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  • 1.
    Armstrong, Chelsey
    et al.
    Department of Archaeology, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada .
    Shoemaker, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    McKechnie, Iain
    Department of Anthropology, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, Hakai Institute, Heriot Bay, Quadra Island, British Columbia, Canada.
    Ekblom, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Szabó, Péter
    Department of Vegetation Ecology, Institute of Botany of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Brno, Czech Republic .
    Lane, Paul J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology. School of Geography, Archaeology and Environmental Studies, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa .
    McAlvay, Alex C.
    Department of Botany, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America .
    Boles, Oliver
    Institute of Archaeology, University College London, London, United Kingdom .
    Walshaw, Sarah
    Department of History, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada .
    Petek, Nik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Gibbons, Kevin
    Department of Anthropology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, United States of America.
    Quintana Morales, Erendira
    Department of Anthropology, Rice University, Houston, Texas, United States of America .
    Anderson, Eugene
    Department of Anthropology, University California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California, United States of America .
    Ibragimow, Aleksandra
    Adams Mickiewicz Univ, Polish German Res Inst, Poznan, Poland.; European Univ, Viadrina, Germany.
    Podruczny, Grzegorz
    Adams Mickiewicz Univ, Polish German Res Inst, Poznan, Poland.; European Univ, Viadrina, Germany.
    Vamosi, Jana
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada .
    Marks-Block, Tony
    Department of Anthropology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America.
    LeCompte, Joyce
    Independent Scholar, Seattle, Washington, United States of America.
    Awâsis, Sākihitowin
    Department of Geography, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada, Atlohsa Native Family Healing Services, Canada, London, Ontario, Canada .
    Nabess, Carly
    Department of Anthropology, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, British Columbia, Canada.
    Sinclair, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Crumley, Carole L.
    Department of Anthropology, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America; Integrated History of Future of People on Earth (IHOPE) Initiative, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Anthropological contributions to historical ecology: 50 questions, infinite prospects2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 2, article id e0171883Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the results of a consensus-driven process identifying 50 priority research questions for historical ecology obtained through crowdsourcing, literature reviews, and in-person workshopping. A deliberative approach was designed to maximize discussion and debate with defined outcomes. Two in-person workshops (in Sweden and Canada) over the course of two years and online discussions were peer facilitated to define specific key questions for historical ecology from anthropological and archaeological perspectives. The aim of this research is to showcase the variety of questions that reflect the broad scope for historical-ecological research trajectories across scientific disciplines. Historical ecology encompasses research concerned with decadal, centennial, and millennial human-environmental interactions, and the consequences that those relationships have in the formation of contemporary landscapes. Six interrelated themes arose from our consensus-building workshop model: (1) climate and environmental change and variability; (2) multi-scalar, multi-disciplinary; (3) biodiversity and community ecology; (4) resource and environmental management and governance; (5) methods and applications; and (6) communication and policy. The 50 questions represented by these themes highlight meaningful trends in historical ecology that distill the field down to three explicit findings. First, historical ecology is fundamentally an applied research program. Second, this program seeks to understand long-term human-environment interactions with a focus on avoiding, mitigating, and reversing adverse ecological effects. Third, historical ecology is part of convergent trends toward transdisciplinary research science, which erodes scientific boundaries between the cultural and natural.

  • 2.
    Badenhorst, Shaw
    et al.
    Ditsong National Museum of Natural History (formerly Transvaal Museum.
    Sinclair, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Ekblom, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Faunal remains from Chibuene, an Iron Age coastal trading station in central Mozambique2011In: Southern African Humanities, ISSN 1681-5564, Vol. 23, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the small faunal assemblage from the Iron Age coastal trading station of Chibuene, situated on the coastal littoral of central Mozambique. The faunal assemblage was excavated in 1995 and contains bones from a variety of animals, including livestock, chickens, wild game animals, as well as aquatic species such as turtles and fish. Fish, turtle and shark remains dominate the assemblage. The fauna from the first and second millennium AD occupations share similarities with other contemporaneous sites to the north on the East African coast, rather than with sites located in South Africa.

  • 3. Costanza, Robert
    et al.
    van der Leeuw, Sander
    Hibbard, Kathy
    Aulenbach, Steve
    Brewer, Simon
    Burek, Michael
    Cornell, Sarah
    Crumley, Carole
    Dearing, John
    Folke, Carl
    Graumlich, Lisa
    Hegmon, Michelle
    Heckbert, Scott
    Jackson, Stephen T.
    Kubiszewski, Ida
    Scarborough, Vernon
    Sinclair, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Sorlin, Sverker
    Steffen, Will
    Developing an Integrated History and future of People on Earth (IHOPE)2012In: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, ISSN 1877-3435, E-ISSN 1877-3443, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 106-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Integrated History and future of People on Earth (IHOPE) initiative is a global network of researchers and research projects with its International Program Office (IPO) now based at the Stockholm Resilience Center (SRC), Uppsala University, Arizona State University, Portland State University, and the Australian National University. Research linked to IHOPE demonstrates that Earth system changes in the past have been strongly associated with changes in the coupled human-environment system. IHOPE supports integrating knowledge and resources from the biophysical and the social sciences and the humanities to address analytical and interpretive issues associated with coupled human-earth system dynamics. This integration of human history and Earth system history is a timely and important task. Until recently, however, there have been few attempts at such integration. IHOPE will create frameworks that can be used to help achieve this integration. The overarching goal is to produce a rich understanding of the relationships between environmental and human processes over the past millennia. HOPE recognizes that one major challenge for reaching this goal is developing 'workable' terminology that can be accepted by scholars of all disciplines. The specific objectives for IHOPE are to identify slow and rapidly moving features of complex social-ecological systems, on local to continental spatial scales, which induce resilience, stress, or collapse in linked systems of humans in nature. These objectives will be reached by exploring innovative ways of conducting interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary science, including theory, case studies, and integrated modeling. Examples of projects underway to implement this initiative are briefly discussed.

  • 4.
    Ekblom, Anneli
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Eichhorn, Barbara
    Institut für Archäologische Wissenschaften, Archäologie und Archäobotanik Afrikas, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität.
    Sinclair, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Badenhorst, Shaw
    Department of Archaeozoology, Transvaal Museum, Department of anthropology and Archaeology, University of South Africa.
    Berger, Amelie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Land use history and resource utilisation from A.D. 400to the present, at Chibuene, southern Mozambique2014In: Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, ISSN 0939-6314, E-ISSN 1617-6278, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 15-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses changing patterns of resource utilisation over time in the locality of Chibuene, Vilankulos, situated on the coastal plain of southern Mozambique. The macroscopic charcoal, bone and shellassemblages from archaeological excavations are presented and discussed against the off-site palaeoecological records from pollen, fungal spores and microscopic charcoal. The Chibuene landscape has experienced four phases of land use and resource utilisation that have interacted with changes in the environment. Phase 1 (A.D. 400–900), forest savanna mosaic, low intensity cattle herding and cultivation, trade of resources for domestic use. Phase 2 (A.D. 900–1400), forest savanna mosaic, high intensity/extensive cultivation and cattle herding. Phase 3 (A.D. 1400–1800), savanna woodland and progressive decrease in forests owing to droughts. Decline of agricultural activities and higher reliance on marine resources. Possible trade of resources with the interior. Phase 4 (A.D. 1800–1900), open savanna with few forest patches. Warfare and social unrest. Collapse of trade with the interior. Decline in marine resources and wildlife. Loss of cattle herds. Expansion of agriculture locally and introduction of New World crops and clearing of Brachystegia trees. The study shows the importance of combining different environmental resources for elucidating how land use and natural variability have changed over time.

  • 5.
    Ekblom, Anneli
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, Centre for Environment and Development Studies.
    Lane, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Radimilahy, Chantal
    Rakotoarisoa, J.-A.
    Sinclair, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Virah-Samwy, Malika
    Plant Conservation Unit, Botany Department, University of Cape Town.
    Migrations and interactions between Madagascar and the eastern Africa, 500 BC – 1000 AD:: the archeological perspective2016In: Early Exchange between Africa and the Wider Indian Ocean World / [ed] Campbell, G., Cham: Springer International Publishing , 2016, p. 191-230Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6. Seitzinger, Sybil P.
    et al.
    Svedin, Uno
    Crumley, Carole L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Swedish Biodiversity Centre.
    Steffen, Will
    Abdullah, Saiful Arif
    Alfsen, Christine
    Broadgate, Wendy J.
    Biermann, Frank
    Bondre, Ninad R.
    Dearing, John A.
    Deutsch, Lisa
    Dhakal, Shobhakar
    Elmqvist, Thomas
    Farahbakhshazad, Neda
    Gaffney, Owen
    Haberl, Helmut
    Lavorel, Sandra
    Mbow, Cheikh
    McMichael, Anthony J.
    deMorais, Joao M. F.
    Olsson, Per
    Pinho, Patricia Fernanda
    Seto, Karen C.
    Sinclair, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Smith, Mark Stafford
    Sugar, Lorraine
    Planetary Stewardship in an Urbanizing World: Beyond City Limits2012In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 41, no 8, p. 787-794Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cities are rapidly increasing in importance as a major factor shaping the Earth system, and therefore, must take corresponding responsibility. With currently over half the world's population, cities are supported by resources originating from primarily rural regions often located around the world far distant from the urban loci of use. The sustainability of a city can no longer be considered in isolation from the sustainability of human and natural resources it uses from proximal or distant regions, or the combined resource use and impacts of cities globally. The world's multiple and complex environmental and social challenges require interconnected solutions and coordinated governance approaches to planetary stewardship. We suggest that a key component of planetary stewardship is a global system of cities that develop sustainable processes and policies in concert with its non-urban areas. The potential for cities to cooperate as a system and with rural connectivity could increase their capacity to effect change and foster stewardship at the planetary scale and also increase their resource security.

  • 7.
    Sinclair, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Staden som idé och tanke2012In: Miljöhistorier: Personliga, lokala, globala berättelser om dåtid, nutid och framtid. / [ed] Anneli Ekblom, Michel Notelid, Uppsala: CSD Uppsala och Institution för arkeologi och antik historia, Uppsala universitet , 2012, p. 37-44Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Städer ingår i det mänskliga tänkandet, de bebyggs, utvecklas och överges som ett resultat av mänskliga beslut och handlingar. Vi blir alltmer medvetna om samspelet mellan tanke och handling och miljön både på lokal och regional skala. Ibland låser stadsplanering, befolkningstryck och ekonomi in stadens invånare i beteenden och skeenden som gör att den ekologiska kapaciteten i staden och dess omland överskrids. Men det är tranformation snarare än kollaps som står i fokus i våra studier. Städer flyttas eller ombildas, dess organisation och funktion förändras och dess befolkning är ofta blandad med stor ekonomisk, social och kulturell mångfald. Det råder föga tvivel i våra sinnen att städers hållbarhetsproblematik är central när det gäller att bemöta de mångfacetterade och allvarliga globala förändringar som vi alla står inför i dag. En ofta citerad men högst relevant iakttagelse är att mer än hälften av världens befolkning nu bor i städer. Städer utgör på så sätt både ursprunget till och samtidigt den potentiella lösningen på de hållbarhetsproblem vi ser idag.

  • 8.
    Sinclair, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Towards an Understanding of Spatio-Temporal Dynamics at Great Zimbabwe: Contributions of the Urban Origins in Eastern and Southern Africa Programme2019In: Acta Archaeologica, ISSN 0065-101X, E-ISSN 1600-0390, Vol. 90, no 1, p. 123-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1987 archaeologists from nine African countries and colleagues from Sweden began a co-operation programme to study urbanism in eastern and southern Africa under the auspices of The Urban Origins programme. The programme involved 22 parallel field projects throughout the West Indian Ocean region and the southern Africa interior. The article presents a compilation of diverse material on Great Zimbabwe that has been scattered in different fora. The research was directed by an overall approach that investigations in urban archaeology in Africa must be at the same scale that people lived in the past. The results briefly presented here show the potential of multivariate assessments of the spatial distributions of large-scale urban sites in Africa.

  • 9.
    Sinclair, Paul
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Ekblom, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Wood, Marilee
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Trade and society on the south-east African coast in the later first millennium AD: the case of Chibuene2012In: Antiquity, ISSN 0003-598X, E-ISSN 1745-1744, Vol. 86, no 333, p. 723-737Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The south-east coast of Africa in the later first millennium was busy with boats and the movement of goods from across the Indian Ocean to the interior. The landing places were crucial mediators in this process, in Africa as elsewhere. Investigations at the beach site of Chibuene show that a local community was supplying imported beads to such interior sites as Schroda, with the consequent emergence there of hierarchical power structures.

  • 10.
    Sinclair, Paul
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. Pretoria Univ, Dept Anthropol & Archaeol, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Moen, Jon
    Umeå Univ, Dept Ecol & Environm Sci, Umeå, Sweden.
    Crumley, Carole L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Swedish Biodivers Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden; Univ N Carolina, Dept Anthropol, Chapel Hill, NC USA.
    Historical Ecology and the Longue Durée2018In: Issues and Concepts in Historical Ecology: The Past and Future of Landscapes and Regions / [ed] Crumley, Carole L.; Lennartsson, Tommy & Westin, Anna, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018, p. 13-40Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11. van der Leeuw, Sander
    et al.
    Costanza, Robert
    Aulenbach, Steve
    Brewer, Simon
    Burek, Michael
    Cornell, Sarah
    Crumley, Carole
    Dearing, John A.
    Downy, Catherine
    Graumlich, Lisa J.
    Heckbert, Scott
    Hegmon, Michelle
    Hibbard, Kathy
    Jackson, Stephen T.
    Kubiszewski, Ida
    Sinclair, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Sorlin, Sverker
    Steffen, Will
    Toward an Integrated History to Guide the Future2011In: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 2-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many contemporary societal challenges manifest themselves in the domain of human-environment interactions. There is a growing recognition that responses to these challenges formulated within current disciplinary boundaries, in isolation from their wider contexts, cannot adequately address them. Here, we outline the need for an integrated, transdisciplinary synthesis that allows for a holistic approach, and, above all, a much longer time perspective. We outline both the need for and the fundamental characteristics of what we call "integrated history." This approach promises to yield new understandings of the relationship between the past, present, and possible futures of our integrated human-environment system. We recommend a unique new focus of our historical efforts on the future, rather than the past, concentrated on learning about future possibilities from history. A growing worldwide community of transdisciplinary scholars is forming around building this Integrated History and future of People on Earth (IHOPE). Building integrated models of past human societies and their interactions with their environments yields new insights into those interactions and can help to create a more sustainable and desirable future. The activity has become a major focus within the global change community.

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