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  • 1.
    Cedernaes, Jonathan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Rångtell, Frida H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Axelsson, Emil K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Yeganeh, Adine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Vogel, Heike
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Dept Physiol & Endocrinol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Broman, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Dickson, Suzanne L.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Dept Physiol & Endocrinol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Schiöth, Helgi B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Benedict, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Short Sleep Makes Declarative Memories Vulnerable to Stress in Humans2015In: Sleep, ISSN 0161-8105, E-ISSN 1550-9109, Vol. 38, no 12, p. 1861-1868Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Objective: This study sought to investigate the role of nocturnal sleep duration for the retrieval of oversleep consolidated memories, both prior to and after being cognitively stressed for similar to 30 minutes the next morning. Design: Participants learned object locations (declarative memory task comprising 15 card pairs) and a finger tapping sequence (procedural memory task comprising 5 digits) in the evening. After learning, participants either had a sleep opportunity of 8 hours (between similar to 23:00 and similar to 07:00, full sleep condition) or they could sleep between similar to 03:00 and similar to 07:00 (short sleep condition). Retrieval of both memory tasks was tested in the morning after each sleep condition, both before (similar to 08:30) and after being stressed (similar to 09:50). Setting: Sleep laboratory. Participants: 15 healthy young men. Results: The analyses demonstrated that oversleep memory changes did not differ between sleep conditions. However, in their short sleep condition, following stress hallmarked by increased subjective stress feelings, the men were unable to maintain their pre-stress performance on the declarative memory task, whereas their performance on the procedural memory task remained unchanged. While men felt comparably subjectively stressed by the stress intervention, overall no differences between pre- and post-stress recalls were observed following a full night of sleep. Conclusions: The findings suggest that 8-h sleep duration, within the range recommended by the US National Sleep Foundation, may not only help consolidate newly learned procedural and declarative memories, but also ensure full access to both during periods of subjective stress.

  • 2.
    Chapman, Colin D.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Nilsson, Emil K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Nilsson, Victor C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Cedernaes, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Rångtell, Frida H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Vogel, Heike
    Dickson, Suzanne L.
    Broman, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Hogenkamp, Pleunie S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Schiöth, Helgi B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Benedict, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Acute sleep deprivation increases food purchasing in men2013In: Obesity, ISSN 1930-7381, E-ISSN 1930-739X, Vol. 21, no 12, p. E555-E560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To investigate if acute sleep deprivation affects food purchasing choices in a mock supermarket.

    Design and Methods

    On the morning after one night of total sleep deprivation (TSD) or after one night of sleep, 14 normal-weight men were given a fixed budget (300 SEKapproximately 50 USD). They were instructed to purchase as much as they could out of a possible 40 items, including 20 high-caloric foods (>2 kcal/g) and 20 low-caloric foods (<2 kcal/g). The prices of the high-caloric foods were then varied (75%, 100% (reference price), and 125%) to determine if TSD affects the flexibility of food purchasing. Before the task, participants received a standardized breakfast, thereby minimizing the potential confound produced by hunger. In addition, morning plasma concentrations of the orexigenic hormone ghrelin were measured under fasting conditions.

    Results

    Independent of both type of food offered and price condition, sleep-deprived men purchased significantly more calories (+9%) and grams (+18%) of food than they did after one night of sleep (both P<0.05). Morning plasma ghrelin concentrations were also higher after TSD (P<0.05). However, this increase did not correlate with the effects of TSD on food purchasing.

    Conclusions

    This experiment demonstrates that acute sleep loss alters food purchasing behavior in men.

  • 3.
    Hogenkamp, Pleunie S
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Nilsson, Emil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Nilsson, Victor C
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Chapman, Colin D
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Vogel, Heike
    Lundberg, Lina S
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Zarei, Sanaz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Cedernaes, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Rångtell, Frida H
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Broman, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Dickson, Suzanne L
    Brunström, Jeffrey M
    Benedict, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Schiöth, Helgi B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Acute sleep deprivation increases portion size and affects food choice in young men2013In: Psychoneuroendocrinology, ISSN 0306-4530, E-ISSN 1873-3360, Vol. 38, no 9, p. 1668-1674Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acute sleep loss increases food intake in adults. However, little is known about the influence of acute sleep loss on portion size choice, and whether this depends on both hunger state and the type of food (snack or meal item) offered to an individual. The aim of the current study was to compare portion size choice after a night of sleep and a period of nocturnal wakefulness (a condition experienced by night-shift workers, e.g. physicians and nurses). Sixteen men (age: 23 ± 0.9 years, BMI: 23.6 ± 0.6 kg/m2) participated in a randomized within-subject design with two conditions, 8-h of sleep and total sleep deprivation (TSD). In the morning following sleep interventions, portion size, comprising meal and snack items, was measured using a computer-based task, in both fasted and sated state. In addition, hunger as well as plasma levels of ghrelin were measured. In the morning after TSD, subjects had increased plasma ghrelin levels (13%, p = 0.04), and chose larger portions (14%, p = 0.02), irrespective of the type of food, as compared to the sleep condition. Self-reported hunger was also enhanced (p < 0.01). Following breakfast, sleep-deprived subjects chose larger portions of snacks (16%, p = 0.02), whereas the selection of meal items did not differ between the sleep interventions (6%, p = 0.13). Our results suggest that overeating in the morning after sleep loss is driven by both homeostatic and hedonic factors. Further, they show that portion size choice after sleep loss depend on both an individual's hunger status, and the type of food offered.

  • 4.
    Rångtell, Frida H
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    If only I could sleep, maybe I could remember2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Memory lies the ground for human cognitive skills, enabling complex social interaction, abstract thinking, and execution of precise motor skills. Development of these memory functions can be modified by several factors, including previous knowledge, reward, and sleep. In Paper I, skill level already when learning a motor skill determined whether the newly encoded memory would be enhanced during a subsequent post-learning period without training. Those already performing at a high level during learning gained less until recall, whereas those who performed at a lower level during learning demonstrated an enhanced improvement at recall.

    Thus, in Paper I we determined modulators of skill enhancement. In Paper II, we actively intended to modulate subsequent motor skill gain by delivering a praise immediately following learning. We found that praise had a positive effect on performance gain, which demonstrates that there are interventions that can easily be applied to enhance motor skill learning across time.

    Sleep is vital for healthy cognitive functions, and sleep disruption has not only been correlated with impaired cognitive function in the short-term, it has also been implicated as a risk factor for development of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease. In paper I, nighttime sleep between learning and recall of a motor memory was beneficial for learning compared to a daytime wake period. In Paper III, depriving participants from sleep negatively influenced performance on a working memory task; as did auditory distractions, but independent from sleep deprivation. However, working memory functions were not equally effected in women and men; working memory functions in women were more affected by sleep deprivation.

    Although it is well-known that sleep is good for health and well-being, in today’s modern society, most people have access to electricity and internet 24/7, and it is not uncommon to exchange sleep time with spending time in front of screen-based devices, such as smartphones. Access to screen-based devices in the evening and during the night are negatively correlated with a good night’s rest. In Paper IV, we did not find support for that the light emitted from those screens play a role for this negative correlation.

    List of papers
    1. Learning performance is linked to procedural memory consolidation across both sleep and wakefulness
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning performance is linked to procedural memory consolidation across both sleep and wakefulness
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    2017 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 10234Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated whether learning performance in a procedural finger tapping task before nocturnal sleep would predict performance gains after sleep in 60 young adults. Gains were defined as change in correctly tapped digit sequences between learning (12 trials administered in the evening) and retesting (3 trials administered in the morning after sleep). The same task was also administered to a separate wake group (N = 54 young adults), which learned in the morning and was retested in the evening. Learning performance was determined by either using the average performance on the last three learning trials or the average performance on the best three learning trials. Our results demonstrated an inverse association between learning performance and gains in procedural skill, i.e., good learners exhibited smaller performance gains across both wakefulness and sleep than poor learners. Regardless of learning performance, gains in finger tapping skills were greater after sleep than daytime wakefulness. Importantly, some of our findings were influenced by how learning performance was estimated. Collectively, these results suggest that learning performance and the method through which it is estimated may influence performance gains in finger tapping skills across both sleep and wakefulness.

    National Category
    Neurosciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334935 (URN)10.1038/s41598-017-09263-5 (DOI)000408781200093 ()28860592 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    AFA InsuranceLars Hierta Memorial FoundationNovo NordiskSwedish Society for Medical Research (SSMF)Swedish Society of MedicineThe Swedish Brain FoundationSwedish Research CouncilÅke Wiberg Foundation
    Available from: 2017-12-01 Created: 2017-12-01 Last updated: 2019-04-23Bibliographically approved
    2. Praise and competence-based self-esteem alter offline gains in motor skills
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Praise and competence-based self-esteem alter offline gains in motor skills
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Monetary reward and video-based praise following training of a motor skill result in greater gains in the skill. Whether this could also be achieved by text-only praise after learning is unclear. Neither is it known whether the effects of praise on subsequent consolidation of motor memories depend on the learner’s competence-based self-esteem. A high competence-based self-esteem is defined by one’s abilities, constituting a fragile basis for feelings of self-worth, and correlates with a lower intrinsic self-esteem.

    In the present study, seventy-eight subjects performed a motor task where they tapped a digit sequence (on a laptop) as fast and accurate as possible at three separate sessions: learning (scheduled in the evening on the training day), short-term recall (12 hours later), and long-term recall (~30 days later). Immediately after learning, all participants of the PRAISE group (n=39) were given a text praise, whereas those of the NO PRAISE group were not. Our results demonstrate that praise overall resulted in greater post-training gains in finger skill compared with no praise (P<0.05, ~ +6%). We also found that those with low scores on the competence-based self-esteem scale (i.e., likely to have a high intrinsic self-esteem) showed more pronounced post-training gains in finger skill than those with higher scores (P<0.05). However, competence-based self-esteem did not change the effect of praise on offline gains in finger skill (P>0.05). If confirmed by future studies, our findings could suggest that praise and a person’s self-esteem can contribute to variance in post-training improvements of motor skill.

    Keywords
    Procedural memory, Motor skills, Learning, Praise, Reward, Competence-based self-esteem
    National Category
    Neurosciences Psychology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-382099 (URN)
    Available from: 2019-04-22 Created: 2019-04-22 Last updated: 2019-05-02
    3. A single night of sleep loss impairs objective but not subjective working memory performance in a sex-dependent manner
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A single night of sleep loss impairs objective but not subjective working memory performance in a sex-dependent manner
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    2019 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 28, no 1, article id e12651Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Acute sleep deprivation can lead to judgement errors and thereby increases the risk of accidents, possibly due to an impaired working memory. However, whether the adverse effects of acute sleep loss on working memory are modulated by auditory distraction in women and men are not known. Additionally, it is unknown whether sleep loss alters the way in which men and women perceive their working memory performance. Thus, 24 young adults (12 women using oral contraceptives at the time of investigation) participated in two experimental conditions: nocturnal sleep (scheduled between 22:30 and 06:30 hours) versus one night of total sleep loss. Participants were administered a digital working memory test in which eight-digit sequences were learned and retrieved in the morning after each condition. Learning of digital sequences was accompanied by either silence or auditory distraction (equal distribution among trials). After sequence retrieval, each trial ended with a question regarding how certain participants were of the correctness of their response, as a self-estimate of working memory performance. We found that sleep loss impaired objective but not self-estimated working memory performance in women. In contrast, both measures remained unaffected by sleep loss in men. Auditory distraction impaired working memory performance, without modulation by sleep loss or sex. Being unaware of cognitive limitations when sleep-deprived, as seen in our study, could lead to undesirable consequences in, for example, an occupational context. Our findings suggest that sleep-deprived young women are at particular risk for overestimating their working memory performance.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2019
    Keywords
    sound distraction, women and men, nocturnal wakefulness, subjective performance, cognition
    National Category
    Applied Psychology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-376724 (URN)10.1111/jsr.12651 (DOI)000456255400005 ()29383809 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Fredrik och Ingrid Thurings StiftelseSwedish Research Council, 2015-03100Åke Wiberg FoundationThe Swedish Brain Foundation, FO2016-0092Swedish Society of MedicineTore Nilsons Stiftelse för medicinsk forskningNovo Nordisk, NNF14OC0009349Erik, Karin och Gösta Selanders FoundationAFA Insurance, 140006Swedish Research Council
    Available from: 2019-02-11 Created: 2019-02-11 Last updated: 2019-04-23Bibliographically approved
    4. Two hours of evening reading on a self-luminous tablet vs. reading a physical book does not alter sleep after daytime bright light exposure
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Two hours of evening reading on a self-luminous tablet vs. reading a physical book does not alter sleep after daytime bright light exposure
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Sleep Medicine, ISSN 1389-9457, E-ISSN 1878-5506, Vol. 23, p. 111-118Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The use of electronic devices emitting blue light during evening hours has been associated with sleep disturbances in humans, possibly due to the blue light-mediated suppression of the sleep promoting hormone melatonin. However, experimental results have been mixed. The present study therefore sought to investigate if reading on a self-luminous tablet during evening hours would alter sleepiness, melatonin secretion, nocturnal sleep, as well as electroencephalographic power spectral density during early slow-wave sleep. Methods: Following a constant bright light exposure over 6.5 hours (similar to 569 lux), 14 participants (six females) read a novel either on a tablet or as physical book for two hours (21:00-23:00). Evening concentrations of saliva melatonin were repeatedly measured. Sleep (23:15-07:15) was recorded by polysomnography. Sleepiness was assessed before and after nocturnal sleep. About one week later, experiments were repeated; participants who had read the novel on a tablet in the first experimental session continued reading the same novel in the physical book, and vice versa. Results: There were no differences in sleep parameters and pre-sleep saliva melatonin levels between the tablet reading and physical book reading conditions. Conclusions: Bright light exposure during daytime has previously been shown to abolish the inhibitory effects of evening light stimulus on melatonin secretion. Our results could therefore suggest that exposure to bright light during the day - as in the present study - may help combat sleep disturbances associated with the evening use of electronic devices emitting blue light. However, this needs to be validated by future studies with larger sample populations.

    Keywords
    Evening LED screen exposure, Saliva melatonin, Sleep, Power spectral density, Daytime light exposure
    National Category
    Neurology Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-308796 (URN)10.1016/j.sleep.2016.06.016 (DOI)000386409000016 ()27539026 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    AFA InsuranceNovo NordiskThe Swedish Brain FoundationSwedish Research Council
    Available from: 2016-12-01 Created: 2016-11-30 Last updated: 2019-04-23Bibliographically approved
  • 5.
    Rångtell, Frida H.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Broman, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Benedict, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Bringing the tablet to the bedroom: LED screen light exposure and consequences on sleep2016In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 25, p. 285-286Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Rångtell, Frida H.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Ekstrand, Emelie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Rapp, Linnea
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Lagermalm, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Liethof, Lisanne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Bucaro, Marcela Olaya
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Lingfors, David H. S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics.
    Jan-Erik, Broman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Schiöth, Helgi B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Benedict, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Two hours of evening reading on a self-luminous tablet vs. reading a physical book does not alter sleep after daytime bright light exposure2016In: Sleep Medicine, ISSN 1389-9457, E-ISSN 1878-5506, Vol. 23, p. 111-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The use of electronic devices emitting blue light during evening hours has been associated with sleep disturbances in humans, possibly due to the blue light-mediated suppression of the sleep promoting hormone melatonin. However, experimental results have been mixed. The present study therefore sought to investigate if reading on a self-luminous tablet during evening hours would alter sleepiness, melatonin secretion, nocturnal sleep, as well as electroencephalographic power spectral density during early slow-wave sleep. Methods: Following a constant bright light exposure over 6.5 hours (similar to 569 lux), 14 participants (six females) read a novel either on a tablet or as physical book for two hours (21:00-23:00). Evening concentrations of saliva melatonin were repeatedly measured. Sleep (23:15-07:15) was recorded by polysomnography. Sleepiness was assessed before and after nocturnal sleep. About one week later, experiments were repeated; participants who had read the novel on a tablet in the first experimental session continued reading the same novel in the physical book, and vice versa. Results: There were no differences in sleep parameters and pre-sleep saliva melatonin levels between the tablet reading and physical book reading conditions. Conclusions: Bright light exposure during daytime has previously been shown to abolish the inhibitory effects of evening light stimulus on melatonin secretion. Our results could therefore suggest that exposure to bright light during the day - as in the present study - may help combat sleep disturbances associated with the evening use of electronic devices emitting blue light. However, this needs to be validated by future studies with larger sample populations.

  • 7.
    Rångtell, Frida H
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Karamchedu, Swathy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Andersson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Cedernaes, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Benedict, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Women and men are differentially affected by sleep loss with respect to cognitive performance and hunger regulation2017In: Sleep, ISSN 0161-8105, E-ISSN 1550-9109, Vol. 40, p. A97-A97Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Rångtell, Frida H
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Karamchedu, Swathy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Andersson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Liethof, Lisanne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Bucaro, Marcela Olaya
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Lampola, Lauri
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Schiöth, Helgi B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Cedernaes, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Benedict, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    A single night of sleep loss impairs objective but not subjective working memory performance in a sex-dependent manner2019In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 28, no 1, article id e12651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acute sleep deprivation can lead to judgement errors and thereby increases the risk of accidents, possibly due to an impaired working memory. However, whether the adverse effects of acute sleep loss on working memory are modulated by auditory distraction in women and men are not known. Additionally, it is unknown whether sleep loss alters the way in which men and women perceive their working memory performance. Thus, 24 young adults (12 women using oral contraceptives at the time of investigation) participated in two experimental conditions: nocturnal sleep (scheduled between 22:30 and 06:30 hours) versus one night of total sleep loss. Participants were administered a digital working memory test in which eight-digit sequences were learned and retrieved in the morning after each condition. Learning of digital sequences was accompanied by either silence or auditory distraction (equal distribution among trials). After sequence retrieval, each trial ended with a question regarding how certain participants were of the correctness of their response, as a self-estimate of working memory performance. We found that sleep loss impaired objective but not self-estimated working memory performance in women. In contrast, both measures remained unaffected by sleep loss in men. Auditory distraction impaired working memory performance, without modulation by sleep loss or sex. Being unaware of cognitive limitations when sleep-deprived, as seen in our study, could lead to undesirable consequences in, for example, an occupational context. Our findings suggest that sleep-deprived young women are at particular risk for overestimating their working memory performance.

  • 9.
    Rångtell, Frida H.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Karamchedu, Swathy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Andersson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    van Egmond, Lieve
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Hultgren, Tyra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Broman, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Cedernaes, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Benedict, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Learning performance is linked to procedural memory consolidation across both sleep and wakefulness2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 10234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated whether learning performance in a procedural finger tapping task before nocturnal sleep would predict performance gains after sleep in 60 young adults. Gains were defined as change in correctly tapped digit sequences between learning (12 trials administered in the evening) and retesting (3 trials administered in the morning after sleep). The same task was also administered to a separate wake group (N = 54 young adults), which learned in the morning and was retested in the evening. Learning performance was determined by either using the average performance on the last three learning trials or the average performance on the best three learning trials. Our results demonstrated an inverse association between learning performance and gains in procedural skill, i.e., good learners exhibited smaller performance gains across both wakefulness and sleep than poor learners. Regardless of learning performance, gains in finger tapping skills were greater after sleep than daytime wakefulness. Importantly, some of our findings were influenced by how learning performance was estimated. Collectively, these results suggest that learning performance and the method through which it is estimated may influence performance gains in finger tapping skills across both sleep and wakefulness.

  • 10.
    Rångtell, Frida H
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Schmidt, Felix
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Würfel, Josefine
    German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany.
    Karamchedu, Swathy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, Neuroscience and Behavioral Disorders Program, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore.
    Andersson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Vogel, Heike
    Benedict, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Morning Enzymatic Activity of DPP-4 Is Differentially Altered by Sleep Loss in Women and Men2018In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 41, no 2, p. e10-e11Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Rångtell, Frida
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    van Egmond, Lieve
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Karamchedu, S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Moulis, A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Ilemosoglou, M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Schmidt, F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Tan, Xiao
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Benedict, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Well done! Effects of post-learning positive reinforcement on motor memory recall performance 12 hours and 1 month after learning2018In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 27Article in journal (Other academic)
1 - 11 of 11
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