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  • 1.
    Arifeen, Shams El
    et al.
    Int Ctr Diarrhoeal Dis Res Icddr B, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Ekström, Eva-Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Frongillo, Edward A
    Univ South Carolina, Arnold Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Hlth Promot Educ & Behav, Columbia, SC USA.
    Hamadani, Jena
    Int Ctr Diarrhoeal Dis Res Icddr B, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Khan, Ashraful Islam
    Int Ctr Diarrhoeal Dis Res Icddr B, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Naved, Ruchira T
    Int Ctr Diarrhoeal Dis Res Icddr B, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Rahman, Anisur
    Int Ctr Diarrhoeal Dis Res Icddr B, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Raqib, Rubhana
    Int Ctr Diarrhoeal Dis Res Icddr B, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Rasmussen, Kathleen M
    Cornell Univ, Div Nutr Sci, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA.
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Wagatsuma, Yukiko
    Univ Tsukuba, Dept Med, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.
    Persson, Lars-Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition. London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Dept Dis Control, London, England.
    Cohort Profile: The Maternal and Infant Nutrition Interventions in Matlab (MINIMat) Cohort in Bangladesh2018In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 1737-1738eArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Bergström, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Skeen, Sarah
    Duc, Duong M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Blandon, Elmer Zelaya
    Estabrooks, Carole
    Gustavsson, Petter
    Hoa, Dinh Thi Phuong
    Kallestal, Carina
    Målqvist, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Nga, Nguyen Thu
    Persson, Lars-Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Pervin, Jesmin
    Peterson, Stefan Swartling
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Rahman, Anisur
    Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Squires, Janet E.
    Tomlinson, Mark
    Waiswa, Peter
    Wallin, Lars
    Health system context and implementation of evidence-based practices-development and validation of the Context Assessment for Community Health (COACH) tool for low- and middle-income settings2015In: Implementation Science, ISSN 1748-5908, E-ISSN 1748-5908, Vol. 10, article id 120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The gap between what is known and what is practiced results in health service users not benefitting from advances in healthcare, and in unnecessary costs. A supportive context is considered a key element for successful implementation of evidence-based practices (EBP). There were no tools available for the systematic mapping of aspects of organizational context influencing the implementation of EBPs in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Thus, this project aimed to develop and psychometrically validate a tool for this purpose. Methods: The development of the Context Assessment for Community Health (COACH) tool was premised on the context dimension in the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services framework, and is a derivative product of the Alberta Context Tool. Its development was undertaken in Bangladesh, Vietnam, Uganda, South Africa and Nicaragua in six phases: (1) defining dimensions and draft tool development, (2) content validity amongst in-country expert panels, (3) content validity amongst international experts, (4) response process validity, (5) translation and (6) evaluation of psychometric properties amongst 690 health workers in the five countries. Results: The tool was validated for use amongst physicians, nurse/midwives and community health workers. The six phases of development resulted in a good fit between the theoretical dimensions of the COACH tool and its psychometric properties. The tool has 49 items measuring eight aspects of context: Resources, Community engagement, Commitment to work, Informal payment, Leadership, Work culture, Monitoring services for action and Sources of knowledge. Conclusions: Aspects of organizational context that were identified as influencing the implementation of EBPs in high-income settings were also found to be relevant in LMICs. However, there were additional aspects of context of relevance in LMICs specifically Resources, Community engagement, Commitment to work and Informal payment. Use of the COACH tool will allow for systematic description of the local healthcare context prior implementing healthcare interventions to allow for tailoring implementation strategies or as part of the evaluation of implementing healthcare interventions and thus allow for deeper insights into the process of implementing EBPs in LMICs.

  • 3.
    Duc, Duong M.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Hanoi Sch Publ Hlth, Fac Social Sci Behav & Hlth Educ, 138 Giang Vo St, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Bergström, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). UCL, Inst Global Hlth, London, England..
    Eriksson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Ha, Bui Thi Thu
    Faculty of Social Science - Behaviours and Health Education, Hanoi School of Public Health, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Wallin, Lars
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Response process and test-retest reliability of the Context Assessment for Community Health tool in Vietnam2016In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 9, article id 31572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The recently developed Context Assessment for Community Health (COACH) tool aims to measure aspects of the local healthcare context perceived to influence knowledge translation in low-and middle-income countries. The tool measures eight dimensions (organizational resources, community engagement, monitoring services for action, sources of knowledge, commitment to work, work culture, leadership, and informal payment) through 49 items. Objective: The study aimed to explore the understanding and stability of the COACH tool among health providers in Vietnam. Designs: To investigate the response process, think-aloud interviews were undertaken with five community health workers, six nurses and midwives, and five physicians. Identified problems were classified according to Conrad and Blair's taxonomy and grouped according to an estimation of the magnitude of the problem's effect on the response data. Further, the stability of the tool was examined using a test-retest survey among 77 respondents. The reliability was analyzed for items (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and percent agreement) and dimensions (ICC and Bland-Altman plots). Results: In general, the think-aloud interviews revealed that the COACH tool was perceived as clear, well organized, and easy to answer. Most items were understood as intended. However, seven prominent problems in the items were identified and the content of three dimensions was perceived to be of a sensitive nature. In the test-retest survey, two-thirds of the items and seven of eight dimensions were found to have an ICC agreement ranging from moderate to substantial (0.5-0.7), demonstrating that the instrument has an acceptable level of stability. Conclusions: This study provides evidence that the Vietnamese translation of the COACH tool is generally perceived to be clear and easy to understand and has acceptable stability. There is, however, a need to rephrase and add generic examples to clarify some items and to further review items with low ICC.

  • 4.
    Duc, Duong M.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition. Hanoi University of Public Health, Vietnam.
    Eriksson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Wallin, Lars
    School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Cummings, Greta
    Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Canada.
    Nga, Nguyen Thu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Bui, Ha
    Hanoi University of Public Health, Vietnam.
    Bergström, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Measuring local healthcare context for knowledge translation in primary and secondary levels of care in northern Vietnam: A cross-sectional studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The influence of context in shaping the effectiveness of knowledge translation (KT) is widely recognized. The Context Assessment for Community Health (COACH) tool aims to assess contextual aspects that are of importance for KT in healthcare in low- and middle-income settings. This study used the COACH tool to describe healthcare context as perceived by health workers in primary and secondary levels of care in a northern province in Vietnam and to further evaluate the internal structure of the COACH tool.

    Methods

    This cross-sectional study administered the COACH tool to 677 eligible health workers in primary and secondary levels of care. The relationships between individual background variables and COACH dimensions were analysed using binary logistic regression. Further, internal construct validity was calculated by a first-order independent cluster model confirmatory factor analysis (CFA).

    Results

    Overall, the healthcare context was perceived as supportive for KT. Gender, age, and geographic location showed significant relationships to one of the COACH dimensions. Male health workers rated their Commitment to work as lower than female health workers (OR=0.39, 95% CI: 0.20–0.78). There were, however, only minor differences in  scores for the dimensions of context, at each health facility as well as between health facilities. The CFA asserted an acceptable internal structure of the COACH tool.

    Conclusions

    The survey enhanced the understanding of how aspects of the healthcare context for KT are perceived by health workers at primary and secondary levels of care in a province in Vietnam. There was an overall positive perception of the work context with only minor variability, reflecting a ‘receptive to change’ context for KT. This should, however, be interpreted with caution due to the risk of social desirability response bias. The findings on the acceptable internal structure of the COACH tool supports its further use as a valid instrument. 

  • 5.
    Ekström, Eva-Charlotte
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Lindström, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Raqib, Rubhana
    El Arifeen, Shams
    Basu, Samar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Oxidative Stress and Inflammation.
    Brismar, Kerstin
    Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Persson, Lars-Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Effects of prenatal micronutrient and early food supplementation on metabolic status of the offspring at 4.5 years of age. The MINIMat randomized trial in rural Bangladesh.2016In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 1656-1667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Fetal nutritional insults may alter the later metabolic phenotype. We hypothesized that early timing of prenatal food supplementation and multiple micronutrient supplementation (MMS) would favourably influence childhood metabolic phenotype.

    METHODS: Pregnant women recruited 1 January to 31 December 2002 in Matlab, Bangladesh, were randomized into supplementation with capsules of either 30 mg of iron and 400 μg of folic acid, 60 mg of iron and 400 μg of folic acid, or MMS containing a daily allowance of 15 micronutrients, and randomized to food supplementation (608 kcal) either with early invitation (9 weeks' gestation) or usual invitation (at 20 weeks). Their children (n = 1667) were followed up at 4.5 years with assessment of biomarkers of lipid and glucose metabolism, inflammation and oxidative stress.

    RESULTS: Children in the group with early timing of food supplementation had lower cholesterol (difference -0.079 mmol/l, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.156; -0.003), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) (difference -0.068 mmol/l, 95% CI -0.126; -0.011) and ApoB levels (difference -0.017 g/l, 95% CL -0.033; -0.001). MMS supplementation resulted in lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL) (difference -0.028 mmol/l, 95% CL -0.053; -0.002), lower glucose (difference -0.099 mmol/l, 95% CL -0.179; -0.019) and lower insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) (difference on log scale -0.141 µg/l, 95% CL -0.254; -0.028) than 60 mg iron and 400 μg folic acid. There were no effects on markers of inflammation or oxidative stress.

    CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest that in a population where malnutrition is prevalent, nutrition interventions during pregnancy may modify the metabolic phenotype in the young child that could have consequences for later chronic disease risks.

  • 6.
    Eriksson, Leif
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Huy, Tran Q
    Nursing office, Department of Medical Services Administration, Ministry of Health Vietnam.
    Duc, Duong M
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Hanoi School of Public Health, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Hoa, Dinh P
    Hanoi School of Public Health, Vietnam.
    Thuy, Nguyen T
    Vietnam Sweden Uong Bi General Hospital, Quang Ninh, Vietnam.
    Nga, Nguyen Thu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Vietnam Sweden Uong Bi General Hospital, Quang Ninh, Vietnam.
    Persson, Lars-Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Wallin, Lars
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet. School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden..
    Process evaluation of a knowledge translation intervention using facilitation of local stakeholder groups to impove neonatal survival in Quang Ninh province, Vietnam2016In: Trials, ISSN 1745-6215, E-ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Annually, 2.8 million neonatal deaths occur worldwide, despite the fact that three-quarters of them could be prevented if available evidence-based interventions were used. Facilitation of community groups has been recognized as a promising method to translate knowledge into practice. In northern Vietnam, the Neonatal Health – Knowledge Into Practice trial evaluated facilitation of community groups (2008–2011) and succeeded in reducing the neonatal mortality rate (adjusted odds ratio, 0.51; 95 % confidence interval 0.30–0.89). The aim of this paper is to report on the process (implementation and mechanism of impact) of this intervention.

    Methods

    Process data were excerpted from diary information from meetings with facilitators and intervention groups, and from supervisor records of monthly meetings with facilitators. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. An evaluation including attributes and skills of facilitators (e.g., group management, communication, and commitment) was performed at the end of the intervention using a six-item instrument. Odds ratios were analyzed, adjusted for cluster randomization using general linear mixed models.

    Results

    To ensure eight active facilitators over 3 years, 11 Women’s Union representatives were recruited and trained. Of the 44 intervention groups, composed of health staff and commune stakeholders, 43 completed their activities until the end of the study. In total, 95 % (n = 1508) of the intended monthly meetings with an intervention group and a facilitator were conducted. The overall attendance of intervention group members was 86 %. The groups identified 32 unique problems and implemented 39 unique actions. The identified problems targeted health issues concerning both women and neonates. Actions implemented were mainly communication activities. Communes supported by a group with a facilitator who was rated high on attributes and skills (n = 27) had lower odds of neonatal mortality (odds ratio, 0.37; 95 % confidence interval, 0.19–0.73) than control communes (n = 46).

    Conclusions

    This evaluation identified several factors that might have influenced the outcomes of the trial: continuity of intervention groups’ work, adequate attributes and skills of facilitators, and targeting problems along a continuum of care. Such factors are important to consider in scaling-up efforts.

  • 7.
    Eriksson, Leif
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Nga, Nguyen T
    Research Institute for Child Health, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Hoa, Dinh T Phuong
    Hanoi University of Public Health, Vietnam.
    Duc, Duong M
    Hanoi University of Public Health, Vietnam.
    Bergström, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition. Institute for Global Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Wallin, Lars
    School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Målqvist, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Huy, Tran Q
    Department of Medical Services Administration, Ministry of Health, Nursing office, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Thuy, Nguyen T
    Vietnam-Sweden Uong Bi General Hospital, Uong Bi, Vietnam.
    Do, Tran Thanh
    National Institute of Nutrition (NIN), Ministry of Health, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Lien, Pham T L
    Research Institute for Child Health, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Persson, Lars-Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition. London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Secular trend, seasonality and effects of a community-based intervention on neonatal mortality: follow-up of a cluster-randomised trial in Quang Ninh province, Vietnam2018In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 72, no 9, p. 776-782Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Little is know about whether the effects of community engagement interventions for child survival in low-income and middle-income settings are sustained. Seasonal variation and secular trend may blur the data. Neonatal mortality was reduced in a cluster-randomised trial in Vietnam where laywomen facilitated groups composed of local stakeholders employing a problem-solving approach for 3 years. In this analysis, we aim at disentangling the secular trend, the seasonal variation and the effect of the intervention on neonatal mortality during and after the trial.

    Methods: In Quang Ninh province, 44 communes were allocated to intervention and 46 to control. Births and neonatal deaths were assessed in a baseline survey in 2005, monitored during the trial in 2008–2011 and followed up by a survey in 2014. Time series analyses were performed on monthly neonatal mortality data.

    Results: There were 30 187 live births and 480 neonatal deaths. The intervention reduced the neonatal mortality from 19.1 to 11.6 per 1000 live births. The reduction was sustained 3 years after the trial. The control areas reached a similar level at the time of follow-up. Time series decomposition analysis revealed a downward trend in the intervention areas during the trial that was not found in the control areas. Neonatal mortality peaked in the hot and wet summers.

    Conclusions: A community engagement intervention resulted in a lower neonatal mortality rate that was sustained but not further reduced after the end of the trial. When decomposing time series of neonatal mortality, a clear downward trend was demonstrated in intervention but not in control areas.

    Trial registration number: ISRCTN44599712, Post-results.

  • 8.
    Gunnarsdottir, Johanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health).
    Cnattingius, Sven
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lundgren, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Uppsala Univ, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Högberg, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics. Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Prenatal exposure to preeclampsia is associated with accelerated height gain in early childhood2018In: PLoS Medicine, ISSN 1549-1277, E-ISSN 1549-1676, Vol. 13, no 2, article id e0192514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Preeclampsia is associated with low birth weight, both because of increased risks of preterm and of small-for-gestational-age (SGA) births. Low birth weight is associated with accelerated childhood height gain and cardiovascular diseases later in life. The aim was to investigate if prenatal exposure to preeclampsia is associated with accelerated childhood height gain, also after adjustments for SGA-status and gestational age at birth. Methods In a cohort of children prenatally exposed to preeclampsia (n = 865) or unexposed (n = 22,898) we estimated height gain between birth and five years of age. The mean difference in height gain between exposed and unexposed children was calculated and adjustments were done with linear regression models. Results Children exposed to preeclampsia were on average born shorter than unexposed. Exposed children grew on average two cm more than unexposed from birth to five years of age. After adjustments for maternal characteristics including socioeconomic factors, height, body mass index (BMI) and diabetes, as well as for parents smoking habits, infant's breastfeeding and childhood obesity, the difference was 1.6 cm (95% CI 1.3-1.9 cm). Further adjustment for SGA birth only slightly attenuated this estimate, but adjustment for gestational age at birth decreased the estimate to 0.5 cm (95% CI 0.1-0.7 cm). Conclusion Prenatal exposure to preeclampsia is associated with accelerated height gain in early childhood. The association seemed independent on SGA-status, but partly related to shorter gestational age at birth.

  • 9.
    Henriksson, Dorcus Kiwanuka
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fredriksson, Mio
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research.
    Waiswa, Peter
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Makerere University College of Health Sciences, Uganda.
    Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Swartling Peterson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Makerere University College of Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Kampala, Uganda.
    Bottleneck analysis at district level to illustrate gaps within the district health system in Uganda2017In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 1327256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Poor quality of care and access to effective and affordable interventions have been attributed to constraints and bottlenecks within and outside the health system. However, there is limited understanding of health system barriers to utilization and delivery of appropriate, high-impact, and cost-effective interventions at the point of service delivery in districts and sub-districts in low-income countries. In this study we illustrate the use of the bottleneck analysis approach, which could be used to identify bottlenecks in service delivery within the district health system.

    METHODS: A modified Tanahashi model with six determinants for effective coverage was used to determine bottlenecks in service provision for maternal and newborn care. The following interventions provided during antenatal care were used as tracer interventions: use of iron and folic acid, intermittent presumptive treatment for malaria, HIV counseling and testing, and syphilis testing. Data from cross-sectional household and health facility surveys in Mayuge and Namayingo districts in Uganda were used in this study.

    RESULTS: Effective coverage and human resource gaps were identified as the biggest bottlenecks in both districts, with coverage ranging from 0% to 66% for effective coverage and from 46% to 58% for availability of health facility staff. Our findings revealed a similar pattern in bottlenecks in both districts for particular interventions although the districts are functionally independent.

    CONCLUSION: The modified Tanahashi model is an analysis tool that can be used to identify bottlenecks to effective coverage within the district health system, for instance, the effective coverage for maternal and newborn care interventions. However, the analysis is highly dependent on the availability of data to populate all six determinants and could benefit from further validation analysis for the causes of bottlenecks identified.

  • 10.
    Hesselman, Susanne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Högberg, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Råssjö, E-B
    Center for Clinical Research, Dalarna, Falun, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    The risk of uterine rupture is not increased with single- compared with double-layer closure: a Swedish cohort study2015In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 122, no 11, p. 1535-1541Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To compare single- with double-layer closure of the uterus for the risk of uterine rupture in women attempting vaginal birth after one prior caesarean delivery.

    DESIGN:

    Cohort study.

    SETTING:

    Sweden.

    POPULATION:

    From a total of 19 604 nulliparous women delivered by caesarean section in the years 2001-2007, 7683 women attempting vaginal birth in their second delivery were analysed.

    METHODS:

    Data from population-based registers were linked to hospital-based registers that held data from maternity and delivery records. Logistic regression was used to estimate the risk of uterine rupture after single- or double-layer closure of the uterus. Results are presented as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs).

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

    Uterine rupture.

    RESULTS:

    Uterine rupture during labour occurred in 103 (1.3%) women. There was no increased risk of uterine rupture when single- was compared with double-layer closure of the uterus (OR 1.17; 95% CI 0.78-1.76). Maternal factors associated with uterine rupture were: age ≥35 years and height ≤160 cm. Factors from the first delivery associated with uterine rupture in a subsequent delivery were: infection and giving birth to an infant large for gestational age. Risk factors from the second delivery were induction of labour, use of epidural analgesia, and a birthweight of ≥4500 g.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    There was no significant difference in the rate of uterine rupture when single-layer closure was compared with double -layer closure of the uterus.

  • 11.
    Johansson, Emily White
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Gething, Peter W
    Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Hildenwall, Helena
    Global Health, Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mappin, Bonnie
    Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Petzold, Max
    Center for Applied Biostatistics, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Peterson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Diagnostic Testing of Pediatric Fevers: Meta-Analysis of 13 National Surveys Assessing Influences of Malaria Endemicity and Source of Care on Test Uptake for Febrile Children under Five Years2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 4, p. e95483-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    In 2010, the World Health Organization revised guidelines to recommend diagnosis of all suspected malaria cases prior to treatment. There has been no systematic assessment of malaria test uptake for pediatric fevers at the population level as countries start implementing guidelines. We examined test use for pediatric fevers in relation to malaria endemicity and treatment-seeking behavior in multiple sub-Saharan African countries in initial years of implementation.

    METHODS AND FINDINGS:

    We compiled data from national population-based surveys reporting fever prevalence, care-seeking and diagnostic use for children under five years in 13 sub-Saharan African countries in 2009–2011/12 (n = 105,791). Mixed-effects logistic regression models quantified the influence of source of care and malaria endemicity on test use after adjusting for socioeconomic covariates. Results were stratified by malaria endemicity categories: low (PfPR2–10<5%), moderate (PfPR2–10 5–40%), high (PfPR2–10>40%). Among febrile under-fives surveyed, 16.9% (95% CI: 11.8%–21.9%) were tested. Compared to hospitals, febrile children attending non-hospital sources (OR: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.56–0.69) and community health workers (OR: 0.31, 95% CI: 0.23–0.43) were less often tested. Febrile children in high-risk areas had reduced odds of testing compared to low-risk settings (OR: 0.51, 95% CI: 0.42–0.62). Febrile children in least poor households were more often tested than in poorest (OR: 1.63, 95% CI: 1.39–1.91), as were children with better-educated mothers compared to least educated (OR: 1.33, 95% CI: 1.16–1.54).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Diagnostic testing of pediatric fevers was low and inequitable at the outset of new guidelines. Greater testing is needed at lower or less formal sources where pediatric fevers are commonly managed, particularly to reach the poorest. Lower test uptake in high-risk settings merits further investigation given potential implications for diagnostic scale-up in these areas. Findings could inform continued implementation of new guidelines to improve access to and equity in point-of-care diagnostics use for pediatric fevers.

  • 12.
    Johansson, Emily White
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Gething, Peter W
    Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, UK.
    Hildenwall, Helena
    Global Health - Health Systems and Policy, Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mappin, Bonnie
    Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, UK.
    Petzold, Max
    University of Gothenburg, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Health Metrics, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Peterson, Stefan Swartling
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Effect of diagnostic testing on medicines used by febrile children less than five years in 12 malaria-endemic African countries: a mixed-methods study2015In: Malaria Journal, ISSN 1475-2875, E-ISSN 1475-2875, Vol. 14, article id 194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In 2010, WHO revised guidelines to recommend testing all suspected malaria cases prior to treatment. Yet, evidence to assess programmes is largely derived from limited facility settings in a limited number of countries. National surveys from 12 sub-Saharan African countries were used to examine the effect of diagnostic testing on medicines used by febrile children under five years at the population level, including stratification by malaria risk, transmission season, source of care, symptoms, and age.

    METHODS: Data were compiled from 12 Demographic and Health Surveys in 2010-2012 that reported fever prevalence, diagnostic test and medicine use, and socio-economic covariates (n = 16,323 febrile under-fives taken to care). Mixed-effects logistic regression models quantified the influence of diagnostic testing on three outcomes (artemisinin combination therapy (ACT), any anti-malarial or any antibiotic use) after adjusting for data clustering and confounding covariates. For each outcome, interactions between diagnostic testing and the following covariates were separately tested: malaria risk, season, source of care, symptoms, and age. A multiple case study design was used to understand varying results across selected countries and sub-national groups, which drew on programme documents, published research and expert consultations. A descriptive typology of plausible explanations for quantitative results was derived from a cross-case synthesis.

    RESULTS: Significant variability was found in the effect of diagnostic testing on ACT use across countries (e.g., Uganda OR: 0.84, 95% CI: 0.66-1.06; Mozambique OR: 3.54, 95% CI: 2.33-5.39). Four main themes emerged to explain results: available diagnostics and medicines; quality of care; care-seeking behaviour; and, malaria epidemiology.

    CONCLUSIONS: Significant country variation was found in the effect of diagnostic testing on paediatric fever treatment at the population level, and qualitative results suggest the impact of diagnostic scale-up on treatment practices may not be straightforward in routine conditions given contextual factors (e.g., access to care, treatment-seeking behaviour or supply stock-outs). Despite limitations, quantitative results could help identify countries (e.g., Mozambique) or issues (e.g., malaria risk) where facility-based research or programme attention may be warranted. The mixed-methods approach triangulates different evidence to potentially provide a standard framework to assess routine programmes across countries or over time to fill critical evidence gaps.

  • 13.
    Johansson, Emily White
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Humphreys, Nsona
    Malawi Ministry of Health.
    Bonnie, Mappin
    University of Oxford, Department of Zoology, Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group.
    Peter, Gething
    University of Oxford, Department of Zoology, Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group.
    Petzold, Max
    University of Gothenburg, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Center for Applied Biostatistics.
    Peterson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Hildenwall, Helena
    Karolinska Institutet, Global Health - Health Systems and Policy Research Group.
    Integrated pediatric fever management and antibiotic over-treatment in Malawi health facilities: data mining a national facility census2016Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Kallioinen, Maija
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ekström, Eva-Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Khan, Ashraful Islam
    Int Ctr Diarrhoeal Dis Res, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Lindström, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Persson, Lars-Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Rahman, Anisur
    Int Ctr Diarrhoeal Dis Res, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Prenatal early food and multiple micronutrient supplementation trial reduced infant mortality in Bangladesh, but did not influence morbidity2017In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 106, no 12, p. 1979-1986Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: A previous maternal and infant nutrition intervention in rural Matlab, Bangladesh, showed that prenatal nutrient supplements improved child survival, but had no effect on size at birth. This secondary analysis examined whether prenatal multiple micronutrient supplements (MMS), on their own or combined with an early invitation to receive prenatal food supplements, affected child morbidity.

    METHODS: This randomised trial enrolled 4436 pregnant women from November 2001 to October 2003 and allocated them to early or standard invitations to food supplements, in the ninth and 20th weeks of pregnancy, respectively, and supplements of either the standard 60 mg iron with 400 μg folic acid, 30 mg iron with 400 μg folic acid or MMS. Quasi-Poisson regression was used to analyse morbidity.

    RESULTS: There were 3560 single live births and 3516 had morbidity data. The incidence rates of fever, diarrhoea and acute lower respiratory tract infection were 15.3, 3.6 and 2.3 episodes per person-year, respectively. The separate or combined interventions had no effect on morbidity up to 24 months.

    CONCLUSION: Early invitations to prenatal food supplements or prenatal MMS had no effect on common infections in rural Bangladesh, suggesting that earlier findings on improved child survival were not mediated by an effect on child morbidity.

  • 15.
    Kitutu, Freddy Eric
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Kalyango, Joan Nakayaga
    Mayora, Chrispus
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Peterson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Wamani, Henry
    Integrated community case management by drug sellers influences appropriate treatment of paediatric febrile illness in South Western Uganda: a quasi-experimental study.2017In: Malaria Journal, ISSN 1475-2875, E-ISSN 1475-2875, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Fever case management is a major challenge for improved child health globally, despite existence of cheap and effective child survival health technologies. The integrated Community Case Management (iCCM) intervention of paediatric febrile illnesses though adopted by Uganda's Ministry of Health to be implemented by community health workers, has not addressed the inaccess to life-saving medicines and diagnostics. Therefore, the iCCM intervention was implemented in private drug shops and evaluated for its effect on appropriate treatment of paediatric fever in a low malaria transmission setting in South Western Uganda.

    METHODS: From June 2013 to September 2015, the effect of the iCCM intervention on drug seller paediatric fever management and adherence to iCCM guidelines was assessed in a quasi-experimental study in South Western Uganda. A total of 212 care-seeker exit interviews were done before and 285 after in the intervention arm as compared to 216 before and 268 care-seeker interviews at the end of the study period in the comparison arm. The intervention effect was assessed by difference-in-difference analysis of drug seller treatment practices against national treatment recommendations between the intervention and comparison arms. Observed proportions among care-seeker interviews were compared with corresponding proportions from 5795 child visits recorded in patient registries and 49 direct observations of drug seller-care-seeker encounters in intervention drug shops.

    RESULTS: The iCCM intervention increased the appropriate treatment of uncomplicated malaria, pneumonia symptoms and non-bloody diarrhoea by 80.2% (95% CI 53.2-107.2), 65.5% (95% CI 51.6-79.4) and 31.4% (95% CI 1.6-61.2), respectively. Within the intervention arm, drug seller scores on appropriate treatment for pneumonia symptoms and diagnostic test use were the same among care-seeker exit interviews and direct observation. A linear trend (negative slope, - 0.009 p value < 0.001) was observed for proportions of child cases prescribed any antimicrobial medicine in the intervention arm drug shops.

    CONCLUSIONS: The iCCM intervention improved appropriate treatment for uncomplicated malaria, pneumonia symptoms and diarrhoea. Drug seller adherence to iCCM guidelines was high, without causing excessive prescription of antimicrobial medicines in this study. Further research should assess whether this effect is sustained over time and under routine supervision models.

  • 16.
    Kitutu, Freddy
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Martensson, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Wamani, Henry
    Makerere University School of Public Health.
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Peterson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Kalyango, Joan
    Makerere University College of Health Sciences, Department of Pharmacy.
    Perceived quality of paediatric fever care from private drug shops and care-seeking choice in South Western Uganda: data from household surveys.In: Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Child mortality is influenced by interventions beyond the health sector such as adequate access to education, quality water and sanitation, transport and general socio-economic wellbeing. Child mortality due to febrile illnesses remains unevenly distributed within countries. The role of context and variables that act at a higher level such as a geographical location has been largely under-examined. Factors that act at group level are commonly described in literature as neighbourhood factors. The aim of the study was to investigate whether contextual differences in choice of childhood fever care-seeking in South Western Uganda remain after relevant individual and household characteristics have been taken into account, for three outcome variables, namely, choice of care-seeking in private versus government health facilities, choice of care-seeking in private health facilities versus community level and perceived quality of childhood fever care at drug shops, among households in Mbarara and Bushenyi districts.

    Methods

    Two household surveys were conducted at different time periods in Bushenyi and Mbarara districts. The first survey of 2261 households was conducted from July to October 2013 before implementation of an adapted integrated Community Case Management (iCCM) intervention for paediatric febrile illness in drug shops in Mbarara district. The second survey of 3073 households was done from April to May 2015 after the intervention. These data were analysed for effect of contextual factors, the iCCM intervention and other predictors on choice of care-seeking and perceived quality of care among the households in Mbarara and Bushenyi.

     

    Results:

    In the pre-intervention survey , more households in both Mbarara and Bushenyi reported time required to travel to either a private clinic (31%) or drug shop (43%) of 15 minutes or less as compared to a government health facility (12%). The crude second level (neighbourhood) variance of the odds ratio for care-seeking in private versus government health facility was 0.446 (SE, 0.089). The intra-neighbourhood correlation and median odds ratio were 11.9% and 1.89, respectively, for the crude model. After adjusting for covariates that were kept in the prediction model, the estimates of neighbourhood variance, intra-neighbourhood correlation and mean odds ratio decreased to 0.241 (0.069), 6.8% and 1.6, respectively.

     

    Conclusion:         

    In addition to individual factors, contextual characteristics of the neighbourhoods predict the choice of care-seeking from private versus government health facilities, private health facilities versus in the community and perceived quality of pediatric fever care at drug shops.

  • 17.
    Kitutu, Freddy
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Makerere Univ, Coll Hlth Sci, Pharm Dept, Kampala, Uganda.
    Wamani, Henry
    Makerere University School of Public Health.
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Katabazi, Fred
    Makerere University College of Health Sciences, Department of Medical Microbiology.
    Kuteesa, Ronald
    Makerere University College of Health Sciences, Infectious Disease Institute.
    Peterson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Makerere Univ, Coll Hlth Sci, Pharm Dept, Kampala, Uganda; Makerere Univ, Coll Hlth Sci, Infect Dis Inst, Kampala, Uganda.
    Kalyango, Joan
    Makerere University College of Health Sciences, Department of Pharmacy.
    Mårtensson, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Can malaria rapid diagnostic tests by drug sellers under feld conditions classify children 5 years old or less with or without Plasmodium falciparum malaria?: Comparison with nested PCR analysis2018In: Malaria Journal, ISSN 1475-2875, E-ISSN 1475-2875, Vol. 17, article id 365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) available as dipsticks or strips, are simple to perform, easily interpretable and do not require electricity nor infrastructural investment. Correct interpretation of and compliance with the malaria RDT results is a challenge to drug sellers. Thus, drug seller interpretation of malaria RDT strips was compared with laboratory scientist re-reading, and PCR analysis of Plasmodium DNA extracted from malaria RDT nitrocellulose strips and Fast Transient Analysis (FTA) cards. Malaria RDT cassettes are also assessed as potential source of Plasmodium DNA.

    Methods

    A total of 212 children aged between 2 and 60 months, 199 of whom had complete records at two study drug shops in south west Uganda participated in the study. Duplicate 5μL samples of capillary blood were picked from the 212 children, dispensed onto the sample well of the CareStartTM Pf-HRP2 RDT cassette and a fast transient analysis (FTA), WhatmanTM 3MM filter paper in parallel. The malaria RDT strip was interpreted by the drug seller within 15 to 20 minutes, visually re-read centrally by laboratory scientist and from it; Plasmodium DNA was recovered and detected by PCR, and compared with FTA recovered P. falciparum DNA PCR detection.

    Results

    Malaria positive samples were 62/199 (31.2% 95% CI 24.9 - 38.3) by drug seller interpretation of malaria RDT strip, 59/212 (27.8% 95% CI 22.2 – 34.3) by laboratory scientist, 55/212 (25.9% 95% CI 20.0 – 32.6) by RDT nitrocellulose strip PCR and 64/212 (30.2% 95% CI 24.4 – 37.7). The overall agreement between the drug seller interpretation and laboratory scientist re-reading of the malaria RDT strip was 93% with kappa value of 0.8 (95 % CI 0.7, 0.9). The drug seller compliance with the reported malaria RDT results and kappa value were 92.5% and 0.8 (95% CI 0.7, 0.9), respectively. The performance of the three diagnostic strategies compared with FTA PCR as the gold standard had sensitivity between 76.6% and 86.9%, specificity above 90%, positive predictive value ranging from 79% to 89.8% and negative predictive value above 90%.

    Conclusion:

    Drug sellers can use of malaria RDTs in field conditions and achieve acceptable accuracy for malaria diagnosis, and they comply with the malaria RDT results. Plasmodium DNA can be recovered from malaria RDT nitrocellulose strips even in the context of drug shops. Future malaria surveillance and diagnostic quality control studies with malaria RDT cassette as a source of Plasmodium DNA are recommended.

  • 18.
    Källestål, Carina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Blandón Zelaya, E
    Peña, R
    Pérez, Wilton
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Contreras, Mariela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Persson, Lars-Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Sysoev, O
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Predicting poverty. Data mining approaches to the health and demographic surveillance system in Cuatro Santos, Nicaragua.2019In: International Journal for Equity in Health, ISSN 1475-9276, E-ISSN 1475-9276, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In order to further identify the needed interventions for continued poverty reduction in our study area Cuatro Santos, northern Nicaragua, we aimed to elucidate what predicts poverty, measured by the Unsatisfied Basic Need index. This analysis was done by using decision tree methodology applied to the Cuatro Santos health and demographic surveillance databases.

    METHODS: Using variables derived from the health and demographic surveillance update 2014, transferring individual data to the household level we used the decision tree framework Conditional Inference trees to predict the outcome "poverty" defined as two to four unsatisfied basic needs using the Unsatisfied Basic Need Index. We further validated the trees by applying Conditional random forest analyses in order to assess and rank the importance of predictors about their ability to explain the variation of the outcome "poverty." The majority of the Cuatro Santos households provided information and the included variables measured housing conditions, assets, and demographic experiences since the last update (5 yrs), earlier participation in interventions and food security during the last 4 weeks.

    RESULTS: Poverty was rare in households that have some assets and someone in the household that has a higher education than primary school. For these households participating in the intervention that installed piped water with water meter was most important, but also when excluding this variable, the resulting tree showed the same results. When assets were not taken into consideration, the importance of education was pronounced as a predictor for welfare. The results were further strengthened by the validation using Conditional random forest modeling showing the same variables being important as predicting the outcome in the CI tree analysis. As assets can be a result, rather than a predictor of more affluence our results in summary point specifically to the importance of education and participation in the water installation intervention as predictors for more affluence.

    CONCLUSION: Predictors of poverty are useful for directing interventions and in the Cuatro Santos area education seems most important to prioritize. Hopefully, the lessons learned can continue to develop the Cuatro Santos communities as well as development in similar poor rural settings around the world.

  • 19.
    Musafili, Aimable
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Essén, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Baribwira, Cyprien
    Maternal and Child Health, Pediatric HIV-AIDS, PMTCTRwanda Program of the Institute of Human Virology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Kigali, Rwanda.
    Binagwaho, Agnes
    Ministry of Health, Kigali, Rwanda.
    Persson, Lars-Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Trends and social differentials in child mortality inRwanda 1990–2010: results from three demographicand health surveys2015In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 69, no 9, p. 834-840Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Rwanda has embarked on ambitious programmes to provide equitable health services and reduce mortality in childhood. Evidence from other countries indicates that advances in child survival often have come at the expense of increasing inequity. Our aims were to analyse trends and social differentials in mortality before the age of 5 years in Rwanda from 1990 to 2010. Methods We performed secondary analyses of data from three Demographic and Health Surveys conducted in 2000, 2005 and 2010 in Rwanda. These surveys included 34 790 children born between 1990 and 2010 to women aged 15-49 years. The main outcome measures were neonatal mortality rates (NMR) and under-5 mortality rates (U5MR) over time, and in relation to mother's educational level, urban or rural residence and household wealth. Generalised linear mixed effects models and a mixed effects Cox model (frailty model) were used, with adjustments for confounders and cluster sampling method. Results Mortality rates in Rwanda peaked in 1994 at the time of the genocide (NMR 60/1000 live births, 95% CI 51 to 65; U5MR 238/1000 live births, 95% CI 226 to 251). The 1990s and the first half of the 2000s were characterised by a marked rural/urban divide and inequity in child survival between maternal groups with different levels of education. Towards the end of the study period (2005-2010) NMR had been reduced to 26/1000 (95% CI 23 to 29) and U5MR to 65/1000 (95% CI 61 to 70), with little or no difference between urban and rural areas, and household wealth groups, while children of women with no education still had significantly higher U5MR. Conclusions Recent reductions in child mortality in Rwanda have concurred with improved social equity in child survival. Current challenges include the prevention of newborn deaths.

  • 20.
    Musafili, Aimable
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Essén, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Baribwira, Cyprien
    Maternal and Child Health, Pediatric HIV-AIDS, PMTCT-Rwanda Program of the Institute of Human Virology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Kigali, Rwanda.
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Persson, Lars-Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Social equity in perinatal survival: a case-control study at hospitals in Kigali, Rwanda2015In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 104, no 12, p. 1233-1240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    Rwanda has invested heavily in improving maternal and child health, but knowledge is limited regarding social equity in perinatal survival. We analysed whether perinatal mortality risks differed between social groups in hospitals in the country's capital.

    METHODS:

    A case-control study was carried out on singleton births aged at least 22 weeks of gestation and born in district or tertiary referral hospitals in Kigali from July 2013 to May 2014. Perinatal deaths were recorded as they occurred, with the next two surviving neonates born in the same hospital selected as controls. Conditional logistic regression was used to determine social determinants of perinatal death after adjustments for potential confounders.

    RESULTS:

    We analysed 234 perinatal deaths and 468 controls. Rural residence was linked to an increased risk of perinatal death (OR = 3.31, 95% CI 1.43-7.61), but maternal education or household asset score levels were not. Having no health insurance (OR = 2.11, 95% CI 0.91-4.89) was associated with an increased risk of perinatal death, compared to having community health insurance.

    CONCLUSION:

    Living in a rural area and having no health insurance were associated with an increased risk of perinatal mortality rates in the Rwandan capital, but maternal education and household assets were not.

  • 21.
    Målqvist, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Hoa, Dinh Phuong Thi
    Hanoi School of Public Health, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Persson, Lars-Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Effect of Facilitation of Local Stakeholder Groups on Equity in Neonatal Survival: Results from the NeoKIP Trial in Northern Vietnam.2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 12, article id e0145510Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: To operationalize the post-MDG agenda, there is a need to evaluate the effects of health interventions on equity. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect on equity in neonatal survival of the NeoKIP trial (ISRCTN44599712), a population-based, cluster-randomized intervention trial with facilitated local stakeholder groups for improved neonatal survival in Quang Ninh province in northern Vietnam.

    METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with all mothers experiencing neonatal mortality and a random sample of 6% of all mothers with a live birth in the study area during the study period (July 2008-June 2011). Multilevel regression analyses were performed, stratifying mothers according to household wealth, maternal education and mother's ethnicity in order to assess impact on equity in neonatal survival.

    FINDINGS: In the last year of study the risk of neonatal death was reduced by 69% among poor mothers in the intervention area as compared to poor mothers in the control area (OR 0.31, 95% CI 0.15-0.66). This pattern was not evident among mothers from non-poor households. Mothers with higher education had a 50% lower risk of neonatal mortality if living in the intervention area during the same time period (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.28-0.90), whereas no significant effect was detected among mothers with low education.

    INTERPRETATION: The NeoKIP intervention promoted equity in neonatal survival based on wealth but increased inequity based on maternal education.

  • 22.
    Målqvist, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Yuan, Beibei
    Peking University, China Center for Health Development Studies, Beijing, China.
    Trygg, Nadja
    Department of Public Health Sciences, Global Health/IHCAR, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Thomsen, Sarah
    Department of Public Health Sciences, Global Health/IHCAR, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Targeted Interventions for Improved Equity in Maternal and Child Health in Low- and Middle-Income Settings: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 6, p. e66453-Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Targeted interventions to improve maternal and child health is suggested as a feasible and sometimes even necessary strategy to reduce inequity. The objective of this systematic review was to gather the evidence of the effectiveness of targeted interventions to improve equity in MDG 4 and 5 outcomes. Methods and Findings: We identified primary studies in all languages by searching nine health and social databases, including grey literature and dissertations. Studies evaluating the effect of an intervention tailored to address a structural determinant of inequity in maternal and child health were included. Thus general interventions targeting disadvantaged populations were excluded. Outcome measures were limited to indicators proposed for Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5. We identified 18 articles, whereof 15 evaluated various incentive programs, two evaluated a targeted policy intervention, and only one study evaluated an intervention addressing a cultural custom. Meta-analyses of the effectiveness of incentives programs showed a pooled effect size of RR 1.66 (95% CI 1.43-1.93) for antenatal care attendance (four studies with 2,476 participants) and RR 2.37 (95% CI 1.38-4.07) for health facility delivery (five studies with 25,625 participants). Meta-analyses were not performed for any of the other outcomes due to scarcity of studies. Conclusions: The targeted interventions aiming to improve maternal and child health are mainly limited to addressing economic disparities through various incentive schemes like conditional cash transfers and voucher schemes. This is a feasible strategy to reduce inequity based on income. More innovative action-oriented research is needed to speed up progress in maternal and child survival among the most disadvantaged populations through interventions targeting the underlying structural determinants of inequity.

  • 23.
    Nga, Nguyen Thu
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Målqvist, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Eriksson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Hoa, Dinh Phuong
    Hanoi School of Public Health.
    Selling, Katarina Ekholm
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Johansson, Annika
    Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institution.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Persson, Lars-Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Effect of Facilitation of Local Maternal-and-Newborn Health Groups on Continuum of Perinatal Care: Results from the NeoKIP Trial in Northern Vietnam2012In: American Journal of Public Health, ISSN 0090-0036, E-ISSN 1541-0048Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Continuum of maternal, delivery and newborn is a prerequisite for improved neonatal health and survival. This requires involvement from households, health system, and the society as a whole. In a community-based trial using facilitation of local perinatal health stakeholder groups in northern Vietnam neonatal mortality was reduced (NeoKIP trial; ISRCTN44599712). In this report we analyse the effect by the intervention on continuum of anternal, delivery, and newborn care. We also assess in perinatal health knowledge among primary health care staff in the area that could be associated with the intervention.

    Methods:

    The trial had a cluster-randomised design; 44 communes in Quang Ninh province were allocated to intervention and 46 to control. Laywomen recruited from Women’s Union facilitated monthly meetings during 3 years in groups composed by staff from health centres and key persons in the communes. A problem-solving approach was employed. Births and neonatal deaths were monitored. A sample of 6% all live births was randomly selected each month to represent the entire birth cohort. Mothers of these newborns were interviewed at home 8-10 weeks after delivery. Information was collected on use of antenatal, delivery, and postpartum health services. Primary healthcare staff was also interviewed assessing their knowledge on newborn care before and after the intervention. Results were compared between intervention and control communes.

    Results:

    Of the 22 377 live births occurring in the study area during the three years of trial, 1338 (5.9%) were randomly selected for home interview with the mothers. In total, 1243 interviews with mothers of surviving neonates were completed in intervention and control communes. Intervention and control areas were comparable in social characteristics. Coverage differed between intervention and control communes regarding antenatal care (difference 8.7 percent units, 95%CI 5.0-12.6) and most of its included service components, birth preparedness (difference 3.6 percent units, 0.2-7.0) and institutional delivery (difference 3.8, 0.3-7.4). Primary healthcare staff’s knowledge on newborn care also increased in intervention communes while there was no change in control communes.

    Conclusions:

    A community-based participatory intervention by facilitation of local stakeholder groups that resulted in decreased neonatal mortality was linked to small positive differences in continuum of maternal and neonatal care and in primary healthcare staff’s knowledge on newborn care. This may reflect the process of change in utilization of services and performance of services that ultimately lowered neonatal mortality in the area.

  • 24.
    Persson, Lars-Åke
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Nga, Nguyen Thu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Målqvist, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Thi Phuong Hoa, Dinh
    Hanoi School of Public Health, Hanoi, Viet Nam.
    Eriksson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Wallin, Lars
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Huy, Tran Q
    Ministry of Health, Hanoi, Viet Nam.
    Duc, Duong M
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Tiep, Tran V
    Vietnam-Sweden Uong Bi General Hospital, Uong Bi, Viet Nam.
    Thi Thu Thuy, Vu
    Provincial Health Bureau, Quang Ninh Province, Viet Nam.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Effect of Facilitation of Local Maternal-and-Newborn Stakeholder Groups on Neonatal Mortality: Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial2013In: PLoS Medicine, ISSN 1549-1277, E-ISSN 1549-1676, Vol. 10, no 5, p. e1001445-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Facilitation of local women's groups may reportedly reduce neonatal mortality. It is not known whether facilitation of groups composed of local health care staff and politicians can improve perinatal outcomes. We hypothesised that facilitation of local stakeholder groups would reduce neonatal mortality (primary outcome) and improve maternal, delivery, and newborn care indicators (secondary outcomes) in Quang Ninh province, Vietnam.

    METHODS AND FINDINGS:

    In a cluster-randomized design 44 communes were allocated to intervention and 46 to control. Laywomen facilitated monthly meetings during 3 years in groups composed of health care staff and key persons in the communes. A problem-solving approach was employed. Births and neonatal deaths were monitored, and interviews were performed in households of neonatal deaths and of randomly selected surviving infants. A latent period before effect is expected in this type of intervention, but this timeframe was not pre-specified. Neonatal mortality rate (NMR) from July 2008 to June 2011 was 16.5/1,000 (195 deaths per 11,818 live births) in the intervention communes and 18.4/1,000 (194 per 10,559 live births) in control communes (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.96 [95% CI 0.73-1.25]). There was a significant downward time trend of NMR in intervention communes (p = 0.003) but not in control communes (p = 0.184). No significant difference in NMR was observed during the first two years (July 2008 to June 2010) while the third year (July 2010 to June 2011) had significantly lower NMR in intervention arm: adjusted OR 0.51 (95% CI 0.30-0.89). Women in intervention communes more frequently attended antenatal care (adjusted OR 2.27 [95% CI 1.07-4.8]).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    A randomized facilitation intervention with local stakeholder groups composed of primary care staff and local politicians working for three years with a perinatal problem-solving approach resulted in increased attendance to antenatal care and reduced neonatal mortality after a latent period.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION:

    Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN44599712

  • 25.
    Rahman, Anisur
    et al.
    Int Ctr Diarrhoea Dis Res, Maternal & Child Hlth Div, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Rahman, Monjur
    Int Ctr Diarrhoea Dis Res, Maternal & Child Hlth Div, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Pervin, Jesmin
    Int Ctr Diarrhoea Dis Res, Maternal & Child Hlth Div, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Razzaque, Abdur
    Int Ctr Diarrhoeal Dis Res, Hlth Syst & Populaiton Studies Div, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Aktar, Shaki
    Int Ctr Diarrhoea Dis Res, Maternal & Child Hlth Div, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Ahmed, Jamal Uddin
    Int Ctr Diarrhoeal Dis Res, Matlab Hlth Res Ctr, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Svefors, Pernilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    El Arifeen, Shams
    Int Ctr Diarrhoea Dis Res, Maternal & Child Hlth Div, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Persson, Lars Ake
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Infect & Trop Dis, Dept Dis Control, London, England.
    Time trends and sociodemographic determinants of preterm births in pregnancy cohorts in Matlab, Bangladesh, 1990-20142019In: BMJ GLOBAL HEALTH, ISSN 2059-7908, Vol. 4, no 4, article id e001462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Preterm birth is the major cause of under-five mortality. Population-based data on determinants and proportions of children born preterm are limited, especially from low-income countries. This study aimed at assessing time trends and social, reproductive and environmental determinants of preterm births based on a population-based pregnancy cohort over 25 years in rural Bangladesh.

    Methods

    In this cohort study in Matlab, a rural area in Bangladesh, we used data from the Health and Demographic Surveillance System from 1990 to 2014. Gestational age at birth was based on the reported last menstrual period and verified by ultrasound assessments. Preterm birth proportions were assessed within strata of social and reproductive characteristics, and time series analysis was performed with decomposition for trend and seasonality. We also determined the prevented fractions of preterm birth reduction associated with social and demographic changes during the follow-up period.

    Results

    Analyses were based on 63 063 live births. Preterm birth decreased from 29% (95% CI 28.6 to 30.1) in 1990-1994 to 11% (95% CI 10.5 to 11.6) in 2010-2014. Low education, older age and multi-parity were associated with higher proportions of preterm births across the study period. Preterm births had a marked seasonal variation. A rapid increase in women's educational level and decrease in parity were associated with the decline in preterm births, and 27% of the reduction observed from 1990 to 2014 could be attributed to these educational and reproductive changes.

    Conclusion

    The reduction in preterm birth was to a large extent associated with the sociodemographic transition, especially changes in maternal education and parity. The persistent seasonal variation in the proportion of preterm birth may reflect the environmental stressors for pregnant women across the study period. Continued investments in girls' education and family planning programmes may contribute to further reduction of preterm births in Bangladesh.

  • 26.
    Svefors, Pernilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Shaheen, Rubina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Khan, Ashraful Islam
    International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), Dhaka, Bangladesh .
    Persson, LA
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Department of Disease Control, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
    Lindholm, Lars
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden .
    Cost-effectiveness of prenatal food and micronutrient interventions on under-five mortality and stunting: Analysis of data from the MINIMat randomized trial, Bangladesh2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 2, article id e0191260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Nutrition interventions may have favourable as well as unfavourable effects. The Maternal and Infant Nutrition Interventions in Matlab (MINIMat), with early prenatal food and micronutrient supplementation, reduced infant mortality and were reported to be very cost-effective. However, the multiple micronutrients (MMS) supplement was associated with an increased risk of stunted growth in infancy and early childhood. This unfavourable outcome was not included in the previous cost-effectiveness analysis. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether the MINIMat interventions remain cost-effective in view of both favourable (decreased under-five-years mortality) and unfavourable (increased stunting) outcomes.

    METHOD: Pregnant women in rural Bangladesh, where food insecurity still is prevalent, were randomized to early (E) or usual (U) invitation to be given food supplementation and daily doses of 30 mg, or 60 mg iron with 400 μg of folic acid, or MMS with 15 micronutrients including 30 mg iron and 400 μg of folic acid. E reduced stunting at 4.5 years compared with U, MMS increased stunting at 4.5 years compared with Fe60, while the combination EMMS reduced infant mortality compared with UFe60. The outcome measure used was disability adjusted life years (DALYs), a measure of overall disease burden that combines years of life lost due to premature mortality (under five-year mortality) and years lived with disability (stunting). Incremental cost effectiveness ratios were calculated using cost data from already published studies.

    RESULTS: By incrementing UFe60 (standard practice) to EMMS, one DALY could be averted at a cost of US$24.

    CONCLUSION: When both favourable and unfavourable outcomes were included in the analysis, early prenatal food and multiple micronutrient interventions remained highly cost effective and seem to be meaningful from a public health perspective.

  • 27.
    Svefors, Pernilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Shaheen, Rubina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Persson, Lars Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Lindholm, Lars
    Umeå Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umeå, Sweden..
    Prenatal food and micronutrient interventions in rural Bangladesh remain cost-effective when assessing both favorable and unfavorable outcomes: Cost-effectiveness analysis of the MINIMat trial on under five-mortality and stunting.2017In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860, Vol. 31, no 1, article id 786.33Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Svefors, Pernilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Pervin, Jesmin
    International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh .
    Khan, Ashraful
    International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh .
    Anisur, Rahman
    International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh .
    Ekström, Eva-Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    El Arifeen, Shams
    International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh .
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Persson, Lars-Åke
    3Department of Disease Control, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK .
    Stunting, recovery from stunting and puberty timing in the MINIMat cohort, BangladeshManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Nutritional status is a well-known determinant of pubertal development and age at menarche. In low-resource settings, puberty onset usually takes place at an older age. Epidemiological and adoption studies have indicated that early life undernutrition that is followed by catch-up growth may result in early puberty and younger age at menarche. Early puberty might, in turn, be associated with an increased risk of adult chronic diseases. This paper aims to analyze the association between intrauterine growth restriction, infancy and childhood stunting, recovery from stunting, and the outcome timing of puberty in a rural Bangladeshi cohort.

    Methods: The participants in the present study were children to mothers participating in the Maternal and Infant Nutrition Interventions in Matlab (MINIMat) trial. Pregnant women were identified in early pregnancy, and a birth cohort was followed from birth to puberty. The analyzed sample included 994 girls and 987 boys aged from 12 to 15 years. Puberty assessment was done by evaluating the breast, testicle, and hair developments according to Tanner. The age at menarche was recorded and in boys data from pre-pubertal and two consecutive pubertal height measurements, six months apart were used to determine whether the pubertal growth spurt had started or not. Intrauterine growth restriction, infancy and childhood stunting, and recovery from stunting were modeled with age at menarche by Cox proportional hazards analyses, and with pubertal onset in boys by logistic regression.

    Results: The median age at menarche was 13.0 years (95% CI 13.0-13.1). Adolescents, who had reached a later stage of puberty and had a younger age at menarche, had mothers who were heavier, more educated, and belonged to a higher socioeconomic group. There was no difference in age at menarche between girls that were small or appropriate for gestational age at birth. Boys born small for gestational age entered their pubertal growth spurt later than those with appropriate weight. Children who were stunted had later pubertal development, age at menarche and timing of growth spurt than non-stunted children. Children who recovered from stunting had similar pubertal development, age at menarche, and timing of growth spurt in boys as non-stunted children.

    Conclusion: Infant and childhood stunting was associated with a later pubertal development. Infant or young child recovery from stunting was not associated with earlier puberty in comparison with non-stunted children.

  • 29.
    Svefors, Pernilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Rahman, Anisur
    International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (iccdr,b), Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Ekström, Eva-Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Khan, Ashraful Islam
    International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (iccdr,b), Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Lindström, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Persson, Lars Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Stunted at 10 Years. Linear Growth Trajectories and Stunting from Birth to Pre-Adolescence in a Rural Bangladeshi Cohort.2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 3, article id e0149700Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Few studies in low-income settings analyse linear growth trajectories from foetal life to pre-adolescence. The aim of this study is to describe linear growth and stunting from birth to 10 years in rural Bangladesh and to analyse whether maternal and environmental determinants at conception are associated with linear growth throughout childhood and stunting at 10 years.

    METHODS AND FINDINGS: Pregnant women participating in the MINIMat trial were identified in early pregnancy and a birth cohort (n = 1054) was followed with 19 growth measurements from birth to 10 years. Analyses of baseline predictors and mean height-for-age Z-scores (HAZ) over time were modelled using GLMM. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the associations between baseline predictors and stunting (HAZ<-2) at 10 years. HAZ decreased to 2 years, followed by an increase up to 10 years, while the average height-for-age difference in cm (HAD) to the WHO reference median continued to increase up to 10 years. Prevalence of stunting was highest at 2 years (50%) decreasing to 29% at 10 years. Maternal height, maternal educational level and season of conception were all independent predictors of HAZ from birth to pre-adolescence (p<0.001) and stunting at 10 years. The highest probability to be stunted at 10 years was for children born by short mothers (<147.5 cm) (ORadj 2.93, 95% CI: 2.06-4.20), mothers with no education (ORadj 1.74, 95% CI 1.17-2.81) or those conceived in the pre-monsoon season (ORadj 1.94, 95% CI 1.37-2.77).

    CONCLUSIONS: Height growth trajectories and prevalence of stunting in pre-adolescence showed strong intergenerational associations, social differentials, and environmental influence from foetal life. Targeting women before and during pregnancy is needed for the prevention of impaired child growth.

  • 30.
    Svefors, Pernilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Sysoev, Oleg
    Linköping Universitet.
    Ekström, Eva-Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Perrson, Lars Åke
    Department of Disease Control, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK, .
    El Arifeen, Shams
    International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh .
    Naved, Ruchira
    International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh .
    Rahman, Anisur
    International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh .
    Khan, Ashraful
    International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh .
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    The relative importance of pre- and postnatal determinants of stunting.: Data mining approaches to the Maternal and Infant Nutrition Interventions in Matlab (MINIMat) cohort, BangladeshManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The WHO has set a goal to reduce the prevalence of stunted child growth by 40% by the year 2025. To reach this goal, it is imperative to establish the relative importance of risk factors for stunting to deliver the appropriate interventions. Currently, most interventions take place in late infancy and early childhood. This study aimed to identify the most critical pre- and postnatal determinants of linear growth 0–24 months and the risk factors for stunting at two years, and to identify subgroups with different growth trajectories and levels of stunting at two years.

    Method and Findings Conditional inference-tree-based methods were applied to the extensive Maternal and Infant Nutrition Interventions in Matlab (MINIMat) trial database with 309 variables of 2,723 children: their parents and living conditions, including socioeconomic, nutritional and other biological characteristics of the parents; maternal exposure to violence; household food security; breast- and complementary-feeding; and measurement of morbidity of the mothers during pregnancy and repeatedly of their children up to 24 months of age. Child anthropometry was measured monthly from birth to 12 months, thereafter quarterly to 24 months. Birth length and weight were the most critical factors for linear growth 0–24 months and stunting at two years, followed by maternal anthropometry and parental education. Conditions after birth, such as feeding practices and morbidity, were less strongly associated with linear growth trajectories and stunting at two years.

    Interpretation The results of this study, together with findings from recent reviews, motivate a change in policy and practice, emphasizing the benefit of interventions before conception and during pregnancy to reach a substantial reduction in stunting.

  • 31.
    Svefors, Pernilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Sysoev, Oleg
    Ekström, Eva-Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Persson, Lars-Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Arifeen, Shams E
    Naved, Ruchira T
    Rahman, Anisur
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Khan, Ashraful Islam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Relative importance of prenatal and postnatal determinants of stunting: data mining approaches to the MINIMat cohort, Bangladesh.2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 8, article id e025154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: WHO has set a goal to reduce the prevalence of stunted child growth by 40% by the year 2025. To reach this goal, it is imperative to establish the relative importance of risk factors for stunting to deliver appropriate interventions. Currently, most interventions take place in late infancy and early childhood. This study aimed to identify the most critical prenatal and postnatal determinants of linear growth 0-24 months and the risk factors for stunting at 2 years, and to identify subgroups with different growth trajectories and levels of stunting at 2 years.

    METHODS: Conditional inference tree-based methods were applied to the extensive Maternal and Infant Nutrition Interventions in Matlab trial database with 309 variables of 2723 children, their parents and living conditions, including socioeconomic, nutritional and other biological characteristics of the parents; maternal exposure to violence; household food security; breast and complementary feeding; and measurements of morbidity of the mothers during pregnancy and repeatedly of their children up to 24 months of age. Child anthropometry was measured monthly from birth to 12 months, thereafter quarterly to 24 months.

    RESULTS: Birth length and weight were the most critical factors for linear growth 0-24 months and stunting at 2 years, followed by maternal anthropometry and parental education. Conditions after birth, such as feeding practices and morbidity, were less strongly associated with linear growth trajectories and stunting at 2 years.

    CONCLUSION: The results of this study emphasise the benefit of interventions before conception and during pregnancy to reach a substantial reduction in stunting.

  • 32.
    Sysoev, Oleg
    et al.
    Linköping Univ, Dept Comp & Informat Sci, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bartoszek, Krzysztof
    Linköping Univ, Dept Comp & Informat Sci, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ekström, Eva-Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    PSICA: Decision trees for probabilistic subgroup identification with categorical treatments2019In: Statistics in Medicine, ISSN 0277-6715, E-ISSN 1097-0258, Vol. 38, no 22, p. 4436-4452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Personalized medicine aims at identifying best treatments for a patient with given characteristics. It has been shown in the literature that these methods can lead to great improvements in medicine compared to traditional methods prescribing the same treatment to all patients. Subgroup identification is a branch of personalized medicine, which aims at finding subgroups of the patients with similar characteristics for which some of the investigated treatments have a better effect than the other treatments. A number of approaches based on decision trees have been proposed to identify such subgroups, but most of them focus on two-arm trials (control/treatment) while a few methods consider quantitative treatments (defined by the dose). However, no subgroup identification method exists that can predict the best treatments in a scenario with a categorical set of treatments. We propose a novel method for subgroup identification in categorical treatment scenarios. This method outputs a decision tree showing the probabilities of a given treatment being the best for a given group of patients as well as labels showing the possible best treatments. The method is implemented in an R package psica available on CRAN. In addition to a simulation study, we present an analysis of a community-based nutrition intervention trial that justifies the validity of our method.

  • 33.
    Wahlberg, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Johnsdotter, Sara
    Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Källestål, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Essén, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Baseline data from a planned RCT on attitudes to female genital cutting after migration: when are interventions justified?2017In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, article id e017506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To present the primary outcomes from a baseline study on attitudes towards female genital cutting (FGC) after migration.

    Design: Baseline data from a planned cluster randomised, controlled trial. Face-to-face interviews were used to collect questionnaire data in 2015. Based on our hypothesis that established Somalis could be used as facilitators of change among those newly arrived, data were stratified into years of residency in Sweden.

    Setting: Sweden.

    Participants: 372 Somali men and women, 206 newly arrived (0–4 years), 166 established (>4 years).

    Primary outcome measures: Whether FGC is acceptable, preferred for daughter and should continue, specified on anatomical extent.

    Results: The support for anatomical change of girls and women’s genitals ranged from 0% to 2% among established and from 4% to 8% among newly arrived. Among those supporting no anatomical change, 75%–83% among established and 53%–67% among newly arrived opposed all forms of FGC, with the remaining supporting pricking of the skin with no removal of tissue. Among newly arrived, 37% stated that pricking was acceptable, 39% said they wanted their daughter to be pricked and 26% reported they wanted pricking to continue being practised. Those who had lived in Sweden ≤ 2 years had highest odds of supporting FGC; thereafter, the opposition towards FGC increased over time after migration.

    Conclusion: A majority of Somali immigrants, including those newly arrived, opposed all forms of FGC with increased opposition over time after migration. The majority of proponents of FGC supported pricking. We argue that it would have been unethical to proceed with the intervention as it, with this baseline, would have been difficult to detect a change in attitudes given that a majority opposed all forms of FGC together with the evidence that a strong attitude change is already happening. Therefore, we decided not to implement the planned intervention.

    Trial registration number: Trial registration number NCT02335697;Pre-results.

  • 34.
    Wahlberg, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Johnsdotter, Sara
    Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Sweden.
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Källestål, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Essén, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Factors associated with the support of pricking (female genital cutting type IV) among Somali immigrants – a cross-sectional study in Sweden2017In: Reproductive Health, ISSN 1742-4755, E-ISSN 1742-4755, Vol. 14, article id 92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pricking, classified as female genital cutting (FGC) type IV by the World Health Organization, is an under-researched area gaining momentum among diaspora communities. Our aim was to explore factors associated with being supportive of pricking among Somalis in Sweden.

    Methods: In a cross-sectional design, attitudes and knowledge regarding FGC, and measures of socioeconomic status, acculturation, and social capital, were assessed by a 49-item questionnaire in four municipalities in Sweden. Data were collected in 2015 from 648 Somali men and women, >= 18 years old, of which 113 supported the continuation of pricking. Logistic regression was used for the analysis.

    Results: Those more likely to support the continuation of pricking were older, originally from rural areas, and newly arrived in Sweden. Further, those who reported that they thought pricking was: acceptable, according to their religion (aOR: 10.59, 95% CI: 5.44-20.62); not a violation of children's rights (aOR: 2.86, 95% CI: 1.46-5.61); and did not cause long-term health complications (aOR: 5.52, 95% CI: 2.25-13.52) had higher odds of supporting pricking. Religion was strongly associated with the support of pricking among both genders. However, for men, children's rights and the definition of pricking as FGC or not were important aspects in how they viewed pricking, while, for women, health complications and respectability were important.

    Conclusions: Values known to be associated with FGC in general are also related to pricking. Hence, there seems to be a change in what types of FGC are supported rather than in their perceived values.

  • 35.
    Wahlberg, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Johnsdotter, Sara
    Malmo Univ, Malmo, Sweden.
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Källestål, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Essén, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Factors associated with the support of pricking (female genital cutting type IV) among Somali immigrants - a cross-sectional study in Sweden2017In: Reproductive Health, ISSN 1742-4755, E-ISSN 1742-4755, Vol. 14Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 36.
    White Johansson, Emily
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Nsona, Humphreys
    Mappin, Bonnie
    Gething, Peter W.
    Petzold, Max
    Swartling Peterson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Hildenwall, Helena
    Integrated Pediatric Fever Management And Antibiotic Over-Treatment In Malawi Health Facilities: Data Mining A National Facility Census2017In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, ISSN 0002-9637, E-ISSN 1476-1645, Vol. 95, no 5, p. 574-574Article in journal (Other academic)
1 - 36 of 36
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