uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 16 of 16
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Cnattingius, Ragnhild
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Höglund, Berit
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Kieler, Helle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Emergency cesarean delivery in induction of labor: an evaluation of risk factors.2005In: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand, ISSN 0001-6349, Vol. 84, no 5, p. 456-62Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Höglund, Berit
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Pregnancy, Childbirth and Midwifery Care among Women with Intellectual Disability in Sweden: Epidemiological and Descriptive Studies2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate pregnancy and childbirth in women with intellectual disability (ID), in Sweden, the health of their newborns and midwifery care for these women. Two register studies and two descriptive studies are included. Pregnancy and birth outcomes as well as data on the newborns’ health were examined by linking data from the National Patient Register and the Medical Birth Register (I-II). The women’s experience of pregnancy and delivery was investigated with repeated interviews (III). Midwives’ knowledge of, experience of and attitudes towards pregnancy and childbirth in women with ID were evaluated with questionnaires (IV). Mothers with ID were more often teenagers, smoked more during pregnancy and had more Caesarean Sections. Their children had a higher proportion of pre-term births, were small-for-gestational-age, stillborn or died in the perinatal period. The women with ID struggled to attain motherhood and feared to lose custody of the child. The pregnancy was seen as a happy event, even though relatives did not always approve. Parent education was considered important, but not adequately adapted to their needs. The birth process was overwhelming and difficult to understand, but the child was welcomed with warm feelings, and breastfeeding was natural. Midwives stated it was different to care for women with ID and requested additional knowledge. The majority of midwives affirmed that women with ID could not manage the mother role satisfactorily, and one-third expressed that women with ID should refrain from having children. A majority of the midwives considered that the children should grow up with the parents with support from family and society, but one out of five stated that the children should grow up in foster care.

    Conclusion: Women with ID and their children should be considered as risk groups in pregnancy and childbirth. Professionals in maternity services need to elucidate their knowledge and skills for counselling and supporting this particular group of pregnant women in pre-, intra- and post-partum care.

    List of papers
    1. Pregnancy and birth outcomes of women with intellectual disability in Sweden: a national register study between 1999 and 2007
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pregnancy and birth outcomes of women with intellectual disability in Sweden: a national register study between 1999 and 2007
    2012 (English)In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 91, no 12, p. 1381-1387Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective.

    To investigate the antenatal health and demographic factors as well as pregnancy and delivery outcomes in women with intellectual disability (ID) in Sweden.

    Design.

    A population-based register study.

    Setting.

    The National Patient Register (NPR) linked to the Medical Birth Register (MBR).

    Sample.

    Women with ID classified as International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 8–10 who gave birth in 1999–2007 (n = 326), identified from the NPR linked to the MBR, were compared with all first-time, singleton mothers without ID or any other psychiatric diagnoses during this period in Sweden (n = 340 624).

    Methods.

    Population-based data were extracted from the NPR and the MBR.

    Main outcome measures.

    Health and socio-demography at first antenatal visit, mode of delivery, pain relief during labor, preterm birth and discharge from hospital.

    Results.

    A higher proportion of women with ID were teenagers (18.4 vs. 3.3%), obese (20.1 vs. 8.6%) and single (36.6 vs. 6.2%) compared with women without ID, and women with ID smoked more often (27.9 vs. 7.9%). Women with ID had more often a preterm birth (12.2 vs. 6.1%), a cesarean section (CS) (24.5 vs. 17.7%) and used less nitrous oxide as pain relief during labor (59.5 vs. 75.8%). Women with ID had a higher risk for preterm birth [odds ratio (OR) 1.68], CS (OR1.55), non-use of nitrous oxide (OR 1.89) and discharge from hospital to a place other than home (OR 2.24).

    Conclusion.

    Pregnant women with ID should be considered a risk group suggesting that better tailored pre- and intrapartum care and support are needed for these women.

    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Research subject
    Obstetrics and Gynaecology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-183011 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-0412.2012.01509.x (DOI)000312032700005 ()
    Projects
    Berit Höglund
    Available from: 2012-10-20 Created: 2012-10-20 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    2. Newborns of mothers with intellectual disability have a higher risk of perinatal death and being small-for-gestational age
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Newborns of mothers with intellectual disability have a higher risk of perinatal death and being small-for-gestational age
    2012 (English)In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 91, no 12, p. 1409-1414Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective.

    To study mode of birth, perinatal health and death in children born to mothers with intellectual disability (ID) in Sweden.

    Design.

    Population based register study.

