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  • 1.
    Cai, Yixiao
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Pujari-Palmer, Shiuli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Gururaj, Satwik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Fu, Le
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Chen, Song
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Engqvist, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Karlsson Ott, Marjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Xia, Wei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Utilization of Translucent Hydroxyapatite Nano-Ceramics as a Bio-Window Material2016In: Nano Advances, Vol. 1, p. 45-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bioceramic materials are importantlyused in the field ofhard tissue engineering. The direct detection of cell response is almost impossible for mostof bioceramics due to theiropaqueness. Thus,the live tracking of cell behavior cannot be performedon these ceramics. In this study, we proposea strategy thatdirect observation of cell growth through hydroxyapatite (HA)ceramics can be realized by employing a translucent hydroxyapatite (tHA) nano-ceramic. We obtained MC3T3 preosteoblast cells and cultured them in the presence of tHA for up to 7 days. The results show that MC3T3cells were able to be seen through the tHA. In addition, live fluorescent staining confirmed that the MC3T3 cells were viable throughout the culture time period. The findings reveal the as-fabricated tHA nano-ceramics can bepotentialas a bio-window material for cell adhesion and proliferation.

  • 2.
    Chen, Song
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Pujari-Palmer, Shiuli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Rubino, Stefano
    Univ Oslo, Dept Phys, Oslo, Norway; Simon Fraser Univ, Dept Chem, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada.
    Westlund, Viktoria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Ott, Marjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Engqvist, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Xia, Wei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Highly repeatable synthesis of nHA with high aspect ratio2015In: Materials letters (General ed.), ISSN 0167-577X, E-ISSN 1873-4979, Vol. 159, p. 163-167Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Grandfield, Kathryn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Pujari, Shiuli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Ott, Marjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Engqvist, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Xia, Wei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Effect of Calcium and Strontium on Mesoporous Titania Coatings for Implant Applications2013In: Journal of Biomaterials and Nanobiotechnology, ISSN 2158-7027, E-ISSN 2158-7043, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 107-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ncreasing interest in the role of ions such as calcium and strontium in bone formation has called for the investigation of multifunctional ion-doped implant coatings. Mesoporous titania coatings incorporating calcium or strontium enabled a unique pore morphology and potential for drug delivery. Coatings were produced on titanium by an evaporation induced self-assembly method with the addition of calcium or strontium to the sol causing a shift in morphology from a hexagonally-packed to a worm-like porous network. Pore sizes ranged from 3.8 - 5 nm and coatings exhibited high surface areas between 181 - 215.5 m2/g, as measured by N2adsorption-desorption. Coatings were loaded with 1 mg/ml Cephalothin, and showed sustained release of the antibiotic over one week in vitro. Cell studies confirmed that the ion addition had no toxic effect on human-like osteoblastic SaOS-2 cells. The results of this study suggest the potential for mesoporous coatings with calcium or strontium incorporation for direct bone-interfacing and combined drug delivery implant applications.

  • 4.
    Grandfield, Kathryn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Pujari, Shiuli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Ott, Marjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Engqvist, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Xia, Wei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Mesoporous titania implant coatings with and without calcium and strontium ion incorporation2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Lindahl, Carl
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Pujari-Palmer, Shiuli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Hoess, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Ott, Marjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Engqvist, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Xia, Wei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    The influence of Sr content in calcium phosphate coatings2015In: Materials science & engineering. C, biomimetic materials, sensors and systems, ISSN 0928-4931, E-ISSN 1873-0191, Vol. 53, p. 322-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study calcium phosphate coatings with different amounts of strontium.(Sr) were prepared using a biomineralization method. The incorporation of Sr changed the composition and morphology of coatings from plate-like to sphere-like morphology. Dissolution testing indicated that the solubility of the coatings increased with increased Sr concentration. Evaluation of extracts (with Sr concentrations ranging from 0 to 237 mu g/mL) from the HA, 0.06Sr, 0.6Sr, and 12Sr coatings during in vitro cell cultures showed that Sr incorporation into coatings significantly enhanced the ALP activity in comparison to cells treated with control and HA eluted media. These findings show that calcium phosphate coatings could promote osteogenic differentiation even in a low amount of strontium. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 6.
    Pujari, Shiuli
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Hoess, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Shen, J.
    Thormann, A.
    Heilmann, A.
    Tang, L.
    Karlsson-Ott, Miriam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Effect of nanoporosity on inflammatory cells2014In: European Journal of Clinical Investigation, ISSN 0014-2972, E-ISSN 1365-2362, Vol. 44, no S1, p. 36-36Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Pujari, Shiuli
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Hoess, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Shen, Jinhui
    Thormann, Annika
    Heilmann, Andreas
    Tang, Liping
    Karlsson-Ott, Marjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Effects of nanoporous alumina on inflammatory cell response2014In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part A, ISSN 1549-3296, E-ISSN 1552-4965, Vol. 102, no 11, p. 3773-3780Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study focuses on the effects of nanoscale porosity on inflammatory response in vitro and in vivo. Nanoporous alumina membranes with different pore sizes, 20 and 200 nm in diameter, were used. We first evaluated cell/alumina interactions in vitro by observing adhesion, proliferation, and activation of a murine fibroblast and a macrophage cell line. To investigate the chronic inflammatory response, the membranes were implanted subcutaneously in mice for 2 weeks. Cell recruitment to the site of implantation was determined by histology and the production of cytokines was measured by protein array analysis. Both in vitro and in vivo studies showed that 200 nm pores induced a stronger inflammatory response as compared to the alumina with 20 nm pores. This was observed by an increase in macrophage activation in vitro as well as higher cell recruitment and generation of proinflammatory cytokines around the alumina with 200 nm pores, in vivo. Our results suggest that nanofeatures can be modulated in order to control the inflammatory response to implants.

  • 8.
    Pujari-Palmer, Michael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Pujari-Palmer, Shiuli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Engqvist, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Ott, Marjam Karlsson
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Rebamipide Delivered by Brushite Cement Enhances Osteoblast and Macrophage Proliferation2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many of the bioactive agents capable of stimulating osseous regeneration, such as bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), are limited by rapid degradation, a short bioactive half-life at the target site in vivo, or are prohibitively expensive to obtain in large quantities. Rebamipide, an amino acid modified hydroxylquinoline, can alter the expression of key mediators of bone anabolism, cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2), BMP-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), in diverse cell types such as mucosal and endothelial cells or chondrocytes. The present study investigates whether Rebamipide enhances proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts when delivered from brushite cement. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) quenching ability of Rebampide was tested in macrophages as a measure of bioactivity following drug release incubation times, up to 14 days. Rebamipide release from brushite occurrs via non-fickian diffusion, with a rapid linear release of 9.70%+/- 0.37% of drug per day for the first 5 days, and an average of 0.5%-1% per day thereafter for 30 days. Rebamipide slows the initial and final cement setting time by up to 3 and 1 minute, respectively, but does not significantly reduce the mechanical strength below 4% (weight percentage). Pre-osteoblast proliferation increases by 24% upon exposure to 0.4uM Rebamipide, and by up to 73% when Rebamipide is delivered via brushite cement. Low doses of Rebamipide do not adversely affect peak alkaline phosphatase activity in differentiating pre-osteoblasts. Rebamipide weakly stimulates proliferation in macrophages at low concentrations (118 +/- 7.4% at 1uM), and quenches ROS by 40-60%. This is the first investigation of Rebamipide in osteoblasts.

  • 9.
    Pujari-Palmer, Shiuli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences.
    Nanofeatures of Biomaterials and their Impact on the Inflammatory Response2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanomaterials offer an advantage over traditional biomaterials since cells naturally communicate via nanoscale interactions. The extracellular matrix, for example, modulates adhesion and cellular functions via nanoscale features. Thus incorporating nanofeatures into biomaterials may promote tissue regeneration, however in certain forms and doses nanomaterials can also cause harm. A thorough understanding of cell-nanomaterial interactions is therefore necessary to better design functional biomaterials. This thesis focuses on evaluating the effect of nanofeatures on inflammation using two different models: nanoporous alumina and hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (HANPs).

    The inflammatory response caused by in vitro exposure of macrophages to nanoporous alumina, with pore diameters of 20nm and 200nm, was investigated. In addition in vivo studies were performed by implantation of nanoporous membranes in mice. In both cases the 200nm pore diameter elicited a stronger inflammatory response.

    Nanoporous alumina with 20, 100 and 200nm pores were loaded with Trolox, a vitamin E analogue, in order to scavenge ROS produced by primary human polymorphonuclear (PMNC) and mononuclear (MNCs) leukocytes. Unloaded alumina membranes stimulated greater ROS production from PMNCs cultured on 20nm versus 100nm pores. This trend reversed when PMNCs were cultured on Trolox loaded membranes since Trolox eluted slower from 20nm than 100nm and 200nm pores. ROS produced from PMNCs was reduced between 8-30% when cultured on Trolox loaded membranes. For MNCs, ROS production was not affected by pore size. However when the alumina was loaded with Trolox ROS production was quenched by 95%.

    HANPs with distinct morphologies (long rods, sheets, dots, and fibers) were synthesized via hydrothermal and precipitation methods. The HANPs were then exposed to PMNCs, MNCs, and the human dermal fibroblast (hDF) cell line. Changes in cell viability, ROS, morphology, and apoptotic behavior were evaluated. PMNC and hDF viability decreased following exposure to fibers, while the dot particles reduced MNC viability. Fibers stimulated greater ROS production from PMNCs and MNCs, and caused apoptotic behavior in all cell types. Furthermore, they also stimulated greater capsule thickness in vivo, suggesting that nanoparticle morphology can significantly influence acute inflammation.

    The outcome of this thesis, confirms the importance of understanding how nanofeatures influence inflammation.

    List of papers
    1. Effects of nanoporous alumina on inflammatory cell response
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of nanoporous alumina on inflammatory cell response
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part A, ISSN 1549-3296, E-ISSN 1552-4965, Vol. 102, no 11, p. 3773-3780Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The present study focuses on the effects of nanoscale porosity on inflammatory response in vitro and in vivo. Nanoporous alumina membranes with different pore sizes, 20 and 200 nm in diameter, were used. We first evaluated cell/alumina interactions in vitro by observing adhesion, proliferation, and activation of a murine fibroblast and a macrophage cell line. To investigate the chronic inflammatory response, the membranes were implanted subcutaneously in mice for 2 weeks. Cell recruitment to the site of implantation was determined by histology and the production of cytokines was measured by protein array analysis. Both in vitro and in vivo studies showed that 200 nm pores induced a stronger inflammatory response as compared to the alumina with 20 nm pores. This was observed by an increase in macrophage activation in vitro as well as higher cell recruitment and generation of proinflammatory cytokines around the alumina with 200 nm pores, in vivo. Our results suggest that nanofeatures can be modulated in order to control the inflammatory response to implants.

    Keyword
    nanoporous alumina, nanofeatures, inflammation, in vivo
    National Category
    Biomaterials Science Engineering and Technology
    Research subject
    Engineering Science with specialization in Materials Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-236525 (URN)10.1002/jbm.a.35048 (DOI)000343010100001 ()24288233 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-12-01 Created: 2014-11-19 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    2. Reduced oxidative stress in primary human cells by antioxidant released from nanoporous alumina
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reduced oxidative stress in primary human cells by antioxidant released from nanoporous alumina
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied biomaterials, ISSN 1552-4973, E-ISSN 1552-4981, Vol. 104, no 3, p. 568-575Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Nanoporous alumina elicits different inflammatory responses dependent on pore size, such as increased complement activation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, on 200 versus 20 nm pores. In this study, we attempt to further modulate inflammatory cell response by loading nanoporous alumina membranes (20, 100, and 200 nm pores), with an antioxidant, Trolox, for controlled drug release. For mononuclear cells (MNC) no difference in cell response, due to pore size, was seen when cultured on nonloaded membranes. However, when exposed to membranes loaded with Trolox, 100 uM was enough to quench ROS by more than 95% for all pore sizes. Polymorphonuclear cells (PMNC) produced significantly more ROS when exposed to 20 versus 100 nm pores. For Trolox loaded membranes, this trend reversed, due to slower release of antioxidant from the 20 nm pores. Furthermore, Trolox exhibited a unique effect on PMNCs that has not previously been reported: It delayed the production of ROS in a manner distinct from antioxidant activity. The present study confirms that nanoporous alumina is a suitable vehicle for drug delivery, and that Trolox can successfully modulate the inflammatory response of both MNC and PMNCs.

    Keyword
    nanoporous alumina; Trolox; mononuclear cells; polymorphonuclear cells; reactive oxygen species
    National Category
    Immunology Biomaterials Science Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-283488 (URN)10.1002/jbm.b.33427 (DOI)000372297100016 ()25952986 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    The Swedish Foundation for International Cooperation in Research and Higher Education (STINT)
    Available from: 2016-04-13 Created: 2016-04-13 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
    3. Highly repeatable synthesis of nHA with high aspect ratio
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Highly repeatable synthesis of nHA with high aspect ratio
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Materials letters (General ed.), ISSN 0167-577X, E-ISSN 1873-4979, Vol. 159, p. 163-167Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    National Category
    Biomaterials Science Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-265712 (URN)10.1016/j.matlet.2015.06.086 (DOI)000362603000043 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 2013-5419VINNOVA, 2010-01907EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, INFRA-2010-262163
    Available from: 2015-11-02 Created: 2015-11-02 Last updated: 2018-02-08
    4. In vivo and in vitro evaluation of hydroxyapatite nanoparticle morphology on the acute inflammatory response
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>In vivo and in vitro evaluation of hydroxyapatite nanoparticle morphology on the acute inflammatory response
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Biomaterials, ISSN 0142-9612, E-ISSN 1878-5905, Vol. 90, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Biomedical implants have been widely used in bone repair applications. However, nanosized degradation products from these implants could elicit an inflammatory reaction, which may lead to implant failure. It is well known that the size, chemistry, and charge of these nanoparticles can modulate this response, but little is known regarding the role that the particle's morphology plays in inducing inflammation. The present study aims to investigate the effect of hydroxyapatite nanoparticle (HANPs) morphology on inflammation, in-vitro and in-vivo. Four distinct HANP morphologies were fabricated and characterized: long rods, dots, sheets, and fibers. Primary human polymorphonuclear cells (PMNCs), mononuclear cells (MNCs), and human dermal fibroblasts (hDFs) were exposed to HANPs and alterations in cell viability, morphology, apoptotic activity, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production were evaluated, in vitro. PMNCs and hDFs experienced a 2-fold decrease in viability following exposure to fibers, while MNC viability decreased 5-fold after treatment with the dots. Additionally, the fibers stimulated an elevated ROS response in both PMNCs and MNCs, and the largest apoptotic behavior for all cell types. Furthermore, exposure to fibers and dots resulted in greater capsule thickness when implanted subcutaneously in mice. Collectively, these results suggest that nanoparticle morphology can significantly impact the inflammatory response.

    Keyword
    Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles; Morphology; Mononuclear cells; Polymorphonuclear cells; Reactive oxygen species; In vivo
    National Category
    Immunology Biomaterials Science Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-283555 (URN)10.1016/j.biomaterials.2016.02.039 (DOI)000374618100001 ()26974703 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    VINNOVA, 2010-01907
    Available from: 2016-04-13 Created: 2016-04-13 Last updated: 2018-02-08Bibliographically approved
  • 10.
    Pujari-Palmer, Shiuli
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Chen, Song
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Rubino, Stefano
    Weng, Hong
    Xia, Wei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Engqvist, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Tang, Liping
    Ott, Marjam Karlsson
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    In vivo and in vitro evaluation of hydroxyapatite nanoparticle morphology on the acute inflammatory response2016In: Biomaterials, ISSN 0142-9612, E-ISSN 1878-5905, Vol. 90, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biomedical implants have been widely used in bone repair applications. However, nanosized degradation products from these implants could elicit an inflammatory reaction, which may lead to implant failure. It is well known that the size, chemistry, and charge of these nanoparticles can modulate this response, but little is known regarding the role that the particle's morphology plays in inducing inflammation. The present study aims to investigate the effect of hydroxyapatite nanoparticle (HANPs) morphology on inflammation, in-vitro and in-vivo. Four distinct HANP morphologies were fabricated and characterized: long rods, dots, sheets, and fibers. Primary human polymorphonuclear cells (PMNCs), mononuclear cells (MNCs), and human dermal fibroblasts (hDFs) were exposed to HANPs and alterations in cell viability, morphology, apoptotic activity, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production were evaluated, in vitro. PMNCs and hDFs experienced a 2-fold decrease in viability following exposure to fibers, while MNC viability decreased 5-fold after treatment with the dots. Additionally, the fibers stimulated an elevated ROS response in both PMNCs and MNCs, and the largest apoptotic behavior for all cell types. Furthermore, exposure to fibers and dots resulted in greater capsule thickness when implanted subcutaneously in mice. Collectively, these results suggest that nanoparticle morphology can significantly impact the inflammatory response.

  • 11.
    Pujari-Palmer, Shiuli
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Chen, Song
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Xia, Wei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Robino, Stefano
    Weng, Hong
    Xia, Wei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Engqvist, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Tang, Liping
    Ott, Marjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Influence of hydroxyapatite nanoparticle morphology on inflammatory response2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Pujari-Palmer, Shiuli
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Chen, Song
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Xia, Wei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Rubino, Stefano
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Weng, H
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Arlington.
    Tang, Liping
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Arlington.
    Karlsson Ott, Marjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Influence of hydroxyapatite nanoparticle morphology on inflammatory response2015In: European Cells and Materials, ISSN 1473-2262, E-ISSN 1473-2262, Vol. 29Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Pujari-Palmer, Shiuli
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Chen, Song
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Xia, Wei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Rubino, Stefano
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Weng, Hong
    Tang, Liping
    Ott, Marjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Influence of hydroxyapatite nanoparticle morphology on inflammatory response2015In: European Cells and Materials, ISSN 1473-2262, E-ISSN 1473-2262, Vol. 29, no S1, p. 43-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Pujari-Palmer, Shiuli
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Lind, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Xia, Wei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Tang, Liping
    University of Texas at Arlington.
    Karlsson Ott, Marjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Controlling Osteogenic Differentiation through Nanoporous Alumina2014In: Journal of Biomaterials and Nanobiotechnology, ISSN 2158-7027, E-ISSN 2158-7043, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 98-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanotopographical features are found to have significant effects on bone behavior. In the presentstudy, nanoporous aluminas with different pore sizes (20, 100 and 200 nm in diameter), were eva-luated for their osteoinductive and drug eluting properties. W20-17 marrow stromal cells wereseeded on nanoporous alumina with and without the addition of BMP-2. Although cell prolifera-tion was not affected by pore size, osteogenic differentiation was 200 nm as compared to 20 and100 nm pores induced higher alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) and osteocalcin expression le-vels, thus indicating osteoblastic differentiation. Cell morphology revealed that cells cultured on20 nm pores adopted a rounded shape, while larger pores (200 nm) elicited an elongated morpho-logy. Furthermore, ALP expression levels were consistently higher on BMP-2 loaded nanoporousalumina surfaces compared to unloaded surfaces, indicating that not only is nanoporous aluminaosteoinductive, but also has the potential to be used as a drug eluting bone-implant coating.

  • 15.
    Pujari-Palmer, Shiuli
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Lu, Xi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Singh, Vijay P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Organic Chemistry.
    Engman, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Organic Chemistry.
    Pujari-Palmer, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Karlsson Ott, Marjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Incorporation and delivery of an organoselenium antioxidant from a brushite cement2017In: Materials letters (General ed.), ISSN 0167-577X, E-ISSN 1873-4979, Vol. 197, p. 115-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An inflammatory reaction occurs following biomaterial implantation in the body, which produce toxic byproducts such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although ROS is required to clear the wound, excessive ROS can damage the tissue around the implant site, eventually leading to implant failure. One approach to control the inflammatory response is to incorporate an antioxidant into the biomaterial in order to scavenge ROS produced by activated phagocytes. In the present study, an organoselenium antioxidative compound was incorporated into a brushite cement, with the goal of scavenging ROS generated from activated primary human mononuclear leukocytes (MNCs), in vitro. The effect of the antioxidant on the physical properties of brushite cement, and its release from the cement were investigated via compressive strength, setting time, phase composition, and UV spectroscopy analysis. The physical properties of brushite remained unchanged following incorporation of the antioxidant. The antioxidant was slowly released from the cement, following a non-Fickian transport mechanism, with approximately 60% of the loaded antioxidant released over five days. The released antioxidant was then tested for its ability to scavenge ROS released by MNCs using the luminol amplified chemiluminescence assay. The results show that antioxidative released at both early stages (24 h) and late stages (120 h) retained its scavenging capacity and effectively reduced ROS production. These results indicate that brushite cements loaded with organoselenium compounds can modulate ROS production after implantation and potentially modulate the inflammatory response to improve device integration.

  • 16.
    Pujari-Palmer, Shiuli
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Pujari-Palmer, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Karlsson Ott, Marjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Reduced oxidative stress in primary human cells by antioxidant released from nanoporous alumina2016In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied biomaterials, ISSN 1552-4973, E-ISSN 1552-4981, Vol. 104, no 3, p. 568-575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanoporous alumina elicits different inflammatory responses dependent on pore size, such as increased complement activation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, on 200 versus 20 nm pores. In this study, we attempt to further modulate inflammatory cell response by loading nanoporous alumina membranes (20, 100, and 200 nm pores), with an antioxidant, Trolox, for controlled drug release. For mononuclear cells (MNC) no difference in cell response, due to pore size, was seen when cultured on nonloaded membranes. However, when exposed to membranes loaded with Trolox, 100 uM was enough to quench ROS by more than 95% for all pore sizes. Polymorphonuclear cells (PMNC) produced significantly more ROS when exposed to 20 versus 100 nm pores. For Trolox loaded membranes, this trend reversed, due to slower release of antioxidant from the 20 nm pores. Furthermore, Trolox exhibited a unique effect on PMNCs that has not previously been reported: It delayed the production of ROS in a manner distinct from antioxidant activity. The present study confirms that nanoporous alumina is a suitable vehicle for drug delivery, and that Trolox can successfully modulate the inflammatory response of both MNC and PMNCs.

  • 17.
    Xia, Wei
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Lindahl, Carl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Ballo, Ahmed
    Gothenburg University.
    Hoess, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Pujari, Shiuli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Lausmaa, Jukka
    SP.
    Thomsen, Peter
    Gothenburg University.
    Ott, Marjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Engqvist, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Biological properties of ion substituted apatite coatings2013Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 17 of 17
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