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  • 1.
    Folke, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Landstinget Dalarna, Dept Psychiat, Falun, Sweden.
    Hursti, Timo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Kanter, Jonathan W
    Arinell, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Tungström, Stefan
    Söderberg, Per
    Ekselius, L
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Exploring the relationship between activities and emotional experience using a diary in a mental health inpatient setting.2018In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 276-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mental health inpatient milieus have repeatedly been found to be associated with passivity, social disengagement, and low levels of interaction with staff. However, little is known about patients' experiences related to different ward activities. In the present study, we aimed to study the reports of activities and associated experiences of patients admitted to acute psychiatric inpatient wards. Disengaged, inactive, and solitary activities were hypothesized to be associated with less reward and more distress than their counterparts. We also aimed to investigate if such activities predicted distress, and if they were associated with clinical severity. Participants (n = 102) recorded their activities along with concurrent ratings of reward and distress in a structured 1-day diary, and nurses provided clinical severity ratings. On average, 3.74 of the 11 hours assessed (34%) were spent doing nothing, only 0.88 hours (8%) were spent with staff, and most of the time was spent in solitude. Doing nothing, being alone, and passivity were associated with the greatest levels of distress and lowest levels of reward, whereas informal socializing demonstrated the opposite pattern. Distress was not predicted by activity or reward when adjusting for baseline distress. Clinical severity was not associated with the amount of time spent alone or the experience of reward during activity. In conclusion, the risk for passivity and social disengagement during admission prevails. This activity pattern could have detrimental emotional consequences and warrants action, but more studies are needed to determine if activity actually precedes emotional experience.

  • 2.
    Folke, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Hursti, Timo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Tungström, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Söderberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Kanter, Jonathan W.
    Behavioral Activation Between Acute Inpatient and Outpatient Psychiatry: Description of a Protocol and a Pilot Feasibility Study2015In: Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, ISSN 1077-7229, E-ISSN 1878-187X, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 468-480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Gaps in the continuity of care between acute inpatient and outpatient psychiatric services are common and potentially detrimental for service users. In this paper we provide the rationale for and description of a 12-session behavioral activation intervention for acute inpatients with depression and comorbid psychiatric disorders. The intervention was tailored to be initiated during acute inpatient care and to continue after discharge into outpatient services. We also describe a small pilot investigation (N = 13) of the intervention’s preliminary feasibility. Treatment retention, self-ratings, and participants’ adherence to treatment principles indicate preliminary feasibility of behavioral activation in this complex context. Self-rated activation and avoidance improved during the intervention. The value of a parsimonious inpatient therapy that can bridge the gap between services is discussed along with the limitations of this study.

  • 3.
    Folke, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Hursti, Timo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Tungström, Stefan
    Söderberg, Per
    Kanter, Jonathan W
    Kuutmann, Klara
    Olofsson, Hanna
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Behavioral activation in acute inpatient psychiatry: A multiple baseline evaluation2015In: Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, ISSN 0005-7916, E-ISSN 1873-7943, Vol. 46, p. 170-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The present study employed a multiple baseline study design with repeated measures to explore clinical outcomes, therapy mechanisms, and feasibility of Behavioral Activation for persons admitted to inpatient psychiatry.

    METHODS: Six adult inpatients with depressive symptoms and different psychiatric disorders were randomized to different lengths of baseline standard inpatient treatment. Subsequently a 5-day, 10-session Behavioral Activation protocol was added. Daily self-report outcome and process measures were administered and supplemented with hourly self-reports and clinician assessments before and after each study phase.

    RESULTS: After a relatively stable baseline, at least four participants showed marked gradual improvements both in terms of outcome as well as activation and avoidance as Behavioral Activation was initiated. The temporal relation between process and outcome differed somewhat across metrics. In most instances however, change in activation and avoidance either coincided or preceded decreased depression.

    LIMITATIONS: We did not include some relatively common disorders, did not control for the effects of increased attention, did not investigate treatment integrity, and did not conduct follow-up after discharge. Raters were not blind and measures were mainly focused on depressive symptoms. All received concurrent medical treatment.

    CONCLUSIONS: This preliminary study further supports the promise of Behavioral Activation as an inpatient treatment for persons with a variety of psychiatric disorders. Results also lends preliminary support for the purported mechanisms of Behavioral Activation.

  • 4.
    Folke, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Parling, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Melin, Lennart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Depression: A Preliminary Randomized Clinical Trial for Unemployed on Long-Term Sick Leave2012In: Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, ISSN 1077-7229, E-ISSN 1878-187X, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 583-594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This preliminaly study investigated the feasibility of a brief Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) in a Swedish sample of unemployed individuals on long-term sick leave due to depression. Participants were randomized to a nonstandardized control condition (N = 16) or to the ACT condition (N = 18) consisting of 1 individual and 5 group sessions. From pretreatment to 18-month follow-up the ACT participants improved significantly on measures of depression, general health, and quality of life compared to participants in the control condition. The conditions did not differ regarding sick leave and employment status at any time point. The results indicate that ACT is a promising treatment for depression. The need for further refinements of future ACT protocols for this population is discussed.

  • 5.
    Ramnero, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Psychol, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Folke, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Kanter, Jonathan W.
    Univ Washington, Dept Psychol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    A learning theory account of depression2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 73-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning theory provides a foundation for understanding and deriving treatment principles for impacting a spectrum of functional processes relevant to the construct of depression. While behavioral interventions have been commonplace in the cognitive behavioral tradition, most often conceptualized within a cognitive theoretical framework, recent years have seen renewed interest in more purely behavioral models. These modern learning theory accounts of depression focus on the interchange between behavior and the environment, mainly in terms of lack of reinforcement, extinction of instrumental behavior, and excesses of aversive control, and include a conceptualization of relevant cognitive and emotional variables. These positions, drawn from extensive basic and applied research, cohere with biological theories on reduced reward learning and reward responsiveness and views of depression as a heterogeneous, complex set of disorders. Treatment techniques based on learning theory, often labeled Behavioral Activation ( BA) focus on activating the individual in directions that increase contact with potential reinforcers, as defined ideographically with the client. BA is considered an empirically well-established treatment that generalizes well across diverse contexts and populations. The learning theory account is discussed in terms of being a parsimonious model and ground for treatments highly suitable for large scale dissemination.

  • 6.
    Salberg, Johanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Folke, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Clin Res Ctr, Dalarna, Falun, Sweden.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Öster, Caisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Nursing staff-led behavioural group intervention in psychiatric in-patient care: Patient and staff experiences2018In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 1401-1410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A promising intervention in mental health in-patient care is behavioural activation (BA). Interventions based on BA can be used by mental health nurses and other staff members. The aim of this study was to evaluate patients' and staff members' experiences of a nursing staff-led behavioural group intervention in mental health in-patient care. The intervention was implemented at three adult acute general mental health in-patient wards in a public hospital setting in Sweden. A self-administrated questionnaire, completed by 84 patients and 34 nurses and nurse assistants, was administered, and nonparametric data analysed using descriptive statistics. Our findings revealed that both patients and nursing staff ranked nursing care and care environment as important aspects in the recovery process. Patients and staff members reported overall positive experiences of the group sessions. Patients with higher frequencies of attendance and patients satisfied with overall care had a more positive attitude towards the intervention. A more positive experience of being a group leader was reported by staff members who had been leading groups more than ten times. The most common impeding factor during implementation, reported by staff members, was a negative attitude to change. Conducive factors were having support from a psychologist and the perception that patients were showing interest. These positive experiences reported by patients and nursing staff, combined with previous research in this field, are taking us one step further in evaluating group sessions based on BA as a meaningful nursing intervention in mental health in-patient care.

1 - 6 of 6
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