    Setting.

    National registers; the National Patient Register linked to the Medical Birth Register.

    Sample.

    Children of first-time mothers with ID (n = 326) (classified in the ICD 8–10) were identified and compared to 340 624 children of first-time mothers without ID or any other psychiatric diagnosis during 1999 and 2007.

    Methods.

    Population-based data were extracted from the National Patient Register and the Medical Birth Register.

    Main Outcome Measures.

    Mode of birth, preterm birth, small-for-gestational age, Apgar score, stillbirth and perinatal death.

    Results.

    Children born to mothers with ID were more often stillborn (1.2% vs. 0.3%) or died perinatally (1.8% vs. 0.4%) than children born to mothers without ID. They had a higher proportion of cesarean section birth (24.5% vs. 17.7%), preterm birth (12.2% vs. 6.1%), were small-for-gestational age (8.4% vs. 3.1%) and had lower Apgar scores <7 points at 5 minutes (3.7% vs 1.5%), compared to children born to mother without ID. Logistic regression adjusted for maternal characteristics confirmed an increased risk of small-for-gestational age (odds ratio 2.25), stillbirth (odds ratio 4.53) and perinatal death (odds ratio 4.25) in children born to mothers with ID.

    Conclusions.

    Unborn and newborn children of mothers with ID should be considered a risk group, and their mothers may need better individual-based care and support.

    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-183015 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-0412.2012.01537.x (DOI)000312032700009 ()
    Available from: 2012-10-20 Created: 2012-10-20 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    3. Struggling for motherhood with an intellectual disability: a qualitative study of women's experiences in Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Struggling for motherhood with an intellectual disability: a qualitative study of women's experiences in Sweden
    2013 (English)In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 698-704Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    to gain a deeper understanding of the experiences of childbearing in women with intellectual disabililty (ID).

    Design/setting

    ten women with ID, who had given birth within seven years, were interviewed twice and data were analysed with content analysis.

    Findings

    the overarching theme was: Struggling for motherhood with an ID. The significance of having an intellectual disability became evident when the women encountered mixed reactions from partners and relatives, who sometimes suggested an induced abortion. The women disclosed their diagnosis if they believed it was beneficial for them. Throughout the process the women also felt anxious and distressed about the custody of the child. Women experienced the pregnancy as a physical and psychological transition. It was mostly a happy and responsible life event, and the women were aware of physical signs in their bodies and contact with the unborn child. Parent education was considered important but not adequately adapted to their needs. The women described the delivery as hard and painful work, sometimes difficult to understand and they had different strategies to handle the pain and strain of labour. The child was welcomed with warmth and curiosity by the women, who cared for and breast fed the child even if the hospital environment could be confusing and continued custody not taken for granted.

    Conclusions

    women with ID struggle for motherhood and fear losing custody of the child. Professionals need to identify and support these women, who may not always disclose their diagnosis. Since pregnancy, delivery and the transition into motherhood can be difficult to understand, information and support should be better tailored to their needs.

    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-183017 (URN)10.1016/j.midw.2012.06.014 (DOI)000318904400020 ()
    Available from: 2012-10-20 Created: 2012-10-20 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    4. Midwives’ knowledge of, attitudes towards and experiences of caring for women with intellectual disability during pregnancy and childbirth: a cross-sectional study in Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Midwives’ knowledge of, attitudes towards and experiences of caring for women with intellectual disability during pregnancy and childbirth: a cross-sectional study in Sweden
    2013 (English)In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 29, no 8, p. 950-955Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: to investigate midwives' knowledge of, attitudes towards andexperiences of caring for women with intellectual disability (ID) during pregnancy andchildbirth. Design/setting: a cross-sectional study among six hundred midwives working at antenatal care and labour wards in Sweden. Results: more than four out of five (81.5%) midwives had experience of caring for womenwith ID. Almost all midwives (97.1%) reported that caring for women with ID is different fromcaring for women without ID. Almost one-half (47.3%) had not received any education aboutpregnancy and delivery of women with ID, and a majority of the midwives (95.4%) requested evidence-based knowledge of women with ID in relation to childbirth. High proportion (69.7%) of the midwives were of the opinion that women with ID cannot satisfactorily manage the mother role, and more than one-third (35.7%) of the midwives considered that womenwith ID should not be pregnant and give birth at all. Most midwives partly/totally agreed that children of women with ID should grow up with their parents supported by the social authorities, but nearly one-fifth (19.1%) partly/totally agreed that the children should grow up in foster care. Conclusions: even if the majority of midwives had experience of caring for women with ID, they were uncertain about how to adapt and give advice and they needed more knowledgeabout these women. Some midwives had negative attitudes towards childbearing amongwomen with ID. Health Service providers should encourage midwives to update theirknowledge and provide supportive supervision in midwifery care for women with ID. 

