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  • 1.
    Barrozo, Alexandre
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology.
    Promiscuity and Selectivity in Phosphoryl Transferases2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Phosphoryl transfers are essential chemical reactions in key life processes, including energy production, signal transduction and protein synthesis. They are known for having extremely low reaction rates in aqueous solution, reaching the scale of millions of years. In order to make life possible, enzymes that catalyse phosphoryl transfer, phosphoryl transferases, have evolved to be tremendously proficient catalysts, increasing reaction rates to the millisecond timescale.

    Due to the nature of the electronic structure of phosphorus atoms, understanding how hydrolysis of phosphate esters occurs is a complex task. Experimental studies on the hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters with acidic leaving groups suggest a concerted mechanism with a loose, metaphosphate-like transition state. Theoretical studies have suggested two possible concerted pathways, either with loose or tight transition state geometries, plus the possibility of a stepwise mechanism with the formation of a phosphorane intermediate. Different pathways were shown to be energetically preferable depending on the acidity of the leaving group. Here we performed computational studies to revisit how this mechanistic shift occurs along a series of aryl phosphate monoesters, suggesting possible factors leading to such change.

    The fact that distinct pathways can occur in solution could mean that the same is possible for an enzyme active site. We performed simulations on the catalytic activity of β-phosphoglucomutase, suggesting that it is possible for two mechanisms to occur at the same time for the phosphoryl transfer.

    Curiously, several phosphoryl transferases were shown to be able to catalyse not only phosphate ester hydrolysis, but also the cleavage of other compounds. We modeled the catalytic mechanism of two highly promiscuous members of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily. Our model reproduces key experimental observables and shows that these enzymes are electrostatically flexible, employing the same set of residues to enhance the rates of different reactions, with different electrostatic contributions per residue.

    List of papers
    1. Evaluation and Characterisation of Mechanistic Alternatives for beta-Phosphoglucomutase
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation and Characterisation of Mechanistic Alternatives for beta-Phosphoglucomutase
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    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-278943 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-02-26 Created: 2016-02-26 Last updated: 2016-04-12
    2. Force Field Independent Metal Parameters Using a Nonbonded Dummy Model
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Force Field Independent Metal Parameters Using a Nonbonded Dummy Model
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    2014 (English)In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 118, no 16, p. 4351-4362Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The cationic dummy atom approach provides a powerful nonbonded description for a range of alkaline-earth and transition-metal centers, capturing both structural and electrostatic effects. In this work we refine existing literature parameters for octahedrally coordinated Mn2+, Zn2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+, as well as providing new parameters for Ni2+, Co2+, and Fe2+. In all the cases, we are able to reproduce both M2+-O distances and experimental solvation free energies, which has not been achieved to date for transition metals using any other model. The parameters have also been tested using two different water models and show consistent performance. Therefore, our parameters are easily transferable to any force field that describes nonbonded interactions using Coulomb and Lennard-Jones potentials. Finally, we demonstrate the stability of our parameters in both the human and Escherichia coli variants of the enzyme glyoxalase 1 as showcase systems, as both enzymes are active with a range of transition metals. The parameters presented in this work provide a valuable resource for the molecular simulation community, as they extend the range of metal ions that can be studied using classical approaches, while also providing a starting point for subsequent parametrization of new metal centers.

    National Category
    Physical Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-225523 (URN)10.1021/jp501737x (DOI)000335113600010 ()
    Funder
    Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), 2013/26-1
    Available from: 2014-06-23 Created: 2014-06-04 Last updated: 2018-12-03Bibliographically approved
    3. Mechanistic Shifts Along the Linear Free Energy Relationship for Aryl Phosphate Monoester Hydrolysis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mechanistic Shifts Along the Linear Free Energy Relationship for Aryl Phosphate Monoester Hydrolysis
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Theoretical Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-278945 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-02-26 Created: 2016-02-26 Last updated: 2016-04-12
    4. Cooperative Electrostatic Interactions Drive Functional Evolution in the Alkaline Phosphatase Superfamily
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cooperative Electrostatic Interactions Drive Functional Evolution in the Alkaline Phosphatase Superfamily
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    2015 (English)In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 137, no 28, p. 9061-9076Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    It is becoming widely accepted that catalytic promiscuity, i.e., the ability of a single enzyme to catalyze the turnover of multiple, chemically distinct substrates, plays a key role in the evolution of new enzyme functions. In this context, the members of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily have been extensively studied as model systems in order to understand the phenomenon of enzyme multifunctionality. In the present work, we model the selectivity of two multiply promiscuous members of this superfamily, namely the phosphonate monoester hydrolases from Burkholderia caryophylli and Rhizobium leguminosarum. We have performed extensive simulations of the enzymatic reaction of both wild-type enzymes and several experimentally characterized mutants. Our computational models are in agreement with key experimental observables, such as the observed activities of the wild-type enzymes, qualitative interpretations of experimental pH-rate profiles, and activity trends among several active site mutants. In all cases the substrates of interest bind to the enzyme in similar conformations, with largely unperturbed transition states from their corresponding analogues in aqueous solution. Examination of transition-state geometries and the contribution of individual residues to the calculated activation barriers suggest that the broad promiscuity of these enzymes arises from cooperative electrostatic interactions in the active site, allowing each enzyme to adapt to the electrostatic needs of different substrates. By comparing the structural and electrostatic features of several alkaline phosphatases, we suggest that this phenomenon is a generalized feature driving selectivity and promiscuity within this superfamily and can be in turn used for artificial enzyme design.

    National Category
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-260856 (URN)10.1021/jacs.5b03945 (DOI)000358556200033 ()26091851 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 2010-5026EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 306474Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), 25/2-10
    Note

    De 2 första författarna delar förstaförfattarskapet.

    Available from: 2015-08-26 Created: 2015-08-25 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
  • 2.
    Barrozo, Alexandre
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational and Systems Biology.
    Borstnar, Rok
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational and Systems Biology.
    Marloie, Gaël
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational and Systems Biology.
    Kamerlin, Lynn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational and Systems Biology.
    Computational Protein Engineering: Bridging the Gap between Rational Design and Laboratory Evolution2012In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, ISSN 1422-0067, E-ISSN 1422-0067, Vol. 13, no 10, p. 12428-12460Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enzymes are tremendously proficient catalysts, which can be used as extracellular catalysts for a whole host of processes, from chemical synthesis to the generation of novel biofuels. For them to be more amenable to the needs of biotechnology, however, it is often necessary to be able to manipulate their physico-chemical properties in an efficient and streamlined manner, and, ideally, to be able to train them to catalyze completely new reactions. Recent years have seen an explosion of interest in different approaches to achieve this, both in the laboratory, and in silico. There remains, however, a gap between current approaches to computational enzyme design, which have primarily focused on the early stages of the design process, and laboratory evolution, which is an extremely powerful tool for enzyme redesign, but will always be limited by the vastness of sequence space combined with the low frequency for desirable mutations. This review discusses different approaches towards computational enzyme design and demonstrates how combining newly developed screening approaches that can rapidly predict potential mutation “hotspots” with approaches that can quantitatively and reliably dissect the catalytic step can bridge the gap that currently exists between computational enzyme design and laboratory evolution studies.

  • 3.
    Barrozo, Alexandre
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Duarte, Fernanda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bauer, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Carvalho, Alexandra T. P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kamerlin, Shina C. Lynn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Cooperative Electrostatic Interactions Drive Functional Evolution in the Alkaline Phosphatase Superfamily2015In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 137, no 28, p. 9061-9076Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is becoming widely accepted that catalytic promiscuity, i.e., the ability of a single enzyme to catalyze the turnover of multiple, chemically distinct substrates, plays a key role in the evolution of new enzyme functions. In this context, the members of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily have been extensively studied as model systems in order to understand the phenomenon of enzyme multifunctionality. In the present work, we model the selectivity of two multiply promiscuous members of this superfamily, namely the phosphonate monoester hydrolases from Burkholderia caryophylli and Rhizobium leguminosarum. We have performed extensive simulations of the enzymatic reaction of both wild-type enzymes and several experimentally characterized mutants. Our computational models are in agreement with key experimental observables, such as the observed activities of the wild-type enzymes, qualitative interpretations of experimental pH-rate profiles, and activity trends among several active site mutants. In all cases the substrates of interest bind to the enzyme in similar conformations, with largely unperturbed transition states from their corresponding analogues in aqueous solution. Examination of transition-state geometries and the contribution of individual residues to the calculated activation barriers suggest that the broad promiscuity of these enzymes arises from cooperative electrostatic interactions in the active site, allowing each enzyme to adapt to the electrostatic needs of different substrates. By comparing the structural and electrostatic features of several alkaline phosphatases, we suggest that this phenomenon is a generalized feature driving selectivity and promiscuity within this superfamily and can be in turn used for artificial enzyme design.

  • 4.
    Barrozo, Alexandre
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology.
    Esguerra, Mauricio
    Marloie, Gael
    Florian, Jan
    Williams, Nicholas
    Kamerlin, Shina
    Evaluation and Characterisation of Mechanistic Alternatives for beta-PhosphoglucomutaseManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Barrozo, Alexandre H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational and Systems Biology.
    Harnessing Promiscuity Patterns to Map Evolution in the Alkaline Phosphatase Superfamily2013In: Biophysical Journal, ISSN 0006-3495, E-ISSN 1542-0086, Vol. 104, no 2, p. 232A-232AArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Barrozo, Alexandre H.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational and Systems Biology.
    Carvalho, Alexandra Pires
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational and Systems Biology.
    Understanding Functional Evolution in the Alkaline Phosphatase Superfamily2014In: Biophysical Journal, ISSN 0006-3495, E-ISSN 1542-0086, Vol. 106, no 2, p. 675A-675AArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past 40 years, it has been demonstrated that many enzymes are capable of promiscuous catalytic activities, facilitating the turnover of more than one chemically distinct substrate. This has been argued to play an important role in enzyme evolution, with highly promiscuous progenitor enzymes evolving under evolutionary pressure to modern day specialists, while still retaining some level of their former promiscuous activities1. This theory has been extensively tested by different experiments using in vitro evolution2. The alkaline phosphatase superfamily members provide a particularly attractive showcase for studying enzyme promiscuity, as they often show reciprocal promiscuity, in that the native reaction for one member is often a side-reaction for another3. While deceptively similar, their catalyzed reactions (cleavage of P-O and S-O bonds) proceed via distinct transition states and protonation requirements4,5. We present detailed computational studies of the promiscuous catalytic activity of three evolutionarily related members: the arylsulfatase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa6, and the phosphonate monoester hydrolases from Burkholderia caryophili7and Rhizobium leguminosarum8. By tracking their structural and electrostatic features, and comparing to other known members of the superfamily, we provide an atomic-level map for functional evolution within this superfamily.

  • 7.
    Barrozo, Alexandre
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Liao, Qinghua
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structural Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Esguerra, Mauricio
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational Biology and Bioinformatics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Marloie, Gael
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Florian, Jan
    Loyola Univ Chicago, Dept Chem & Biochem, Chicago, IL 60660 USA..
    Williams, Nicholas H.
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Chem, Sheffield S3 7HF, S Yorkshire, England..
    Kamerlin, Shina C. Lynn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Computer simulations of the catalytic mechanism of wild-type and mutant beta-phosphoglucomutase2018In: Organic and biomolecular chemistry, ISSN 1477-0520, E-ISSN 1477-0539, Vol. 16, no 12, p. 2060-2073Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    beta-Phosphoglucomutase (beta-PGM) has served as an important model system for understanding biological phosphoryl transfer. This enzyme catalyzes the isomerization of beta-glucose-1-phosphate to -glucose-6-phosphate in a two-step process proceeding via a bisphosphate intermediate. The conventionally accepted mechanism is that both steps are concerted processes involving acid-base catalysis from a nearby aspartate (D10) side chain. This argument is supported by the observation that mutation of D10 leaves the enzyme with no detectable activity. However, computational studies have suggested that a substrate-assisted mechanism is viable for many phosphotransferases. Therefore, we carried out empirical valence bond (EVB) simulations to address the plausibility of this mechanistic alternative, including its role in the abolished catalytic activity of the D10S, D10C and D10N point mutants of beta-PGM. In addition, we considered both of these mechanisms when performing EVB calculations of the catalysis of the wild type (WT), H20A, H20Q, T16P, K76A, D170A and E169A/D170A protein variants. Our calculated activation free energies confirm that D10 is likely to serve as the general base/acid for the reaction catalyzed by the WT enzyme and all its variants, in which D10 is not chemically altered. Our calculations also suggest that D10 plays a dual role in structural organization and maintaining electrostatic balance in the active site. The correct positioning of this residue in a catalytically competent conformation is provided by a functionally important conformational change in this enzyme and by the extensive network of H-bonding interactions that appear to be exquisitely preorganized for the transition state stabilization.

  • 8.
    Bauer, Paul
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Barrozo, Alexandre
    Department of Chemistry, University of Southern California, SGM 418, 3620 McClintock Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90089-1062, United StatesDepartment of Chemistry, University of Southern California, SGM 418, 3620 McClintock Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90089-1062, United States.
    Purg, Miha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Amrein, Beat Anton
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Esguerra, Mauricio
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Wilson, Philippe Barrie
    Leicester School of Pharmacy, De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester LE1 9BH, UK.
    Major, Dan Thomas
    Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900, Israel.
    Åqvist, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational Biology and Bioinformatics.
    Kamerlin, Shina C. Lynn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structural Biology.
    Q6: A comprehensive toolkit for empirical valence bond and related free energy calculations2018In: SoftwareX, ISSN 2352-7110, p. 388-395Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atomistic simulations have become one of the main approaches to study the chemistry and dynamicsof biomolecular systems in solution. Chemical modelling is a powerful way to understand biochemistry,with a number of different programs available to perform specialized calculations. We present here Q6, anew version of the Q software package, which is a generalized package for empirical valence bond, linearinteraction energy, and other free energy calculations. In addition to general technical improvements, Q6extends the reach of the EVB implementation to fast approximations of quantum effects, extended solventdescriptions and quick estimation of the contributions of individual residues to changes in the activationfree energy of reactions.

  • 9.
    Carvalho, Alexandra T P
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational and Systems Biology.
    Barrozo, Alexandre
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational and Systems Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Doron, Dvir
    Kilshtain, Alexandra Vardi
    Major, Dan Thomas
    Kamerlin, Lynn Shina Caroline
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational and Systems Biology.
    Challenges in computational studies of enzyme structure, function and dynamics2014In: Journal of Molecular Graphics and Modelling, ISSN 1093-3263, E-ISSN 1873-4243, Vol. 54, p. 62-79Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this review we give an overview of the field of Computational enzymology. We start by describing the birth of the field, with emphasis on the work of the 2013 chemistry Nobel Laureates. We then present key features of the state-of-the-art in the field, showing what theory, accompanied by experiments, has taught us so far about enzymes. We also briefly describe computational methods, such as quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics approaches, reaction coordinate treatment, and free energy simulation approaches. We finalize by discussing open questions and challenges.

  • 10. Duarte, Fernanda
    et al.
    Barrozo, Alexandre
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology.
    Åqvist, Johan
    Williams, Nicholas
    Kamerlin, Shina
    Mechanistic Shifts Along the Linear Free Energy Relationship for ArylPhosphate Monoester Hydrolysis.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Duarte, Fernanda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational and Systems Biology.
    Bauer, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational and Systems Biology.
    Barrozo, Alexandre
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational and Systems Biology.
    Amrein, Beat Anton
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational and Systems Biology.
    Purg, Miha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational and Systems Biology.
    Åqvist, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational and Systems Biology.
    Kamerlin, Shina Caroline Lynn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational and Systems Biology.
    Force Field Independent Metal Parameters Using a Nonbonded Dummy Model2014In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 118, no 16, p. 4351-4362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cationic dummy atom approach provides a powerful nonbonded description for a range of alkaline-earth and transition-metal centers, capturing both structural and electrostatic effects. In this work we refine existing literature parameters for octahedrally coordinated Mn2+, Zn2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+, as well as providing new parameters for Ni2+, Co2+, and Fe2+. In all the cases, we are able to reproduce both M2+-O distances and experimental solvation free energies, which has not been achieved to date for transition metals using any other model. The parameters have also been tested using two different water models and show consistent performance. Therefore, our parameters are easily transferable to any force field that describes nonbonded interactions using Coulomb and Lennard-Jones potentials. Finally, we demonstrate the stability of our parameters in both the human and Escherichia coli variants of the enzyme glyoxalase 1 as showcase systems, as both enzymes are active with a range of transition metals. The parameters presented in this work provide a valuable resource for the molecular simulation community, as they extend the range of metal ions that can be studied using classical approaches, while also providing a starting point for subsequent parametrization of new metal centers.

  • 12. Shurki, Avital
    et al.
    Derat, Etienne
    Barrozo, Alexandre
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kamerlin, Shina Caroline Lynn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    How valence bond theory can help you understand your (bio)chemical reaction2015In: Chemical Society Reviews, ISSN 0306-0012, E-ISSN 1460-4744, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 1037-1052Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Almost a century has passed since valence bond (VB) theory was originally introduced to explain covalent bonding in the H-2 molecule within a quantum mechanical framework. The past century has seen constant improvements in this theory, with no less than two distinct Nobel prizes based on work that is essentially developments in VB theory. Additionally, ongoing advances in both methodology and computational power have greatly expanded the scope of problems that VB theory can address. In this Tutorial Review, we aim to give the reader a solid understanding of the foundations of modern VB theory, using a didactic example of a model S(N)2 reaction to illustrate its immediate applications. This will be complemented by examples of challenging problems that at present can only be efficiently addressed by VB-based approaches. Finally, the ongoing importance of VB theory is demonstrated. It is concluded that VB will continue to be a major driving force for chemistry in the century to come.

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