live births per started in vitro fertilization-intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF-ICSI) cycle, and poor and excessive response to controlled ovarian hyperstimulation. Material and methods. This was a cohort study in a private infertility center in collaboration with Uppsala University, comprising 1230 IVF-ICSI cycles in 892 consecutive women between April 2008 and June 2011. Anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) levels, antral follicle counts (AFC), combinations of basal levels of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone, and menstrual cycle lengths were analyzed for correlation and treatment outcome prediction in age-adjusted statistical models. Stepwise multivariable generalized estimating equation analyses were carried out in a sub-group with complete data on all four ORTs (620 cycles in 443 women). Odds ratios and c-statistics were calculated in the largest available set of data for each significant variable. Primary outcomes were live birth rate per started cycle and poor and excessive ovarian response to controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (defined by the ovarian sensitivity index). Results. All ORTs correlated significantly with each other, with the strongest correlation between AFC and AMH (r = 0.71, p < 0.0001). Univariately, AMH and age equivalently predicted live birth (c-statistic 0.61), and together they provided a significantly better model (c-statistic 0.64). For prediction of poor and excessive response the best model included AMH, AFC and age (c-statistic 0.89). Conclusions. AMH improves the ability to estimate live birth rates after assisted reproduction compared with female age alone. AMH, AFC and age together constituted the best model for prediction of ovarian response.

  • 4.
    Eggers, Kai M.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Hadziosmanovic, Nermin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Baron, Tomasz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Hambraeus, Kristina
    Department of Cardiology, Falun Hospital, Falun, Sweden.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Cardiology, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Danderyd, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Anna
    Faculty of Health, Department of Cardiology, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Tornvall, Per
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Myocardial Infarction with Nonobstructive Coronary Arteries: The Importance of Achieving Secondary Prevention Targets2018In: American Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0002-9343, E-ISSN 1555-7162, Vol. 131, no 5, p. 524-531.e6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Approximately 5% to 10% of all patients with myocardial infarction have nonobstructive coronary arteries. Studies investigating the importance of follow-up and achievement of conventional secondary prevention targets in these patients are lacking.

    METHODS:

    In this analysis from the Swedish Web-system for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-based care in Heart disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies (SWEDEHEART) registry, we investigated 5830 patients with myocardial infarction with nonobstructive coronary arteries (group 1) and 54,637 patients with myocardial infarction with significant coronary artery disease (≥50% stenosis; group 2). Multivariable- and propensity score-adjusted statistics were used to assess the reduction in the 1-year risk of major adverse events associated with prespecified secondary preventive measures: participation in follow-up at 6 to 10 weeks after the hospitalization and achievement of secondary prevention targets (blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in the target ranges, nonsmoking, and participation in exercise training).

    RESULTS:

    Patients in group 1 were less often followed up compared with patients in group 2 and less often achieved any of the secondary prevention targets. Participation in the 6- to 10-week follow-up was associated with a 3% to 20% risk reduction in group 1, similar as for group 2 according to interaction analysis. The improvement in outcome in group 1 was mainly mediated by achieving target range low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (24%-32% risk reduction) and, to a smaller extent, by participation in exercise training (10%-23% risk reduction).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Selected secondary preventive measures are associated with prognostic benefit in patients with myocardial infarction with nonobstructive coronary arteries, in particular achieving target range low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Our results indicate that these patients should receive similar follow-up as myocardial infarction patients with significant coronary stenoses.

  • 5.
    Feichtinger, Michael
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Div Gynecol & Reprod, Dept Reprod Med, Novumhuset Plan 4, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden;Wunschbaby Inst Feichtinger, Vienna, Austria;Med Univ Vienna, Div Gynecol Endocrinol & Reprod Med, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Vienna, Austria;Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nordenhok, Emelie
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Div Gynecol & Reprod, Dept Reprod Med, Novumhuset Plan 4, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Jan I.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Div Gynecol & Reprod, Dept Reprod Med, Novumhuset Plan 4, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hadziosmanovic, Nermin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Rodriguez-Wallberg, Kenny A.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Div Gynecol & Reprod, Dept Reprod Med, Novumhuset Plan 4, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Endometriosis and cumulative live birth rate after fresh and frozen IVF cycles with single embryo transfer in young women: no impact beyond reduced ovarian sensitivity-a case control study2019In: Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics, ISSN 1058-0468, E-ISSN 1573-7330, Vol. 36, no 8, p. 1649-1656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose To investigate the impact of symptomatic and surgically confirmed endometriosis on ovarian sensitivity index (OSI) and cumulative live-birth rates (LBR) using predominantly single embryo transfer (SET). Methods Cross-sectional case-control study in a University-based ART program. Women with symptomatic and surgically confirmed endometriosis (N = 172), who underwent IVF/ICSI at Karolinska University Hospital were compared to controls without clinically suspected endometriosis (N = 2585). Two thousand seven hundred fifty-seven patients underwent 8236 treatment cycles (4598 fresh and 3638 frozen cycles). Primary outcome measures included Ovarian Sensitivity Index (OSI) estimated as collected oocytes/FSH dose and cumulative LBR/oocyte pickup (OPU). Generalized estimated equation (GEE) model accounting for dependencies between consecutive treatments were applied. Secondary outcomes included number of oocytes, pregnancy rate per OPU and per ET, LBR per ET, and miscarriage rate. Results Patients diagnosed with endometriosis had significantly fewer oocytes collected (8.47 vs. 9.54, p = 0.015) and lower OSI (p = 0.011) than controls. There were no differences in cycle cancelations (p = 0.59) or miscarriages (p = 0.95) between the two groups. Cumulative LBR/OPU did not differ between women with endometriosis and controls (35.6% vs. 34.7%, respectively, p = 0.83). In both groups, more than 60% of women had consecutive FETs after fresh ETs (p = 0.49) with SET in > 70% of cases. The results were similar whether ovarian endometrioma was present or not. Conclusions Our data support that a diagnosis of endometriosis, with or without present endometrioma, does not negatively affect ART cumulative results. The impact of endometriosis was discernible on OSI but not on clinical relevant outcomes including pregnancy and LBR.