    National Category
    Other Medical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-183018 (URN)10.1016/j.midw.2012.12.002 (DOI)000321431200019 ()
    Projects
    Berit Höglund
    Available from: 2012-10-20 Created: 2012-10-20 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
  • 3.
    Höglund, Berit
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Larsson, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Ethical dilemmas and legal aspects in contraceptive counselling for women with intellectual disability: Focus group interviews among midwives in Sweden2019In: JARID: Journal of applied research in intellectual disabilities, ISSN 1360-2322, E-ISSN 1468-3148, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 1558-1566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Few studies have explored ethical and legal issues in contraceptive counselling among women with intellectual disability (ID). This study aimed to gain a deeper understanding of these issues during midwifery contraceptive counselling.

    Method

    The present authors interviewed 19 midwives in five focus groups in Sweden 2016 – 2017 and analysed data with content analysis.

    Results

    The participants expressed that women with intellectual disability have equal right to relationships and sexual expressions, but feared exposure to sexual exploitation/abuse. They experienced ethical dilemmas related to principles of fairness and autonomy, but strived to provide assistance in spite of the women's cognitive impairment, presence of supporting persons and uncertainty of optimal counselling. Organizational support was insufficient.

    Conclusions

    The midwives experienced ambivalence, uncertainty and ethical dilemmas in their counselling. They were, however, aware of legal aspects and strived for the women's best interest, right to self‐determination and autonomous choices. The participants wanted better professional teamwork and support.

  • 4.
    Höglund, Berit
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Uppsala Univ, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Larsson, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Midwives' comprehension of care for women with intellectual disability during pregnancy and childbirth: An open-ended questionnaire study in Sweden2015In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, Vol. 28, no 3, p. E57-E62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Few studies have investigated midwifery care for women with intellectual disability (ID). Aim: To gain a deeper understanding of midwives' comprehension of care for women with ID during pregnancy and childbirth. Methods: A cross-sectional study among 375 midwives at antenatal clinics and delivery wards in Sweden. Findings 2476 quotations were sorted into six categories: information; communication and approach; the role of the midwife; preparing for and performing interventions and examinations; methods and assessments; and organisation of care. The midwives affirmed that individual, clear and repeated information together with practical and emotional support was important for women with ID. The midwives planned the care as to strengthen the capacity of the women, open doors for the unborn child and reinforce the process of becoming a mother. Extra time could be needed. They tried to minimise interventions. The midwives felt a dual responsibility, to support the mother-child contact but also to assess and identify any deficits in the caring capacity of the mother and to involve other professionals if needed. Conclusions: The midwives described specially adapted organisation of care, models of information, practical education and emotional support to facilitate the transition to motherhood for women with ID. They have a dual role and responsibility in supporting the woman, while making sure the child is properly cared for. Healthcare services should offer a safe and trusted environment to enable such midwifery care. When foster care is planned, the society should inform and co-operate with midwives in the care of these women.

  • 5.
    Höglund, Berit
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Larsson, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Midwives' work and attitudes towards contraceptive counselling and contraception among women with intellectual disability: focus group interviews in Sweden2019In: European journal of contraception & reproductive health care, ISSN 1362-5187, E-ISSN 1473-0782, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 39-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Family planning counselling is an essential part of sexual and reproductive health care; however, health care professionals often fail to offer sexual and reproductive health services to women with intellectual disability (ID), based on a misconception of inactive sexuality. The aims of this study were to gain a deeper understanding of midwives' perceptions of sexual health and contraceptive use of women with ID, and of midwives' practices in providing contraceptive counselling to women with ID.

    Methods: Five focus group interviews were conducted with 19 midwives at five antenatal/family planning clinics in central Sweden between December 2016 and February 2017.

    Results: The findings are presented in a paradigm model comprising the following components: context, causal conditions for women with ID needing contraception, intervening conditions, action and interaction strategies based on the midwives' approach and performance during the consultation, and finally consequences. Midwives strived to enhance informed choice, whenever possible, and tried to maintain a neutral attitude during counselling. They wanted to provide the most suitable contraceptive method balanced against any risk of long-term use and possible side effects. Midwives raised the need for teamwork and inter-professional support to improve health care, security and access to other related services for women with ID.

