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  • 1.
    Börjeson, Love
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    What to Do with Interviews – A Clinical-Organizational Perspective2014In: Against Separation: Experiences in Early Intervention for Young Children with Disabilities in Russia and Byelorussia / [ed] Kenneth Sundh, Elena Kozhevnikova, Jonas Alwall, Ersta Sköndal University College , 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    An attempt to nuance the understanding of professional reports in archaeology2015In: GL16 Conference Proceedings, Amsterdam, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Professional (i.e. extra-academic) contract archaeology is an internationally widespread practice contributing significantly to the archaeological literature. However, professional knowledge production in archaeology, and most notably the professional report genre, is at times described as problematic. The problem descriptions are ambiguous and can be grouped under at least three different topics: concerns for content quality and practical accessibility, concerns for the comparably low degree of analytical and theoretical synthesizing in reports and concerns for lack of mutual knowledge transfer between academic archaeologists and professional archaeologists. Technical issues of access are to an increasing extent being solved. Format standardizations are also developing. Hence the report genre becomes more accessible, and the content more readable and informative. Yet articulations of attitudes toward the genre in archaeology text books and journal articles remain focused on the genre’s problems. The aim of my ongoing dissertation research is to nuance the understanding of the professional report genre in archaeology. I do so by analyzing factors shaping reporting as it takes place in the intersection between academic norms, professional values and market logics. I argue an improved genre understanding is crucial to diminish cultural issues of access to the report literature, and also as a basis for development of reporting practices. In1the dissertation research I analyze (1) perceptions about the report genre in archaeology literature, (2) information policy regulating reporting in archaeology, (3) how report writers and county board professionals interpret the reporting and report auditing work tasks and (4) the frames of reference report writers bring into reporting. The aim of this paper is to explicate the research design consisting of four sub-studies, to briefly report on findings from study no. 4, and to discuss preliminary, partial results from study no. 2.

  • 3.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Beyond information policy: Conflicting documentation ideals in extra-academic knowledge making practices2016In: Journal of Documentation, ISSN 0022-0418, E-ISSN 1758-7379, Vol. 72, no 4, 674-695 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore and explicate documentation ideals parallel to information policy, and by means of this analysis demonstrate how the concept “documentation ideals” is an analytical tool for engaging with political and institutional contexts of information practices.

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on a case study of documentation ideals in a debate about quality in archaeological documentation. The methodology draws on idea analysis, and on the science and technology studies’ controversy studies approach.

    Findings – The paper explicates three documentation ideals, how these ideals allocate responsibility for documentation to different actors, how the ideals assign roles to practitioners, and how the ideals point to different beneficiaries of the documentation. Furthermore, the analysis highlights ideas about two different means to reach the documentation ideals.

    Research limitations/implications – The case’s debate reflects opinions of Northern European professionals.

    Social implications – The paper illuminates how documentation ideals tweak and even contest formal information policy in claims on the documentation and on the practitioners doing documentation.

    Originality/value – Documentation ideal analysis is crucial as a complement to formal information policy analysis and to analysis guided by practice theory in attempts to understand the contexts of information practices and documentation, insights central for developing information literacies.

  • 4.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Biblioteksplaner i praktiken2013In: Biblioteksbladet, ISSN 0006-1867, no 1, 27-28 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Data file for journal article Beyond information policy: Conflicting documentation ideals in extra-academic knowledge making practices2016Other (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Data files for journal article Grey literature – grey sources? Nuancing the perception of professional documentation: the case of Swedish archaeology2015Data set
  • 7.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Data files for part of journal article Information Policy for (Digital) Information in Archaeology: current state and suggestions for development: Analystabeller nationell nivå samt Vägledning för tillämpning av Kulturminneslagen, Uppdragsarkeologi (2 kap, 10-13 §§)2015Data set (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Grey literature – grey sources?: Nuancing the view on professional documentation: the case of Swedish archaeology2015In: Journal of Documentation, ISSN 0022-0418, E-ISSN 1758-7379, Vol. 71, no 6, 1158-1182 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    This study aims at nuancing the perception about professional documentation (a.k.a. ‘grey literature’), assuming perception of documentation being a cultural aspect of accessibility.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The study explores variations within the archaeological report genre through a bibliometric analysis of source use. Source characteristics are explored as well as correlations between report authors and source originators. Statistical frequency distribution is complemented by a correspondence analysis and a k-Means cluster analysis to explore patterns. The patterns are interpreted as ‘frames of references’ and related to circumstances for archaeological work. The study also discusses source representations.

    Findings

    The source use patterns reveal a latent variation, not visible in the general analysis: a professional/academic frame of reference (mainly among authors affiliated with incorporated businesses and sole proprietorships) and an administrative frame of reference (mainly among authors affiliated with government agencies, foundations and member associations) emerge.

    Research limitations/implications

    The study focuses on Swedish field evaluation reports. Future research could 1) test the results in relation to other types of reports, and 2) go beyond the document perspective to explore source use in documentation practices.

    Social implications

    The results on variations in frames of references among report writers have implication for report readers and user. The results should also be considered in archaeology management and policy-making. On the level of source representation the results call for clarifications of vague representations and possibly omitted sources.

    Originality/value

    This study contextualises archaeological information use and focuses on variations in professional archaeology which has received little previous research attention. The bibliometric approach complements previous qualitative studies of archaeological information.

  • 9.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Research outside academia?: An analysis of resources in extra-academic report writing2016In: Proceedings of the 79th ASIS&T Annual Meeting: Creating Knowledge, Enhancing Lives through Information & Technology / [ed] Andrew Grove, Diane H. Sonnenwald, Lauren Harrison et. al., Silver Spring: Association for Information Science and Technology , 2016, Vol. 53Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A significant part of all research takes place in extraacademic organizations. Practitioner researchers often present their results in publications different from those in academia, e.g. in reports, sometimes (and here) referred to as “gray literature”. Gray literature is increasingly available online. However, availability does not mean that reports are exploited to their full potential in research. Disciplines like archaeology have substantial problems with the scholarly communication and knowledge sharing between extraacademic and academic research. This paper approaches this problem from a report-user perspective. For the benefit of potential report users’ gray literature literacies, reportwriting practices are analyzed by means of practice theory. Qualitative interviews with six practitioner researchers in Swedish archaeology firms make up the material. The analysis focuses on how report writers draw on regulative, institutional, and infrastructural resources in their practices. Based on the findings about the practices in which reports are written and become informative, the paper presents seven suggestions supporting report users’ potential to critically analyze and use report content. The results contribute to the information science field with insights into extra-academic information practices, and as input in a wider critical discussion of the information-related conditions for research outside academia.

  • 10.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM. Dept. of ALM, Uppsala University.
    Research outside academia?: An analysis of resources in extra-academic report writing2016In: Proceedings of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A significant part of all research takes place in extra-academic organizations. Practitioner researchers often present their results in publications different from those in academia, e.g. in reports, sometimes (and here) referred to as “gray literature”. Gray literature is increasingly available online. However, availability does not mean that reports are exploited to their full potential in research. Disciplines like archaeology have substantial problems with the scholarly communication and knowledge sharing between extra-academic and academic research. This paper approaches this problem from a report-user perspective. For the benefit of potential report users’ gray literature literacies, report-writing practices are analyzed by means of practice theory. Qualitative interviews with six practitioner researchers in Swedish archaeology firms make up the material. The analysis focuses on how report writers draw on regulative, institutional, and infrastructural resources in their practices. Based on the findings about the practices in which reports are written and become informative, the paper presents seven suggestions supporting report users’ potential to critically analyze and use report content. The results contribute to the information science field with insights into extra-academic information practices, and as input in a wider critical discussion of the information-related conditions for research outside academia.

  • 11.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Resources for scholarly documentation in professional service organizations: A study of Swedish development-led archaeology report writing2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This information studies dissertation deals with the problem that results from research outside academia risk to receive little or no attention if communicated through reports, instead of in mainstream academic genres like research journal articles. The case in focus is Swedish development-led (DL) archaeology, i.e. state regulated archaeology preceding land development. Swedish DL archaeology is organized as a semi-regulated market. The organizations competing on the market are professional service organizations selling research services to land developers. Regional government departments, county administrative boards, function as intermediaries setting up procurement-like processes.

    In previous research on archaeological documentation, the problem with non-use of reports has been described as depending on cultural issues of access, possible to solve if individuals make efforts to communicate and use extra-academic results. This dissertation offers an alternative definition of the problem, highlighting a different set of solutions. The aim is to further the understanding of how the distribution of research duties to professional service organizations affects the scholarly documentation in Swedish archaeology. The aim is met through identification, operationalization and analysis of resources available to report writing DL archaeology practitioners, and an analysis of how practitioners draw on these resources. The results further the understanding of how reports are shaped within the DL archaeology institution. In view of these results, efforts to solve issues of access should target the organization of research in the archaeology discipline, and specifically how scholarly documentation is governed on the archaeology market.

    The dissertation draws on science and technology studies, practice theory, and document theory for the design of the study of documentation resources and contexts in extra-academic research. A mixed methods approach is applied to capture regulative, institutional, and infrastructural resources, and practitioners’ use thereof. Dissertation papers I-III contain analyses of concrete instantiations of the resources: information policy, documentation ideals, and information source use. The fourth paper presents an analysis of how practitioners draw on these resources in their everyday report writing. The dissertation concerns archaeology specifically, but serves as grounds to inquire into the premises for scholarly documentation in other areas of extra-academic research and knowledge-making as well.

    List of papers
    1. Information Policy for (Digital) Information in Archaeology: current state and suggestions for development
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Information Policy for (Digital) Information in Archaeology: current state and suggestions for development
    2015 (English)In: Internet Archaeology, ISSN 1363-5387, E-ISSN 1363-5387, no 40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The introduction of digital data capturing and management technologies has transformed information practices in archaeology. Digital documentation and digital infrastructures are integrated in archaeologists' daily work now more than ever. International and national institutions and projects have contributed to the development of digital archiving and curation practices. Because knowledge production in archaeology depends heavily on documentation and information dissemination, and on retrieval of past documentation, the question of how information is managed is profoundly intertwined with the possibilities for knowledge production. Regulations at different levels articulate demands and expectations from the emerging digital information practices, but how are these different regulations coordinated, and do they support archaeological knowledge production?

    In this article we look into the state of information policy - the sum of principles guiding decisions about information - in archaeology and related areas. The aim of the article is to shed light on how information policy directs practice in archaeology, and to show that analysis of such policies is therefore vital. Information policy in legislation and guidelines in Swedish archaeology serves as a case study, and examples from development-led archaeology and the museum sector illustrate how information policies have varied roles across different heritage sectors. There are historical and local trajectories in the policy documents specific to Sweden, but the discussion shows that the emergence of Swedish policies have many parallels with processes in other countries. The article provides recommendations for information policy development for archaeology and related areas.

    Keyword
    Digital humanities; cultural heritage sector; digital heritage; digital archaeology; digital museums; information policy; digital agendas; digitization
    National Category
    Information Studies Archaeology
    Research subject
    Library and Information Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-275630 (URN)10.11141/ia.40.4 (DOI)
    Projects
    ARKDIS
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 340-2012-5751
    Available from: 2016-02-04 Created: 2016-02-04 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
    2. Beyond information policy: Conflicting documentation ideals in extra-academic knowledge making practices
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beyond information policy: Conflicting documentation ideals in extra-academic knowledge making practices
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Documentation, ISSN 0022-0418, E-ISSN 1758-7379, Vol. 72, no 4, 674-695 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore and explicate documentation ideals parallel to information policy, and by means of this analysis demonstrate how the concept “documentation ideals” is an analytical tool for engaging with political and institutional contexts of information practices.

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on a case study of documentation ideals in a debate about quality in archaeological documentation. The methodology draws on idea analysis, and on the science and technology studies’ controversy studies approach.

    Findings – The paper explicates three documentation ideals, how these ideals allocate responsibility for documentation to different actors, how the ideals assign roles to practitioners, and how the ideals point to different beneficiaries of the documentation. Furthermore, the analysis highlights ideas about two different means to reach the documentation ideals.

    Research limitations/implications – The case’s debate reflects opinions of Northern European professionals.

    Social implications – The paper illuminates how documentation ideals tweak and even contest formal information policy in claims on the documentation and on the practitioners doing documentation.

    Originality/value – Documentation ideal analysis is crucial as a complement to formal information policy analysis and to analysis guided by practice theory in attempts to understand the contexts of information practices and documentation, insights central for developing information literacies.

    Keyword
    Archaeology, Information practices, Information policy, Controversy studies, Documentation ideals, Idea analysis, Knowledge making practices
    National Category
    Information Studies
    Research subject
    Library and Information Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-277190 (URN)10.1108/JDOC-10-2015-0134 (DOI)000379787000004 ()
    Projects
    ARKDIS
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 340-2012-5751
    Available from: 2016-02-17 Created: 2016-02-17 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
    3. Grey literature – grey sources?: Nuancing the view on professional documentation: the case of Swedish archaeology
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Grey literature – grey sources?: Nuancing the view on professional documentation: the case of Swedish archaeology
    2015 (Swedish)In: Journal of Documentation, ISSN 0022-0418, E-ISSN 1758-7379, Vol. 71, no 6, 1158-1182 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    This study aims at nuancing the perception about professional documentation (a.k.a. ‘grey literature’), assuming perception of documentation being a cultural aspect of accessibility.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The study explores variations within the archaeological report genre through a bibliometric analysis of source use. Source characteristics are explored as well as correlations between report authors and source originators. Statistical frequency distribution is complemented by a correspondence analysis and a k-Means cluster analysis to explore patterns. The patterns are interpreted as ‘frames of references’ and related to circumstances for archaeological work. The study also discusses source representations.

    Findings

    The source use patterns reveal a latent variation, not visible in the general analysis: a professional/academic frame of reference (mainly among authors affiliated with incorporated businesses and sole proprietorships) and an administrative frame of reference (mainly among authors affiliated with government agencies, foundations and member associations) emerge.

    Research limitations/implications

    The study focuses on Swedish field evaluation reports. Future research could 1) test the results in relation to other types of reports, and 2) go beyond the document perspective to explore source use in documentation practices.

    Social implications

    The results on variations in frames of references among report writers have implication for report readers and user. The results should also be considered in archaeology management and policy-making. On the level of source representation the results call for clarifications of vague representations and possibly omitted sources.

    Originality/value

    This study contextualises archaeological information use and focuses on variations in professional archaeology which has received little previous research attention. The bibliometric approach complements previous qualitative studies of archaeological information.

    Keyword
    Documentation; Reports; Grey literature; Information sources; Information use: Referencing; Bibliometrics; Sociology of professions; Archaeology
    National Category
    Information Studies
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-246514 (URN)10.1108/JD-09-2014-0137 (DOI)000369171600003 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 340-2012-5751
    Available from: 2015-03-08 Created: 2015-03-08 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
    4. Research outside academia?: An analysis of resources in extra-academic report writing
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Research outside academia?: An analysis of resources in extra-academic report writing
    2016 (English)In: Proceedings of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 2016Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A significant part of all research takes place in extra-academic organizations. Practitioner researchers often present their results in publications different from those in academia, e.g. in reports, sometimes (and here) referred to as “gray literature”. Gray literature is increasingly available online. However, availability does not mean that reports are exploited to their full potential in research. Disciplines like archaeology have substantial problems with the scholarly communication and knowledge sharing between extra-academic and academic research. This paper approaches this problem from a report-user perspective. For the benefit of potential report users’ gray literature literacies, report-writing practices are analyzed by means of practice theory. Qualitative interviews with six practitioner researchers in Swedish archaeology firms make up the material. The analysis focuses on how report writers draw on regulative, institutional, and infrastructural resources in their practices. Based on the findings about the practices in which reports are written and become informative, the paper presents seven suggestions supporting report users’ potential to critically analyze and use report content. The results contribute to the information science field with insights into extra-academic information practices, and as input in a wider critical discussion of the information-related conditions for research outside academia.

    Keyword
    Scholarly communication; Practitioner researchers; Grey literature; Archaeology; Practice theory
    National Category
    Information Studies
    Research subject
    Library and Information Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-303766 (URN)
    Conference
    Annual Meeting of the Association for Information Science and Technology, Copenhagen, Denmark Oct. 14-18, 2016
    Projects
    ARKDIS
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 340-2012-5751
    Available from: 2016-09-23 Created: 2016-09-23 Last updated: 2017-10-20
  • 12.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Äppelhyllevardag: folkbibliotekens arbete med tillgängliga medier för barn2014Report (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Alsbjer, Peter
    Biblioteken som lärandeorganisationer - hur skapas och bibehålls de?2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Dell'Unto, Nicolo
    Lund University.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Larsson, Carolina
    Lund University.
    Löwenborg, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Petersson, Bodil
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper (KV).
    Stenborg, Per
    University of Gothenburg.
    A Neo-Documentalist Lens for Exploring the Premises of Disciplinary Knowledge Making2016In: Proceedings from the Document Academy, ISSN 2473-215X, Vol. 3, no 1, 1-23 p., 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to demonstrate how documentation analysis with a neo-documentalist lens can help us explore variations (and stabilities) in conceptions and materialities of documents, as intertwined with disciplinary and sub-disciplinary practices of informing and knowing. Drawing on documentation theory, and with previous research on archaeological documentation as a background, by means of autoethnographic vignettes we explore contemporary conceptions of documentation in five areas in or related to archaeology (Intra-site 3D documentation, Development-led archaeology, Aggregating documentation for use outside the organization, Mediating documentation – or documentation mediation, and Documenting and displaying archaeology in a changing environment). Digitization, and how digitization has spurred renegotiations of what counts as documentation, functions as a common denominator discussed in all of the vignettes. The analysis highlights simultaneously ongoing renegotiations of documentation serving each area’s unique epistemic purposes, and pushing document materialities in different directions. This operationalization of documentation analysis creates an understanding for intra-disciplinary variations in documentation but is importantly also a practical tool to uncover documentation-related premises of disciplinary knowledge-making. This tool can be applied for example in processes of information policy development (regulating what purposes documentation should serve, and what it should be like), information systems design (e.g. for creation and communication of documentation), and infrastructure development (e.g. for preservation and accessibility of documentation).

  • 15.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Petersson, Bodil
    Department of Cultural Sciences, Linnaeus University.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM. Information and Knowledge Management, Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    Information Policy for (Digital) Information in Archaeology: current state and suggestions for development2015In: Internet Archaeology, ISSN 1363-5387, E-ISSN 1363-5387, no 40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The introduction of digital data capturing and management technologies has transformed information practices in archaeology. Digital documentation and digital infrastructures are integrated in archaeologists' daily work now more than ever. International and national institutions and projects have contributed to the development of digital archiving and curation practices. Because knowledge production in archaeology depends heavily on documentation and information dissemination, and on retrieval of past documentation, the question of how information is managed is profoundly intertwined with the possibilities for knowledge production. Regulations at different levels articulate demands and expectations from the emerging digital information practices, but how are these different regulations coordinated, and do they support archaeological knowledge production?

    In this article we look into the state of information policy - the sum of principles guiding decisions about information - in archaeology and related areas. The aim of the article is to shed light on how information policy directs practice in archaeology, and to show that analysis of such policies is therefore vital. Information policy in legislation and guidelines in Swedish archaeology serves as a case study, and examples from development-led archaeology and the museum sector illustrate how information policies have varied roles across different heritage sectors. There are historical and local trajectories in the policy documents specific to Sweden, but the discussion shows that the emergence of Swedish policies have many parallels with processes in other countries. The article provides recommendations for information policy development for archaeology and related areas.

  • 16.
    Hedemark, Åse
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    Att använda en plan: Fenomenet biblioteksplaner och begreppet användning problematiserat2014In: Nordisk kulturpolitisk tidskrift, ISSN 1403-3216, E-ISSN 2000-8325, no 1, 93-113 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Planning and evaluation has become increasingly important within the Swedish public library sphere. The aim of this article is to problematize the libraries’ (the Royal Library, the regional libraries and the public libraries) task to evaluate the design and use of ‘library plans’. The task will be described in relation to the development of the Swedish library legislation and the evolution of library plans as an administrative phenomenon. The analytical focus in the article is the concept of use as applied in government practice and library practice. The empirical material consists of documents reflecting the enforcement of use of plans and evaluation of use of plans, and of qualitative interviews with library staff reflecting plans in library practice. The analysis shows how government practice in combination with library practice creates an administrative habit regarding the use, and evaluation of use of plans. Nonetheless the government practice has the first word in deciding which concepts should dominate the library administration. In the concluding discussion we argue the current library administration – and the concepts such as plans, use of plans and plan evaluation, dominating that administration – might be altered if there would be alternatives to the current administrative trends with strong influences from market economy logics.

  • 17.
    Olle, Sköld
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Lisa, Börjesson
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Det svenska spelarvet: strategisk bevarandeplanering behövs i nationell strategi för spelindustrin2016In: Tidskrift för ABM, ISSN 2002-4614, no 1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Spel och spelande är arenor för socialt samspel, lärande, förströelse och reflektion - de är en del av vår kultur. På senare år har tunga aktörer tillsammans uttryckt behov av statliga satsningar för att gynna svensk spelutveckling och spelforskning. Samtidigt har bevarandeperspektivet saknats i diskussionen. Här förklarar vi varför bevarande är viktigt, varför nationella och internationella bevarandesatsningar bör samordnas, och varför vi menar att spel och spelkultur bör bevaras tillsammans.

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