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  • 1.
    Bodén, Robert
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Persson, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Wall, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Antoni, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Molecular Imaging.
    Striatal Phosphodiesterase 10A and Medial Prefrontal Cortical Thickness in Patients with Schizophrenia: A PET and MRI Study2017In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 81, no 10, p. S386-S387Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Bodén, Robert
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Persson, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Wall, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Antoni, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Striatal phosphodiesterase 10A and medial prefrontal cortical thickness in patients with schizophrenia: a PET and MRI study2017In: Translational Psychiatry, ISSN 2158-3188, E-ISSN 2158-3188, Vol. 7, no 3, article id e1050Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The enzyme phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) is abundant in striatal medium spiny neurons and has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia in animal models and is investigated as a possible new pharmacological treatment target. A reduction of prefrontal cortical thickness is common in schizophrenia, but how this relates to PDE10A expression is unknown. Our study aim was to compare, we believe for the first time, the striatal non-displaceable binding potential (BPND) of the new validated PDE10A ligand [(11)C]Lu AE92686 between patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. Furthermore, we aimed to assess the correlation of PDE10A BPND to cortical thickness. Sixteen healthy male controls and 10 male patients with schizophrenia treated with clozapine, olanzapine or quetiapine were investigated with positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Striatal binding potential (BPND) of [(11)C]Lu AE92686 was acquired through dynamic PET scans and cortical thickness by structural MRI. Clinical assessments of symptoms and cognitive function were performed and the antipsychotic dosage was recorded. Patients with schizophrenia had a significantly lower BPND of [(11)C]Lu AE92686 in striatum (P=0.003) than healthy controls. The striatal BPND significantly correlated to cortical thickness in the medial prefrontal cortex and superior frontal gyrus across patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. No significant correlation was observed between the BPND for [(11)C]Lu AE92686 in striatum and age, schizophrenia symptoms, antipsychotic dosage, coffee consumption, smoking, duration of illness or cognitive function in the patients. In conclusion, PDE10A may be important for functioning in the striato-cortical interaction and in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  • 3.
    Engman, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Persson, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Söderlund, Hedvig
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The right way: The importance of hippocampal lateralization for spatial memory performance2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Nordin, Kristin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Persson, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Stening, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Herlitz, A
    Morell, A
    Wahlund, L.-O.
    Wikström, J.
    Söderlund, Hedvig
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Same strategy–different structure: hippocampal and caudate volume are differently associated with navigation strategy in men and women2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Nordin, Kristin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Persson, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Stening, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Herlitz, Agneta
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Söderlund, Hedvig
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Structural whole-brain covariance of the anterior and posterior hippocampus: Associations with age and memory2018In: Hippocampus, ISSN 1050-9631, E-ISSN 1098-1063, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 151-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hippocampus (HC) interacts with distributed brain regions to support memory and shows significant volume reductions in aging, but little is known about age effects on hippocampal whole-brain structural covariance. It is also unclear whether the anterior and posterior HC show similar or distinct patterns of whole-brain covariance and to what extent these are related to memory functions organized along the hippocampal longitudinal axis. Using the multivariate approach partial least squares, we assessed structural whole-brain covariance of the HC in addition to regional volume, in young, middle-aged and older adults (n = 221), and assessed associations with episodic and spatial memory. Based on findings of sex differences in both memory and brain aging, we further considered sex as a potential modulating factor of age effects. There were two main covariance patterns: one capturing common anterior and posterior covariance, and one differentiating the two regions by capturing anterior-specific covariance only. These patterns were differentially related to associative memory while unrelated to measures of single-item memory and spatial memory. Although patterns were qualitatively comparable across age groups, participants' expression of both patterns decreased with age, independently of sex. The results suggest that the organization of hippocampal structural whole-brain covariance remains stable across age, but that the integrity of these networks decreases as the brain undergoes age-related alterations.

  • 6.
    Peira, N
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Persson, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Fusiform & Inferior Frontal Gyrus activation in attentional top-down modulation to emotional stimuli2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Persson, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Making Head or Tail of the Hippocampus: A Long-Axis Account of Episodic and Spatial Memory2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    While episodic and spatial memory both depend on the hippocampus, opposite gender differences in these functions suggest they are partly separate, with different neural underpinnings. The anterior and posterior hippocampus differ  in structure and whole-brain connectivity, and studies point to the posterior hippocampus being more involved in spatial memory while the anterior hippocampus’ role in episodic memory is less clear. This thesis aims to explore the role of the anterior and posterior hippocampus, and associated brain regions, in episodic and spatial memory. Paper I studied gender differences in hippocampal activation underlying differences in spatial memory performance. Better performance in men was accompanied by greater right-lateralization of hippocampal activation compared to women. Paper II investigated regions of gray matter that covaried in volume with the anterior and posterior hippocampus, and whether these covariance patterns depended on gender and were related to behavior. The anterior and posterior hippocampus showed different patterns of covariance, with the anterior hippocampus covariance pattern observed in women and the posterior hippocampus covariance pattern primarily in men. Paper III considered whether the location of hippocampal recruitment in episodic memory depends on memory content. Verbal stimuli were associated with more anterior, and left-lateralized, encoding activations than pictorial stimuli, which in turn were associated with more posterior and bilateral encoding activations. This was not observed during retrieval. Paper IV investigated whether resting-state connectivity associated with the anterior and posterior hippocampus predicts episodic and spatial memory performance, respectively. Resting-state connectivity associated with the anterior, not posterior, hippocampus predicted episodic memory performance, while resting-state connectivity associated with the posterior, not anterior, hippocampus predicted spatial memory performance. This thesis lends further support to differences in function and structure between the anterior and posterior hippocampus suggesting that these two sub–segments play different roles in episodic and spatial memory. Further, it suggests that gender differences in anterior and posterior hippocampus function underlies gender differences in episodic and spatial memory, respectively. Considering the anterior and posterior hippocampus, as well as men and women, separately, is hence important when studying the effect of age and pathology on the hippocampus and associated memory functions.

    List of papers
    1. Remembering our origin: Gender differences in spatial memory are reflected in gender differences in hippocampal lateralization
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Remembering our origin: Gender differences in spatial memory are reflected in gender differences in hippocampal lateralization
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: Behavioural Brain Research, ISSN 0166-4328, E-ISSN 1872-7549, Vol. 256, p. 219-228Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Gender differences in spatial memory favoring men are frequently reported, and the involvement of the hippocampus in these functions is well-established. However, little is known of whether this behavioral gender difference is mirrored in a gender difference in hippocampal function. Here we assessed hippocampal activity, using functional MRI, while 24 men and women moved through three-dimensional virtual mazes (navigation phase) of varying length, and at the end-point estimated the direction of the starting-point (pointing phase). Men were indeed more accurate than women at estimating direction, and this was especially true in longer mazes. Both genders activated the posterior hippocampus throughout the whole task. During the navigation phase, men showed a larger activation in the right hippocampus than women, while in the pointing phase, women showed a larger activation in the left hippocampus than men. Right-lateralized activation during the navigation phase was associated with greater task performance, and may reflect a spatial strategy that is beneficial in this task. Left-sided activation during the pointing phase might reflect a less efficient post hoc verbal recapitulation of the route. This study is the first to identify neural correlates of the commonly observed male advantage in recalling one's original position, and points to hippocampal lateralization as a possible explanation for this behavioral gender difference.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-207612 (URN)10.1016/j.bbr.2013.07.050 (DOI)000328094100027 ()23938766 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2013-09-17 Created: 2013-09-17 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    2. Sex differences in volume and structural covariance of the anterior and posterior hippocampus
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sex differences in volume and structural covariance of the anterior and posterior hippocampus
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, no 99, p. 215-25Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Sex differences in episodic and spatial memory are frequently observed, suggesting that there may be sex-related structural differences in the hippocampus (HC). Earlier findings are inconsistent, possibly due to a known variability along the hippocampal longitudinal axis. Here, we assessed potential sex differences in hippocampal volume and structural covariance with the rest of the brain in young men and women (N=76), considering the anterior (aHC) and posterior (pHC) hippocampus separately. Women exhibited a larger pHC than men adjusted for brain size. Using partial least squares, we identified two significant patterns of structural covariance of the aHC and pHC. The first included brain areas that covaried positively and negatively in volume with both the aHC and pHC in men, but showed greater covariance with the aHC than pHC in women. The second pattern revealed distinct structural covariance of the aHC and pHC that showed a clear difference between men and women: in men the pHC showed reliable structural covariance with the medial and lateral parietal lobes and the prefrontal cortex, whereas in women the aHC showed reliable structural covariance with the anterior temporal lobe bilaterally. This pattern converges with resting state functional connectivity of the aHC and pHC and suggests that these hippocampal sections interact with different brain regions, consistent with a division of labor with regards to episodic and spatial memory. Our findings lend support to a division of the HC into an anterior and posterior part and identify sex as a potential moderating factor when investigating hippocampal structure and connectivity.

    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-225425 (URN)10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.05.038 (DOI)000339860000023 ()24857714 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-06-03 Created: 2014-06-03 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    3. Hippocampal hemispheric and long-axis differentiation of stimulus content during episodic memory encoding and retrieval: An activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hippocampal hemispheric and long-axis differentiation of stimulus content during episodic memory encoding and retrieval: An activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis
    2015 (English)In: Hippocampus, ISSN 1050-9631, E-ISSN 1098-1063, Vol. 25, no 12, p. 1614-1631Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    While there is ample evidence that the hippocampus is functionally heterogeneous along its longitudinal axis, there is still no consensus regarding its exact organization. Whereas spatial memory tasks frequently engage the posterior hippocampus, the regions engaged during episodic memory are more varying and may depend on the specific nature of the stimuli. Here, we investigate the effect of stimulus content on the location of hippocampal recruitment during episodic memory encoding and retrieval of pictorial and verbal material with a meta-analysis approach, using activation likelihood estimation and restricting the analysis to the hippocampus. Verbal material was associated with left-lateralized anterior activation, compared to pictorial material that recruited a more posterior aspect of the hippocampus, primarily within the right hemisphere. This effect held for encoding of both single items and item-item associations but was less clear during retrieval. The findings lend further support to a functional subdivision of the hippocampus along its longitudinal axis and indicate that the content of episodic memories is one factor that determines the location of hippocampal recruitment.

    Keywords
    meta-analysis; hippocampus; episodic memory; spatial memory; activation likelihood estimation; encoding; retrieval
    National Category
    Psychology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-259778 (URN)10.1002/hipo.22482 (DOI)000368281700012 ()26108671 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2015-08-11 Created: 2015-08-11 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
    4. Predicting episodic and spatial memory performance from hippocampal resting-state functional connectivity: evidence for an anterior-posterior division of function
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predicting episodic and spatial memory performance from hippocampal resting-state functional connectivity: evidence for an anterior-posterior division of function
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Psychology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-259780 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-08-11 Created: 2015-08-11 Last updated: 2015-09-29
  • 8.
    Persson, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Herlitz, Agneta
    Engman, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Morell, Arvid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Sjölie, Daniel
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Söderlund, Hedvig
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Remembering our origin: Gender differences in spatial memory are reflected in gender differences in hippocampal lateralization2013In: Behavioural Brain Research, ISSN 0166-4328, E-ISSN 1872-7549, Vol. 256, p. 219-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gender differences in spatial memory favoring men are frequently reported, and the involvement of the hippocampus in these functions is well-established. However, little is known of whether this behavioral gender difference is mirrored in a gender difference in hippocampal function. Here we assessed hippocampal activity, using functional MRI, while 24 men and women moved through three-dimensional virtual mazes (navigation phase) of varying length, and at the end-point estimated the direction of the starting-point (pointing phase). Men were indeed more accurate than women at estimating direction, and this was especially true in longer mazes. Both genders activated the posterior hippocampus throughout the whole task. During the navigation phase, men showed a larger activation in the right hippocampus than women, while in the pointing phase, women showed a larger activation in the left hippocampus than men. Right-lateralized activation during the navigation phase was associated with greater task performance, and may reflect a spatial strategy that is beneficial in this task. Left-sided activation during the pointing phase might reflect a less efficient post hoc verbal recapitulation of the route. This study is the first to identify neural correlates of the commonly observed male advantage in recalling one's original position, and points to hippocampal lateralization as a possible explanation for this behavioral gender difference.

  • 9.
    Persson, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Spreng, N.
    Turner, G
    Herlitz, A
    Morell, A
    Stening, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Wahlund, L.-O.
    Wikström, J
    Söderlund, Hedvig
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sex differences in volume and structural covariance of the anterior and posterior hippocampus2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Persson, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Spreng, R Nathan
    Turner, Gary
    Herlitz, Agneta
    Morell, Arvid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Stening, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Wahlund, Lars-Olof
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Söderlund, Hedvig
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sex differences in volume and structural covariance of the anterior and posterior hippocampus2014In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, no 99, p. 215-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sex differences in episodic and spatial memory are frequently observed, suggesting that there may be sex-related structural differences in the hippocampus (HC). Earlier findings are inconsistent, possibly due to a known variability along the hippocampal longitudinal axis. Here, we assessed potential sex differences in hippocampal volume and structural covariance with the rest of the brain in young men and women (N=76), considering the anterior (aHC) and posterior (pHC) hippocampus separately. Women exhibited a larger pHC than men adjusted for brain size. Using partial least squares, we identified two significant patterns of structural covariance of the aHC and pHC. The first included brain areas that covaried positively and negatively in volume with both the aHC and pHC in men, but showed greater covariance with the aHC than pHC in women. The second pattern revealed distinct structural covariance of the aHC and pHC that showed a clear difference between men and women: in men the pHC showed reliable structural covariance with the medial and lateral parietal lobes and the prefrontal cortex, whereas in women the aHC showed reliable structural covariance with the anterior temporal lobe bilaterally. This pattern converges with resting state functional connectivity of the aHC and pHC and suggests that these hippocampal sections interact with different brain regions, consistent with a division of labor with regards to episodic and spatial memory. Our findings lend support to a division of the HC into an anterior and posterior part and identify sex as a potential moderating factor when investigating hippocampal structure and connectivity.

  • 11.
    Persson, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Stening, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nordin, Kristin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Söderlund, Hedvig
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Predicting episodic and spatial memory performance from hippocampal resting-state functional connectivity: Evidence for an anterior-posterior division of function2018In: Hippocampus, ISSN 1050-9631, E-ISSN 1098-1063, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 53-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    fMRI studies have identified distinct resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) networks associated with the anterior and posterior hippocampus. However, the functional relevance of these two networks is still largely unknown. Hippocampal lesion studies and task-related fMRI point to a role for the anterior hippocampus in non-spatial episodic memory and the posterior hippocampus in spatial memory. We used Relevance Vector Regression (RVR), a machine-learning method that enables predictions of continuous outcome measures from multivariate patterns of brain imaging data, to test the hypothesis that patterns of whole-brain RSFC associated with the anterior hippocampus predict episodic memory performance, while patterns of whole-brain RSFC associated with the posterior hippocampus predict spatial memory performance. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and memory assessment took place at two separate occasions. The anterior and posterior RSFC largely corresponded with previous findings, and showed no effect of laterality. Supporting the hypothesis, RVR produced accurate predictions of episodic performance from anterior, but not posterior, RSFC, and accurate predictions of spatial performance from posterior, but not anterior, RSFC. In contrast, a univariate approach could not predict performance from resting-state connectivity. This supports a functional dissociation between the anterior and posterior hippocampus, and indicates a multivariate relationship between intrinsic functional networks and cognitive performance within specific domains, that is relatively stable over time.

  • 12.
    Persson, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Stening, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Söderlund, Hedvig
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    A Network For Navigation: Cross-Hemispheric Hippocampal Connectivity Predicts Water Maze Performance2013In: Journal of cognitive neuroscience, ISSN 0898-929X, E-ISSN 1530-8898, no Supplement, p. 199-199Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Persson, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry.
    Szalisznyo, Krisztina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry.
    Antoni, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET-MRI Platform. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preparative Medicinal Chemistry.
    Wall, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Fällmar, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Zora, Hatice
    Bodén, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry.
    Phosphodiesterase 10A levels are related to striatal function in schizophrenia: a combined positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging study2019In: European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience, ISSN 0940-1334, E-ISSN 1433-8491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pharmacological inhibition of phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) is being investigated as a treatment option in schizophrenia. PDE10A acts postsynaptically on striatal dopamine signaling by regulating neuronal excitability through its inhibition of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), and we recently found it to be reduced in schizophrenia compared to controls. Here, this finding of reduced PDE10A in schizophrenia was followed up in the same sample to investigate the effect of reduced striatal PDE10A on the neural and behavioral function of striatal and downstream basal ganglia regions. A positron emission tomography (PET) scan with the PDE10A ligand [11C]Lu AE92686 was performed, followed by a 6 min resting-state magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan in ten patients with schizophrenia. To assess the relationship between striatal function and neurophysiological and behavioral functioning, salience processing was assessed using a mismatch negativity paradigm, an auditory event-related electroencephalographic measure, episodic memory was assessed using the Rey auditory verbal learning test (RAVLT) and executive functioning using trail-making test B. Reduced striatal PDE10A was associated with increased amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) within the putamen and substantia nigra, respectively. Higher ALFF in the substantia nigra, in turn, was associated with lower episodic memory performance. The findings are in line with a role for PDE10A in striatal functioning, and suggest that reduced striatal PDE10A may contribute to cognitive symptoms in schizophrenia.

  • 14.
    Persson, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Söderlund, Hedvig
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hippocampal hemispheric and long-axis differentiation of stimulus content during episodic memory encoding and retrieval: An activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis2015In: Hippocampus, ISSN 1050-9631, E-ISSN 1098-1063, Vol. 25, no 12, p. 1614-1631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While there is ample evidence that the hippocampus is functionally heterogeneous along its longitudinal axis, there is still no consensus regarding its exact organization. Whereas spatial memory tasks frequently engage the posterior hippocampus, the regions engaged during episodic memory are more varying and may depend on the specific nature of the stimuli. Here, we investigate the effect of stimulus content on the location of hippocampal recruitment during episodic memory encoding and retrieval of pictorial and verbal material with a meta-analysis approach, using activation likelihood estimation and restricting the analysis to the hippocampus. Verbal material was associated with left-lateralized anterior activation, compared to pictorial material that recruited a more posterior aspect of the hippocampus, primarily within the right hemisphere. This effect held for encoding of both single items and item-item associations but was less clear during retrieval. The findings lend further support to a functional subdivision of the hippocampus along its longitudinal axis and indicate that the content of episodic memories is one factor that determines the location of hippocampal recruitment.

  • 15.
    Stening, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Persson, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Eriksson, Elias
    Wahlund, Lars-Olof
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Söderlund, Hedvig
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Apolipoprotein E ϵ4 is positively related to spatial performance but unrelated to hippocampal volume in healthy young adults2016In: Behavioural Brain Research, ISSN 0166-4328, E-ISSN 1872-7549, Vol. 299, p. 11-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The apolipoprotein E (APOE) ϵ4 allele is known to be a major genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). It has been linked to especially episodic memory decline and hippocampal atrophy in both healthy and demented elderly populations. In young adults, ϵ4 carriers have shown better performance in episodic memory compared to non-carriers. Spatial memory, however, has not been thoroughly assessed in relation to APOE in spite of its dependence on the hippocampus. In this study, we assessed the effect of APOE genotype on a variety of spatial and episodic memory tasks as well as hippocampal volume assessed through manual tracing in a sample of young adults (N=123). We also assessed whether potential effects were modulated by sex. The presence of one or more ϵ4 alleles had positive effects on spatial function and memory and object location memory, but no effect on word recognition. Men were superior to women in spatial function and memory but there were no sex differences in the other tasks. In spite of APOE ϵ4 carriers having superior performance in several memory tasks, no difference was found as a function of APOE genotype in hippocampal volume. To our knowledge, this study is the first to show that APOE ϵ4 has a positive effect on spatial ability in young adults.

  • 16.
    Stening, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Persson, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Eriksson, Elias
    Wahlund, Lars-Olof
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Söderlund, Hedvig
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Specific patterns of whole-brain structural covariance of the anterior and posterior hippocampus in young APOE ε4 carriers2017In: Behavioural Brain Research, ISSN 0166-4328, E-ISSN 1872-7549, Vol. 326, p. 256-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 has been associated with smaller hippocampal volumes in healthy aging, while findings in young adults are inconclusive. Previous studies have mostly used univariate methods, and without considering potential anterior/posterior differences. Here, we used a multivariate method, partial least squares, and assessed whole-brain structural covariance of the anterior (aHC) and posterior (pHC) hippocampus in young adults (n = 97) as a function of APOE ε4 status and sex. Two significant patterns emerged: 1) specific structural covariance of the aHC with frontal regions, temporal and occipital areas in APOE ε4 women, whereas the volume of both the aHC and pHC in all other groups co-varied with frontal, parietal and cerebellar areas; and 2) opposite structural covariance of the pHC in ε4 carriers compared to the aHC in non-carriers, with the pHC of ε4 carriers covarying with parietal and frontal areas, and the aHC of ε4 non-carriers covarying with motor areas and the middle frontal gyrus. APOE ε4 has in young adults been associated with better episodic and spatial memory, functions involving the aHC and pHC, respectively. We found no associations between structural covariance and performance, suggesting that other factors underlie the performance differences seen between carriers and non-carriers. Our findings indicate that APOE ε4 carriers and non-carriers differ in hippocampal organization and that there are differences as a function of sex and hippocampal segment. They stress the need to consider the hippocampus as a heterogeneous structure, and highlight the benefits of multivariate methods in assessing group differences in the brain.

  • 17.
    Stening, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Persson, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nordin, K
    Wikström, J
    Söderlund, Hedvig
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Parahippocampal involvement in source encoding: does sex make a difference?2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Stening, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Persson, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Söderlund, Hedvig
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The Precuneus Makes The Difference: Precuneal Activity During Recollection Of Concrete Compared To Abstract Nouns Is Linked To Retrieval Success2013In: Journal of cognitive neuroscience, ISSN 0898-929X, E-ISSN 1530-8898, no Supplement, p. 227-227Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Åhs, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Engman, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Persson, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Kumlien, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Medial temporal lobe resection attenuates superior temporal sulcus response to faces2014In: Neuropsychologia, ISSN 0028-3932, E-ISSN 1873-3514, Vol. 61, p. 291-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Face perception depends on activation of a core face processing network including the fusiform face area, the occipital face area and the superior temporal sulcus (STS). The medial temporal lobe (MTL) is also involved in decoding facial expression and damage to the anterior MTL, including the amygdala, generally interferes with emotion recognition. The impairment in emotion recognition following anterior MTL injury can be a direct result from injured MTL circuitry, as well as an indirect result from decreased MTL modulation of areas in the core face network. To test whether the MTL modulates activity in the core face network, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate activation in the core face processing network in patients with right or left anterior temporal lobe resections (ATR) due to intractable epilepsy. We found reductions of face-related activation in the right STS after both right and left ATR together with impaired recognition of facial expressions. Reduced activity in the fusiform and the occipital face areas was also observed in patients after right ATR suggesting widespread effects on activity in the core face network in this group. The reduction in face-related STS activity after both right and left ATR suggests that MTL modulation of the STS may facilitate recognition of facial expression.

1 - 19 of 19
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