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  • 1.
    Matz, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Analogical Reasoning and the Diplomacy of the Raoul Wallenberg Case 1945-72015In: International History Review, ISSN 0707-5332, E-ISSN 1949-6540, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 582-606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the negotiations in the years 1945-7 between Soviet and Swedish diplomats over the Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg, who was arrested by the Soviets in Budapest on 17 January 1945. As is clear from both Soviet and Swedish archival records, including the recently de-classified encrypted Soviet diplomatic cables, the nature of the communication about Wallenberg went through a number of shifts, dividing the years 1945-7 into three periods. Despite in-depth reviews of both the Soviet and Swedish Foreign Ministry archives, no instructions from the political leaderships of Sweden and the USSR explaining these shifts have been identified. Why is it that we can distinguish changing patterns of communication despite the absence of corresponding instructions from the leaders of the two states? This article argues that dynamics inherent to the diplomatic dialogue itself go a long way to explain the shifting communication patterns. In order to make the case viable as well as communicable, Soviet and Swedish diplomats, short of authoritative guidance, were bound to ascribe meaning and purpose to the behaviour of the other' on the basis of analogical reasoning founded on their experiences from parallel matters on the Soviet-Swedish agenda.

  • 2.
    Matz, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Cables in Cipher, the Raoul Wallenberg Case and Swedish-Soviet Diplomatic Communication 1944-472013In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 344-366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    In 2011, the Russian government, in order to mark the 100th anniversary of Swedish Diplomat Raoul Wallenberg, decided to allow one Swedish researcher to go through the diplomatic correspondence in cipher between the Soviet Embassy in Stockholm and the Soviet Foreign Ministry during the years 1944–1947. This article presents some of the major findings on Wallenberg and discusses whether parallel paths of Soviet encrypted communication between Moscow and Stockholm may still be harbouring additional information on his case. The ciphers cannot provide us with any conclusive answers on the Soviet motives for arresting Wallenberg, or his ultimate fate. They do, however, provide us with unique insights into how the matter was handled on both the Soviet and Swedish sides.

  • 3.
    Matz, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Soviet Refugees to Sweden 1941-1947 and the Raoul Wallenberg Case2015In: Journal of Baltic Studies, ISSN 0162-9778, E-ISSN 1751-7877, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 435-457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the years 1941-1948, thousands of people escaped across the Baltic Sea from eastern Europe to Sweden, primarily from the Baltic states but also from the USSR. On the basis of newly declassified Soviet correspondence through encrypted cables between the Soviet foreign ministry and the Soviet legation in Stockholm for the years 1944-1947, this article addresses the Soviet-Swedish diplomatic negotiations over a number of these refugees. The article also asks whether the 1947 Andrei Vyshinskii note on Raoul Wallenberg should be understood not only as a Soviet attempt to put an end to the Wallenberg case, but also to acquire a change in Sweden's handling of Soviet requests for the extradition of refugees.

  • 4.
    Matz, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Sweden, the United States, and Raoul Wallenberg's Mission to Hungary in 19442012In: Journal of Cold War Studies, ISSN 1520-3972, E-ISSN 1531-3298, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 97-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article provides an in-depth examination of the U.S. government's role in the case of Raoul Wallenberg, the courageous Swedish envoy who died mysteriously in the Soviet Union after being arrested by Soviet occupation forces at the end of World War II for unknown reasons. The article recounts how U.S. officials, particularly the diplomat Herschel V. Johnson, tried to alleviate the plight of Hungarian Jews after German forces occupied Hungary in 1944. A key part of this policy was their effort to work with Sweden in enlisting Wallenberg's help. The U.S.-Swedish relationship was never particularly close, and the mistrust that officials in each country felt toward the other side impeded any coordinated action. The article discusses the bureaucratic impediments on the U.S. side and highlights some of the obstacles that Johnson strove to overcome. The article builds on the report produced by the Eliasson Commission documenting the Swedish government's handling of the Wallenberg case. Although the Swedish authorities bore by far the greatest amount of blame for doing nothing in the face of Soviet stonewalling, Matz argues that U.S. officials also made significant misjudgments that may have exacerbated the situation.

  • 5.
    Matz, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Sweden, the USSR and the early Cold War 1944-47: declassified encrypted cables shed new light on Soviet diplomatic reporting about Sweden in the aftermath of World War II2015In: Cold War History, ISSN 1468-2745, E-ISSN 1743-7962, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 27-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In March 1946 the Soviet government decided to radically revise their policy towards Sweden. The Soviet demand, ever since November 1944, for the total extradition of the approximately 30,000 Baltic refugees in Sweden was suddenly dropped and a number of measures were taken by Moscow to accomplish a rapprochement between the two countries. On the basis of recently declassified Soviet encrypted diplomatic correspondence between the Soviet mission in Stockholm and the Soviet foreign ministry for the years 1944-1947, this article analyses the way in which the Soviet envoy to Sweden, Il'ia Chernyshev, represented Swedish affairs before his superiors in Moscow, and how these representations may have contributed to Moscow's decision to revise its policy towards Sweden.

  • 6.
    Matz, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    The Concept of Neutrality in Stalin's Foreign Policy, 1945-19532016In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 257-261Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Matz, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    USSR and Lithuania during the Second World War: A collection of documents, vol 2: Lithuania in the Soviet policy and international relations (August 1940-September 1945)2013In: Journal of Baltic Studies, ISSN 0162-9778, E-ISSN 1751-7877, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 547-550Article, book review (Other academic)
1 - 7 of 7
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