    Conclusions: Few women with ID request contraceptive counselling, which limits midwives' knowledge, experience and competence. Midwives, therefore, plan consultations carefully and strive to enable women with ID to make informed contraceptive choices. Increased teamwork could be a way to strengthen the role of midwives and thereby improve counselling.

  • 6.
    Höglund, Berit
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Larsson, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Professional and social support enhances maternal well-being in women with intellectual disability: a Swedish interview study2014In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 30, no 11, p. 1118-1123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: to gain a deeper understanding of the experience of professional and social support during pregnancy and childbirth among women with intellectual disability (ID) in Sweden.

    DESIGN/SETTING: an interview study among 10 women with ID, who had given birth within seven years. Two interviews were performed with each woman and data were analysed with qualitative content analysis.

    FINDINGS: the overarching theme was: Professional and social support enhances maternal well-being in women with intellectual disability. The women described that the midwife and other caregivers contributed to their own insights and supported their mother-to-be process. They were mostly satisfied with the professional care and support during pregnancy and childbirth, based on aspects such as continuity, competence and professional experience of the midwives but also professional approach and working methods. Dissatisfaction and confusion occurred when questions were left unanswered or when the women׳s special needs were not taken into consideration. Family members, friends and colleagues could also have a supporting role and, together with the health staff, contribute to the well-being of the woman.

    CONCLUSIONS: if professional support and care from midwives and other caregivers is adapted to the special needs of women with ID, it contributes to new insights, enhances well-being and supports the process of becoming a mother. Midwife-led continuity of care together with continuous social support should be offered to pregnant women with ID during pregnancy and childbirth.

  • 7.
    Höglund, Berit
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Larsson, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Struggling for motherhood with an intellectual disability: a qualitative study of women's experiences in Sweden2013In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 698-704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    to gain a deeper understanding of the experiences of childbearing in women with intellectual disabililty (ID).

    Design/setting

    ten women with ID, who had given birth within seven years, were interviewed twice and data were analysed with content analysis.

    Findings

    the overarching theme was: Struggling for motherhood with an ID. The significance of having an intellectual disability became evident when the women encountered mixed reactions from partners and relatives, who sometimes suggested an induced abortion. The women disclosed their diagnosis if they believed it was beneficial for them. Throughout the process the women also felt anxious and distressed about the custody of the child. Women experienced the pregnancy as a physical and psychological transition. It was mostly a happy and responsible life event, and the women were aware of physical signs in their bodies and contact with the unborn child. Parent education was considered important but not adequately adapted to their needs. The women described the delivery as hard and painful work, sometimes difficult to understand and they had different strategies to handle the pain and strain of labour. The child was welcomed with warmth and curiosity by the women, who cared for and breast fed the child even if the hospital environment could be confusing and continued custody not taken for granted.

    Conclusions

    women with ID struggle for motherhood and fear losing custody of the child. Professionals need to identify and support these women, who may not always disclose their diagnosis. Since pregnancy, delivery and the transition into motherhood can be difficult to understand, information and support should be better tailored to their needs.

  • 8.
    Höglund, Berit
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Larsson, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Lindgren, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Pregnancy and birth among women with intellectual disability in Sweden - experiences and outcomes2012In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 91, p. 90-91Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Höglund, Berit
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Lindgren, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Larsson, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Midwives’ knowledge of, attitudes towards and experiences of caring for women with intellectual disability during pregnancy and childbirth: a cross-sectional study in Sweden2013In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 29, no 8, p. 950-955Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: to investigate midwives' knowledge of, attitudes towards andexperiences of caring for women with intellectual disability (ID) during pregnancy andchildbirth. Design/setting: a cross-sectional study among six hundred midwives working at antenatal care and labour wards in Sweden. Results: more than four out of five (81.5%) midwives had experience of caring for womenwith ID. Almost all midwives (97.1%) reported that caring for women with ID is different fromcaring for women without ID. Almost one-half (47.3%) had not received any education aboutpregnancy and delivery of women with ID, and a majority of the midwives (95.4%) requested evidence-based knowledge of women with ID in relation to childbirth. High proportion (69.7%) of the midwives were of the opinion that women with ID cannot satisfactorily manage the mother role, and more than one-third (35.7%) of the midwives considered that womenwith ID should not be pregnant and give birth at all. Most midwives partly/totally agreed that children of women with ID should grow up with their parents supported by the social authorities, but nearly one-fifth (19.1%) partly/totally agreed that the children should grow up in foster care. Conclusions: even if the majority of midwives had experience of caring for women with ID, they were uncertain about how to adapt and give advice and they needed more knowledgeabout these women. Some midwives had negative attitudes towards childbearing amongwomen with ID. Health Service providers should encourage midwives to update theirknowledge and provide supportive supervision in midwifery care for women with ID. 