  • 6.
    Gard, Anton
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Batra, Gorav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Hadziosmanovic, Nermin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Hjort, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Szummer, Karolina Elisabeth
    Baron, Tomasz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Interphysician agreement on subclassification of myocardial infarction.2018In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 104, no 15, p. 1284-1291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The universal definition of myocardial infarction (MI) differentiates MI due to oxygen supply/demand mismatch (type 2) from MI due to plaque rupture (type 1) as well as from myocardial injuries of non-ischaemic or multifactorial nature. The purpose of this study was to investigate how often physicians agree in this classification and what factors lead to agreement or disagreement.

    METHODS: A total of 1328 patients diagnosed with MI at eight different Swedish hospitals 2011 were included. All patients were retrospectively reclassified into different MI or myocardial injury subtypes by two independent specially trained physicians, strictly adhering to the third universal definition of MI.

    RESULTS: Overall, there was a moderate interobserver agreement with a kappa coefficient (κ) of 0.55 in this classification. There was substantial agreement when distinguishing type 1 MI (κ: 0.61), compared with moderate agreement when distinguishing type 2 MI (κ: 0.54). In multivariate logistic regression analyses, ST elevation MI (P<0.001), performed coronary angiography (P<0.001) and larger changes in troponin levels (P=0.023) independently made the physicians agree significantly more often, while they disagreed more often with symptoms of dyspnoea (P<0.001), higher systolic blood pressure (P=0.001) and higher C reactive protein levels on admission (P=0.016).

    CONCLUSION: Distinguishing MI types is challenging also for trained adjudicators. Although strictly adhering to the third universal definition of MI, differentiation between type 1 MI, type 2 MI and myocardial injury only gave a moderate rate of interobserver agreement. More precise and clinically applicable criteria for the current classification, particularly for type 2 MI diagnosis, are urgently needed.

  • 7. Hammar, P.
    et al.
    Duvernoy, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Nordenskjold, A. M.
    Hadziosmanovic, Nermin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Johansson, Lars O.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Unrecognized myocardial infarction assessed by CMR is associated with hemodynamically significant stenosis at coronary angiography in patients with stable angina pectoris2013In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 34, no S1, p. 818-818Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Hammar, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Nordenskjöld, Anna M
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Duvernoy, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Hadziosmanovic, Nermin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Unrecognized myocardial infarctions assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance are associated with the severity of the stenosis in the supplying coronary artery2015In: Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, ISSN 1097-6647, E-ISSN 1532-429X, Vol. 17, article id 98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: A previous study has shown an increased prevalence of late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance (LGE CMR) detected unrecognized myocardial infarction (UMI) with increasing extent and severity of coronary artery disease. However, the coronary artery disease was evaluated on a patient level assuming normal coronary anatomy. Therefore, the aims of the present study were to investigate the prevalence of UMI identified by LGE CMR imaging in patients with stable angina pectoris and no known previous myocardial infarction; and to investigate whether presence of UMI is associated with stenotic lesions in the coronary artery supplying the segment of the myocardium in which the UMI is located, using coronary angiography to determine the individual coronary anatomy in each patient.

    METHODS: In this prospective multicenter study, we included patients with stable angina pectoris and without prior myocardial infarction, scheduled for coronary angiography. A LGE CMR examination was performed prior to the coronary angiography. The study cohort consisted of 235 patients (80 women, 155 men) with a mean age of 64.8 years.

    RESULTS: UMIs were found in 25 % of patients. There was a strong association between stenotic lesions (≥70 % stenosis) in a coronary artery and the presence of an UMI in the myocardial segments supplied by the stenotic artery; it was significantly more likely to have an UMI downstream a stenosis ≥ 70 % as compared to < 70 % (OR 5.1, CI 3.1-8.3, p < 0.0001). 56 % of the UMIs were located in the inferior and infero-lateral myocardial segments, despite predominance for stenotic lesions in the left anterior descending artery.

    CONCLUSION: UMI is common in patients with stable angina and the results indicate that the majority of the UMIs are of ischemic origin due to severe coronary atherosclerosis. In contrast to what is seen in recognized myocardial infarctions, UMIs are predominately located in the inferior and infero-lateral myocardial segments.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: The PUMI study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov ( NCT01257282 ).

  • 9. Huber, Malin
    et al.
    Hadziosmanovic, Nermin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Berglund, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Holte, Jan
    Using the ovarian sensitivity index to define poor, normal, and high response after controlled ovarian hyperstimulation in the long gonadotropin-releasing hormone-agonist protocol: suggestions for a new principle to solve an old problem2013In: Fertility and Sterility, ISSN 0015-0282, E-ISSN 1556-5653, Vol. 100, no 5, p. 1270-1276.e3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore the utility of using the ratio between oocyte yield and total dose of FSH, i.e., the ovarian sensitivity index (OSI), to define ovarian response patterns. Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Setting: University-affiliated private center. Patient(s): The entire unselected cohort of 7,520 IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection treatments (oocyte pick-ups [OPUs]) during an 8-year period (long GnRH agonist-recombinant FSH protocol). Intervention(s): None. Main Outcome Measure(s): The distribution of the OSI (oocytes recovered x 1,000/total dose of FSH), the cutoff levels for poor and high response, set at +/- 1 SD, and the relationship between OSI and treatment outcome. Result(s): OSI showed a log-normal distribution with cutoff levels for poor and high response at 1.697/IU and 10.07/IU, respectively. A nomogram is presented. Live-birth rates per OPU were 10.5 +/- 0.1%, 26.9 +/- 0.6%, and 36.0 +/- 1.4% for poor, normal, and high response treatments, respectively. The predictive power (C-statistic) for OSI to predict live birth was superior to that of oocyte yield. Conclusion(s): The OSI improves the definition of ovarian response patterns because it takes into account the degree of stimulation. The nomogram presents evidence-based cutoff levels for poor, normal, and high response and could be used for unifying study designs involving ovarian response patterns.

  • 10.
    Karlström, Per-Olof
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Reprod Med Obstet & Gynecol, SE-14186 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Holte, Jan
    Carl von Linne Clin, SE-75183 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hadziosmanovic, Nermin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Rodriguez-Wallberg, Kenny A.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Reprod Med Obstet & Gynecol, SE-14186 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Olofsson, Jan I.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Reprod Med Obstet & Gynecol, SE-14186 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Div Obstet & Gynecol, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Does ovarian stimulation regimen affect IVF outcome?: a two-centre, real-world retrospective study using predominantly cleavage-stage, single embryo transfer2018In: Reproductive Biomedicine Online, ISSN 1472-6483, E-ISSN 1472-6491, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 59-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, ovarian stimulation using highly purified human menopausal gonadotrophin (HP-HMG) and recombinant FSH (rFSH) for IVF were compared in two large assisted reproduction technique centres in Sweden. A total of 5902 women underwent 9631 oocyte retrievals leading to 8818 embryo transfers (7720 on day 2): single embryo transfers (74.2%); birth rate per embryo transfer (27.7%); multiple birth rate (5.0%); incidence of severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (0.71%). Compared with ovarian stimulation with rFSH, women who received HP-HMG were older, had higher dosages of gonadotrophins administered, fewer oocytes retrieved and more embryos transferred. After multivariate analysis controlling for age and generalized estimating equation model, no differences were found in delivery outcomes per embryo transfers between HP-HMG and rFSH, independent of gonadotrophin releasing hormone analogue (GnRH) used. Logit curves for live birth rate suggested differences for various subgroups, most prominently for women with high oocyte yield or when high total doses were used. Differences were not significant, perhaps owing to skewed distributions of the FSH compounds versus age and other covariates. These 'real-life patients' had no differences in live birth rate between HP-HMG and rFSH overall or in subgroups of age, embryo score, ovarian sensitivity or use of GnRH analogue regimen.

  • 11.
    Lind, T.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Oncol Pathol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Olofsson, J. I.
    Karolinska Sjukhuset, Reprod Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Holte, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Hadziosmanovic, Nermin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Berglund, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Gudmundsson, Johannes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Wallberg, Rodriguez-K. W. R.
    Karolinska Inst, Oncol Pathol & Reprod Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Reduced clinical pregnancy rates by ART in women with a history of unilateral oophorectomy. Results of a large multi-center cohort study2015In: Human Reproduction, ISSN 0268-1161, E-ISSN 1460-2350, Vol. 30, no Suppl. 1, p. 33-33Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Lind, Tekla
    et al.
    Soder Sjukhuset, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Sjukhusbacken 10, S-11883 Stockholm, Sweden.;Soder Sjukhuset, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Sjukhusbacken 10, S-11883 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Holte, Jan
    Carl von Linne Clin, Uppsala Sci Pk, S-75183 Uppsala, Sweden.;Uppsala Ctr Reprod Biol, Box 7054, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Olofsson, Jan I.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Tomtebodavagen 18A, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Reprod Med, Novumhuset Plan 4, SE-14186 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hadziosmanovic, Nermin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Gudmundsson, Johannes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Nedstrand, Elizabeth
    Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Ctr Reprod Med, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Lood, Mikael
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Fertil Unit, S-70185 Orebro, Sweden..
    Berglund, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Rodriguez-Wallberg, Kenny
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Reprod Med, Novumhuset Plan 4, SE-14186 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, Karolinska Univ Sjukhuset Z1 00, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Reduced live-birth rates after IVF/ICSI in women with previous unilateral oophorectomy: results of a multicentre cohort study2018In: Human Reproduction, ISSN 0268-1161, E-ISSN 1460-2350, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 238-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Is there a reduced live-birth rate (LBR) after IVF/ICSI treatment in women with a previous unilateral oophorectomy (UO)? A significantly reduced LBR after IVF/ICSI was found in women with previous UO when compared with women with intact ovaries in this large multicentre cohort, both crudely and after adjustment for age, BMI, fertility centre and calendar period and regardless of whether the analysis was based on transfer of embryos in the fresh cycle only or on cumulative results including transfers using frozen-thawed embryos. Similar pregnancy rates after IVF/ICSI have been previously reported in case-control studies and small cohort studies of women with previous UO versus women without ovarian surgery. In all previous studies multiple embryos were transferred. No study has previously evaluated LBR in a large cohort of women with a history of UO. This research was a multicentre cohort study, including five reproductive medicine centres in Sweden: Carl von Linn, Clinic (A), Karolinska University Hospital (B), Uppsala University Hospital (C), Linkoping University Hospital (D) and A-rebro University Hospital (E). The women underwent IVF/ICSI between January 1999 and November 2015. Single embryo transfer (SET) was performed in approximately 70% of all treatments, without any significant difference between UO exposed women versus controls (68% versus 71%), respectively (P = 0.32), and a maximum of two embryos were transferred in the remaining cases. The dataset included all consecutive treatments and fresh and frozen-thawed cycles. The exposed cohort included 154 women with UO who underwent 301 IVF/ICSI cycles and the unexposed control cohort consisted of 22 693 women who underwent 41 545 IVF/ICSI cycles. Overall, at the five centres (A-E), the exposed cohort underwent 151, 34, 35, 41 and 40 treatments, respectively, and they were compared with controls of the same centre (18 484, 8371, 5575, 4670 and 4445, respectively). The primary outcome was LBR, which was analysed per started cycle, per ovum pick-up (OPU) and per embryo transfer (ET). Secondary outcomes included the numbers of oocytes retrieved and supernumerary embryos obtained, the Ovarian Sensitivity Index (OSI), embryo quality scores and cumulative pregnancy rates. We used a Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) model for statistical analysis in order to account for repeated treatments. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: The exposed (UO) and control women's groups were comparable with regard to age and performance of IVF or ICSI. Significant differences in LBR, both crude and age-adjusted, were observed between the UO and control groups: LBR per started cycle (18.6% versus 25.4%, P = 0.007 and P = 0.014, respectively), LBR/OPU (20.3% versus 27.1%, P = 0.012 and P = 0.015, respectively) and LBR/ET (23.0% versus 29.7%, P = 0.022 and P = 0.025, respectively). The differences in LBR remained significant after inclusion of both fresh and frozen-thawed transfers (both crude and age-adjusted data): LBR/OPU (26.1% versus 34.4%, P = 0.005 and P = 0.006, respectively) and LBR/ET (28.3% versus 37.1%, P = 0.006 and P = 0.006, respectively). The crude cancellation rate was significantly higher among women with a history of UO than in controls (18.9% versus 14.5%, P = 0.034 and age-adjusted, P = 0.178). In a multivariate GEE model, the cumulative odds ratios for LBR (fresh and frozen-thawed)/OPU (OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.52-0.94, P = 0.016) and LBR (fresh and frozen-thawed)/ET (OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.51-0.92, P = 0.012) were approximately 30% lower in the group of women with UO when adjusted for age, BMI, reproductive centre, calendar period and number of embryos transferred when appropriate. The OSI was significantly lower in women with a history of UO than in controls (3.6 versus 6.0) and the difference was significant for both crude and age-adjusted data (P =< 0.001 for both). Significantly fewer oocytes were retrieved in treatments of women with UO than in controls (7.2 versus 9.9, P = < 0.001, respectively). LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION: Due to the nature of the topic, this is a retrospective analysis, with all its inherent limitations. Furthermore, the cause for UO was not possible to obtain in all cases. A diagnosis of endometriosis was also more common in the UO group, i. e. a selection bias in terms of poorer patient characteristics in the UO group cannot be completely ruled out. However, adjustment for all known confounders did not affect the general results. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: To date, this is the largest cohort investigated and the first study indicating an association of achieving reduced live birth after IVF/ICSI in women with previous UO. These findings are novel and contradict the earlier notion that IVF/ICSI treatment is not affected, or is only marginally affected by previous UO.

