uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 14 of 14
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Ahmad, Aisha
    et al.
    Harvard Kennedy School.
    Ruffa, Chiara
    Harvard Kennedy School.
    Semple, Michael
    Harvard Kennedy School.
    Scholars reflect on Afghan Koran burnings, rioting2012Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Several Harvard Kennedy School scholars who have worked in Afghanistan were asked to comment on how the United States should respond to the accidental burning of Korans by the U.S. military, and the subsequent deadly rioting in the country. Here are their responses:

  • 2. Giacomello, G.
    et al.
    Ruffa, Chiara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Small navies and border and immigration control: Frontex operations in the Mediterranean2014In: Small Navies: Strategy and Policy for Small Navies in War and Peace, Ashgate, 2014, p. 133-150Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Ruffa, Chiara
    Harvard Kennedy School.
    Afghan War Lessons2012Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Even as the U.S. looks to withdraw troops from Afghanistan, it’s still worth asking what could be done better.

  • 4.
    Ruffa, Chiara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Explaining Coordination and Breakdown in Complex Operations2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Ruffa, Chiara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Introduction: Coordinating actors in complex operations2013In: Small Wars & Insurgencies, ISSN 0959-2318, E-ISSN 1743-9558, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 206-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    International responses to conflicts and humanitarian emergencies have become more crowded. Not only do traditional actors intervene on a greater scale, such as non-governmental organizations and the military, but new actors such as Private Military Security Companies also play an increasingly important role. These actors often differ in their precise objective and the constituencies they are accountable to. Yet, the practices of these actors in operations are intertwined and many of their tasks overlap. Improved communication and coordination of these actors in complex operations can thus be expected to lead to strong increases in mission effectiveness. This Special Issue provides a conceptual platform to understand and explain under what conditions coordination among these actors occurs. The articles cluster around three themes. A first set focuses on who the actors involved are along a private vs public and military vs civilian divide; a second group of articles assesses experiences of coordination of different actors in the field; finally, a third looks at a plurality of elements that may trigger or hinder coordination.

  • 6.
    Ruffa, Chiara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Sweden2013In: Strategic cultures in Europe: Security and defence policies across the continent / [ed] Heiko Biehl, Bastian Giegerich, Alexandra Jonas, Wiesbaden: Springer, 2013, p. 343-358Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Ruffa, Chiara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Sweden2013In: Strategic cultures in Europe: security and defence policies across the continent / [ed] Heiko Biehl, Bastian Giegerich, Alexandra Jonas, Wiesbaden: Springer, 2013, p. 343-357Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Ruffa, Chiara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    The long and winding road... to success? Unit Peace Operation Effectiveness (UPOE) and the success of the NATO mission in Afghanistan2013In: Defense and Security Analysis, ISSN 1475-1798, E-ISSN 1475-1801, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 128-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Why does peacekeeping sometimes fail? How can effective peacekeepers increase thelikelihood of success of a mission? The two main flaws in the current evaluations of peaceoperations are that they mainly rely on already concluded missions and that they make useof indicators that do not reveal micro-level dynamics. This article introduces an analyticalframework relating the effectiveness of soldiers to their actual impact in their area ofoperation in a peace operation. The framework is called “unit peace operation effectiveness”(UPOE). Focusing on soldiers in peace operations, this article shows that: different unitsbehave differently; emphasize different aspects of the mandate; and are effective indifferent ways. Ultimately, this has an actual impact on the end-state of the mission. It relieson and adapts classic security studies works to theoretically enrich the peacekeepingliterature. The model is tested in an illustrative case study based on ethnographic work onFrench and Italian units in Afghanistan between 2008 and 2010.

  • 9.
    Ruffa, Chiara
    Swedish National Defence College.
    What kind of Military Leadership for what Kind of Operation?: Assessing ‘Mission Command’ in Peace Operations and Counterinsurgencies2012In: Leadership in Challenging Situations / [ed] Harald Haas, Franz Kernic, Andrea Plaschke, Frankfurt: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2012, p. 183-194Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Ruffa, Chiara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    What Peacekeepers Think and Do: An Exploratory Study of French, Ghanaian, Italian, and South Korean Armies in the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon2014In: Armed forces and society, ISSN 0095-327X, E-ISSN 1556-0848, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 199-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This exploratory article points out how armies differ in the performance of their daily military activities during a peacekeeping mission and analyses the role of contrasting perceptions of the mission operational environment in explaining this variation. As a first step, this article documents systematic variations in the way French, Ghanaian, Italian, and Korean units implement the mandate of the UN mission in Lebanon in their daily military activity. Second, it shows that the four armies also interpret or “construct” the operational environment differently and in a way that is consistent with their different military behavior. Third, preliminary evidence suggests that previous experiences of each army influence the way in which the operational environment is constructed. Data were collected combining participant observation in Southern Lebanon with questionnaires and interviews. This article thus builds on sociological works on different operational styles but takes a methodological approach closer to that in security studies.

  • 11.
    Ruffa, Chiara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Dandeker, Christopher
    King’s College, London.
    Vennesson, Pascal
    Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
    Soldiers Drawn into Politics?: Civil-Military Relations, Hybrid Military Spaces and the Future of Interventions2013In: The armed forces: towards a post-interventionist era? / [ed] Gerhard Kümmel, Bastian Giegerich, Frankfurt: Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2013, p. 29-40Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In January 2012, a video depicting U.S. soldiers urinating on Afghan dead bodies was released. Mr George Little, a Pentagon spokesman, declared that the footage was “utterly deplorable”, and this was followed by similar statements by other high-ranking U.S. government officials (Bowley/Rosenberg 2012). The behavior of these soldiers had dramatic political consequences for the reputation of U.S. soldiers abroad and for their credibility and legitimacy in respect to military operations in Afghanistan.

  • 12.
    Ruffa, Chiara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Dandeker, Christopher
    Department of War Studies, King’s College London, London.
    Vennesson, Pascal
    S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies (RSIS), Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang, Singapore.
    Soldiers drawn into politics? The influence of tactics in civil–military relations2013In: Small Wars & Insurgencies, ISSN 0959-2318, E-ISSN 1743-9558, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 322-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The tactical level has become increasingly important in the conduct of contemporary complex military operations. Yet, the potential impact that this tactical level may have on domestic civil–military relations has been neglected. In this article, we focus on mechanisms by which low-level soldiers have acquired an increasing importance in tactical operations and we suggest that this may influence civil–military relations in the future. We argue that two phenomena deserve particular attention. These mechanisms are not new but they have had new effects by making it possible for soldiers to influence politics in sometimes unforeseen ways: the first is the strategic corporal and the second is the expansion of ancillary tasks. Our contribution lies at the interface between military sociology and security studies and seeks to show how the tactical level of warfare has become a fundamental context in which civil–military relations are enacted. Exploring these dynamics is fundamental to understanding under what conditions soldiers may interact with other actors in complex operations.

  • 13.
    Ruffa, Chiara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Sundberg, Ralph
    Breaking the frame? Frame dispute of war and peace2017In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Ruffa, Chiara
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College.
    Vennesson, Pascal
    S. Rajaratnam School of Interna- tional Studies, Nanyang Technological University.
    Fighting and Helping? The Domestic Politics of NGO-Military Relations in Complex Humanitarian Emergencies2014In: Security Studies, ISSN 0963-6412, E-ISSN 1556-1852, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 582-621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In complex humanitarian emergencies, why are NGO-military relations cooperative in some cases, yet deeply conflictual in others? Drawing on historical-institutionalist theoretical insights, we argue that NGOs and military organizations are embedded in, and responding to, domestic institutional configurations that define a set of political incentives and constraints, material and normative, which structures and influences the characteristics and outcomes of their relations. Counterarguments suggest that organizational differences and the nature of their missions affect NGO-military relations. Using fresh empirical evidence we assess these arguments by comparing the Italian and the French experiences of NGO-military relations during the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) mission in Afghanistan and the UN mission in Lebanon (UNIFIL II) between 2007 and 2011.We find that domestic institutional configurations are not left behind when NGOs and military units deploy abroad. Rather, they shape NGOs' and militaries' capacity to work together instead of at cross purposes and ultimately influence the success of international action.

1 - 14 of 14
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf