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  • 1.
    Ahlberg, Beth Maina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Skaraborg Inst Res & Dev, Skovde, Sweden.
    Maina, Faith
    Department of Curriculum Studies and Teacher Education, Texas Tech University, USA.
    Kubai, Anne
    Khamasi, Wanjiku
    Dedan Kimathi University of Technology, Nyeri, Kenya.
    Ekman, Marianne
    Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundqvist-Persson, Cristina
    Skaraborg Institute for Research and Development, Skövde, Sweden;Lund Univ, Dept Psychol, Psychol, Lund, Sweden.
    ‘"A child, a tree": Challenges in building collaborative relations in a community research project in a Kenyan context2016In: Action Research, ISSN 1476-7503, E-ISSN 1741-2617, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 257-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper highlights the potential for basing participatory action research on priorities identified by communities. The case builds on a research project by the Social Science Medicine Africa Network (Soma-net) focusing on AIDS prevention among school youth in Kajiado in Kenya during 2003-2006. It became clear from that study just how complex it is to promote open communication on issues of sexuality considered critical for sexual health promotion. Towards the end of that study a spin-off in the form of a concept a child, a tree or tree planting evolved and the research thereafter continued as a partnership between the school community and the researchers. The focus then was on understanding how health promotion could be integrated into other aspects of community life. The concept and tree planting when implemented created a sense of ownership among the pupils largely because they were placed at the centre of the development activities. The story illuminates the nature of change developing in the course of the project, but also the challenges and complexity of creating and maintaining collaborative relations in the face of cultural and gender power dynamics and interventions imposed from outside the community.

  • 2. Duh, Abdalla
    et al.
    Gaas, Mohammed Hussein
    Gasimelseed, Abdalla
    Gorani, Amel
    Kleist, Nauja
    Kubai, Anne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Church and Mission studies, Science of Mission.
    McEachrane, Michael
    Omar, Saifalyazal
    Tegenu, Tsegaye
    Tiilikainen, Marja
    A Horn of Africa in Northern Europe: An Email Conversation2013In: Afro-Nordic Landscapes: Engaging Blackness in Northern Europe / [ed] Michael McEachrane, Oxford: Routledge , 2013, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3. Kubai, Anne
    Being Church in post genocide Rwanda: The Challenges of Forgiveness and Reconciliation2005In: On Being Church: African Women’s Voices and Visions / [ed] Isabel Phiri and Sarojini Nadar, Geneva: World Council of Churches , 2005Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Kubai, Anne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, The Hugo Valentin Centre. Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Being here and there: Migrant communities in Sweden and the conflicts in the Horn of Africa2015In: Africans on the Move: Migration, Diaspora and Development Nexus / [ed] Fassil Demissie, Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2015, p. 76-90Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The largest migrant communities in Sweden come from Africa's most troubled region, the Horn. These are the Somali and Ethiop-Eritrean communities. This paper examines the not-so-obvious ways in which Ethiop-Eritrean and Somali communities in Sweden influence the political developments, particularly the conflicts at 'home'. Many of these immigrants living in Sweden keep up with social and political developments in their countries of origin almost on daily basis and remain engaged, to a large extent, in the affairs of both their families and communities 'out there' while they 'are here in Sweden'. This article therefore focuses on the particular forms of engagement that have either intended or unintended impact on the intractable conflicts in which the societies in these countries are engaged. I argue that 'nostalgia underpins the immigrants' sense of commitment to the affairs of their countries of origin, and therefore, providing moral and material support to warring groups derives the impetus largely from the affective dimension of migration.

  • 5.
    Kubai, Anne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, The Hugo Valentin Centre. Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Being here and there: Migrant communities in Sweden and the conflicts in the Horn of Africa2013In: African and Black Diaspora: An International Journal, ISSN 1752-8631, E-ISSN 1752-864X, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 174-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The largest migrant communities in Sweden come from Africa’s most troubled region, the Horn. These are the Somali and Ethiop-Eritrean communities. This paper examines the not-so-obvious ways in which Ethiop-Eritrean and Somali communities in Sweden influence the political developments, particularly the conflicts at ‘home’. Many of these immigrants living in Sweden keep up with social and political developments in their countries of origin almost on daily basis and remain engaged, to a large extent, in the affairs of both their families and communities ‘out there’ while they ‘are here in Sweden’. This article therefore focuses on the particular forms of engagement that have either intended or unintended impact on the intractable conflicts in which the societies in these countries are engaged. I argue that ‘nostalgia underpins the immigrants’ sense of commitment to the affairs of their countries of origin, and therefore, providing moral and material support to warring groups derives the impetus largely from the affective dimension of migration.

  • 6.
    Kubai, Anne
    Life and Peace Institute, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Between justice and reconciliation: The survivors of Rwanda2007In: African Security Review, ISSN 1024-6029, E-ISSN 2154-0128, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 53-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the dilemmas of post-genocide Rwanda, where society finds itself caught between justice and reconciliation. One of the major challenges for Rwandans today is to engender reconciliation in a deeply wounded nation and do justice to both victims and perpetrators. It is difficulty to affirm the victims, punish the perpetrators and at the same time bring about reconciliation between them. Yet there are unequivocal claims, especially from the victims, that there can be no justice without reparation and there can be no reconciliation without justice. To bring about justice and reconciliation, the Gacaca process was put in place, but it has turned out to be a source of fear for the perpetrators, who are desperate to bury the evidence by intimidating the survivors, and for the survivors, who are now living in fear of their lives. Consequently, the rising insecurity of survivors has become a matter of national concern, and the challenges to the Gacaca process are threatening to hamper its progress. But this apparently is the only viable justice system for communities to carry out trials at community level, for it was there that the crime of genocide was committed in a mass-killing frenzy. Truth telling and confessions by perpetrators, and forgiveness by victims have been identified as crucial steps towards reconciliation, but the dilemma lies in the inherent contradictions in the application of these concepts: truth, confession and forgiveness.

  • 7. Kubai, Anne
    Changing relations between Churches in Europe and Africa2008In: Swedish Missiological Themes, ISSN 0346-217X, Vol. 96, no 2Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 8. Kubai, Anne
    Christian couples coping with childlessness: Narratives from Machame, Kilimanjaro2011In: Swedish Missiological Themes, ISSN 0346-217X, Vol. 98, no 2Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Kubai, Anne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Church and Mission studies. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Conducting fieldwork in Rwanda: Listening to silence and processing experiences of genocide2014In: Engaging violence: Trauma, Memory and Representation / [ed] Ivana Macek, London: Routledge, 2014, p. 111-126Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Kubai, Anne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology. Univ South Africa, Inst Relig & Theol, Pretoria, South Africa..
    'Confession' and 'Forgiveness' as a strategy for development in post-genocide Rwanda2016In: HTS Teologiese Studies/Theological Studies, ISSN 0259-9422, E-ISSN 2072-8050, Vol. 72, no 4, article id UNSP a3562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The government of Rwanda has pursued reconciliation with great determination in the belief that it is the only moral alternative to post-genocide social challenges. In Rwanda, communities must be mobilised and reshaped for social, political and economic reconstruction. This creates a rather delicate situation. Among other strategies, the state has turned to the concepts of confession and forgiveness which have deep religious roots, and systematised them both at the individual and community or state level in order to bring about reconciliation, justice, social cohesion and ultimately economic development. In view of these strategies and challenges, some of the important questions are: Does forgiveness restore victims and empower them to heal their communities? What empirical evidence exists that religiously inspired justice and reconciliation processes after mass political violence make a difference? In what areas might the understanding of religious thought and activity towards transitional justice be deepened? These questions provide the backdrop against which I examine the case of post-genocide Rwanda in this article. A hermeneutic interpretative analysis is used to situate the phenomena of forgiveness, confession and social transformation within the specific context of post-conflict societies.

  • 11.
    Kubai, Anne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology.
    Gacaca and post genocide reconstruction in Rwanda2010In: Indegenous Voices in the Sustainability Discourse: Spirituality and the struggle for a better quality of life / [ed] Frans Wijsen and Sylvia Marcos, Munster: LIT VERLAG , 2010, p. 261-280Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12. Kubai, Anne
    Genocide and war crimes and crimes against humanity: A digest of the case law of the international Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda2010In: New Routes. A Journal of Peace Research and Action, ISSN ISSN: 1403-3785 / E-ISSN:2000-8082, Vol. 15, no 3Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Kubai, Anne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Church and Mission studies, Science of Mission.
    Historical and cultural dimensions of militia and rebel groups in Africa2010In: Militias, Rebels and Islamist militants: Human insecurity and state crises in Africa / [ed] Wafuala Okumu and Augustine Ikelegbe, Pretoria: stitute for Security Studies , 2010, p. 45-67Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Kubai, Anne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Church and Mission studies, Science of Mission.
    It Was the Work of Satan: Perpetrators rationalize the atrocities of the Rwanda genocide2013In: Gods and Arms: On Religion and Armed Conflict / [ed] Kjell-Åke Nordqvist, Eugene, Oregon: Pickwick Publications, 2013, p. 49-68Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Kubai, Anne
    Life & Peace Institute, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Living in the Shadow of Genocide: Women and HIV/AIDS in Rwanda2008In: Women, Religion and HIV/AIDS in Africa: Responding to Ethical and Theological Challenges / [ed] Teresia Hinga, Anne Kubai, Philomena Mwaura, and Hazel Ayanga, Durban: Cluster Publications , 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Kubai, Anne
    Life & Peace Institute, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Post-genocide Rwanda: The Changing Religious Landscape2007In: Exchange. Journal of Missiological and Ecumenical Research, ISSN 0166-2740, E-ISSN 1572-543X, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 198-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper seeks to examine the proliferation of Pentecostal churches and the changing religious landscape of Rwanda. The horrific genocide of 1994, left the country's traditional mainline churches bloodied and the Christian faith seriously challenged. Unlike elsewhere in Africa, prior to the genocide, Pentecostal churches had not got a foot-hold in Rwanda, then referred to as the most Catholic country in Africa. In the aftermath, Rwanda has experienced a spontaneous growth of new churches imported by returnees from far and wide. Though the Catholic Church still retains its dominant position, there has been an upsurge of Protestants and the Rwandan religious landscape is changing considerably. This gospel explosion has been attributed to the enormous challenges of social-economic reconstruction of a fractured society, where reconciliation and healing are of utmost importance. By packaging their messages with hindsight of the disillusionment with the traditional churches and the spiritual as well as the material need to arise from the ashes of genocide and rebuild their lives, these churches have attracted thousands of Rwandans.

  • 17.
    Kubai, Anne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Church and Mission studies.
    Reinventing ‘tradition’: Social reconstruction and development in post-genocide Rwanda2014In: Religion and Development: Nordic Perspectives on Development in Africa / [ed] Tomas Sundnes Drønen, New York: Peter Lang , 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18. Kubai, Anne
    Religious Communities and the Struggle for Civil Space2006In: Journal of Henry Martyn Institute, Vol. 25, p. 115-127Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Kubai, Anne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology.
    'Singing the Lord’s Song in a Strange Land’: Challenges and New Frontiers for African Churches in Sweden2013In: Babel is everywhere!: Migration, Religionand Diaspora in Global Perspectives / [ed] Kwabena Asamoah-Gyadu, Andrea Fröchtling, Andreas Kunz-Lübcke, Peter Lang , 2013, p. 251-266Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20. Kubai, Anne
    The encounter of two faiths: Islam and Christianity in the Horn of Africa2011In: New Routes. A journal of Peace Research and Action, ISSN ISSN: 1403-3785 / E-ISSN:2000-8082, Vol. 16, no 1Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Kubai, Anne
    Life & Peace Institute, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Walking a Tight Rope: Christians and Muslims in Post-Genocide Rwanda2007In: Islam and Christian-Muslim Relations, ISSN 0959-6410, E-ISSN 1469-9311, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 219-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 1994 genocide has become a major factor in Rwandan history. At its root lie both ethnic and religious dimensions. These events are considered in the context of a long history of tension and conflict between segments of the population. Religion having contributed to the radicalization of social identities through the involvement of the religious leadership in the genocide, the article analyses Christian–Muslim relations in post-genocide Rwanda. Interviews with Christians and Muslims show that the hitherto marginalized Muslim minority has been able to protect victims and, in cooperation with other groups, has embarked on jihād to enhance and facilitate reconciliation. As a result, both Tutsis and Hutus have been turning to Islam.

  • 22.
    Kubai, Anne
    et al.
    Life & Peace Institute, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Adebo, TarekegnLife & Peace Institute, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Striving in Faith: Christians and Muslims in Africa2008Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Kubai, Anne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, The Hugo Valentin Centre. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Church and Mission studies, Science of Mission.
    Ahlberg, Beth Maina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Making and unmaking ethnicities in the Rwandan context: implication for gender-based violence, health, and wellbeing of women2013In: Ethnicity and Health, ISSN 1355-7858, E-ISSN 1465-3419, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 469-482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    To examine ethnicity and gender violence in Rwanda from cultural and historical perspectives and explore the encounters between cultural beliefs and practices and the new gender equality policy and programs and the implications of the particular encounters to the health of women.

    Design

    The study is a qualitative drawing from the growing range of interactive approaches and methods within an ethnographic framework of the research design. Twenty individual interviews, six focus group discussions and two 'community mobilization' dialogs were conducted.

    Results

    Violence has continued and there is a conflict between cultural tradition, the de-ethnicization, and gender equality policies. Some of the gender violence preventive programs are influenced by the ethos of the traditional norms, and therefore unwittingly perpetuate gender-based violence.

    Conclusions

    In spite of the progress that Rwanda has made in political empowerment of women, it still seems a long way before real gender equality is achieved. It seems that women's empowerment is not only just an opportunity for political participation but also this is important. It is also about the capacity to make effective choices and to translate them into desired actions and outcomes, unfettered by cultural sanctions. Universalised, top-down gender policy programs have not furnished all women with the necessary capacity to make decisions that affect their traditionally all important reproductive functions; to challenge the embedded gender imbalance; and to strive for a holistic wellbeing of their families, where they play a central role. Indeed, some of the policies could have negative implications to the health of women, in particular, with sexually transmitted infections, including HIV and AIDS.

1 - 23 of 23
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