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  • 1.
    Cheeke, Tanya E.
    et al.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Uppsala Bioctr, Dept Forest Mycol & Plant Pathol, Uppsala, Sweden.;Indiana Univ, Dept Biol, 1001 E Third St, Bloomington, IN 47405 USA..
    Phillips, Richard P.
    Indiana Univ, Dept Biol, 1001 E Third St, Bloomington, IN 47405 USA..
    Brzostek, Edward R.
    West Virginia Univ, Dept Biol, 53 Campus Dr, Morgantown, WV 26506 USA..
    Rosling, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Bever, James D.
    Indiana Univ, Dept Biol, 1001 E Third St, Bloomington, IN 47405 USA.;Univ Kansas, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, 2041 Haworth Hall,1200 Sunnyside Ave, Lawrence, KS 66045 USA..
    Fransson, Petra
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Uppsala Bioctr, Dept Forest Mycol & Plant Pathol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Dominant mycorrhizal association of trees alters carbon and nutrient cycling by selecting for microbial groups with distinct enzyme function2017In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 214, no 1, p. 432-442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While it is well established that plants associating with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi cycle carbon (C) and nutrients in distinct ways, we have a limited understanding of whether varying abundance of ECM and AM plants in a stand can provide integrative proxies for key biogeochemical processes. We explored linkages between the relative abundance of AM and ECM trees and microbial functioning in three hardwood forests in southern Indiana, USA. Across each site's 'mycorrhizal gradient', we measured fungal biomass, fungal : bacterial (F : B) ratios, extracellular enzyme activities, soil carbon : nitrogen ratio, and soil pH over a growing season. We show that the percentage of AM or ECM trees in a plot promotes microbial communities that both reflect and determine the C to nutrient balance in soil. Soils dominated by ECM trees had higher F : B ratios and more standing fungal biomass than AM stands. Enzyme stoichiometry in ECM soils shifted to higher investment in extracellular enzymes needed for nitrogen and phosphorus acquisition than in C-acquisition enzymes, relative to AM soils. Our results suggest that knowledge of mycorrhizal dominance at the stand or landscape scale may provide a unifying framework for linking plant and microbial community dynamics, and predicting their effects on ecological function.

  • 2. Clarholm, Marianne
    et al.
    Skyllberg, Ulf
    Rosling, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Organic acid induced release of nutrients from metal-stabilized soil organic matter - The unbutton model2015In: Soil Biology and Biochemistry, ISSN 0038-0717, E-ISSN 1879-3428, Vol. 84, p. 168-176Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Processes of soil organic matter (SOM) stabilization and the reverse, destabilization of SOM resulting in subsequent release and mobilization of nutrients from SOM, remain largely unresolved. The perception of SOM as supramolecular aggregates built of low molecular mass biomolecules is currently emerging. Polyvalent metal cations contribute to SOM tertiary structure by bridging functional groups of such molecules (Simpson et al., 2002). The strong bond to metals protects high quality organic material from being immediately accessed and decomposed. Here we propose a three-step process by which low molecular mass organic acids (LMMOAs) and hydrolytic enzymes act in series to destabilize SOM supramolecules to release organic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) for local hyphal and root uptake. Complexation of the stabilizing metals by fungal-released LMMOA gives fungal-root consortia direct access to organic substrates of good quality. Because of their small sizes and carboxyl group configuration, citric and oxalic acids are the most effective LMMOAs forming stable complexes with the main SOM bridging metals Ca and Al in SOM. Citrate, forming particularly strong complexes with the trivalent cations Al and Fe, is dominant in soil solutions of low-productive highly acidic boreal forest soils where mycorrhizal associations with roots are formed predominantly by fungi with hydrophobic hyphal surfaces. In these systems mycelia participate in the formation of N-containing SOM with a significant contribution from strong Al bridges. In less acidic soils of temperate forests, including calcareous influenced soils, SOM is stabilized predominantly by Ca bridges. In such systems mycorrhizal fungi with more hydrophilic surfaces dominate, and oxalic acid, forming strong bidentate complexes with Ca, is the most common LMMOA exuded. A plant-fungus driven biotic mechanism at the supramolecular aggregate level (10(3)-10(5) Da) resolves micro-spatial priming of SOM, where the destabilization step is prerequisite for subsequent release of nutrients. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 3. Fransson, Petra
    et al.
    Rosling, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Fungal and bacterial community responses to Suillus variegtus extraradical mycelia and soil profile in Scots pine microcosms2014In: Plant and Soil, ISSN 0032-079X, E-ISSN 1573-5036, Vol. 385, no 1-2, p. 255-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims To investigate the importance of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) extraradical mycelia and soil substrate in shaping specific mycorrhizosphere microbial communities. Methods Suillus variagtus inoculated Scots pine seedlings were grown for approximately 5 months in soil microcosms using five soil layer treatments. Fungal and bacterial community composition near roots, in hyphal fronts and 'bulk soil' was studied using T-RFLP, cloning and sequencing. Plant chemistry at harvest and initial chemical properties for the soil layers were analysed. Results Both fungal and bacterial community compositions differed between different soil layers for S. variegatus inoculated seedlings. The mixed soil, corresponding to the interface between organic and mineral layers, supported the highest plant and fungal biomass and the most diverse fungal communities. Environmental variables explained ca. 50 % of the variation in data. In OE mixed layers the main driver shaping communities was plant chemistry, reflecting below-ground C flow, and for O and E layers soil chemistry (nutrients and pH) was the main driver. Fungal communities included 56 identified taxa, and more taxa were found in soil associated with hyphal fronts compared to 'bulk soil' and roots. Bacterial communities changed over time and bacteria associated with hyphal fronts partly differentiated from other sampling sites. Conclusion The experimental microcosm setup allowed establishment of communities reflecting those naturally occurring at the field site. Given that below-ground C flow is sufficient, extraradical mycelial expansion in the substrate has the potential to drive microbial community development.

  • 4.
    George, T. S.
    et al.
    James Hutton Inst, Dundee DD2 5DA, Scotland.
    Giles, C. D.
    James Hutton Inst, Dundee DD2 5DA, Scotland.
    Menezes-Blackburn, D.
    Univ Lancaster, Lancaster Environm Ctr, Lancaster LA1 4YQ, England.
    Condron, L. M.
    Lincoln Univ, Christchurch 7647, New Zealand.
    Gama-Rodrigues, A. C.
    Univ Estadual Norte Flumninense Darcy Ribeiro, UENF, Lab Solos, Av Alberto Lamego 2000, Campos Dos Goytacazes, RJ, Brazil.
    Jaisi, D.
    Univ Delaware, Plant & Soil Sci, 160 Townsend Hall, Newark, DE 19716 USA.
    Lang, F.
    Univ Freiburg, Chair Soil Ecol, Fac Environm & Nat Resources, Bertoldstr 17, D-79098 Freiburg, Germany.
    Neal, A. L.
    Rothamsted Res, Harpenden AL5 2JQ, Herts, England.
    Stutter, M. , I
    Almeida, D. S.
    Sao Paulo State Univ, UNESP, Dept Crop Sci, Coll Agr Sci, 1780 Jose Barbosa de Barros St, Botucatu, SP, Brazil.
    Bol, R.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst Bio & Geosci IBG Agrosphere 3, D-52425 Julich, Germany.
    Cabugao, K. G.
    Oak Ridge Natl Lab, POB 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 USA.
    Celi, L.
    Univ Turin, Soil Biogeochem, DISAFA, Largo Braccini 2, I-10095 Turin, Italy.
    Cotner, J. B.
    Univ Minnesota, 1479 Gortner Ave St Paul, Twin, MN 55108 USA.
    Feng, G.
    China Agr Univ, Beijing, Peoples R China.
    Goll, D. S.
    IPSL LSCE CEA CNRS UVSQ Saclay, Lab Sci Climat & Environm, Gif Sur Yvette, France.
    Hallama, M.
    Univ Hohenheim, Inst Soil Sci, Emil Wolff Str 27, D-70599 Stuttgart, Germany.
    Krueger, J.
    Univ Freiburg, Chair Soil Ecol, Fac Environm & Nat Resources, Bertoldstr 17, D-79098 Freiburg, Germany.
    Plassard, C.
    INRA, UMR ECO & SOLS, Montpellier, France.
    Rosling, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Darch, T.
    Rothamsted Res, Okehampton EX20 2SB, Devon, England.
    Fraser, T.
    Univ Reading, Sch Agr Policy & Dev, Ctr Agrienvironm Res, POB 237, Reading RG6 6AR, Berks, England.
    Giesler, R.
    Umea Univ, Dept Ecol & Environm Sci, Climate Impacts Res Ctr, S-98107 Abisko, Sweden.
    Richardson, A. E.
    CSIRO Agr & Food, Canberra, ACT, Australia.
    Tamburini, F.
    ETH, D USYS, Tannenstr 1, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland.
    Shand, C. A.
    James Hutton Inst, Aberdeen AB15 8QH, Scotland.
    Lumsdon, D. G.
    James Hutton Inst, Aberdeen AB15 8QH, Scotland.
    Zhang, H.
    Univ Lancaster, Lancaster Environm Ctr, Lancaster LA1 4YQ, England.
    Blackwell, M. S. A.
    Rothamsted Res, Okehampton EX20 2SB, Devon, England.
    Wearing, C.
    Univ Lancaster, Lancaster Environm Ctr, Lancaster LA1 4YQ, England.
    Mezeli, M. M.
    James Hutton Inst, Dundee DD2 5DA, Scotland.
    Almas, A. R.
    Norwegian Univ Life Sci, Dept Environm Sci, Post Box 5003, N-1432 As, Norway.
    Audette, Y.
    Univ Guelph, 50 Stone Rd East, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.
    Bertrand, I
    INRA, UMR ECO & SOLS, Montpellier, France.
    Beyhaut, E.
    Natl Inst Agr Res Uruguay, Montevideo, Uruguay.
    Boitt, G.
    Lincoln Univ, Christchurch 7647, New Zealand.
    Bradshaw, N.
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Chem & Biol Engn, Mappin St, Sheffield S1 3JD, S Yorkshire, England.
    Brearley, C. A.
    Univ East Anglia, Sch Biol Sci, Norwich Res Pk, Norwich NR4 7TJ, Norfolk, England.
    Bruulsema, T. W.
    Int Plant Nutr Inst, 18 Maplewood Dr, Guelph, ON N1G 1L8, Canada.
    Ciais, P.
    IPSL LSCE CEA CNRS UVSQ Saclay, Lab Sci Climat & Environm, Gif Sur Yvette, France.
    Cozzolino, V
    Univ Napoli Federico II, Ctr Interdipartimentale Ric Risonanza Magnet Nucl, Via Univ 100, I-80055 Portici, Italy.
    Duran, P. C.
    Univ La Frontera, Temuco, Chile.
    Mora, M. L.
    Univ Napoli Federico II, Ctr Interdipartimentale Ric Risonanza Magnet Nucl, Via Univ 100, I-80055 Portici, Italy.
    de Menezes, A. B.
    Univ Salford, Sch Environm & Life Sci, Manchester M5 4WT, The Crescent, England.
    Dodd, R. J.
    Bangor Univ, Sch Environm Nat Resources & Geog, Bangor LL57 2UW, Gwynedd, Wales.
    Dunfield, K.
    Univ Guelph, 50 Stone Rd East, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.
    Engl, C.
    Queens Univ Belfast, Med Biol Ctr, Sch Biol Sci, 97 Lisburn Rd, Belfast BT9 7BL, Antrim, North Ireland;Queens Univ Belfast, Med Biol Ctr, Inst Global Food Secur, 97 Lisburn Rd, Belfast BT9 7BL, Antrim, North Ireland.
    Frazao, J. J.
    Univ Sao Paulo, CENA, Ave Centenario 303, BR-13416000 Piracicaba, SP, Brazil.
    Garland, G.
    ETH, D USYS, Tannenstr 1, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland.
    Jimenez, J. L. Gonzalez
    Johnstown Castle Co, TEAGASC, Environm Res Ctr, Wexford, Ireland.
    Graca, J.
    Johnstown Castle Co, TEAGASC, Environm Res Ctr, Wexford, Ireland.
    Granger, S. J.
    Rothamsted Res, Okehampton EX20 2SB, Devon, England.
    Harrison, A. F.
    Ctr Ecol & Hydrol, Lib Ave, Lancaster LA1 4AP, England.
    Heuck, C.
    Univ Bayreuth, Bayreuth Ctr Ecol & Environm Res BayCEER, Dept Soil Biogeochem, Dr Hans Frisch Str 1-3, D-95448 Bayreuth, Germany.
    Hou, E. Q.
    Chinese Acad Sci, South China Bot Garden, Guangdong Prov Key Lab Appl Bot, 723 Xingke Rd, Guangzhou 510650, Guangdong, Peoples R China.
    Johnes, P. J.
    Univ Bristol, Sch Geog Sci, Univ Rd, Bristol BS8 1SS, Avon, England;Univ Bristol, Sch Chem, Univ Rd, Bristol BS8 1SS, Avon, England.
    Kaiser, K.
    Martin Luther Univ Halle Wittenberg, Soil Sci & Soil Protect, von Seckendorff Pl 3, D-06120 Halle, Saale, Germany.
    Kjaer, H. A.
    Univ Copenhagen, Ctr Ice & Climate, Niels Bohr Inst, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Klumpp, E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology. Forschungszentrum Julich GmbH, Inst Bio & Geosci, Agrosphere IBG 3, D-52425 Julich, Germany.
    Lamb, A. L.
    British Geol Survey, NERC Isotope Geosci Facil, Nottingham NG12 5GG, England.
    Macintosh, K. A.
    Queens Univ Belfast, Med Biol Ctr, Sch Biol Sci, 97 Lisburn Rd, Belfast BT9 7BL, Antrim, North Ireland;Queens Univ Belfast, Med Biol Ctr, Inst Global Food Secur, 97 Lisburn Rd, Belfast BT9 7BL, Antrim, North Ireland.
    Mackay, E. B.
    Ctr Ecol & Hydrol, Lib Ave, Lancaster LA1 4AP, England.
    McGrath, J.
    Queens Univ Belfast, Med Biol Ctr, Sch Biol Sci, 97 Lisburn Rd, Belfast BT9 7BL, Antrim, North Ireland;Queens Univ Belfast, Med Biol Ctr, Inst Global Food Secur, 97 Lisburn Rd, Belfast BT9 7BL, Antrim, North Ireland.
    McIntyre, C.
    Univ Bristol, Sch Geog Sci, Univ Rd, Bristol BS8 1SS, Avon, England;Univ Bristol, Sch Chem, Univ Rd, Bristol BS8 1SS, Avon, England.
    McLaren, T.
    ETH, D USYS, Tannenstr 1, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland.
    Meszaros, E.
    ETH, D USYS, Tannenstr 1, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland.
    Missong, A.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst Bio & Geosci IBG Agrosphere 3, D-52425 Julich, Germany.
    Mooshammer, M.
    Univ Vienna, Dept Microbiol & Ecosyst Sci, Althanstr 14, A-1090 Vienna, Austria.
    Negron, C. P.
    Univ La Frontera, Temuco, Chile.
    Nelson, L. A.
    Univ Northern British Columbia, 3333 Univ Way, Prince George, BC V2N 4Z9, Canada.
    Pfahler, V
    Rothamsted Res, Okehampton EX20 2SB, Devon, England.
    Poblete-Grant, P.
    Univ La Frontera, Temuco, Chile.
    Randall, M.
    Brigham Young Univ, Provo, UT 84602 USA.
    Seguel, A.
    Univ La Frontera, Temuco, Chile.
    Seth, K.
    Lincoln Univ, Christchurch 7647, New Zealand.
    Smith, A. C.
    British Geol Survey, NERC Isotope Geosci Facil, Nottingham NG12 5GG, England.
    Smits, M. M.
    Hasselt Univ, Ctr Environm Sci, Bldg D,Agoralaan, B-3590 Diepenbeek, Belgium.
    Sobarzo, J. A.
    Univ La Frontera, Temuco, Chile.
    Spohn, M.
    Univ Bayreuth, Bayreuth Ctr Ecol & Environm Res BayCEER, Dept Soil Biogeochem, Dr Hans Frisch Str 1-3, D-95448 Bayreuth, Germany.
    Tawaraya, K.
    Yamagata Univ, Tsuruoka, Yamagata 9978555, Japan.
    Tibbett, M.
    Univ Reading, Sch Agr Policy & Dev, Ctr Agrienvironm Res, POB 237, Reading RG6 6AR, Berks, England.
    Voroney, P.
    Univ Guelph, 50 Stone Rd East, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.
    Wallander, H.
    Lund Univ, Dept Biol, Biol Bldg Solvegatan 35, S-22362 Lund, Sweden.
    Wang, L.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst Bio & Geosci IBG Agrosphere 3, D-52425 Julich, Germany.
    Wasaki, J.
    Hiroshima Univ, Grad Sch Biosphere Sci, Assessment Microbial Environm, Hiroshima, Japan.
    Haygarth, P. M.
    Univ Lancaster, Lancaster Environm Ctr, Lancaster LA1 4YQ, England.
    Organic phosphorus in the terrestrial environment: a perspective on the state of the art and future priorities2018In: Plant and Soil, ISSN 0032-079X, E-ISSN 1573-5036, Vol. 427, no 1-2, p. 191-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dynamics of phosphorus (P) in the environment is important for regulating nutrient cycles in natural and managed ecosystems and an integral part in assessing biological resilience against environmental change. Organic P (P-o) compounds play key roles in biological and ecosystems function in the terrestrial environment being critical to cell function, growth and reproduction. We asked a group of experts to consider the global issues associated with P-o in the terrestrial environment, methodological strengths and weaknesses, benefits to be gained from understanding the P-o cycle, and to set priorities for P-o research. We identified seven key opportunities for P-o research including: the need for integrated, quality controlled and functionally based methodologies; assessment of stoichiometry with other elements in organic matter; understanding the dynamics of P-o in natural and managed systems; the role of microorganisms in controlling P-o cycles; the implications of nanoparticles in the environment and the need for better modelling and communication of the research. Each priority is discussed and a statement of intent for the P-o research community is made that highlights there are key contributions to be made toward understanding biogeochemical cycles, dynamics and function of natural ecosystems and the management of agricultural systems.

  • 5.
    George, T. S.
    et al.
    James Hutton Inst, Dundee DD2 5DA, Scotland..
    Giles, C. D.
    James Hutton Inst, Dundee DD2 5DA, Scotland..
    Menezes-Blackburn, D.
    Univ Lancaster, Lancaster Environm Ctr, Lancaster LA1 4YQ, England..
    Condron, L. M.
    Lincoln Univ, Christchurch 7647, New Zealand..
    Gama-Rodrigues, A. C.
    Univ Estadual Norte Fluminense, UENF Lab Solos, Av Alberto Lamego, BR-2000 Campos Dos Goytacazes, RJ, Brazil..
    Jaisi, D.
    Univ Delaware, Plant & Soil Sci, 160 Townsend Hall, Newark, DE 19716 USA..
    Lang, F.
    Univ Freiburg, Chair Soil Ecol, Fac Environm & Nat Resources, Bertoldstr 17, D-79098 Freiburg, Germany..
    Neal, A. L.
    Rothamsted Res, Harpenden AL5 2JQ, Herts, England..
    Stutter, M. I.
    James Hutton Inst, Aberdeen AB15 8QH, Scotland..
    Almeida, D. S.
    Sao Paulo State Univ UNESP, Dept Crop Sci, Coll Agr Sci, 1780 Jose Barbosa Barros st, Sao Paulo, Brazil..
    Bol, R.
    Forschungszentrum Julich GmbH, Inst Bio & Geosci, Agrosphere IBG 3, D-52425 Julich, Germany..
    Cabugao, K. G.
    Oak Ridge Natl Lab, POB 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 USA..
    Celi, L.
    Univ Turin, DISAFA, Soil Biogeochem, Largo Braccini 2, I-10095 Turin, Italy..
    Cotner, J. B.
    Univ Minnesota, 1479 Gortner Ave, St Paul, MN 55108 USA..
    Feng, G.
    China Agr Univ, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Goll, D. S.
    CNRS, UVSQ, CEA, IPSL LSCE,Lab Sci Climat & Environm, Gif Sur Yvette, France..
    Hallama, M.
    Univ Hohenheim, Inst Soil Sci, EmilWolff Str 27, D-70599 Stuttgart, Germany..
    Krueger, J.
    Univ Freiburg, Chair Soil Ecol, Fac Environm & Nat Resources, Bertoldstr 17, D-79098 Freiburg, Germany..
    Plassard, C.
    INRA, UMR ECO & SOLS, Montpellier, France..
    Rosling, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Darch, T.
    Rothamsted Res, Okehampton EX20 2SB, Devon, England..
    Fraser, T.
    Univ Reading, Sch Agr Policy & Dev, Ctr Agri Environm Res, POB 237, Reading RG6 6AR, Berks, England..
    Giesler, R.
    Umea Univ, Climate Impacts Res Ctr, Dep Ecol & Environm Sci, S-98107 Abisko, Sweden..
    Richardson, A. E.
    CSIRO Agr & Food, Canberra, ACT, Australia..
    Tamburini, F.
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, D USYS, Tannenstr 1, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Shand, C. A.
    James Hutton Inst, Aberdeen AB15 8QH, Scotland..
    Lumsdon, D. G.
    James Hutton Inst, Aberdeen AB15 8QH, Scotland..
    Zhang, H.
    Univ Lancaster, Lancaster Environm Ctr, Lancaster LA1 4YQ, England..
    Blackwell, M. S. A.
    Rothamsted Res, Okehampton EX20 2SB, Devon, England..
    Wearing, C.
    Univ Lancaster, Lancaster Environm Ctr, Lancaster LA1 4YQ, England..
    Mezeli, M. M.
    James Hutton Inst, Dundee DD2 5DA, Scotland..
    Almas, A. R.
    Norwegian Univ Life Sci, Dept Environm Sci, POB 5003, N-1432 As, Norway..
    Audette, Y.
    Univ Guelph, 50 Stone Rd East, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada..
    Bertrand, I.
    INRA, UMR ECO & SOLS, Montpellier, France..
    Beyhaut, E.
    Natl Inst Agr Res Uruguay, Montevideo, Uruguay..
    Boitt, G.
    Lincoln Univ, Christchurch 7647, New Zealand..
    Bradshaw, N.
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Chem & Biol Engn, Mappin St, Sheffield S1 3JD, S Yorkshire, England..
    Brearley, C. A.
    Univ East Anglia, Sch Biol Sci, Norwich Res Pk, Norwich NR4 7TJ, Norfolk, England..
    Bruulsema, T. W.
    Int Plant Nutr Inst, 18 Maplewood Dr, Guelph, ON N1G IL8, Canada..
    Ciais, P.
    CNRS, UVSQ, CEA, IPSL LSCE,Lab Sci Climat & Environm, Gif Sur Yvette, France..
    Cozzolino, V.
    Univ Naples Federico II, Ctr Interdipartimentale Ric Risonanza Magnet Nucl, Via Univ 100, I-80055 Portici, Italy. Univ La Frontera, Temuco, Chile..
    Duran, P. C.
    Mora, M. L.
    Univ Naples Federico II, Ctr Interdipartimentale Ric Risonanza Magnet Nucl, Via Univ 100, I-80055 Portici, Italy. Univ La Frontera, Temuco, Chile..
    de Menezes, A. B.
    Univ Salford, Sch Environm & Life Sci, Manchester M5 4WT, England..
    Dodd, R. J.
    Bangor Univ, Sch Environm Nat Resources & Geog, Bangor LL57 2UW, Gwynedd, Wales..
    Dunfield, K.
    Univ Guelph, 50 Stone Rd East, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada..
    Engl, C.
    Queens Univ Belfast, Med Biol Ctr, Sch Biol Sci, 97 Lisburn Rd, Belfast BT9 7BL, Antrim, North Ireland.;Queens Univ Belfast, Med Biol Ctr, Inst Global Food Secur, 97 Lisburn Rd, Belfast BT9 7BL, Antrim, North Ireland..
    Frazao, J. J.
    Univ Sao Paulo, CENA, Ave Centenario 303, BR-13416000 Piracicaba, SP, Brazil..
    Garland, G.
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, D USYS, Tannenstr 1, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Jimenez, J. L. Gonzalez
    Johnstown Castle Co, Teagasc Environm Res Ctr, Wexford, Ireland..
    Graca, J.
    Johnstown Castle Co, Teagasc Environm Res Ctr, Wexford, Ireland..
    Granger, S. J.
    Rothamsted Res, Okehampton EX20 2SB, Devon, England..
    Harrison, A. F.
    Ctr Ecol & Hydrol, Lib Ave, Lancaster LA1 4AP, England..
    Heuck, C.
    Univ Bayreuth, Bayreuth Ctr Ecol & Environm Res BayCEER, Dept Soil Biogeochem, Dr Hans Frisch Str 1-3, D-95448 Bayreuth, Germany..
    Hou, E. Q.
    Chinese Acad Sci, South China Bot Garden, Guangdong Prov Key Lab Appl Bot, 723 Xingke Rd, Guangzhou 510650, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Johnes, P. J.
    Univ Bristol, Sch Geog Sci, Univ Rd, Bristol BS8 1SS, Avon, England.;Univ Bristol, Sch Chem, Univ Rd, Bristol BS8 1SS, Avon, England..
    Kaiser, K.
    Martin Luther Univ Halle Wittenberg, Soil Sci & Soil Protect, Von Seckendorff Pl 3, D-06120 Halle, Saale, Germany..
    Kjaer, H. A.
    Univ Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Inst, Ctr Ice & Climate, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Klumpp, E.
    Forschungszentrum Julich GmbH, Inst Bio & Geosci, Agrosphere IBG 3, D-52425 Julich, Germany..
    Lamb, A. L.
    British Geol Survey, NERC, Isotope Geosci Facil, Nottingham NG12 5GG, England..
    Macintosh, K. A.
    Queens Univ Belfast, Med Biol Ctr, Sch Biol Sci, 97 Lisburn Rd, Belfast BT9 7BL, Antrim, North Ireland.;Queens Univ Belfast, Med Biol Ctr, Inst Global Food Secur, 97 Lisburn Rd, Belfast BT9 7BL, Antrim, North Ireland..
    Mackay, E. B.
    Ctr Ecol & Hydrol, Lib Ave, Lancaster LA1 4AP, England..
    McGrath, J.
    Queens Univ Belfast, Med Biol Ctr, Sch Biol Sci, 97 Lisburn Rd, Belfast BT9 7BL, Antrim, North Ireland.;Queens Univ Belfast, Med Biol Ctr, Inst Global Food Secur, 97 Lisburn Rd, Belfast BT9 7BL, Antrim, North Ireland..
    McIntyre, C.
    Univ Bristol, Sch Geog Sci, Univ Rd, Bristol BS8 1SS, Avon, England.;Univ Bristol, Sch Chem, Univ Rd, Bristol BS8 1SS, Avon, England..
    McLaren, T.
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, D USYS, Tannenstr 1, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Meszaros, E.
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, D USYS, Tannenstr 1, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Missong, A.
    Forschungszentrum Julich GmbH, Inst Bio & Geosci, Agrosphere IBG 3, D-52425 Julich, Germany..
    Mooshammer, M.
    Univ Vienna, Dept Microbiol & Ecosyst Sci, Althanstr 14, A-1090 Vienna, Austria..
    Negron, C. P.
    Nelson, L. A.
    Univ Northern British Columbia, 3333 Univ Way, Prince George, BC V2N 4Z9, Canada..
    Pfahler, V.
    Rothamsted Res, Okehampton EX20 2SB, Devon, England..
    Poblete-Grant, P.
    Randall, M.
    Brigham Young Univ, Provo, UT 84602 USA..
    Seguel, A.
    Seth, K.
    Lincoln Univ, Christchurch 7647, New Zealand..
    Smith, A. C.
    Smits, M. M.
    Hasselt Univ, Ctr Environm Sci, Bldg D,Agoralaan, B-3590 Diepenbeek, Belgium..
    Sobarzo, J. A.
    Spohn, M.
    Univ Bayreuth, Bayreuth Ctr Ecol & Environm Res BayCEER, Dept Soil Biogeochem, Dr Hans Frisch Str 1-3, D-95448 Bayreuth, Germany..
    Tawaraya, K.
    Yamagata Univ, Tsuruoka, Yamagata 9978555, Japan..
    Tibbett, M.
    Univ Reading, Sch Agr Policy & Dev, Ctr Agri Environm Res, POB 237, Reading RG6 6AR, Berks, England..
    Voroney, P.
    Univ Guelph, 50 Stone Rd East, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada..
    Wallander, H.
    Lund Univ, Dept Biol, Biol Bldg Solvegatan 35, S-22362 Lund, Sweden..
    Wang, L.
    Forschungszentrum Julich GmbH, Inst Bio & Geosci, Agrosphere IBG 3, D-52425 Julich, Germany..
    Wasaki, J.
    Hiroshima Univ, Grad Sch Biosphere Sci, Assessment Microbial Environm, Hiroshima, Japan..
    Haygarth, P. M.
    Univ Lancaster, Lancaster Environm Ctr, Lancaster LA1 4YQ, England..
    Correction to: Organic phosphorus in the terrestrial environment: a perspective on the state of the art and future priorities2018In: Plant and Soil, ISSN 0032-079X, E-ISSN 1573-5036, Vol. 427, no 1-2, p. 209-211Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6. Menkis, Audrius
    et al.
    Urbina, Hector
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    James, Timothy Y.
    Rosling, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Archaeorhizomyces borealis sp nov and a sequence-based classification of related soil fungal species2014In: Fungal Biology, ISSN 1878-6146, E-ISSN 1878-6162, Vol. 118, no 12, p. 943-955Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The class Archaeorhizomycetes (Taphrinomycotina, Ascomycota) was introduced to accommodate an ancient lineage of soil-inhabiting fungi found in association with plant roots. Based on environmental sequencing data Archaeorhizomycetes may comprise a significant proportion of the total fungal community in soils. Yet the only species described and cultivated in this class is Archaeorhizomyces finlayi. In this paper, we describe a second species from a pure culture, Archaeorhizomyces borealis NS99-600(T) (=CBS138755(ExT)) based on morphological, physiological, and multi-locus molecular characterization. Archaeorhizomyces borealis was isolated from a root tip of a Pinus sylvestris seedling grown in a forest nursery in Lithuania. Analysis of Archaeorhizomycete species from environmental samples shows that it has a Eurasian distribution and is the most commonly observed species. Archaeorhizomyces borealis shows slow growth in culture and forms yellowish creamy colonies, characteristics that distinguish A. borealis from its closest relative A. finlayi. Here we also propose a sequence-based taxonomic classification of Archaeorhizomycetes and predict that approximately 500 species in this class remain to be isolated and described.

  • 7.
    Rosling, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Midgley, Meghan G.
    Cheeke, Tanya
    Urbina, Hector
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Fransson, Petra
    Phillips, Richard P.
    Phosphorus cycling in deciduous forest soil differs betweenstands dominated by ecto- and arbuscular mycorrhizal trees2016In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 209, no 3, p. 1184-1195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although much is known about how trees and their associated microbes influence nitrogen cycling in temperate forest soils, less is known about biotic controls over phosphorus (P) cycling. Given that mycorrhizal fungi are instrumental for P acquisition and that the two dominant associations – arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi – possess different strategies for acquiring P, we hypothesized that P cycling would differ in stands dominated by trees associated with AM vs ECM fungi.We quantified soil solution P, microbial biomass P, and sequentially extracted inorganic and organic P pools from May to November in plots dominated by trees forming either AM or ECM associations in south-central Indiana, USA.Overall, fungal communities in AM and ECM plots were functionally different and soils exhibited fundamental differences in P cycling. Organic forms of P were more available in ECM plots than in AM plots. Yet inorganic P decreased and organic P accumulated over the growing season in both ECM and AM plots, resulting in increasingly P-limited microbial biomass. Collectively, our results suggest that P cycling in hardwood forests is strongly influenced by biotic processes in soil and that these are driven by plant-associated fungal communities.

  • 8.
    Rosling, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Timling, Ina
    University of Alaska Fairbanks.
    Taylor, Lee
    University of New Mexico.
    Archaeorhizomycetes: Patterns of Distribution and Abundance in Soil2013In: Genomics of Soil- and Plant-Associated Fungi / [ed] Benjamin A. Horwitz, Prasun K Mukherjee, Mala Mukherjee, Christian P Kubicek, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, p. 333-349Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Soil fungal ecology has developed tremendously with the introduction of environmental sequencing. The soil under our feet harbors great fungal diversity including species and even lineages of unknown identity. Beyond identification we can use environmental sequences to trace distribution patterns of species and lineages to better understand their life strategies and ecological roles. Environmental sequences provide the largest available source of information on the ecology of Archaeorhizomycetes, a class of globally distributed ubiquitous soil fungi for which there are no known fruiting structures and only two of over 250 estimated species have been cultured.

    The class was initially known as the Soil Clone Group 1 (SCG1) (Porter et al. 2008) based on environmental sequences from four diverse ecosystems and twelve published studies. Porter and co-workers highlighted two important features of the class Archaeorhizomycetes: its broad distribution across diverse ecosystems as well as its high species diversity within sites. When the class of Archaeorhizomycetes was formally described by Rosling et al. in 2011, thousands of ITS sequences were available in public databases. Based on meta-data associated with these sequences, ecosystem specificity and geographic distribution patterns emerged among several putative species, i.e. OTUs, within the class. In this chapter we expand upon earlier analyses of distribution by adding complementary datasets including environmental LSU and SSU sequences. Habitat specificity and geographic distribution are further analyzed using public and previously unpublished sequences from ten field studies in Alaska.

  • 9. Schadt, Christopher W.
    et al.
    Rosling, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Comment on "Global diversity and geography of soil fungi"2015In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 348, no 6242Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Tedersoo et al. (Research Article, 28 November 2014, p. 1078) present a compelling study regarding patterns of biodiversity of fungi, carried out at a scale unprecedented to date for fungal biogeographical studies. The study demonstrates strong global biogeographic patterns in richness and community composition of soil fungi. What concerns us with the study is what we do not see. Unfortunately, this study underestimates the fungal diversity of one key group of soil fungi due to reliance on a single primer with known flaws.

  • 10.
    Urbina, Hector
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology. Purdue Univ, Dept Bot & Plant Pathol, 915 W State St, W Lafayette, IN 47907 USA.
    Breed, Martin F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution. Univ Adelaide, Sch Biol Sci, North Terrace, SA 5005, Australia;Univ Adelaide, Environm Inst, North Terrace, SA 5005, Australia.
    Zhao, Weizhou
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Evolution.
    Gurrala, Kanaka Lakshmi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Evolution.
    Andersson, Siv G.E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Evolution.
    Ågren, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Baldauf, Sandra L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Rosling, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Specificity in Arabidopsis thaliana recruitment of root fungal communities from soil and rhizosphere2018In: Fungal Biology, ISSN 1878-6146, E-ISSN 1878-6162, Vol. 122, no 4, p. 231-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biotic and abiotic conditions in soil pose major constraints on growth and reproductive success of plants. Fungi are important agents in plant soil interactions but the belowground mycobiota associated with plants remains poorly understood. We grew one genotype each from Sweden and Italy of the widely studied plant model Arabidopsis thaliana. Plants were grown under controlled conditions in organic topsoil local to the Swedish genotype, and harvested after ten weeks. Total DNA was extracted from three belowground compartments: endosphere (sonicated roots), rhizosphere and bulk soil, and fungal communities were characterized from each by amplification and sequencing of the fungal barcode region ITS2. Fungal species diversity was found to decrease from bulk soil to rhizosphere to endo-sphere. A significant effect of plant genotype on fungal community composition was detected only in the endosphere compartment. Despite A. thaliana being a non-mycorrhizal plant, it hosts a number of known mycorrhiza fungi in its endosphere compartment, which is also colonized by endophytic, pathogenic and saprotrophic fungi. Species in the Archaeorhizomycetes were most abundant in rhizosphere samples suggesting an adaptation to environments with high nutrient turnover for some of these species. We conclude that A. thaliana endosphere fungal communities represent a selected subset of fungi recruited from soil and that plant genotype has small but significant quantitative and qualitative effects on these communities.

  • 11.
    Urbina, Hector
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Scofield, Douglas G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology. Uppsala Univ, Dept Informat Technol, Uppsala Multidisciplinary Ctr Adv Computat Sci, Box 137, S-75105 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Cafaro, Matias
    Univ Puerto Rico, Dept Biol, Mayaguez, PR 00681 USA..
    Rosling, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    DNA-metabarcoding uncovers the diversity of soil-inhabiting fungi in the tropical island of Puerto Rico2016In: Mycoscience, ISSN 1340-3540, E-ISSN 1618-2545, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 217-227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Soil fungal communities in tropical regions remain poorly understood. In order to increase the knowledge of diversity of soil-inhabiting fungi, we extracted total DNA from top-organic soil collected in seven localities dominated by four major ecosystems in the tropical island of Puerto Rico. In order to comprehensively characterize the fungal community, we PCR-amplified the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) fungal barcode using newly designed degenerated primers and varying annealing temperatures to minimize primer bias. Sequencing results, obtained using Ion Torrent technology, comprised a total of 566,613 sequences after quality filtering. These sequences were clustered into 4140 molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs) after removing low frequency sequences and rarefaction to account for differences in read depth between samples. Our results demonstrate that soil fungal communities in Puerto Rico are structured by ecosystem. Ascomycota, followed by Basidiomycota, dominates the diversity of fungi in soil. Amongst Ascomycota, the recently described soil-inhabiting class Archaeorhizomycetes was present in all localities, and taxa in Archaeorhizomycetes were among the most commonly observed MOTUs. The Basidiomycota community was dominated by soil decomposers and ectomycorrhizal fungi with a distribution strongly affected by local variation to a greater degree than Ascomycota.

  • 12.
    Zamora, Juan Carlos
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Svensson, Måns
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Kirschner, Roland
    Natl Cent Univ, Taoyuan, Taiwan.
    Olariaga, Ibai
    Univ Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid 28933, Spain.
    Ryman, Svengunnar
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Alberto Parra, Luis
    Ave Padre Claret 7,5 G, Burgos 09400, Spain.
    Geml, Jozsef
    Nat Biodivers Ctr, Vondellaan 55, NL-2332 AA Leiden, Netherlands.
    Rosling, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Adamcik, Slavomir
    Ahti, Teuvo
    Aime, M. Catherine
    Ainsworth, A. Martyn
    Albert, Laszlo
    Alberto, Edgardo
    Garcia, Alberto Altes
    Ageev, Dmitry
    Agerer, Reinhard
    Aguirre-Hudson, Begona
    Ammirati, Joe
    Andersson, Harry
    Angelini, Claudio
    Antonin, Vladimir
    Aoki, Takayuki
    Aptroot, Andre
    Argaud, Didier
    Sosa, Blanca Imelda Arguello
    Aronsen, Arne
    Arup, Ulf
    Asgari, Bita
    Assyov, Boris
    Atienza, Violeta
    Bandini, Ditte
    Baptista-Ferreira, Joao Luis
    Baral, Hans-Otto
    Baroni, Tim
    Barreto, Robert Weingart
    Baker, Henry
    Bell, Ann
    Bellanger, Jean-Michel
    Bellu, Francesco
    Bemmann, Martin
    Bendiksby, Mika
    Bendiksen, Egil
    Bendiksen, Katriina
    Benedek, Lajos
    Beresova-Guttova, Anna
    Berger, Franz
    Berndt, Reinhard
    Bernicchia, Annarosa
    Biketova, Alona Yu
    Bizio, Enrico
    Bjork, Curtis
    Boekhout, Teun
    Boertmann, David
    Bohning, Tanja
    Boittin, Florent
    Boluda, Carlos G.
    Boomsluiter, Menno W.
    Borovicka, Jan
    Brandrud, Tor Erik
    Braun, Uwe
    Brodo, Irwin
    Bulyonkova, Tatiana
    Burdsall, Harold H., Jr.
    Buyck, Bart
    Burgaz, Ana Rosa
    Calatayud, Vicent
    Callac, Philippe
    Campo, Emanuele
    Candusso, Massimo
    Capoen, Brigitte
    Carbo, Joaquim
    Carbone, Matteo
    Castaneda-Ruiz, Rafael F.
    Castellano, Michael A.
    Chen, Jie
    Clerc, Philippe
    Consiglio, Giovanni
    Corriol, Gilles
    Courtecuisse, Regis
    Crespo, Ana
    Cripps, Cathy
    Crous, Pedro W.
    da Silva, Gladstone Alves
    da Silva, Meiriele
    Dam, Marjo
    Dam, Nico
    Dammrich, Frank
    Das, Kanad
    Davies, Linda
    De Crop, Eske
    De Kesel, Andre
    De Lange, Ruben
    Bonzi, Barbara De Madrignac
    dela Cruz, Thomas Edison E.
    Delgat, Lynn
    Demoulin, Vincent
    Desjardin, Dennis E.
    Diederich, Paul
    Dima, Balint
    Dios, Maria Martha
    Divakar, Pradeep Kumar
    Douanla-Meli, Clovis
    Douglas, Brian
    Drechsler-Santos, Elisandro Ricardo
    Dyer, Paul S.
    Eberhardt, Ursula
    Ertz, Damien
    Esteve-Raventos, Fernando
    Salazar, Javier Angel Etayo
    Evenson, Vera
    Eyssartier, Guillaume
    Farkas, Edit
    Favre, Alain
    Fedosova, Anna G.
    Filippa, Mario
    Finy, Peter
    Flakus, Adam
    Fos, Simon
    Fournier, Jacques
    Fraiture, Andre
    Franchi, Paolo
    Molano, Ana Esperanza Franco
    Friebes, Gernot
    Frisch, Andreas
    Fryday, Alan
    Furci, Giuliana
    Marquez, Ricardo Galan
    Garbelotto, Matteo
    Garcia-Martin, Joaquina Maria
    Otalora, Monica A. Garcia
    Sanchez, Dania Garcia
    Gardiennet, Alain
    Garnica, Sigisfredo
    Benavent, Isaac Garrido
    Gates, Genevieve
    Gerlach, Alice da Cruz Lima
    Ghobad-Nejhad, Masoomeh
    Gibertoni, Tatiana B.
    Grebenc, Tine
    Greilhuber, Irmgard
    Grishkan, Bella
    Groenewald, Johannes Z.
    Grube, Martin
    Gruhn, Gerald
    Gueidan, Cecile
    Gulden, Gro
    Gusmao, Luis F. P.
    Hafellner, Josef
    Hairaud, Michel
    Halama, Marek
    Hallenberg, Nils
    Halling, Roy E.
    Hansen, Karen
    Harder, Christoffer Bugge
    Heilmann-Clausen, Jacob
    Helleman, Stip
    Henriot, Alain
    Hernandez-Restrepo, Margarita
    Herve, Raphael
    Hobart, Caroline
    Hoffmeister, Mascha
    Hoiland, Klaus
    Holec, Jan
    Holien, Hakon
    Hughes, Karen
    Hubka, Vit
    Huhtinen, Seppo
    Ivancevic, Boris
    Jagers, Marian
    Jaklitsch, Walter
    Jansen, AnnaElise
    Jayawardena, Ruvishika S.
    Jeppesen, Thomas Stjernegaard
    Jeppson, Mikael
    Johnston, Peter
    Jorgensen, Per Magnus
    Karnefelt, Ingvar
    Kalinina, Liudmila B.
    Kantvilas, Gintaras
    Karadelev, Mitko
    Kasuya, Taiga
    Kautmanova, Ivona
    Kerrigan, Richard W.
    Kirchmair, Martin
    Kiyashko, Anna
    Knapp, Daniel G.
    Knudsen, Henning
    Knudsen, Kerry
    Knutsson, Tommy
    Kolarik, Miroslav
    Koljalg, Urmas
    Kosuthova, Alica
    Koszka, Attila
    Kotiranta, Heikki
    Kotkova, Vera
    Koukol, Ondrej
    Kout, Jiri
    Kovacs, Gabor M.
    Kriz, Martin
    Natl Cent Univ, Taoyuan, Taiwan.
    Kruys, Asa
    Kudera, Viktor
    Kudzma, Linas
    Kuhar, Francisco
    Kukwa, Martin
    Kumar, T. K. Arun
    Kunca, Vladimir
    Kusan, Ivana
    Kuyper, Thomas W.
    Lado, Carlos
    Laessoe, Thomas
    Laine, Patrice
    Langer, Ewald
    Larsson, Ellen
    Larsson, Karl-Henrik
    Laursen, Gary
    Lechat, Christian
    Lee, Serena
    Lendemer, James C.
    Levin, Laura
    Lindemann, Uwe
    Lindstrom, Hakan
    Liu, Xingzhong
    Hernandez, Regulo Carlos Llarena
    Llop, Esteve
    Locsmandi, Csaba
    Lodge, Deborah Jean
    Loizides, Michael
    Lokos, Laszlo
    Luangsa-ard, Jennifer
    Luderitz, Matthias
    Lumbsch, Thorsten
    Lutz, Matthias
    Mahoney, Dan
    Malysheva, Ekaterina
    Malysheva, Vera
    Manimohan, Patinjareveettil
    Mann-Felix, Yasmina
    Marques, Guilhermina
    Martinez-Gil, Ruben
    Marson, Guy
    Mata, Gerardo
    Matheny, P. Brandon
    Mathiassen, Geir Harald
    Matocec, Neven
    Mayrhofer, Helmut
    Mehrabi, Mehdi
    Melo, Ireneia
    Mesic, Armin
    Methven, Andrew S.
    Miettinen, Otto
    Romero, Ana M. Millanes
    Miller, Andrew N.
    Mitchell, James K.
    Moberg, Roland
    Moreau, Pierre-Arthur
    Moreno, Gabriel
    Morozova, Olga
    Morte, Asuncion
    Muggia, Lucia
    Gonzalez, Guillermo Munoz
    Myllys, Leena
    Nagy, Istvan
    Nagy, Laszlo G.
    Neves, Maria Alice
    Niemela, Tuomo
    Nimis, Pier Luigi
    Niveiro, Nicolas
    Noordeloos, Machiel E.
    Nordin, Anders
    Noumeur, Sara Raouia
    Novozhilov, Yuri
    Nuytinck, Jorinde
    Ohenoja, Esteri
    Fiuza, Patricia Oliveira
    Orange, Alan
    Ordynets, Alexander
    Ortiz-Santana, Beatriz
    Pacheco, Leticia
    Pal-Fam, Ferenc
    Palacio, Melissa
    Palice, Zdenek
    Papp, Viktor
    Partel, Kadri
    Pawlowska, Julia
    Paz, Aurelia
    Peintner, Ursula
    Pennycook, Shaun
    Pereira, Olinto Liparini
    Daniels, Pablo Perez
    Capella, Miguel A. Perez-De-Gregorio
    del Amo, Carlos Manuel Perez
    Gorjon, Sergio Perez
    Perez-Ortega, Sergio
    Perez-Vargas, Israel
    Perry, Brian A.
    Petersen, Jens H.
    Petersen, Ronald H.
    Pfister, Donald H.
    Phukhamsakda, Chayanard
    Piatek, Marcin
    Piepenbring, Meike
    Pino-Bodas, Raquel
    Esquivel, Juan Pablo Pinzon
    Pirot, Paul
    Popov, Eugene S.
    Popoff, Orlando
    Alvaro, Maria Prieto
    Printzen, Christian
    Psurtseva, Nadezhda
    Purahong, Witoon
    Quijada, Luis
    Rambold, Gerhard
    Ramirez, Natalia A.
    Raja, Huzefa
    Raspe, Olivier
    Raymundo, Tania
    Reblova, Martina
    Rebriev, Yury A.
    Garcia, Juan de Dios Reyes
    Ripoll, Miguel Angel Ribes
    Richard, Franck
    Richardson, Mike J.
    Rico, Victor J.
    Robledo, Gerardo Lucio
    Barbosa, Flavia Rodrigues
    Rodriguez-Caycedo, Cristina
    Rodriguez-Flakus, Pamela
    Ronikier, Anna
    Casas, Luis Rubio
    Rusevska, Katerina
    Saar, Gunter
    Saar, Irja
    Salcedo, Isabel
    Martinez, Sergio M. Salcedo
    Montoya, Carlos A. Salvador
    Sanchez-Ramirez, Santiago
    Sandoval-Sierra, J. Vladimir
    Santamaria, Sergi
    Monteiro, Josiane Santana
    Schroers, Hans Josef
    Schulz, Barbara
    Schmidt-Stohn, Geert
    Schumacher, Trond
    Senn-Irlet, Beatrice
    Sevcikova, Hana
    Shchepin, Oleg
    Shirouzu, Takashi
    Shiryaev, Anton
    Siepe, Klaus
    Sir, Esteban B.
    Sohrabi, Mohammad
    Soop, Karl
    Spirin, Viacheslav
    Spribille, Toby
    Stadler, Marc
    Stalpers, Joost
    Stenroos, Soili
    Suija, Ave
    Sunhede, Stellan
    Svantesson, Sten
    Svensson, Sigvard
    Svetasheva, Tatyana Yu
    Swierkosz, Krzysztof
    Tamm, Heidi
    Taskin, Hatira
    Taudiere, Adrien
    Tedebrand, Jan-Olof
    Lahoz, Raul Tena
    Temina, Marina
    Thell, Arne
    Thines, Marco
    Thor, Goren
    Thus, Holger
    Tibell, Leif
    Tibell, Sanja
    Timdal, Einar
    Tkalcec, Zdenko
    Tonsberg, Tor
    Trichies, Gerard
    Triebel, Dagmar
    Tsurykau, Andrei
    Tulloss, Rodham E.
    Tuovinen, Veera
    Sosa, Miguel Ulloa
    Urcelay, Carlos
    Valade, Francois
    Garza, Ricardo Valenzuela
    van den Boom, Pieter
    Van Vooren, Nicolas
    Vasco-Palacios, Aida M.
    Vauras, Jukka
    Santos, Juan Manuel Velasco
    Vellinga, Else
    Verbeken, Annemieke
    Vetlesen, Per
    Vizzini, Alfredo
    Voglmayr, Hermann
    Volobuev, Sergey
    von Brackel, Wolfgang
    Voronina, Elena
    Walther, Grit
    Watling, Roy
    Weber, Evi
    Wedin, Mats
    Weholt, Oyvind
    Westberg, Martin
    Yurchenko, Eugene
    Zehnalek, Petr
    Zhang, Huang
    Zhurbenko, Mikhail P.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Considerations and consequences of allowing DNA sequence data as types of fungal taxa2018In: IMA Fungus, ISSN 2210-6340, E-ISSN 2210-6359, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 167-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nomenclatural type definitions are one of the most important concepts in biological nomenclature. Being physical objects that can be re-studied by other researchers, types permanently link taxonomy (an artificial agreement to classify biological diversity) with nomenclature (an artificial agreement to name biological diversity). Two proposals to amend the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants (ICN), allowing DNA sequences alone (of any region and extent) to serve as types of taxon names for voucherless fungi (mainly putative taxa from environmental DNA sequences), have been submitted to be voted on at the 11th International Mycological Congress (Puerto Rico, July 2018). We consider various genetic processes affecting the distribution of alleles among taxa and find that alleles may not consistently and uniquely represent the species within which they are contained. Should the proposals be accepted, the meaning of nomenclatural types would change in a fundamental way from physical objects as sources of data to the data themselves. Such changes are conducive to irreproducible science, the potential typification on artefactual data, and massive creation of names with low information content, ultimately causing nomenclatural instability and unnecessary work for future researchers that would stall future explorations of fungal diversity. We conclude that the acceptance of DNA sequences alone as types of names of taxa, under the terms used in the current proposals, is unnecessary and would not solve the problem of naming putative taxa known only from DNA sequences in a scientifically defensible way. As an alternative, we highlight the use of formulas for naming putative taxa (candidate taxa) that do not require any modification of the ICN.

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