  • 13.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Baron, Tomasz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Erlinge, David
    Lund Univ, Dept Cardiol, Lund, Sweden..
    Hadziosmanovic, Nermin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Nordenskjöld, Anna
    Orebro Univ, Fac Hlth, Dept Cardiol, Orebro, Sweden..
    Gard, Anton
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Medical Therapy for Secondary Prevention and Long-Term Outcome in Patients With Myocardial Infarction With Nonobstructive Coronary Artery Disease2017In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 135, no 16, p. 1481-1489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Myocardial infarction with nonobstructive coronary arteries (MINOCA) occurs in 5% to 10% of all patients with myocardial infarction. Clinical trials of secondary prevention treatment in MINOCA patients are lacking. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the associations between treatment with statins, renin-angiotensin system blockers, beta-blockers, dual antiplatelet therapy, and long-term cardiovascular events. METHODS: This is an observational study of MINOCA patients recorded in the SWEDEHEART registry (the Swedish Web-system for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-based care in Heart disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapy) between July 2003 and June 2013 and followed until December 2013 for outcome events in the Swedish Cause of Death Register and National Patient Register. Of 199 162 myocardial infarction admissions, 9466 consecutive unique patients with MINOCA were identified. Among those, the 9136 patients surviving the first 30 days after discharge constituted the study population. Mean age was 65.3 years, and 61% were women. No patient was lost to follow-up. A stratified propensity score analysis was performed to match treated and untreated groups. The association between treatment and outcome was estimated by comparing between treated and untreated groups by using Cox proportional hazards models. The exposures were treatment at discharge with statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers, beta-blockers, and dual antiplatelet therapy. The primary end point was major adverse cardiac events defined as all-cause mortality, hospitalization for myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and heart failure. RESULTS: At discharge, 84.5%, 64.1%, 83.4%, and 66.4% of the patients were on statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers, beta-blockers, and dual antiplatelet therapy, respectively. During the follow-up of a mean of 4.1 years, 2183 (23.9%) patients experienced a major adverse cardiac event. The hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for major adverse cardiac events were 0.77 (0.68-0.87), 0.82 (0.73-0.93), and 0.86 (0.74-1.01) in patients on statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers, and beta-blockers, respectively. For patients on dual antiplatelet therapy followed for 1 year, the hazard ratio was 0.90 (0.74-1.08). CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate long-term beneficial effects of treatment with statins and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers on outcome in patients with MINOCA, a trend toward a positive effect of beta-blocker treatment, and a neutral effect of dual antiplatelet therapy. Properly powered randomized clinical trials to confirm these results are warranted.

  • 14.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Baron, Tomasz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Erlinge, David
    Lund Univ, Dept Cardiol, Lund, Sweden.
    Hadziosmanovic, Nermin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Nordenskjöld, Anna
    Orebro Univ, Fac Hlth, Dept Cardiol, Orebro, Sweden.
    Gard, Anton
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Danderyd Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Response by Lindahl et al to Letter Regarding Article, "Medical Therapy for Secondary Prevention and Long-Term Outcome in Patients With Myocardial Infarction With Nonobstructive Coronary Artery Disease".2017In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 136, no 11, p. 1082-1083Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15. Marsk, Elin
    et al.
    Bylund, Nina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Jonsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Hammarstedt, Lalle
    Engström, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Hadziosmanovic, Nermin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Berg, Thomas
    Hultcrantz, Malou
    Prediction of nonrecovery in Bell's palsy using sunnybrook grading2012In: The Laryngoscope, ISSN 0023-852X, E-ISSN 1531-4995, Vol. 122, no 4, p. 901-906Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives/Hypothesis: To develop a clinical prognostic model to identify Bell's palsy patients with risk for nonrecovery at 12 months.

    Study Design: Data from a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study.

    Methods: There were 829 patients with Bell's palsy randomized in a factorial fashion to treatment with prednisolone or no prednisolone. Facial function was assessed with the Sunnybrook grading scale. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses at different time points were used to identify factors predicting nonrecovery, defined as Sunnybrook < 70 at 12 months. Variables studied were age, gender, time to inclusion, prednisolone treatment, side of palsy, pain at inclusion, and Sunnybrook scores. Factors of predictable significance were used to construct prognostic models at baseline, days 11 to 17, and at 1 month. Receiver operating characteristics curves were created to test the predictive capacity of the models.

    Results: At baseline, treatment with prednisolone or no prednisolone (P = .0005), age (P = .04) and the Sunnybrook score (P = .0002) were significant factors for predicting nonrecovery. The receiver operating characteristics area under the curve at baseline for these three variables was 0.74 (sensitivity 0.83, specificity 0.57). At days 11 to 17 and at 1 month, the Sunnybrook score was the only significant predictive variable. The respective areas under the curves for the Sunnybrook score at these time points were 0.83 (sensitivity 0.81, specificity 0.75) and 0.94 (sensitivity 0.91, specificity 0.85).

    Conclusions: Sunnybrook grading at 1 month most accurately predicts nonrecovery at 12 months in Bell's palsy.

  • 16.
    Nordenskjold, Anna M.
    et al.
    Univ Orebro, Fac Hlth, Dept Cardiol, S-70185 Orebro, Sweden..
    Hammar, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Vasteras Hosp, Dept Radiol, Vasteras, Sweden..
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Duvernoy, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Eggers, Kai M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Frobert, Ole
    Univ Orebro, Fac Hlth, Dept Cardiol, S-70185 Orebro, Sweden..
    Hadziosmanovic, Nermin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Unrecognized myocardial infarctions detected by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging are associated with cardiac troponin I levels2016In: Clinica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0009-8981, E-ISSN 1873-3492, Vol. 455, p. 189-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Both unrecognized myocardial infarction (UMI) and elevated levels of biomarkers are common in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). The objective of this study was to determine the association between levels of cardiac biomarkers, UMI and extent of CAD in patients with stable CAD.

    Methods: A total of 235 patients (median age: 65 years; 34% women) with stable CAD without previously known myocardial infarction were examined with late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging and coronary angiography. Blood samples were drawn at enrolment and high sensitivity cardiac troponin I (cTnI), NT-proBNP and Galectin-3 were analyzed.

    Results: UMI was detected in 58 patients (25%). The median levels of cTnI, NT-proBNP and Galectin-3 were significantly higher in patients with UMI compared to those without, (p < 0.001, p = 0.006 and p = 0.033, respectively). After adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors, left ventricular ejection fraction and renal function, cTnI remained independently associated with the presence of UMI (p = 0.031) and the extent of CAD (p = 0.047). Neither NT-proBNP, nor Galectin-3, was independently associated with UMI or extent of CAD.

    Conclusions: The independent association between levels of cTnI and UMI indicates a common pathophysiological pathway for the cTnI elevation and development of UMI.

  • 17.
    Nordenskjöld, Anna M.
    et al.
    Univ Orebro, Fac Hlth, Dept Cardiol, SE-70182 Orebro, Sweden.;Univ Orebro, Fac Hlth, Dept Cardiol, Sodra Grev Rosengatan, SE-70182 Orebro, Sweden..
    Hammar, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Vastmanland Hosp Vasteras, Dept Radiol, Vasteras, Sweden..
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Duvernoy, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Eggers, Kai M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Frobert, Ole
    Univ Orebro, Fac Hlth, Dept Cardiol, SE-70182 Orebro, Sweden..
    Hadziosmanovic, Nermin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Unrecognized Myocardial Infarction Assessed by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging - Prognostic Implications2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 2, article id e0148803Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Clinically unrecognized myocardial infarctions (UMI) are not uncommon and may be associated with adverse outcome. The aims of this study were to determine the prognostic implication of UMI in patients with stable suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) and to investigate the associations of UMI with the presence of CAD. Methods and Findings In total 235 patients late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance (LGE-CMR) imaging and coronary angiography were performed. For each patient with UMI, the stenosis grade of the coronary branch supplying the infarcted area was determined. UMIs were present in 25% of the patients and 67% of the UMIs were located in an area supplied by a coronary artery with a stenosis grade >= 70%. In an age-and gender-adjusted model, UMI independently predicted the primary endpoint (composite of death, myocardial infarction, resuscitated cardiac arrest, hospitalization for unstable angina pectoris or heart failure within 2 years of follow-up) with an odds ratio of 2.9; 95% confidence interval 1.1-7.9. However, this association was abrogated after adjustment for age and presence of significant coronary disease. There was no difference in the primary endpoint rates between UMI patients with or without a significant stenosis in the corresponding coronary artery. Conclusions The presence of UMI was associated with a threefold increased risk of adverse events during follow up. However, the difference was no longer statistically significant after adjustments for age and severity of CAD. Thus, the results do not support that patients with suspicion of CAD should be routinely investigated by LGE-CMR for UMI. However, coronary angiography should be considered in patients with UMI detected by LGE-CMR.

  • 18.
    Rhenman, Axel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Berglund, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Brodin, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Olovsson, Matts
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Milton, K.
    Hadziosmanovic, Nermin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Holte, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Which set of embryo variables is most predictive for live birth?: A prospective study in 6252 single embryo transfers to construct an embryo score for the ranking and selection of embryos2015In: Human Reproduction, ISSN 0268-1161, E-ISSN 1460-2350, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 28-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY QUESTION: Which embryo score variables are most powerful for predicting live birth after single embryo transfer (SET) at the early cleavage stage? SUMMARY ANSWER: This large prospective study of visual embryo scoring variables shows that blastomere number (BL), the proportion of mononucleated blastomeres (NU) and the degree of fragmentation (FR) have independent prognostic power to predict live birth. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: Other studies suggest prognostic power, at least univariately and for implantation potential, for all five variables. A previous study from the same centre on double embryo transfers with implantation as the end-point resulted in the integrated morphology cleavage (IMC) score, which incorporates BL, NU and EQ. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE AND DURATION: A prospective cohort study of IVF/ICSI SET on Day 2 (n = 6252) during a 6-year period (2006-2012). The five variables (BL NU, FR, EQ and symmetry of cleavage (SY)) were scored in 3- to 5-step scales and subsequently related to clinical pregnancy and LBR. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS: A total of 4304 women undergoing IVF/ICSI in a university-affiliated private fertility clinic were included. Generalized estimating equation models evaluated live birth (yes/no) as primary outcome using the embryo variables as predictors. Odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals and P-values were presented for each predictor. The C statistic (i.e. area under receiver operating characteristic curve) was calculated for each model. Model calibration was assessed with the Hosmer-Lemeshow test. A shrinkage method was applied to remove bias in c statistics due to over-fitting. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: LBR was 27.1% (1693/6252). BL, NU, FR and EQ were univariately highly significantly associated with LBR. In a multivariate model, BL, NU and FR were independently significant, with c statistic 0.579 (age-adjusted c statistic 0.637). EQ did not retain significance in the multivariate model. Prediction model calibration was good for both pregnancy and live birth. We present a ranking tree with combinations of values of the BL, NU and FR embryo variables for optimal selection of the embryo/s to transfer, providing a revised IMC score. The five embryo variables had similar effects over all age groups. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION: Limitations of the present study are those inherent for real-time visual scoring, including risks of inter-observer variation and the hazards of fixed time-point scoring procedures in a dynamic process. The study is restricted to Day-2 transfers. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: To our knowledge this is the largest prospective, SET study performed with the explicit aim of constructing an evidence-based embryo score for the ranking and selection of early cleavage stage embryos. In line with previous research, our data suggest that the symmetry of cleavage variable may be omitted when scoring embryos in the early cleavage stage. We suggest that, following validation in other populations, the revised IMC score may be used when international standards for embryo scoring are discussed.

  • 19.
    Stewart, Ralph A H
    et al.
    Auckland City Hosp, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Hagström, Emil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Held, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Wang, Tom Kai Ming
    Auckland City Hosp, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Armstrong, Paul W
    Univ Alberta, Canadian VIGOUR Ctr, Edmonton, AB, Canada.
    Aylward, Philip E
    Flinders Univ & Med Ctr, South Australian Hlth & Med Res Inst, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
    Cannon, Christopher P
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, Div Cardiovasc, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Koenig, Wolfgang
    Tech Univ Munich, Deutsch Herzzentrum Munchen, Munich, Germany.;DZHK German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Partner Site Munich Heart Alliance, Munich, Germany.;Univ Ulm, Med Ctr, Dept Internal Med Cardiol 2, Ulm, Germany..
    López-Sendón, José Luis
    Hosp Univ La Paz IdiPaz, Madrid, Spain..
    Mohler, Emile R
    Univ Penn, Perelman Sch Med, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Hadziosmanovic, Nermin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Krug-Gourley, Susan
    GlaxoSmithKline, Metab Pathways & Cardiovasc Therapeut Area, King Of Prussia, PA USA..
    Ramos Corrales, Marco Antonio
    San Jose Satelite Hosp, Naucalpan De Juarez, Mexico..
    Siddique, Saulat
    Punjab Med Ctr, Jail Rd, Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan..
    Steg, Philippe Gabriel
    Hop Bichat Claude Bernard, AP HP, Dept Hosp Univ FIRE, Paris, France.;Diderot Univ, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris, France.;Royal Brompton Hosp, ICMS, NHLI Imperial Coll, London, England.;FACT, INSERM, U1148, Paris, France..
    White, Harvey D
    Auckland City Hosp, Auckland, New Zealand..
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Self-Reported Health and Outcomes in Patients With Stable Coronary Heart Disease2017In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 6, no 8, article id e006096Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background-—The major determinants and prognostic importance of self-reported health in patients with stable coronary heartdisease are uncertain.

    Methods and Results-—The STABILITY (Stabilization of Atherosclerotic Plaque by Initiation of Darapladib Therapy) trialrandomized 15 828 patients with stable coronary heart disease to treatment with darapladib or placebo. At baseline, 98% ofparticipants completed a questionnaire that included the question, “Overall, how do you feel your general health is now?”Possible responses were excellent, very good, good, average, and poor. Adjudicated major adverse cardiac events, whichincluded cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, and stroke, were evaluated by Cox regression during 3.7 years of follow-upfor participants who reported excellent or very good health (n=2304), good health (n=6863), and average or poor health(n=6361), before and after adjusting for 38 covariates. Self-reported health was most strongly associated with geographicregion, depressive symptoms, and low physical activity (P<0.0001 for all). Poor/average compared with very good/excellentself-reported health was independently associated with major adverse cardiac events (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.30 [95% confidenceinterval (CI), 1.92–2.76]; adjusted HR: 1.83 [95% CI, 1.51–2.22]), cardiovascular mortality (HR: 4.36 [95% CI, 3.09–6.16];adjusted HR: 2.15 [95% CI, 1.45–3.19]), and myocardial infarction (HR: 1.87 [95% CI, 1.46–2.39]; adjusted HR: 1.68 [95% CI,1.25–2.27]; P<0.0002 for all).

    Conclusions-—Self-reported health is strongly associated with geographical region, mood, and physical activity. In a globalcoronary heart disease population, self-reported health was independently associated with major cardiovascular events andmortality beyond what is measurable by established risk indicators.

  • 20.
    Stewart, Ralph A. H.
    et al.
    Auckland City Hosp, Green Lane Cardiovasc Serv, Pk Rd, Auckland 1142, New Zealand..
    Held, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Hadziosmanovic, Nermin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Armstrong, Paul W.
    Univ Alberta, Canadian Vigour Ctr, Edmonton, AB, Canada..
    Cannon, Christopher P.
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, Cardiovasc Div, Boston, MA USA..
    Granger, Christopher B.
    Duke Med, Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA..
    Hagström, Emil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Hochman, Judith S.
    NYU, Dept Med, Langone Med Ctr, New York, NY 10016 USA..
    Koenig, Wolfgang
    Univ Ulm, Dept Internal Med Cardiol 2, Med Ctr, Ulm, Germany.;Tech Univ Munich, Deutsch Herzzentrum Munchen, Munich, Germany.;Partner Site Munich Heart Alliance, German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Munich, Germany..
    Lonn, Eva
    McMaster Univ, Dept Med, Hamilton, ON, Canada.;McMaster Univ, Populat Hlth Res Inst, Hamilton, ON, Canada..
    Nicolau, Jose C.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Heart Inst InCor, Med Sch, Sao Paulo, Brazil..
    Steg, Philippe Gabriel
    Hop Bichat Claude Bernard, AP HP, Dept Hosp Univ FIRE Fibrosis Inflammat REmodeling, Paris, France.;Paris Diderot Univ, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris, France.;Royal Brompton Hosp, Inst Cardiovasc Med & Sci, Imperial Coll, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, London, England.;INSERM, U1148, French Clin Res Infrastruct Network, French Alliance Cardiovasc Trials, Paris, France..
    Vedin, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    White, Harvey D.
    Auckland City Hosp, Green Lane Cardiovasc Serv, Pk Rd, Auckland 1142, New Zealand..
    Physical Activity and Mortality in Patients With Stable Coronary Heart Disease2017In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, ISSN 0735-1097, E-ISSN 1558-3597, Vol. 70, no 14, p. 1689-1700Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND Recommendations for physical activity in patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD) are based on modest evidence.

    OBJECTIVES The authors analyzed the association between self-reported exercise and mortality in patients with stable CHD.

    METHODS A total of 15,486 patients from 39 countries with stable CHD who participated in the STABILITY (Stabilization of Atherosclerotic Plaque by Initiation of Darapladib Therapy) study completed questions at baseline on hours spent each week taking mild, moderate, and vigorous exercise. Associations between the volume of habitual exercise in metabolic equivalents of task hours/week and adverse outcomes during a median follow-up of 3.7 years were evaluated.

    RESULTS A graded decrease in mortality occurred with increased habitual exercise that was steeper at lower compared with higher exercise levels. Doubling exercise volume was associated with lower all-cause mortality (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 0.82; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.79 to 0.85; adjusting for covariates, HR: 0.90; 95% CI: 0.87 to 0.93). These associations were similar for cardiovascular mortality (unadjusted HR: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.80 to 0.87; adjusted HR: 0.92; 95% CI: 0.88 to 0.96), but myocardial infarction and stroke were not associated with exercise volume after adjusting for covariates. The association between decrease in mortality and greater physical activity was stronger in the subgroup of patients at higher risk estimated by the ABC-CHD (Age, Biomarkers, Clinical-Coronary Heart Disease) risk score (p for interaction = 0.0007).

    CONCLUSIONS In patients with stable CHD, more physical activity was associated with lower mortality. The largest benefits occurred between sedentary patient groups and between those with the highest mortality risk.

  • 21. Stewart, Ralph Alan Huston
    et al.
    Hagström, Emil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Held, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    Armstrong, Paul
    Aylward, Philip
    Cannon, Christopher
    Koenig, Wolfgang
    Lopez-Sendon, Jose
    Mohler, Emile
    Hadziosmanovic, Nermin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Krug-Gourley, Susan
    Siddique, Saulat
    Steg, Philippe
    White, Harvey
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Self-Reported General Health And Outcomes In Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease: Experiences From The Global Stability Trial2016In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, ISSN 0735-1097, E-ISSN 1558-3597, Vol. 67, no 13, p. 2113-2113Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Vaegter, Katarina Kebbon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive biology. Carl von Linne Clin, Uppsala Sci Pk, Uppsala, Sweden; PCG Clin Serv, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Berglund, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics. Uppsala Univ, Uppsala Clin Res Ctr, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden;Uppsala Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci Geriatr, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Tilly, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Mathematics. PCG Clin Serv, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hadziosmanovic, Nermin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Brodin, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive biology. Carl von Linne Clin, Uppsala Sci Pk, Uppsala, Sweden; PCG Clin Serv, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Holte, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive biology. Carl von Linne Clin, Uppsala Sci Pk, Uppsala, Sweden; Univ Agr Sci Uppsala, Ctr Reprod Biol Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden; PCG Clin Serv, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Construction and validation of a prediction model to minimize twin rates at preserved high live birth rates after IVF2019In: Reproductive Biomedicine Online, ISSN 1472-6483, E-ISSN 1472-6491, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 22-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research question: Elective single-embryo transfer (eSET) at blastocyst stage is widely used to reduce the frequency of multiple pregnancies after IVF. There are, however, concerns about increased risks for the offspring with prolonged embryo culture. Is it possible to select embryos for transfer at the early cleavage stage and still achieve low twin rates at preserved high live birth rates? Design: A prediction model (PM) was developed to optimize eSET based on variables known 2 days after oocyte retrieval (fresh day 2 embryo transfers; double-embryo transfers 1999-2002 (n=2846) and SET 1999-2003 (n=945); n total=3791). Seventy-five variables were analysed for association with pregnancy chance and twin risk and combined for PM construction. This PM was validated in 2004-2016 including frozen-thawed transfers (FET), to compare cumulative live birth rate (CLBR) and twin rate before (1999-2002 fresh embryo transfers plus FET from the same oocyte retrievals until the end of 2007, n=3495) and after (2004-2011 fresh embryo transfers plus FET from the same oocyte retrievals until the end of 2016, n=11195) implementing the model. Results: The PM was constructed from four independent variables: female age, embryo score, ovarian sensitivity and treatment history. The calibration, i.e. the fit of observed versus predicted results, was excellent both at construction and at validation. Without compromising CLBR, twin rate was reduced from 25.2% to 3.8%, accompanied by profound improvements in perinatal outcome. Conclusion: The results provide the first successful construction, validation and impact analysis of a day 2 transfer PM to reduce multiple pregnancies.

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