uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
123 1 - 50 of 128
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1. Bakardjieva, Maria
    et al.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Skoric, Marko
    Digital Citizenship and Activism: Questions of Power and Participation Online2012In: eJournal of eDemocracy & Open Government, ISSN 2075-9517, E-ISSN 2075-9517, Vol. 4, no 1, p. i-ivArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The eJournal of eDemocracy and Open Government (JeDEM) is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal (ISSN: 2075-9517) published twice a year. It addresses theory and practice in the areas of eDemocracy and Open Government as well as eGovernment, eParticipation, and eSociety. JeDEM publishes ongoing and completed research, case studies and project descriptions that are selected after a rigorous blind review by experts in the field.

  • 2.
    Filimonov, Kirill
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    (re)Articulating Feminism A Discourse Analysis of Sweden's Feminist Initiative Election Campaign2016In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 51-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we study campaign material of the Swedish party Feminist Initiative (FI) during the 2014 parliamentary election campaign in Sweden. Approaching the topic from discourse-theoretical and intersectional perspectives, we ask how the inclusion of various social groups into the hegemonic project of feminist politics becomes possible, what was constructed as an antagonist to feminist politics, and in what ways it impeded FI to realise such politics. Our findings show that intersectionality allowed FI to include every group/individual into its feminist political project as long as they experienced oppression. Even though racists and nationalists in general (the Sweden Democrats in particular) were singled out as antagonists, it was mainly norms and structures that were addressed in the online material as standing in the way for FI to fulfil both their identity and hegemonic project.

  • 3. Karppinen, Kari
    et al.
    Moe, Hallvard
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Habermas, Mouffe and Political Communication: A case for theretical eclectisism2008In: Javnost-the public, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 203-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much of the research on communication and democracy continues to lean on Jürgen Habermass work. However, many aspects of his approach have been intensely criticised in recent debates, both in communication studies and political theory. Habermass emphasis on rational consensus as the aim of public communication has particularly been problematised. One of the most prominent critics, Chantal Mouff e and her agonistic model of democracy, have increasingly drawn the interest of media scholars. Mouffe explicitly contrasts the dominant Habermasian concept of the public sphere, and it appears that her model is impossible to combine with the Habermasian approach. But how substantial are the diff erences? What are the disagreements centred on? And what are their consequences for empirical media and communication research? In this article we argue that rather than accepting the standard readings or polar positions accredited to the two, we need to retain a certain theoretical eclecticism in combining normative theories with empirical research. Despite their controversies, we argue that both Habermass and Mouff es theories have value as critical perspectives that help us refl ect on the ideals of democratic public communication

  • 4.
    Klinger, Ulrike
    et al.
    Universität Zürich.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    Network Media Logic and the Strucural Changes of Political Communication. : Some Conceptual Considerations2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Klinger, Ulrike
    et al.
    Universität Zürich.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    Network Media Logic: Some Conceptual Considerations2016In: Routledge Companion to Social Media and Politics / [ed] A. Bruns, G. Enli, E. Skogerbö, A. Larsson & C. Christensen, New York: Routledge, 2016, p. 23-38Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter we revisit our concept of network media logic and further develop it in relation with political logics. The perspective of network media logic is useful to explain how social media platforms change political communication without resorting to technological determinism or normalization. By relating network media logic to both mass media logics as well as political logics we are able outline how these are distinctly different, while still overlapping in terms of how political communication is produced, distributed and used. In this chapter we pay particular attention to how ideals, commercial imperatives, and technological affordances differ in news mass media and on social media platforms in terms of media production, media distribution and media usage.

  • 6.
    Klinger, Ulrike
    et al.
    Zürich University.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    The Emergence of Network Media Logic in Political Communication: A Theoretical Approach2015In: New Media and Society, ISSN 1461-4448, E-ISSN 1461-7315, Vol. 17, no 8, p. 1241-1257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we propose a concept of network media logic in order to discuss how online social media platforms change political communication without resorting to technological determinism or normalization. We argue that social media platforms operate with a distinctly different logic from that of traditional mass media, though overlapping with it. This is leading to different ways of producing content, distributing information and using media. By discussing the differences between traditional mass media and social media platforms in terms of production, consumption and use, we carve out the central elements of network media logic – that is, the rules/format of communication on social media platforms – and some consequences for political communication.

  • 7.
    Klinger, Ulrike
    et al.
    University of Zürich.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    Vernetzung als Problem: Social Media in der Politik2014In: European Journalism Observatory, Vol. Dezember, no 16Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [de]

    Politiker und politische Parteien interessieren sich sehr dafür, das Internet und speziell soziale Netzwerke für ihre Kommunikation einzusetzen. Obwohl bislang unklar bleibt, wie viele zusätzliche Stimmen sich über Facebook, Twitter & Co gewinnen lassen, bieten diese Anwendungen ein großes Potential für Dialog, Image-Management und die gezielte Ansprache von potentiellen Wählern. Vor diesem Hintergrund scheint es zunächst überraschend, dass sich politische Akteure im Umgang mit Social Media so schwer tun. Empirische Studien belegen, dass Social Media, wenn überhaupt, zumeist als weiterer Kanal für einseitige Information eingesetzt werden. Dagegen findet kaum wirkliche Interaktion mit den Bürgern statt und ein großer Teil ihres Potentials bleibt ungenutzt.