  • 10.
    Höglund, Berit
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Lindgren, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Larsson, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Newborns of mothers with intellectual disability have a higher risk of perinatal death and being small-for-gestational age2012In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 91, no 12, p. 1409-1414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective.

    To study mode of birth, perinatal health and death in children born to mothers with intellectual disability (ID) in Sweden.

    Design.

    Population based register study.

    Setting.

    National registers; the National Patient Register linked to the Medical Birth Register.

    Sample.

    Children of first-time mothers with ID (n = 326) (classified in the ICD 8–10) were identified and compared to 340 624 children of first-time mothers without ID or any other psychiatric diagnosis during 1999 and 2007.

    Methods.

    Population-based data were extracted from the National Patient Register and the Medical Birth Register.

    Main Outcome Measures.

    Mode of birth, preterm birth, small-for-gestational age, Apgar score, stillbirth and perinatal death.

    Results.

    Children born to mothers with ID were more often stillborn (1.2% vs. 0.3%) or died perinatally (1.8% vs. 0.4%) than children born to mothers without ID. They had a higher proportion of cesarean section birth (24.5% vs. 17.7%), preterm birth (12.2% vs. 6.1%), were small-for-gestational age (8.4% vs. 3.1%) and had lower Apgar scores <7 points at 5 minutes (3.7% vs 1.5%), compared to children born to mother without ID. Logistic regression adjusted for maternal characteristics confirmed an increased risk of small-for-gestational age (odds ratio 2.25), stillbirth (odds ratio 4.53) and perinatal death (odds ratio 4.25) in children born to mothers with ID.

    Conclusions.

    Unborn and newborn children of mothers with ID should be considered a risk group, and their mothers may need better individual-based care and support.

  • 11.
    Höglund, Berit
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Lindgren, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Larsson, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Pregnancy and birth outcomes of women with intellectual disability in Sweden: a national register study between 1999 and 20072012In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 91, no 12, p. 1381-1387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective.

    To investigate the antenatal health and demographic factors as well as pregnancy and delivery outcomes in women with intellectual disability (ID) in Sweden.

    Design.

    A population-based register study.

    Setting.

    The National Patient Register (NPR) linked to the Medical Birth Register (MBR).

    Sample.

    Women with ID classified as International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 8–10 who gave birth in 1999–2007 (n = 326), identified from the NPR linked to the MBR, were compared with all first-time, singleton mothers without ID or any other psychiatric diagnoses during this period in Sweden (n = 340 624).

    Methods.

    Population-based data were extracted from the NPR and the MBR.

    Main outcome measures.

    Health and socio-demography at first antenatal visit, mode of delivery, pain relief during labor, preterm birth and discharge from hospital.

    Results.

    A higher proportion of women with ID were teenagers (18.4 vs. 3.3%), obese (20.1 vs. 8.6%) and single (36.6 vs. 6.2%) compared with women without ID, and women with ID smoked more often (27.9 vs. 7.9%). Women with ID had more often a preterm birth (12.2 vs. 6.1%), a cesarean section (CS) (24.5 vs. 17.7%) and used less nitrous oxide as pain relief during labor (59.5 vs. 75.8%). Women with ID had a higher risk for preterm birth [odds ratio (OR) 1.68], CS (OR1.55), non-use of nitrous oxide (OR 1.89) and discharge from hospital to a place other than home (OR 2.24).

    Conclusion.

    Pregnant women with ID should be considered a risk group suggesting that better tailored pre- and intrapartum care and support are needed for these women.

  • 12.
    Höglund, Berit
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Radestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet Univ, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hildingsson, Ingegerd
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research. Mid Sweden Univ, Dept Nursing, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Few women receive a specific explanation of a stillbirth - an online survey of women's perceptions and thoughts about the cause of their baby's death2019In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 19, article id 139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In Sweden, three to four out of every 1000 pregnancies end in stillbirth each year. The aim of this study was to investigate whether women who had experienced stillbirth perceived that they had received an explanation of the death and whether they believed that healthcare professionals were responsible for the death of the baby.

    Methods: An online survey of 356 women in Sweden who had experienced a stillbirth from January 2010 to April 2014. A mixed-methods approach with qualitative content analysis was used to examine the women's responses.

    Results: Nearly half of the women (48.6%) reported that they had not received any explanation as to why their babies had died. Of the women who reported that they had received an explanation, 84 (23.6%) had a specific explanation, and 99 (27.8%) had a vague explanation. In total, 73 (30.0%) of the 243 women who answered the question Do you believe that healthcare personnel were responsible for the stillbirth? stated Yes. The women reported that the healthcare staff had not acknowledged their intuition that the pregnancy was proceeding poorly. Furthermore, they perceived that the staff met them with nonchalance and arrogance. Additionally, the midwife had ignored or normalised the symptoms that could indicate that their pregnancy was proceeding poorly. Some women added that neglect and avoidance among the healthcare staff could have led to a lack of monitoring, which could have been crucial for the outcome of the pregnancy.

    Conclusions: Half of the women surveyed reported that they had not received an explanation of their baby's death, and more than one-fourth held healthcare professionals responsible for the death.

  • 13.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Larsson, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Höglund, Berit
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    An intervention using the preparing for Parenting Toolkit: "Children - what does it involve?" and the Real-Care-Baby simulator among students with ID - a feasibility study2018In: JARID: Journal of applied research in intellectual disabilities, ISSN 1360-2322, E-ISSN 1468-3148, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 598-598Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. SUF Kunskapscentrum, Region Uppsala.
    Larsson, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Wickström, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Höglund, Berit
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    An Intervention using the parenting Tool-kit ”Children – what does it involve?” and the Real-Care-Baby simulator among students with ntellectual disability: a feasibility study2019In: JARID: Journal of applied research in intellectual disabilities, ISSN 1360-2322, E-ISSN 1468-3148, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 380-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is limited knowledge about how young people with intellectual disability can be facilitated in their process of deciding about parenthood. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of an upcoming trial to evaluate an intervention using the Toolkit “Children—what does it involve?” and the “Real‐Care‐Baby” (RCB) simulator among students with intellectual disability.

    Methods: Six students with intellectual disability participated in an intervention with eight educational sessions and a 3‐day caring session with the RCB simulator. Data were collected with questionnaires and interviews.

    Results: The study showed that it is possible to evaluate an intervention using these instruments among students with intellectual disability in order to provide them with further insights about parenthood.

    Conclusion: It is feasible to evaluate the Toolkit and the RCB in a cluster‐randomized study and that such a study could add to our knowledge about possible intervention strategies regarding reproduction and parenting among students with intellectual disability.

  • 15.
    Lundborg, Louise
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp & Inst, Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Inga-Maj
    Sodersjukhuset KI SOS, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Höglund, Berit
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Midwives' responsibility with normal birth in interprofessional teams: A Swedish interview study2019In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 77, p. 95-100Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Wickström, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Höglund, Berit
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Larsson, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Lundgren, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Increased risk for mental illness, injuries, and violence in children born to mothers with intellectual disability: A register study in Sweden during 1999-20122017In: International Journal of Child Abuse & Neglect, ISSN 0145-2134, E-ISSN 1873-7757, Vol. 65, p. 124-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several studies have demonstrated that mothers with intellectual disability (ID) have a higher prevalence of mental health illness, lower socio-economic status, and a higher risk of alcohol and drug use compared to mothers without ID. The children of mothers with ID are over-represented in child protection and legal proceedings but are generally a less studied group than the mothers. The aim of this study was to investigate if children born to mothers with ID had an increased risk of being diagnosed with mental illness, injuries, and violence compared with children of mothers without ID. The study comprised a population based cohort of children born in Sweden between 1999 and 2005. Data were collected from the Medical Birth Register and linked with two other national registers; ICD-10 codes were used for medical diagnoses, including ID. The children were followed from birth to seven years of age. In total, 478,577 children were included, of whom 2749 were born to mothers with ID. Children of mothers with ID were at a greater risk of having mental health problems (adjusted odds ratio (OR)= 2.02; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.74-2.35) and ID (OR = 4.14; CI = 2.95-5.82) in early childhood. They had an increased risk for injuries due to falls (OR = 1.15; CI 1.04-1.27). The largest risk related to trauma was violence and child abuse (OR =3.11; CI = 1.89-5.12). In conclusion, children of mothers with ID had an increased risk for injuries, violence, and child abuse. We therefore suggest that parents with ID should receive evidence based support so that their children receive the best care and protection. (C) 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.

1 - 16 of 16
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf