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  • 1.
    Fischerström, Ann
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Nyholm, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lewen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Acute neurosurgery for traumatic brain injury by general surgeons in Swedish county hospitals: A regional study2014In: Acta Neurochirurgica, ISSN 0001-6268, E-ISSN 0942-0940, Vol. 156, no 1, p. 177-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditionally acute life-saving evacuations of extracerebral haematomas are performed by general surgeons on vital indication in county hospitals in the Uppsala-A-rebro health care region in Sweden, a region characterized by long distances and a sparsely distributed population. Recently, it was stated in the guidelines for prehospital care of traumatic brain injury from the Scandinavian Neurosurgical Society that acute neurosurgery should not be performed in smaller hospitals without neurosurgical expertise. The aim of this study was to investigate: how often does acute decompressive neurosurgery occur in county hospitals in the Uppsala-A-rebro region today, what is the indication for surgery, and what is the clinical outcome? Finally, the goal was to evaluate whether the current practice in the Uppsala-A-rebro region should be revised. Patients referred to the neurointensive care unit at the Department of Neurosurgery in Uppsala after acute evacuation of intracranial haematomas in the county hospitals 2005-2010 were included in the study. Data was collected retrospectively from the medical records following a predefined protocol. The presence of vital indication, radiological and clinical results, and long-term outcome were evaluated. A total of 49 patients (17 epidural haematomas and 32 acute subdural haematomas) were included in the study. The operation was judged to have been performed on vital indication in all cases. The postoperative CT scan was improved in 92 % of the patients. The reaction level and pupillary reactions were significantly improved after surgery. Long-term outcomes showed 51 % favourable outcome, 33 % unfavourable outcome, and in 16 % the outcome was unknown. Looking at the indication for acute neurosurgery, the postoperative clinical and radiological results, and the long-term outcome, it appears that our regional policy regarding life-saving decompressive neurosurgery in county hospitals by general surgeons should not be changed. We suggest a curriculum aimed at educating general surgeons in acute neurosurgery.

  • 2.
    Lenell, Samuel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Nyholm, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lewen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Updated periodic evaluation of standardized neurointensive care shows that it is possible to maintain a high level of favorable outcome even with increasing mean age2015In: Acta Neurochirurgica, ISSN 0001-6268, E-ISSN 0942-0940, Vol. 157, no 3, p. 417-425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Periodic evaluation of neurointensive care (NIC) is important. There is a risk that quality of daily care declines and there may also be unrecognized changes in patient characteristics and management. The aim of this work was to investigate the characteristics and outcome for traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients in the period 2008-2009 in comparison with 1996-1997 and to some extent also with earlier periods. TBI patients 16-79 years old admitted from 2008 to 2009 were selected for the study. Glasgow Coma Scale Motor score at admission (GCS M), radiology, surgery, and outcome (Glasgow Outcome Extended Scale) were collected from Uppsala Traumatic Brain Injury Register. The study included 148 patients (mean age, 45 years). Patients > 60 years old increased from 16 % 1996-1997 to 30 % 2008-2009 (p < 0.01). The proportion of GCS M 4-6 were similar, 92 vs. 93 % (NS). In 1996-1997 patients, 73 % had diffuse injury (Marshall classification) compared to 77 % for the 2008-2009 period (NS). More patients underwent surgery during 2008-2009 (43 %) compared to 1996-1997 (32 %, p < 0.05). Good recovery increased and mortality decreased substantially from 1980-1981 to 1987-1988 and to 1996-1997, but then the results were unchanged in the 2008-2009 period, with 73 % favorable outcome and 11 % mortality. Mortality increased in GCS M 6-4, from 2.8 % in 1996-1997 to 10 % in 2008-2009 (p < 0.05); most of the patients that died had aggravating factors, e.g., high age, malignancy. A large-proportion favorable outcome was maintained despite that patients > 60 years with poorer prognosis doubled, indicating that the quality of NIC has increased or at least is unchanged. More surgery may have contributed to maintaining the large proportion of favorable outcome. For future improvements, more knowledge about TBI management in the elderly is required.

  • 3.
    Merzo, Abraham
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lenell, Samuel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Nyholm, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lewen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Promising clinical outcome of elderly with TBI after modern neurointensive care2016In: Acta Neurochirurgica, ISSN 0001-6268, E-ISSN 0942-0940, Vol. 158, no 1, p. 125-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing number of elderly patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) leads to specific neurointensive care (NIC) challenges. Therefore, elderly subjects with TBI need to be further studied. In this study we evaluated the demographics, management and outcome of elderly TBI patients receiving modern NIC. Patients referred to our NIC unit between 2008 and 2010 were included. Patients were divided in two age groups, elderly (E) a parts per thousand yen65 years and younger (Y) 64-15 years. Parameters studied were the dominant finding on CT scans, neurological motor skills and consciousness, type of monitoring, neurosurgical procedures/treatments and Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended score at 6 months after injury. Sixty-two E (22 %) and 222 Y (78 %) patients were included. Falls were more common in E (81 %) and vehicle accidents were more common in Y patients (37 %). Acute subdural hematoma was significantly more common in E (50 % of cases) compared to Y patients (18 %). Intracranial pressure was monitored in 44 % of E and 57 % of Y patients. Evacuation of significant mass lesions was performed more common in the E group. The NIC mortality was similar in both groups (4-6 %). Favorable outcome was observed in 72 % of Y and 51 % of E patients. At the time of follow-up 25 % of E and 7 % of Y patients had died. The outcome of elderly patients with TBI was significantly worse than in younger patients, as expected. However, as much as 51 % of the elderly patients showed a favorable outcome after NIC. We believe that these results encourage modern NIC in elderly patients with TBI. We need to study how secondary brain injury mechanisms differ in the older patients and to identify specific outcome predictors for elderly patients with TBI.

  • 4.
    Nyholm, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Quality systems to avoid secondary brain injury in neurointensive care2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI) depends on the extent of primary cell death and on the development of secondary brain injury. The general aim of this thesis was to find strategies and quality systems to minimize the extent of secondary insults in neurointensive care (NIC).

    An established standardized management protocol system, multimodality monitoring and computerized data collection, and analysis systems were used.

    The Uppsala TBI register was established for regular monitoring of NIC quality indexes. For 2008-2010 the proportion of patients improving during NIC was 60-80%, whereas 10% deteriorated. The percentage of ‘talk and die’ cases was < 1%. The occurrences of secondary insults were less than 5% of good monitoring time (GMT) for intracranial pressure (ICP) > 25 mmHg, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) < 50 mmHg and systolic blood pressure < 100 mmHg. Favorable outcome was achieved by 64% of adults.

    Nurse checklists of secondary insult occurrence were introduced. Evaluation of the use of nursing checklists showed that the nurses documented their assessments in 84-85% of the shifts and duration of monitoring time at insult level was significantly longer when secondary insults were reported regarding ICP, CPP and temperature. The use of nurse checklist was found to be feasible and accurate.

     A clinical tool to avoid secondary insults related to nursing interventions was developed. Secondary brain insults occurred in about 10% of nursing interventions. There were substantial variations between patients. The risk ratios of developing an ICP insult were 4.7 when baseline ICP ≥ 15 mmHg, 2.9 when ICP amplitude ≥ 6 mmHg and 1.7 when pressure autoregulation ≥ 0.3.

    Hyperthermia, which is a known frequent secondary insult, was studied. Hyperthermia was most common on Day 7 after admission and 90% of the TBI patients had hyperthermia during the first 10 days at the NIC unit. The effects of hyperthermia on intracranial dynamics (ICP, brain energy metabolism and BtipO2) were small but individual differences were observed. Hyperthermia increased ICP slightly more when temperature increased in the groups with low compliance and impaired pressure autoregulation. Ischemic pattern was never observed in the microdialysis samples. The treatment of hyperthermia may be individualized and guided by multimodality monitoring. 

    List of papers
    1. Introduction of the Uppsala Traumatic Brain Injury register for regular surveillance of patient characteristics and neurointensive care management including secondary insult quantification and clinical outcome
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction of the Uppsala Traumatic Brain Injury register for regular surveillance of patient characteristics and neurointensive care management including secondary insult quantification and clinical outcome
    2013 (English)In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 118, no 3, p. 169-180Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background. To improve neurointensive care (NIC) and outcome for traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients it is crucial to define and monitor indexes of the quality of patient care. With this purpose we established the web-based Uppsala TBI register in 2008. In this study we will describe and analyze the data collected during the first three years of this project. Methods. Data from the medical charts were organized in three columns containing: 1) Admission data; 2) Data from the NIC period including neurosurgery, type of monitoring, treatment, complications, neurological condition at discharge, and the amount of secondary insults; 3) Outcome six months after injury. Indexes of the quality of care implemented include: 1) Index of improvement; 2) Index of change; 3) The percentages of 'Talk and die' and `Talk and deteriorate' patients. Results. Altogether 314 patients were included 2008-2010: 66 women and 248 men aged 0-86 years. Automatic reports showed that the proportion of patients improving during NIC varied between 80% and 60%. The percentage of deteriorated patients was less than 10%. The percentage of Talk and die/Talk and deteriorate cases was <1%. The mean Glasgow Coma Score (Motor) improved from 5.04 to 5.68 during the NIC unit stay. The occurrences of secondary insults were less than 5% of good monitoring time for intracranial pressure (ICP) >25 mmHg, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) <50 mmHg, and systolic blood pressure <100 mmHg. Favorable outcome was achieved by 64% of adults. Conclusion. The Uppsala TBI register enables the routine monitoring of NIC quality indexes.

    Keywords
    Database, neurointensive care, outcome, quality register, secondary insults, traumatic brain injury
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-204853 (URN)10.3109/03009734.2013.806616 (DOI)000321587100004 ()
    Available from: 2013-08-12 Created: 2013-08-12 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    2. The use of nurse checklists in a bedside computer-based information system to focus on avoiding secondary insults in neurointensive care
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The use of nurse checklists in a bedside computer-based information system to focus on avoiding secondary insults in neurointensive care
    Show others...
    2012 (English)In: ISRN Neurology, ISSN 2090-5505, E-ISSN 2090-5513, Vol. 2012, p. 903954-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The feasibility and accuracy of using checklists after every working shift in a bedside computer-based information system for documentation of secondary insults in the neurointensive care unit were evaluated. The ultimate goal was to get maximal attention to avoid secondary insults. Feasibility was investigated by assessing if the checklists were filled in as prescribed. Accuracy was evaluated by comparing the checklists with recorded minute-by-minute monitoring data for intracranial pressure-ICP, cerebral perfusion pressure CPP, systolic blood pressure SBP, and temperature. The total number of checklist assessments was 2,184. In 85% of the shifts, the checklists were filled in. There was significantly longer duration of monitoring time at insult level when Yes was filled in regarding ICP (mean 134 versus 30 min), CPP (mean 125 versus 26 min) and temperature (mean 315 versus 120 min). When a secondary insult was defined as >5% of monitoring time spent at insult level, the sensitivity/specificity for the checklist assessments was 31%/100% for ICP, 38%/99% for CPP, and 66%/88% for temperature. Checklists were feasible and appeared relatively accurate. Checklists may elevate the alertness for avoiding secondary insults and help in the evaluation of the patients. This concept may be the next step towards tomorrow critical care.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-190818 (URN)10.5402/2012/903954 (DOI)22844615 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2013-01-08 Created: 2013-01-08 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    3. Secondary insults related to nursing interventions in neurointensive care: a descriptive pilot study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Secondary insults related to nursing interventions in neurointensive care: a descriptive pilot study
    2014 (English)In: Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, ISSN 0888-0395, E-ISSN 1945-2810, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 285-291Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The patients at a neurointensive care unit are frequently cared for in many ways, day and night. The aim of this study was to investigate the amount of secondary insults related to oral care, repositioning, endotracheal suctioning, hygienic measures, and simultaneous interventions at a neurointensive care unit with standardized care and maximum attention on avoiding secondary insults. The definition of a secondary insult was intracranial pressure > 20 mm Hg, cerebral perfusion pressure < 60 mm Hg and systolic blood pressure < 100 mm Hg for 5 minutes or more in a 10-minute period starting from when the nursing intervention began. The insult minutes did not have to be consecutive. The study included 18 patients, seven women and 11 men, aged 36-76 years with different neurosurgical diagnoses. The total number of nursing interventions analyzed was 1,717. The most common kind of secondary insults after a nursing measure was high intracranial pressure (n = 93) followed by low cerebral perfusion pressure (n = 43) and low systolic blood pressure (n = 14). Repositioning (n = 39) and simultaneous interventions (n = 32) were the nursing interventions causing most secondary insults. There were substantial variations between the patients; only one patient had no secondary insult. There were, overall, a limited number of secondary insults related to nursing interventions when a standardized management protocol system was applied to reduce the occurrence of secondary insults. Patients with an increased risk of secondary insults should be recognized, and their care and treatment should be carefully planned and performed to avoid secondary insults.

    National Category
    Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
    Research subject
    Neurosurgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-233431 (URN)10.1097/JNN.0000000000000077 (DOI)000341965200009 ()25188684 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-10-03 Created: 2014-10-03 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    4. A decision-making tool to prevent secondary ICP-insults related to nursing interventions: – Evaluation of the predictive value for baseline ICP, compliance and autoregulation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A decision-making tool to prevent secondary ICP-insults related to nursing interventions: – Evaluation of the predictive value for baseline ICP, compliance and autoregulation
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-252875 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-05-13 Created: 2015-05-13 Last updated: 2015-07-07
    5. The effects of hyperthermia on intracranial pressure, cerebral oxymetry, and cerebral metabolism in traumatic brain injury patients during neurointensive care
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of hyperthermia on intracranial pressure, cerebral oxymetry, and cerebral metabolism in traumatic brain injury patients during neurointensive care
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-252877 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-05-13 Created: 2015-05-13 Last updated: 2015-07-07
  • 5.
    Nyholm, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Howells, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    A decision-making tool to prevent secondary ICP-insults related to nursing interventions: – Evaluation of the predictive value for baseline ICP, compliance and autoregulationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Nyholm, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Howells, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Predictive Factors That May Contribute to Secondary Insults With Nursing Interventions in Adults With Traumatic Brain Injury2017In: Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, ISSN 0888-0395, E-ISSN 1945-2810, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 49-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nursing interventions pose risks and benefits to patients with traumatic brain injury at a neurointensive care unit. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the risk of inducing high intracranial pressure (ICP) related to interventions and whether intracranial compliance, baseline ICP, or autoregulation could be used as predictors. Methods: The study had a quantitative, prospective, observational design. Twenty-eight patients with TBI were included, and 67 interventions were observed. The definition of a secondary ICP insult was ICP of 20 mm Hg or greater for 5 minutes or more within a continuous 10-minute period. Results: Secondary ICP insults related to nursing interventions occurred in 6 patients (21%) and 8 occasions (12%). Patients with baseline ICP of 15 mm Hg or greater had 4.7 times higher risk of developing an insult. The predictor with the best combination of sensitivity and specificity was baseline ICP. Conclusions: Baseline ICP of 15 mm Hg or greater was the most important factor to determine the risk of secondary ICP insult related to nursing intervention.

  • 7.
    Nyholm, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Howells, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lewen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Introduction of the Uppsala Traumatic Brain Injury register for regular surveillance of patient characteristics and neurointensive care management including secondary insult quantification and clinical outcome2013In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 118, no 3, p. 169-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. To improve neurointensive care (NIC) and outcome for traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients it is crucial to define and monitor indexes of the quality of patient care. With this purpose we established the web-based Uppsala TBI register in 2008. In this study we will describe and analyze the data collected during the first three years of this project. Methods. Data from the medical charts were organized in three columns containing: 1) Admission data; 2) Data from the NIC period including neurosurgery, type of monitoring, treatment, complications, neurological condition at discharge, and the amount of secondary insults; 3) Outcome six months after injury. Indexes of the quality of care implemented include: 1) Index of improvement; 2) Index of change; 3) The percentages of 'Talk and die' and `Talk and deteriorate' patients. Results. Altogether 314 patients were included 2008-2010: 66 women and 248 men aged 0-86 years. Automatic reports showed that the proportion of patients improving during NIC varied between 80% and 60%. The percentage of deteriorated patients was less than 10%. The percentage of Talk and die/Talk and deteriorate cases was <1%. The mean Glasgow Coma Score (Motor) improved from 5.04 to 5.68 during the NIC unit stay. The occurrences of secondary insults were less than 5% of good monitoring time for intracranial pressure (ICP) >25 mmHg, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) <50 mmHg, and systolic blood pressure <100 mmHg. Favorable outcome was achieved by 64% of adults. Conclusion. The Uppsala TBI register enables the routine monitoring of NIC quality indexes.

  • 8.
    Nyholm, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Howells, Timothy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lewén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Hillered, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    The influence of hyperthermia on intracranial pressure, cerebral oximetry and cerebral metabolism in traumatic brain injury2017In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 122, no 3, p. 177-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Hyperthermia is a common secondary insult in traumatic brain injury (TBI). The aim was to evaluate the relationship between hyperthermia and intracranial pressure (ICP), and if intracranial compliance and cerebral blood flow (CBF) pressure autoregulation affected that relationship. The relationships between hyperthermia and cerebral oximetry (B(ti)pO(2)) and cerebral metabolism were also studied. Methods: A computerized multimodality monitoring system was used for data collection at the neurointensive care unit. Demographic and monitoring data (temperature, ICP, blood pressure, microdialysis, B(ti)pO(2)) were analyzed from 87 consecutive TBI patients. ICP amplitude was used as measure of compliance, and CBF pressure autoregulation status was calculated using collected blood pressure and ICP values. Mixed models and comparison between groups were used. Results: The influence of hyperthermia on intracranial dynamics (ICP, brain energy metabolism, and B(ti)pO(2)) was small, but individual differences were seen. Linear mixed models showed that hyperthermia raises ICP slightly more when temperature increases in the groups with low compliance and impaired CBF pressure autoregulation. There was also a tendency (not statistically significant) for increased B(ti)pO(2), and for increased pyruvate and lactate, with higher temperature, while the lactate/pyruvate ratio and glucose were stable. Conclusions: The major finding was that the effects of hyperthermia on intracranial dynamics (ICP, brain energy metabolism, and B(ti)pO(2)) were not extensive in general, but there were exceptional cases. Hyperthermia treatment has many side effects, so it is desirable to identify cases in which hyperthermia is dangerous. Information from multimodality monitoring may be used to guide treatment in individual patients.

  • 9.
    Nyholm, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lewén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Fröjd, Camilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Education in Nursing.
    Howells, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Nilsson, Pelle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    The use of nurse checklists in a bedside computer-based information system to focus on avoiding secondary insults in neurointensive care2012In: ISRN Neurology, ISSN 2090-5505, E-ISSN 2090-5513, Vol. 2012, p. 903954-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The feasibility and accuracy of using checklists after every working shift in a bedside computer-based information system for documentation of secondary insults in the neurointensive care unit were evaluated. The ultimate goal was to get maximal attention to avoid secondary insults. Feasibility was investigated by assessing if the checklists were filled in as prescribed. Accuracy was evaluated by comparing the checklists with recorded minute-by-minute monitoring data for intracranial pressure-ICP, cerebral perfusion pressure CPP, systolic blood pressure SBP, and temperature. The total number of checklist assessments was 2,184. In 85% of the shifts, the checklists were filled in. There was significantly longer duration of monitoring time at insult level when Yes was filled in regarding ICP (mean 134 versus 30 min), CPP (mean 125 versus 26 min) and temperature (mean 315 versus 120 min). When a secondary insult was defined as >5% of monitoring time spent at insult level, the sensitivity/specificity for the checklist assessments was 31%/100% for ICP, 38%/99% for CPP, and 66%/88% for temperature. Checklists were feasible and appeared relatively accurate. Checklists may elevate the alertness for avoiding secondary insults and help in the evaluation of the patients. This concept may be the next step towards tomorrow critical care.

  • 10.
    Nyholm, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Steffansson, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Fröjd, Camilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Education in Nursing.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Secondary insults related to nursing interventions in neurointensive care: a descriptive pilot study2014In: Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, ISSN 0888-0395, E-ISSN 1945-2810, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 285-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The patients at a neurointensive care unit are frequently cared for in many ways, day and night. The aim of this study was to investigate the amount of secondary insults related to oral care, repositioning, endotracheal suctioning, hygienic measures, and simultaneous interventions at a neurointensive care unit with standardized care and maximum attention on avoiding secondary insults. The definition of a secondary insult was intracranial pressure > 20 mm Hg, cerebral perfusion pressure < 60 mm Hg and systolic blood pressure < 100 mm Hg for 5 minutes or more in a 10-minute period starting from when the nursing intervention began. The insult minutes did not have to be consecutive. The study included 18 patients, seven women and 11 men, aged 36-76 years with different neurosurgical diagnoses. The total number of nursing interventions analyzed was 1,717. The most common kind of secondary insults after a nursing measure was high intracranial pressure (n = 93) followed by low cerebral perfusion pressure (n = 43) and low systolic blood pressure (n = 14). Repositioning (n = 39) and simultaneous interventions (n = 32) were the nursing interventions causing most secondary insults. There were substantial variations between the patients; only one patient had no secondary insult. There were, overall, a limited number of secondary insults related to nursing interventions when a standardized management protocol system was applied to reduce the occurrence of secondary insults. Patients with an increased risk of secondary insults should be recognized, and their care and treatment should be carefully planned and performed to avoid secondary insults.

  • 11.
    Svedung Wettervik, Teodor
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lenell, Samuel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Nyholm, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Howells, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lewén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Decompressive craniectomy in traumatic brain injury: usage and clinical outcome in a single centre2018In: Acta Neurochirurgica, ISSN 0001-6268, E-ISSN 0942-0940, Vol. 160, no 2, p. 229-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Two randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of decompressive craniectomy (DC) in traumatic brain injury (TBI) have shown poor outcome, but there are considerations of how these protocols relate to real practice. The aims of this study were to evaluate usage and outcome of DC and thiopental in a single centre.

    Method: The study included all TBI patients treated at the neurointensive care unit, Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala, Sweden, between 2008 and 2014. Of 609 patients aged 16 years or older, 35 treated with DC and 23 treated with thiopental only were studied in particular. Background variables, intracranial pressure (ICP) measures and global outcome were analysed.

    Results: Of 35 DC patients, 9 were treated stepwise with thiopental before DC, 9 were treated stepwise with no thiopental before DC and 17 were treated primarily with DC. Six patients received thiopental after DC. For 23 patients, no DC was needed after thiopental. Eighty-eight percent of our DC patients would have qualified for the DECRA study and 38% for the Rescue-ICP trial. Favourable outcome was 44% in patients treated with thiopental before DC, 56% in patients treated with DC without prior thiopental, 29% in patients treated primarily with DC and 52% in patients treated with thiopental with no DC.

    Conclusions: The place for DC in TBI management must be evaluated better, and we believe it is important that future RCTs should have clearer and less permissive ICP criteria regarding when thiopental should be followed by DC and DC followed by thiopental.

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