  • 8.
    Kumar, Vikas
    Asia Pacific institute.
    Promoting social change through InformationTechnology2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Kumar, Vikas
    et al.
    Society for Education and Research Development.
    Svensson, JakobKarlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Proceedings of M4D 2012 28-29 February 2012 New Delhi, India2012Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Larsson, Anders Olof
    et al.
    Universitetet i Oslo.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    Politicians online: Identifying current research opportunities2014In: First Monday, ISSN 1396-0466, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 19, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For more than a decade, researchers have shown interest in how politicians make use of the Internet for a variety of purposes. Based on critical assessments of previous online political communication scholarship, this paper identifies a series of overlooked areas of research that should be of interest for researchers concerned with how politicians make use of online technologies. Specifically, three such research opportunities are introduced. First, we suggest that research should attempt to move beyond dichotomization, such as conceiving of the Internet as either bringing about revolutionary changes or having a normalizing effect. Second, while there is a considerable body of knowledge regarding the activity of politicians during election campaigns, relatively little is known about the day–to–day communicative uses of the Internet at the hands of politicians. The third section argues that as political communication research has typically focused on national or international levels of study, scholars within the field should also make efforts to contribute to our knowledge of online practices at the hands of politicians at regional and local levels — something we label as studies at the micro level. In synthesizing the literature available regarding the use of the Internet at the hands of politicians, the paper concludes suggesting routes ahead for interested scholars.

  • 11. Neumayer, Christina
    et al.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    Activism and radical politics in the digital age: Towards a typology2016In: Convergence. The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies, ISSN 1354-8565, E-ISSN 1748-7382, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 131-146Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Neumayer, Christina
    et al.
    IT University of Copenhage.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    Activism and radical politics in the digital age: Towards a typology2016In: Convergence. The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies, ISSN 1354-8565, E-ISSN 1748-7382, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 131-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to develop a typology for evaluating different types of activism in the digital age, based on the ideal of radical democracy. Departing from this ideal, activism is approached in terms of processes of identification by establishing conflictual frontiers to outside Others as either adversaries or enemies. On the basis of these discussions, we outline a typology of four kinds of activists: the salon activist, the contentious activist, the law-abiding activist, and the Gandhian activist. The typology’s first axis, between antagonism and agonism, is derived from normative discussions in radical democracy concerning developing frontiers. The second axis, about readiness to engage in civil disobedience, is derived from a review of studies of different forms of online activism. The article concludes by suggesting that the different forms of political engagement online have to be taken into account when studying how online activism can contribute to social change.

  • 13.
    Poveda Guillén, Oriol
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, The Social Sciences of Religion, Sociology of Religions.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    Re-thinking the Global Age as Interdependence, Opacity and Inertia2016In: tripleC (cognition, communication, co-operation): Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society / Unified Theory of Information Research Group, ISSN 1726-670X, E-ISSN 1726-670X, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 475-495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this theoretical essay we criticize theories of modernity and explore the possibility that the modern epoch is coming to a close while a new configuration is emerging: the global age. Building upon sociologist Martin Albrow's work The Global Age, we claim that Albrow's scholarship did a remarkable job at outlining the shift away from modernity, but that greater clarity is needed in laying out the main characteristics of the global age. With this essay we aim to fill that gap. Acknowledging that capitalism is the most important feature of our societies, we outline the contours of the global age through three interrelated concepts: interdependence, opacity and inertia, which in turn we exemplify with the global environmental crisis, the global economy and the Internet.

  • 14. Russmann, Uta
    et al.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    How to study Instagram?: Reflections on coding visual communication online2016In: CeDem2016 : Conference on E-Democracy and Open Government. / [ed] Parycek, P & Edelmann, N, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Strand, Cecilia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Can the concept “political opportunity structure” inform M4D research?2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile phone acquisition and usage in Sub-Saharan Africa has seen a tremendous growth over the past decade. In the wake of this expansion, the technology has often been ascribed the role of a potential transformer in diverse areas, such as governance and democratization, civil society mobilization, transparency and anti-corruption. A reoccurring theme in much of the literature, is a taken for granted causality between access to mobile technology and civil society participation and ultimately empowerment of the same connected citizens.

    Although social movement theory have long recognized the importance of the political context as a key determining factor for the emergence of social movements, their impact and their longevity, few scholars have paid attention to the concepts of  "political opportunity structure" in relation to M4D (Mobile Communication for Development).  

    The following paper will explore how this concept can inform our understanding of when and where, i.e., under what socio-political conditions mobile technology seem to become a mobiliser and tool to claim space to participate in political processes. The paper will attempt to conceptualize how perceived political opportunity, and indeed constraints could be understood in relation to M4D. The paper departs from an assumption that mobile phones contains a transformative potential, but argues that whether it become enlisted as a tool by social actors is dependent on their understanding of the medium and parameters such as, but not limited to, the receptiveness of the formal political system, the existence of allies within government or the formal political system, the expected monetary and personal costs for social mobilization as well as likely outcomes of collective action. The research argues that existing political institutions should not be treated as epiphenomenal, but rather seen as important structures warranting attention, in order to understand mobiles as a tool for participation.  

  • 16.
    Strand, Cecilia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    Can the concept “political opportunity structure” inform M4D research?2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Strand, Cecilia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    Understanding mEmpowerment in relation marginalised groups2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    Activist Capitals in Network Societies: Towards a Typology for Studying Networking Power in Contemporary Activist Demands2014In: First Monday, ISSN 1396-0466, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 19, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Network societies are characterized by social media — media that are supposed to level out power hierarchies — making political participation more inclusive and equal. By developing a typology for studying networking power within activist demands in network societies, such techno–optimistic/deterministic assumptions are questioned. This typology is based on Bourdieu’s conceptual framework of social fields, habitus and capitals. It revolves around participating, mobilising, connecting and engaging capital and how these intersect, overlap and are used for negotiating recognition which I argue is of pivotal importance for upholding core positions among activists. Such core positions are related to networking power, i.e., knowing how and being in a position to network in order to decide about courses of events in the organisation of the demand/social field and its actions. This largely theoretical account is exemplified from an ethno– and nethnographic study of a group of middle–class activists in southern Stockholm using online platforms in tandem with more traditional off–line activist activities to organise and mobilise participation.

  • 19.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    Activist Networking Capital: A Study of Positioning and Power within an Activist Community2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    Algorithms, Big Data  & the Role of Network Media Logic2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    Amplification and Virtual Back-Patting: The Rationalities of Social Media Uses in the Nina Larsson Web-Campaign2014In: Political Campaigning in the Information Age / [ed] Ashu M. G. Solo, IGI Global, 2014, p. 51-65Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter intends to explore the rationalities of politicians' social media uses in web-campaigning in a party-based democracy. I will do this from an in-depth case study of a Swedish Liberal Party politician, Nina Larsson, who with the help of a PR- agency utilized several social media platforms in her campaign to become re-elected to the Swedish Parliament in 2010. By analysing how and for what purposes Larsson used social media in her web-campaign, this chapter concludes that even though discourses of instrumental rationality, to strategically target specific voter groups, and of communicative rationality, to establish loci for electorate-politician deliberations, were common to make her practices relevant, Nina primarily used social media to amplify certain offline news media texts by recirculating them in her social media networks as well as to commend and support other liberal party members. Hence from this case the chapter concludes that web-campaigning on social media are also used for expressive purposes, to negotiate and maintaing an attractive political image within the party hierarchy. 

  • 22.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Becoming Engagable: Power and Participation among Activists in Southern Stockholm2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Characteristics of Online Political Participation among Activists in Southern Stockholm2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is empirically based in a (n)ethnographic study of a network middle-class activists in Aspudden and Midsommarkransen (southern Stockholm) acting for example to save the local bathhouse, lobby for a cultural centre, preserve green areas and the quality of life in the attractive and well located sister suburbs. The theoretical starting points will be found in the borderland between sociological theories of the network society (Castells), media and communication theories about mediatization and media logic (Altheide) and theories of norms, values, discipline and power (Foucault).The paper discusses the implications of increasing use of social networking sites for political participation emerging outside parliamentary arenas. The paper concludes that in tandem with the increase of social networking sites develops a new kind of network logic underlining identity negotiation as a dominant motivator for political participation online. This logic contributes to rationalized practices for expressions of affinity, which in turn disciplines the individual users to connectedness with like-minded people in the neighbourhood. This manifests itself more concretely through practices of joining e-mail lists, following twitter accounts, joining ning- and facebook groups. These practices does not necessarily mean that people in general will become more engaged in political actions in the neighbourhoods. However, when negotiating individuality through network visibility, referring and tying yourself to activist groups online, you will inevitably also become updated on their actions and hence may engage if suitable. In other words, online social networking makes them engagable.

  • 24.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies. Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Citizenship and Identity in Municipal Deliberative Practices: The Actively Engaged Parent as the Ideal Citizen2007In: Cidaddania(s) discursos e prácticas / [ed] T. Toldy et al., Porto: Universidade Fernando Pessoa , 2007, p. 115-133Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    Citizenship Identities in Municipal Participatory Democracy2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    Delaktighetens avsaknad av betydelse : En studie av medborgarutskotten i Helsingborg. 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Delaktighetens avsaknad av betydelse: En studie av medborgarutskotten i Helsingborg2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    Deliberation, Dialogue or just Updating? : Activist social media practices in southern Stockholm2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses social media platforms and their promise of deliberation. Based on a (n)ethnograpic inspired case study of middle class activists in southern Stockholm, the question this paper seeks to discuss is whether the activists in my study used social media platforms for deliberation, dialogue or for something else. The aim is to understand and discuss contemporary practices of activist political participation online. In this paper it will be argued that rather than deliberation, or dialogue for that matter, activists were engaging in practices of online updating. Such practices will be understood in light of late modern theories of reflexivity, identity negotiation and maintenance.

    Social media platforms are defined as different from other sites because they allow users to articulate their social networks while making them visible to other users (for one definition see Ellison and boyd, 2007, p. 2). The social media platforms used in southern Stockholm (Facebook, Twitter and Ning) provided activists with a new set of opportunities and different modes of processing information, networking and interacting with each other as well as the outside world. Social media platforms are no doubt altering the way we live and socialize, shaping the way things get done, providing access to information and giving us new tools that allow us to arrange and take part in all sorts of activities and encounters (Dahlgren, 2009; Leaning, 2009; Rheingold, 2002). In this paper I will argue that one practice emerging as dominant among contemporary activists is updating, often misleadingly labelled as sharing or interacting which in turn sometimes is confused with dialogue (which in turn is confused for deliberation).

    The paper starts with a brief look at the role of deliberation in Western and connected societies. This section will be followed by a description of the setting in southern Stockholm and the methods used to study the activists there. The analysis begins with an evaluation of the empirical findings in southern Stockholm against theories of deliberation. This will be followed by an argument making the case for updating being the appropriate concept to describe the activists' practices on the social media platforms they used. The paper continues with an analysis about how to understand such practices. Finally, I will end with a discussion on the implications of updating on political participation. Even though they cannot be considered dialogue or deliberation, practices of updating have certain consequences for participation and representative systems that could be considered positive and encouraging for democracy. 

  • 29.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Deliberation or Updating?: The Case of Southern Stockholm Activists Online2012In: Proceedings of the 12th European Conference on eGovernment: ESADE Ramon Llull University Barcelona, Spain 14-15 June 2012. Volume Two / [ed] Gascó, Mila, Reading: ACI Academic Conferences International, 2012, p. 691-697Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a (n)ethnographic inspired study of middle class activists in southern Stockholm, the aim is to understand contemporary political action and to discuss changing practices of participation in digital and late modernity. More specifically this paper addresses the Internet and its promise of deliberation. However instead of echoing techno-deterministic and optimist accounts of the Internet and online social networking affording a digital public sphere where deliberation can flourish, this paper argues that it is more accurate to understand the practices among the activists in southern Stockholm as updating. Updating is described here as a two-way practice,to be updated what is happening in your social networks as well as updating your social networks what is happening.These practices of updating are understood in light of late modern theories of reflexivity, identity negotiation and maintenance, practices that arguably are heightened in digital and networked societies. Hence to avoid determinism without resorting to the idea of technology as neutral, the paper is based in atechno-social dialectical understanding of our time as digital late modernity.The paper will end with a brief discussion of the implications of updating on political participation in digital late modernity. Even though not deliberation, practices of updating has consequences for participation and political action that perhaps could be considered positive and encouraging for democratic tradition in general.

  • 30.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Deliberation or What?: A Study of Activist Participation on Social Networking Sites2012In: International Journal of Electronic Governance, ISSN 1742-7509, E-ISSN 1742-7517, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 103-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses social networking sites (SNSs hereafter) and their promise of deliberation. Based on a (n)ethnograpic inspired case study of middle class activists in southern Stockholm, the question this paper seeks to discuss is whether the activists in my study used SNSs for deliberative purposes or for something else. The aim is to understand and discuss contemporary practices of activist political participation online. In this paper it will be argued that rather than deliberation activists were engaging in practices of online updating. Such practices will be understood in light of late modern theories of reflexivity, identity negotiation and maintenance.

  • 31.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Dialog räcker inte!2008Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Dialog mellan politiker och medborgare lyfts fram som en universallösning på en rad olika problem som staten och kommunerna brottas med. Frågan är om dialog är rätt metod, skriver Jakob Svensson, forskare vid Institutionen för kommunikationsstudier, Lunds universitet. Han lägger snart fram en avhandling om medborgerligt engagemang i den kommunala deltagardemokratin.

    Det är inte svårt att finna vackra ord om den representativa demokratins förtjänster. 1900-talet utnämndes till demokratins århundrade, och västvärldens ledare talar gärna om detta styrelseskick som det enda alternativet. 

    Mot bakgrund av ovanstående är det lätt att tro att de demokratiska traditionerna är vitala och kraftfulla på hemmaplan. Men så är inte fallet. Med kontinuerligt minskat valdeltagande och uttömning av medlemmar i de politiska partierna, har det blivit allt mer uppenbart att invånarna inte längre finner den representativa demokratiska arenan lika relevant för sitt politiska engagemang som tidigare. 

    Det talas om den representativa demokratins legitimitetskris. Frågor av dessa slag bekymrar politiker, tjänstemän och även akademiker. Slutsatsen de drar är att den representativa demokratin måste vitaliseras.

    Idag skapas det därför olika forum där invånare förväntas delta på ett medborgerligt vis. I dessa deltagardemokratiska försök är det en allt större fokusering på samtalet.

    Republikanska ideal om medborgerliga dygder för allmänhetens bästa har förnyats i en mer deliberativ dräkt – att större vikt fästs vid diskussion. Det har skett en deliberativ vändning, även inom den representativa demokratin.

    Flera statliga utredningar understryker en välutvecklad medborgardialog. I Demokratiutredningen 2000 och efterföljande regeringsproposition förespråkas en ”deltagardemokrati med deliberativa kvaliteter”. Deliberation, och framför allt dialog, vilket verkar vara på det sätt som politiker, tjänstemän och utredare tolkar begreppet deliberation, lyfts fram som en universallösning på en rad olika problem som staten och kommunerna brottas med. 

    I dessa resonemang förutsätts en koppling mellan samtalande medborgare och vitaliseringen av den representativa demokratin. Denna koppling synliggörs sällan, utan ligger snarare implicit som ett grundläggande, fullkomligt självklart antagande i till exempel Malena Rosén Sundströms artikel den 19 februari. Att involvera invånare i samtal med politiker och tjänstemän förväntas skapa bättre medborgare, mer rättvisa beslut och bättre regerande. 

    I denna debatt saknar jag en problematisering av det deliberativa demokratiperspektivet. Mitt argument är att den form av samtalsdemokrati som förespråkas inte är helt enkel att applicera i en representativ demokrati. 

    Vi måste också ställa oss frågan vilka det är som deltar i dessa deltagardemokratiska samtal. Är det ett representativt urval av invånarna? Vad händer med den traditionella beslutsgången då medborgarna själva förväntas delta direkt i beslutsfattandet? Och vad händer med de valda företrädarna? Blir politikerna överflödiga i den deliberativa deltagardemokratin? 

    Vi skall inte glömma bort att deliberativa förespråkare ofta baserar sina mentala bilder av det ideala deltagandet i den atenska direktdemokratin, med ett litet torg, fyllt med debattsugna medborgare. Flera deliberativa demokrater menar därför att den representativa demokratin måste ge de deltagande medborgarna direkt inflytande om deliberationen skall lyckas. 

    Men i samma stund som detta krav på inflytande formuleras kommer representativitetsproblemet som ett brev på posten. Då deliberativa deltagardemokratiska aktiviteter sällan lockar ett representativt urval av invånarna, är det viktigt att fundera på hur stort inflytande de invånare som deltar borde ha.

    Själv håller jag med Gilljam i den inledande artikeln i serien Demokrati 2.0. Att föredra är en väl fungerande representativ demokrati, där medborgarna ges tillräckligt med information för att fatta välgrundade beslut vid valurnan. Detta är en representativ demokrati där politikerna själva uppvaktar olika medborgargrupper, och inte enbart lyssnar på dem som skriker högst. 

    JAKOB SVENSSON

    25 februari 2008

  • 32.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Disciplining Visibility among Activists in Southern Stockholm2012In: Critique, Democracy and Philosophy in 21st Century Information Society : Towards Critical Theories of Social Media : The Fourth ICTs and Society-Conference: Collection of abstracts, Uppsala, 2012, p. 8-9Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper seeks to understand relations of power connected to the increasing negotiation of visibility within a middle-class activist community in southern Stockholm using social media (Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Ning and a blog) in tandem with offline participation, fighting among other things to save their bathhouse or to preserve green areas and playgrounds. The method for studying this group is both ethno- and nethnographic, through participant observations and interviews online and offline.

    The theoretical framework is based on theories of visibility and power. Following Foucault, visibility and power have always been connected but in different ways across times. Whereas in an tiquity the visibility of the few to the many was connected to power, in modernity being watched was connected to a subordinate position of being disciplined by a subtle normalizing power of

    the gaze (in schools, armies, hospitals, penal institutions et cetera). Today we are participating in this disciplining by free will online in order to secure a place on the social arena. It is not at all obvious whether being watched in the context of social media is exercising power or being subordinate to it. It all depends on how skilfully the user navigates these new social media networks

    and manages his or hers databases of “friends” and connections. Foucault’s discussions of power and visibility can be applied remarkably well in digital arenas. According to Foucault, the individuals over whom power is exercised are those from whom the knowledge they themselves produce is extracted and used in order to control them. This foucauldian side of social media visibility, as surveillance and control represent, has extra weight in activist ommunities, often defined in opposition to the state and the police.

    The argument put forward in this paper is that a kind of network logic disciplines the activists to negotiate visibility online and to maintain and extend their activist network by continuous and reflexive updating in order to secure a position within the community. Hence activists today need

    to master a new form of sociability, through database and “friend” management on different social media networks. Relations of power in this network logic are manifested in the constant monitoring/ supervision and negotiation of both oneself‘s and others‘ visibility, all encompassed in the practice of updating.

  • 33.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    Discussing Politics in an Online Gay Community2013Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 34.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    Discussing Politics in an Online Gay Community2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    E-Democracy From Above2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    E-participation and iCitizens: The Expressive Turn of Political Participation and Citizenship in Convergence Culture2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    E-participation and iCitizens: The Making of Citizens in the Digital Age2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Expressive Rationality: A Different Approach for Understanding Participation in Municipal Deliberative Practices2008In: Communication, Culture and Critique, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 203-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Why do people engage in municipal deliberative practices? The aim of this article is to explore inhabitants’ motivations for participating in deliberations organized by Civic Committees in the south Swedish municipality of Helsingborg. I have done this through an ethnographic study, observing deliberative practices and interviewing inhabitants, politicians and municipal officials in Helsingborg. This study is also theoretically inspired. I argue that the Civic Committees are inspired by deliberative theories of democracy in order address changing patterns of political participation in late modernity. It is especially the deliberative focus on rationality as communicative, rather than instrumental that is attractive for a municipality trying to reorient civic participation back to its institutions. However, by focusing on the issue of motivation, I argue that neither the instrumental nor the communicative account of rationality is satisfactory in fully understanding inhabitants’ motivations for participating in municipal deliberative practices in late modernity. With a focus on identity, I therefore suggest a more expressive account of rationality.

  • 39.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Expressive Rationality: A Different Approach for Understanding Participation in Municipal Deliberative Practices2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    Gay the Correct Way: Mundane queer flaming practices when discussing politics online2016In: LGBTQs, Media and Culture in Europe: Situated Case Studies / [ed] Alexander Dhoest, Lukasz Szulc & Bart Eeckhout, London: Routledge, 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    Gay the Right Way: Mundane queer flaming practices when discussing politics online2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Global Challenges for Identity Policies2011In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 174-175Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Gör nätet oss allt mer upptagna av vår egen spegelbild?: Blogginlägg på bloggportalen "Viskningar och rop"2009Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Nätverkad individualism och narcissism -  Gör nätet oss alltmer upptagna av vår egen spegelbild?

     

    Då forskaren Castells diskuterar Internet och den form av sociala relationer mediet för med sig, framhåller han idén om nätverkad individualism. Det är främst genom personligt formade nätverk som vi uttrycker oss själva och förhandlar vår identitet i dagens samhälle. För detta med sig, som vissa pessimister menar, att vi blir allt mer isolerade och självupptagna individer speglandes oss själva i sociala medieplattformar, framför våra opersonliga datormaskiner? Jag är mer positivt inställd till den digitala utvecklingen. Istället för att vara hänvisade till redan etablerade och låsta medieplattformar och medieföretag, som ofta är baserad på territorialitet, begränsade rumlisgen likaväl som de begränsar oss rumsligen, innebär nätverkad individualism att vi idag har större makt att själva forma de nätverk som vi väljer att informera oss via, uttrycka oss i, samt kommunicera med andra i. Detta menar jag inte innebär ett tillbakadragande från större sammanhang och kollektiva identiteter, tvärtom.

     

    Vi är beroende av andra för att vara oss själva. Genom att betrakta oss själva utifrån, genom andras ögon, utvecklar vi vår självbild. Detta diskuterades inom socialpsykologin redan på det tidiga 1900-talet. Vi har psykologiskt, såväl som socialt, ett behov att utveckla en mentalt stabil och någorlunda överrensstämmande självbild för att kunna fungera tillsammans med andra. För att utveckla en sådan sund självbild behöver vi plattformar för att uttrycka oss själva på, samt testa och underhålla vår(a) identitet(er). Det som idén om nätverkad individualism pekar på, är att det framför allt är i personligt formade nätverk som vi finner de andra och de kollektiv som idag är av vikt då vi förhandlar vår självbild och vad vi står för.   

     

    Forskaren Giddens menar att självet är beroende av reflexivt egenproducerade biografier. Med andra ord är vår identitet beroende av att vi funderar över våra egna självbiografier och hur vi vill uppfattas av andra (och oss själva). Det är viktigt för vårt psykologiska välbefinnande att dessa biografier/ bilder av oss själva sedan också någorlunda stämmer överens med hur vi verkligen sedan uppfattas av andra runt omkring oss. Det är också av vikt att underhålla, och hålla igång, denna berättelse om oss själva och vilka vi är. Enligt Giddens blir också skapandet av denna vår livshistoria och knytandet av olika identiteter till den, en källa till mening och engagemang. Utifrån ett sådant resonemang menar jag att det blir det rationellt att uttrycka oss själva och vår historia för andra, att det motiverar oss att delta i olika sociala nätverk samt att det motiverar oss att uttrycka politiska åsikter som vi knyter till vår livshistoria och identitet. Till exempel, genom att publicera detta inlägg på bloggen upprätthåller jag bilden av mig själv som en ung och modern medieforskare som gärna för ut sina idéer i en vidare i andra sammanhang än strikt akademiska. Som jag diskuterade i mitt förra blogginlägg kallar jag detta för expressiv rationalitet.

     

    Det förekommer alltså ingen konflikt mellan att genomdriva en individuell identitet samt värdera större kollektiv och sammanslutningar. Tvärtom är dessa beroende av varandra. Vad som är skillnaden i dagens medielandskap är att dessa kollektiv och sammanslutningar allt mer kommer i form av individuellt formade digitala nätverk. Jag ska ge er ett exempel från min vardag som universitetslektor. När jag diskuterar medieanvändning tillsammans med mina studenter blir det uppenbart att vara uppkopplad mot sina nätverk, inte enbart handlar om narcissistisk hantering av det personliga varumärket, utan också att vara sammankopplad med en grupp personligt utvalda andra, bli uppdaterad om deras göromål, vardag, känslor, åsikter, grupptillhörigheter och politiska ställningstagande. Att som seminarieledare till exempel be dem stänga av sina mobila apparater, innebär att jag också ber dem koppla bort sig från sociala nätverk som kanske är viktigare för dem och upprätthållande av deras livshistorier, än den “verkliga” fysiska plats, seminarierummet, som deras kroppar befinner sig i.

     

    Ovanstående exempel visar på att “självet” inte står i motsatsförhållande till andra. Exemplet visar också på att digitala nätverk inte handlar om att isolera oss från den omgivande sociala världen. Tvärtom de sociala världar där vi möter andra och förhandlar oss själva, kommer allt mer i form av digitala nätverk och sociala medieplattformar på nätet.

     

    Sedan den tidiga feministiska förelsen har identitet(er) och erkännande diskuterats som motiverande faktorer bakom politiskt deltagande, särskilt gällande förfördelade grupper i samhället. Identitetsförhandlig och krav på erkännande är också särskilt tydliga på Internet och de olika plattformar som skapas idag och som olika grupperingar samlas på, deltar i och agerar politiskt utifrån. Därför argumenterar forskare att politiska forum på nätet inte enbart handlar om att föra fram åsikter och lyssna till andras, utan de handlar också om att reflektera över sina intressen och identiteter, nätverka och experimentera. Dessa identitetsförhandlingar står inte nödvändigtvis motsatt till altruism och engagemang för andra. Aktivistidentiteter och uttryck kan mycket väl riktas mot genomförandet av ett mer rättvist, jämställt och hållbart samhälle (se till exempel forum och communities som www.miljoforum.info och www.ecoprofile.se). 

     

    Jag anser således inte att Internet gör oss självupptagna. Jag anser att Internet erbjuder en möjlighet att skapa plattformar och nätverk utifrån vilka vi kan uttrycka politiska identiteter och idéer om hur det goda samhället kan se ut, plattformar som vi sedan också kan agera utifrån. Detta sker samtidigt som vi förhandlar vår(a) självbild(er) och filar på vår självbiografi och hur vi vill bli uppfattade. Genom att delta i diskussionerna på Ecoprofile kan jag både bidra till ett mer hållbart samhälle samtidigt som jag förhandlar och ger uttryck för en identitet som miljömedveten och ansvarstagande medborgare. Jag menar således att identitetsförhandling, medborgarskap och politisk deltagande hör ihop.

  • 44.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    HumanIT and Critical Information studies2010Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Invited panelist to the round table on: "Critical Information Studies and the Critical I: A Nascent Transdiscipline in Praxis"

  • 45.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    HumanIT, Social Media and Political Participation (meddelande på ITU seminarium, IT universitet i Köpenhamn)2010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    I en nätverkad sfär, är personlig integritet inte längre ett problem?: Blogginlägg på bloggportalen "Viskningar och rop"2009Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    I en nätverkad sfär, är personlig integritet inte längre ett problem?

     

    Som jag har diskuterat i mitt tidigare inlägg är jag inte orolig för att Internet och sociala medier gör oss mer självupptagna eller mindre politiskt aktiva. Jag är i grunden positivt inställd till Internet, sociala medier och de möjligheter de erbjuder till politiskt deltagande. Vad jag däremot är orolig för är de sätt våra uttryck och självbiografier används, och kan användas för kommersiella intressen och för övervakning. Detta tillsammans med en oro för den bristande insyn vi användare har i sociala medieföretags kommersiella och mellanstatliga förehavande. De kommersiella intressen som till exempel finns på Facebook och Google, och hur dessa företag genererar kapital på den information vi ger ut om oss själva, är sällan synliga för användarna och än mindre öppna för kritisk granskning. Det som är intressant dock, och det som detta inlägg ska handla om, är att det verkar som om frågor om av dessa slag sällan bekymrar dagens, främst yngre, nätmedborgare. Är dagens nätanvändare oförsiktiga, eller har vi lämnat motsatsparet privat/offentligt bakom oss i och med att interaktion i dagens digitaliserade samhälle alltmer sker i personligt skapade och semipublika nätverk?

     

    Då vi förhandlar och uttrycker oss själva och vår personlighet i egenskapade och till viss del även egenstyrda nätverk online, blir frågor om integritet och en skyddad privat sfär, mindre relevanta? På Facebook kan vi skapa olika grupper med olika mycket tillgång till den information vi lägger ut. Vi kan till exempel blockera släktingar att se foton taggade på oss och vi kan välja att inte bli vän med alla gamla gymnasiekompisar. Kommunikation på Facebook är således varken masskommunikation (en till flera) eller tvåvägskommunikation (en till en). Kommunikationen är snarare av många till många-karaktär, och de som kan ta del av/ delta i kommunikationen är ofta individuellt reglerat enligt personliga preferenser, intressen och/ eller bekantskaper.

     

    Det som jag beskriver ovan är ett exempel på flera saker. Dels är det ett exempel på att vi lämnat massamhället bakom, ett samhälle som uppstod med tryckpressens möjlighet att kommunicera ut till en anonym massa, en teknik som signalerar starten på massmediernas tidevarv. Då vi nu med den digitala tekniken lämnar massamhället och massmedierna bakom oss är det märkligt att ställa sig frågorna om vem som lyssnar till alla dessa röster och var publiken finns? Sådana kommentarer är baserade i en linjär massmedial kommunikationsmodell där få kommunicerade till många, en sändare till många mottagare. Så är inte fallet längre. Vi kan inte värdera nätverkad kommunikation med kriterier från massamhällets massmedier. Idag kommunicerar vi genom digitala nätverk till en vald, eller självvald publik. För att knyta an till tidigare blogginlägg drivs den nätverkade sfären snarare av expressiv rationalitet än snäva instrumentella egenintressen eller behjärtansvärda kommunikativa ideal. Och som idén om expressiv rationalitet gör gällande handlar inte kommunikation i nätverk enbart om informationsutbyte eller att tillfredställa behov såsom underhållning, inlärning, avkoppling och nyfikenhet. Det handlar också om att förhandla sin egen självbild med tillhörande identiteter. 

     

    Men idén om en nätverkad sfär visar också på hur irrelevant och obrukbar distinktionen mellan en privat och offentlig sfär blir, eller? De nätverk vi skapar på till exempel Facebook är varken privata eller offentliga, de är liksom mittemellan. Istället för att tala om en privat eller en offentlig sfär kanske en nätverkad sfär bättre beskriver den semipublika (eller semiprivata om ni så vill) sfär som de sociala medierna utgör? Dock har de företag som styr de sociala medierna tillgång till informationen vår lägger ut om oss själva och som då kan användas av/ säljas till diverse andra aktörer (statliga och/eller privata).

     

    Frågan jag ställer mig här är om vi lämnar dikotomin (finare ord för motsatspar) offentligt/privat bakom oss, innebär det också att personlig integritet och privathet inte längre är ett problem? Till exempel, då unga facebookanvändare ställer sig oförstående till frågor om riskerna med att dela med sig av sina bilder från privata fester och annat, är det för att hela diskussionen om skillnaden mellan privat integritet och vad som passar sig i offentliga sammanhang är irrelevant i en nätverkad sfär där förhandlandet av sig själv och sin identitet står i förgrunden, snarare än informationsutbyte för att tillfredställa sina egenintressen eller kommunikation i allmänhetens tjänst? Eller är det så att genom att utge personlig information om sig själv på liknande sociala medier spelar vi kommersiella intressen i händerna genom att vi utför gratis användarundersökningar åt dem? Och underlättar vi således också övervakning av oss själva för till exempel staten (FRA) samt nutida eller framtida arbetsgivare? Med andra ord, är den personliga integriteten en icke-fråga i dagens nätverkade semi-offentlighet, eller är vi naiva och oförstående då vi publicerar oss själva via sociala medier på nätet utan att betänka i vilka syften informationen kan komma att användas?

     

     

  • 47.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    ICT 4 Learning2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    Internet-Based Activism, Privacy and Surveillance2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Lund University, Institute of CommunicationFollow.
    Its a Long Way from Porto Alegre to Helsingborg: A Case Study in Deliberative Democracy in Late Modernity2008In: Journal of Public Deliberation, ISSN 1937-2841, E-ISSN 1937-2841, Vol. 4, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the 1990’s representative democracy has been challenged by a deliberative turn in political philosophy, reaching even into the practices of established political institutions. In Sweden, the Municipality of Helsingborg, inspired by deliberative ideals, established civic committees as a way to deal with changing patterns of civic political behavior in late modernity. One reason for this is that deliberation is assumed to revitalize representative democracy by avoiding the instrumental rational focus on self-interest. However, there are some difficulties in implementing deliberative democracy within this municipal representative democratic setting. This article will point to some problems in the Helsingborg experiment.

  • 50.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Kan Internet stärka dialogen med medborgare?: Blogginlägg på bloggportalen "Viskningar och rop"2009Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Kan Internet stärka dialogen med medborgare?

     

    Det anser Regeringen som i och med ett pressmedelande från tidigare i november ger Sveriges Kommuner och Landsting 800 000 kronor för att fortsätta att utveckla metoder och verktyg för att underlätta medborgarnas deltagande i de politiska beslutsprocesserna. Exempel på verktyg som pressmedelandet tar upp är elektroniska medborgarförslag, SMS-frågeverktyg och chattverktyg. IT-verktyg anses förbättra dialogen mellan medborgare och myndigheter och göra den politiska beslutsprocessen mer transparent och tillgänglig.

    När det gäller Internet och medborgardeltagande initierat inifrån den representativa demokratins institutioner, handlar det ofta om ett uppifrån och ner perspektiv. Det behövs skapas en dialog mellan politiker och medborgare för att förstärka den representativa demokratin vars legitimitet av vissa anses hotad då valdeltagande minskar och de politiska partierna tappar i medlemsantal. Internet ses som ett medium där medborgare kan samtala med varandra och de folkvalda inom ramen för den representativa demokratin. Således handlar det inte enbart om att stärka dialogen, utan främst att förstärka den grund de folkvalda står på. Genom att delta i dessa projekt online, deltar vi också i legitimeringen av det representativa politiska system och vi har idag.

    Ovanstående inomparlamentariskt initierade online projekt ska icke förväxla med utomparlamentariskt initierad medborgaraktivism där Internet används för att gå runt statlig kontroll och territorium för att skapa opinion och protest, som twittrandet i Iran och Moldavien tidigare i år var exempel på. När vi talar om Internet och medborgardeltagande är det således viktigt att hålla isär begreppen framför allt med hänsyn till vart initiativet återfinns, inom eller utanför parlamentet.

    Innebär då deltagande i inomparlamentariska IT-projekt att medborgarnas delaktighet ökar? Återigen är det viktigt att hålla isär begreppen. Att delta kan innebära att man som medborgare blir/känner sig mer delaktig i besluten. Men deltagande innebär inte per automatik sådan delaktighet. Att sätta upp en debattsida på nätet för medborgarna att chatta på och sedan inte ägna chatten någon uppmärksamhet är ett exempel på deltagande utan delaktighet. I begreppet delaktighet ligger en maktdelningsaspekt, att beslutsfattare delar med sig/delegerar en del av beslutsmakten. De ofta citerade deltagande budgeteringsexperimenten med ursprung i den brasilianska staden Porto Alegre är ett exempel på hur en del av till exempel en kommunalbudget läggs i händerna på deltagande medborgare.

    Inom EU finns det en rad projekt (till exempel Debate Europe) där Internet ska ge medborgarna en möjlighet till dialog och på så sätt stärka det parlament färre än 50 % av de röstberättigade legitimerade genom att gå till valurnorna i juni tidigare i år (se här). Jag har dock inte hittat något exempel där EUs debattsidor på nätet haft någon betydelse för beslutsfattandet. Tvärtom har en föregångare till Debate Europe stängts ned utan att de diskussionstrådar som utvecklats tagits till vara på över huvud taget.

    Frågan vi måste ställa oss när nu Regeringen lanserar Internet som ett verktyg i dialogen med medborgare och fortsätter satsa skattepengar på detta, är i fall medborgarnas möjligheter att vara delaktiga i den politiska beslutsprocessen stärks, som det hävdas i pressmeddelandet, eller om dessa IT-verktyg och online-projekt egentligen handlar om att legitimera det system som föder initiativtagarna? Blir kommunala debattsidor på nätet ett verktyg för politiker att hävda delaktighet när det egentligen handlar om att hänvisa debattsugna till en plats bortom beslutsmakt, för att sedan arbeta ifred från högljudda medborgare?

     

123 1 - 50 of 128
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf