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  • 1. Fursova, Valentina
    et al.
    Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Social Problems of Modern Russian Higher Education: The Example of Corruption2014In: International Education Studies, ISSN 1913-9020, E-ISSN 1913-9039, Vol. 7, no 10, p. 25-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Higher education is an essential element in developing a country’s innovative potential, and this has been recognised as such by politicians and those who work in the industry. However, one of the blights of contemporary Russian society, corruption threatens the potential of the next generation. Corruption has permeated all levels of society, including the education sector. It is having a profound effect and is replicating the physical and psychological conditions. This article details the scale and nature of corruption in higher education in Russia, and offers some insight into the various proposals that seek to change the situation for the better.

  • 2.
    Krasnov, Eugene
    et al.
    Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University.
    Karpenko, AnnaInformation Office of the Nordic Council of Ministers.Simons, GregSwedish National Defence College.
    Crisis Management Challenges in Kaliningrad2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Revich, B. A.
    et al.
    Institute of Economic Forecasting of the Russian Academy of Sciences.
    Avaliani, S. L.
    Russian Medical Academy of Advanced Training.
    Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Air Pollution And Public Health In A Megalopolis: A Case Study Of Moscow2016In: Ekonomika regiona, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 1069-1078Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A rapidly growing number of megalopolises in the world leads to some substantial problems to environmentalconditions of their population. One of these problems is the intensification of motor traffic, which contributesto air pollution measured as average concentrations of several air pollutants and climate change inthe form of more frequent heat waves and cold spells. The present study analyzes the selected indicators ofenvironmental health in Moscow, the largest Russian megalopolis which contributes for adoption of soundand evidence-based health risk management policies. Individual carcinogenic risks attributed to traffic emissionsvaried across the study area of 400 km2 between 3 × 10 -4 and 6.53 × 10 -4 which is typical for most megalopolisesin the economically developed countries. However, the carcinogenic risks in some districts may exceedthe threshold of 10 -3 which is regarded as unacceptable. The total population carcinogenic risk for 3.5million people who lived in the study area with intense road traffic was 23 additional cases of malignant neoplasmsper year or 1513 cases per 70 years. Additional mortality during the extreme heat episode in the summerof 2010, when forest and peat fires caused exceptionally high levels of smog in Moscow, reached 11,000deaths. The measures to be taken by the executive authorities include informing the residents about the onsetof extreme heat by means of an early warning system, and rating the relative severity of heat and air pollutionaccording to a 4-point scale.

  • 4.
    Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Aspects of Putin's appeal to international publics2015In: Global Affairs, ISSN 2334-0460, E-ISSN 2334-0479, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 205-208Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Attempting to Re-brand the Branded: Russia’s International Image in the 21st Century2011In: Russian Journal of Communication, ISSN 1940-9419, E-ISSN 1940-9427, Vol. 4, no 3-4, p. 322-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The way in which international relations are being conducted in the 21st century is evolving from the earlier reliance on government to government communications and the use of hard power in order to achieve policy objectives. Currently there is a rush by countries around the world to build up their soft power potential and use attraction as a persuasion and means to attain their goals, Russia being one of these countries. This article focuses on a number of different PR programmes and events run as a means of trying to shift the national reputation and image to a more positive one. The actors and events described are viewed mostly through the lens of public diplomacy, government to people communication. I track a number of the different PR programmes that have been run through mass media and PR agencies. The aim is to gain an insight into the wider picture of Russia’s attempts to rebrand itself, and the successes and obstacles along the way.

  • 6.
    Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    book review of Carnage and Connectivity: Landmarks in the Decline of Conventional Military Power by David Betz2017In: Technology and culture, ISSN 0040-165X, E-ISSN 1097-3729, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 290-291Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Book Review of Matusitz, J., Terrorism and Communication: A Critical Introduction, Thousand Oaks (CA): Sage, 2013, Media, War and Conflict, Vol. 9 (3), 2016, pp. 344-3452016In: Media, War & Conflict, ISSN 1750-6352, E-ISSN 1750-6360, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 344-345Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies. Department of Communication Sciences, Turiba University, Latvia.
    Brand ISIS: Interactions of the Tangible and Intangible Environments2018In: Journal of Political Marketing, ISSN 1537-7857, E-ISSN 1537-7865Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates how the infamous terrorist organization Islamic State (ISIS) uses branding and political marketing as means to increase their intangible value and assets in order to influence their tangible (operational) capacities. In order to investigate the logic of a terrorist organization as a political actor a perspective of political communication is applied as a means to understand more clearly the propaganda of the word and the propaganda of the deed. A systematic communication approach is used to raise awareness of the ISIS brand in order to differentiate the organization and to create a greater sense of credibility and authenticity in an increasingly crowded marketplace of terrorist organizations seeking for attention, support, and fear. Aspects of political marketing are used in order to create sets of relationships of attraction and avoidance with different target audiences. The 15 issues of the magazine Dabiq are examined and analyzed within this approach. However, intangible communication and tangible realities do affect each other. This is evident when there is a swing from military victories to military defeats, which impacts on the quality and quantity of communicational materials produced by ISIS.

  • 9.
    Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Digging Our Own Grave? The Results of CT, COIN and Regime Change2014In: Small Wars JournalArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    War is being increasingly used as an instrument of foreign policy, which has been assisted been political level appreciation of the potential of the West’s superior tangible military strength. The short-term results have been predictable, Saddam Hussein was quickly defeated, Gaddafi was overthrown. Emphasis has been placed on short-term goals and objectives, seemingly without thought to the long-term consequences of these actions. The recent ISIS offensive in Iraq has re-focussed attention that these various wars are still all ongoing. What are the likely or possible results and consequences of failing to take into account the consequences and costs of these wars of choice?

  • 10.
    Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Fake News:: As the Problem or a Symptom of a Deeper Problem?2018In: ОбразArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Fake News: Can There be a Positive Side?2018In: Between Fact and Fakery: Information and Instability in the South Caucasus and Beyond / [ed] Labarre, F. & Niculescu, G., Austrian Ministry of Defence , 2018, p. 143-166Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Media and public diplomacy2018In: Routledge Handbook of Russian Foreign Policy / [ed] Andrei P. Tsygankov, New York: Routledge, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Michael S. Gorham, After newspeak: language culture and politics in Russia from Gorbachev to Putin2015In: Canadian Slavonic Papers, ISSN 0008-5006, Vol. 57, no 3-4, p. 317-318Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Military Intervention and Syria: Moving Towards An Open Aggression?2013In: Prostranstvo i Vremya, ISSN 2219-4525, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 31-46Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    News and Syria: Creating key media moments in the conflict2016In: Cogent Social Sciences, E-ISSN 2331-1886, Vol. 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mass media play a critical role through the production of news in influencing how citizens have their perceptions and opinions shaped. This article intends to delve into the role of news production in creating knowledge and shaping public perception and opinion within the Syrian case and demonstrates that news is not an accidental occurrence, neither in terms of subject or timing. Articles on specific issues, such as the reaction to the chemical weapons attack of August 2013 and the allegations of “industrial killings” by the Syrian government, appearing in the mass media, are subjected to analysis based on the theoretical notions outlined in the paper. These two cases hint that the timing and nature of these specific news events are not as “random” and coincidental as would seem at first glance.

  • 16.
    Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Perception of Russia's Soft Power and Influence in the Baltic States2015In: Public Relations Review, ISSN 0363-8111, E-ISSN 1873-4537, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper seeks to explore and analyse the different means and mechanisms of influence employed by Russia on the three Baltic States (Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania). By influence, it means the attempt to try and get another country to behave in a manner that benefits the influencer's policy and/or interests. As such, this can entail exerting one of two forms of power, hard or soft (as defined by Nye, 2004) to bring about the compliance. The current paper restricts its focus to those mechanisms related to shaping opinion and perception, such as public diplomacy (in its various forms).

    To begin with the paper shall define the various concepts used – influence, power and public diplomacy. It shall then shift to the different Russian institutions that have been created to shape and manage influence, such as Russky Mir or Rossotrudnichestvo. Plus there are those other elements that exist in the region – Russian compatriots and Russian language media (both local and external to the Baltic States). Then the paper shall deal with relations between Russia and the Baltic States, with a focus upon recent history. Sources shall not be limited to academic literature and mass media resources, but will also include interviews for an ‘insider’ perspective on the issue. The responses shall be used to address the following question: How do people in the Baltic States perceive Russian soft power and influence?

  • 17.
    Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies. Swedish Natl Def Coll, Dept Commun Sci, Riga, Latvia.
    Projecting failure as success: Residents’ perspectives of the Christchurch earthquakes recovery2016In: Cogent Social Sciences, E-ISSN 2331-1886, Vol. 2, no 1, article id 1126169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In September 2010 and February 2011, the Canterbury region was rocked by a series of earthquakes. The success or otherwise, of a recovery from a crisis can be found in the perceptions of stakeholders. Many different stakeholders exist, including different levels of Government, bureaucratic institutions and state institutions, private enterprise, non-governmental organisations and the public. In this article, the public are the focus and their perception of the recovery is collected. An online survey was conducted, and it demonstrates a significant gap between the Government’s perception and the perception of residents of Christchurch. How do publics react when they feel as though they have been marginalised by the authorities charged with the crisis event recovery? The Government’s account of success is not shared by the majority of respondents, who have mobilised politically using social media platforms. There are implications for Governments and authorities that are seen to fail segments of the public in the age of social media, where crisis management and public relations meet and political mobilisation against officials and official bodies takes place.

  • 18.
    Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Rethinking Communication Within the Global War On Terrorism2016In: Small Wars JournalArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Review of: World of Media: Journal of Russian Media and Journalism Studies2018In: Russian Journal of Communication, ISSN 1940-9419, E-ISSN 1940-9427, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 106-109Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Russian Media and Censorship: A Means or an End?2015In: Russian Journal of Communication, ISSN 1940-9419, E-ISSN 1940-9427, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 300-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An underlying motive of the paper is to explore the question, is censorship a means or an end? The initial point is that there is a wide understanding and definition of censorship, with many various forms and means. A contradiction that emerges is by law censorship is forbidden in Russia, but there are ways and means of trying to muzzle media and journalists. Something that does emerge is the picture of the perceived importance of media in shaping the attitudes, morals and values of society. This is seen as being particularly important during times of social and political conflict, which is currently being experienced.

  • 21.
    Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Russian public diplomacy in the 21st century: Structure, means and message2014In: Public Relations Review, ISSN 0363-8111, E-ISSN 1873-4537, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 440-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many studies have focussed upon Western countries, such as the United States and members of the European Union, and how they engage with foreign publics. There is also an increasing amount of attention being paid to non-Western countries. The debate on soft power, for instance, shows that the concept is perceived and applied in a manner that differs from Nye's vision. This present article seeks to examine and analyse how and why the Russian state engages foreign publics with different communicational means and methods. Relations and approaches are much more pragmatic in the current situation, ideology seems to have been discarded. The current foreign policy concept gives context to positioning Russia, which not only gives Russia a certain role, but one that is set in relation to other international actors. Although, not all countries are treated the same, a different approach based upon a different set of assumptions produces a different understanding as to what programmes and means are needed. This produces a difference in approach between Western countries and those countries on the territory of the Former Soviet Union. 

  • 22.
    Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Shaping of Cold War 2.0: The Role of Information and Identity2018In: Small Wars JournalArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies. Swedish Def Univ, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Stability and Change in Putin's Political Imageduring the 2000 and 2012 Presidential Elections: Putin 1.0 and Putin 2.0?2016In: Journal of Political Marketing, ISSN 1537-7857, E-ISSN 1537-7865, Vol. 15, no 2-3, p. 149-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been a lot of research done on ‘Western’ politicians and the political systems withregards to political marketing. But what about other countries, and especially those that possess adifferent political standard? This article seeks to address one particular Russian politician –Vladimir Putin. He rose from obscurity to become Russia’s second president (after Boris Yeltsin).Two presidential elections form the focus of attention, 2000 and 2012. The aim is to try anddiscover the consistencies and breaks in the manufacturing of Putin’s political image andreputation. A number of breaks and continuities were discovered in terms of how Putin ismarketed. This seems to be a reflection of the changes taking places in Russia’s politicalenvironment, which then needs to be taken into consideration when political marketing isconducted.

  • 24.
    Simons, Greg
    Swedish Defence University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tangible Threats Through Intangible Means: Aspects of BRICS Information and Communication Security2017In: Systems Psychology and Sociology, ISSN 2223-6880, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 87-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article focuses on tangible threats through intangible means in the framework of broader agenda of information and communication security of BRICS.

  • 25.
    Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    The Death of the Fourth Estate: Corporate Media and News Production2013In: Izvestiya: Ural Federal University Journal, Vol. 118, no 3, p. 145-157Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    The impact of social media and citizen journalismon mainstream Russian news2016In: Russian Journal of Communication, ISSN 1940-9419, E-ISSN 1940-9427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article seeks to address the impact of social media and citizen journalism on mainstreamRussian news by asking those engaged directly or indirectly in the field of professionaljournalism for their opinions and perceptions. It seeks to answer is there any kind ofdiscernible effect so far, and if so, if this influence consolidated. In order to reach thesequestions, it is essential to understand the role and nature of news in Russia, as well asconceptual and theoretical treatment of both social media and citizen journalism. Qualitative data were collected from a questionnaire sent to journalists, educators, and a group ofstudents. Together the result revealed that the effect of new technology has spurred adevelopment in the freedom of information. It was more problematic to identify if this wasconsolidated or not.

  • 27.
    Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    The International Crisis Group and the manufacturing and communicating of crises2014In: Third World Quarterly, ISSN 0143-6597, E-ISSN 1360-2241, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 581-597Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The International Crisis Group (ICG) has the motto 'working to prevent conflict worldwide'. As an organisation the ICG occupies a very specific niche role, which is related to crises of a political nature, specifically armed conflict. While the ICG employs a negative understanding of crisis, the academic definition of what a crisis may constitute is broader, as it can actually represent an opportunity for some actors. This article, written from a communication studies perspective, seeks to address how crises are manufactured in ICG texts. It argues that the way in which crisis events are viewed and reacted to depends on the level of information and 'knowledge' that is produced and circulating about them. The article tackles the issue of the strategic level of the ICG in terms of its means and mechanisms of attempting to project influence. It explores the different ploys and strategies used to influence policy makers, especially its communication strategy, the different values and ethics that are highlighted, and the 'causes' that are promoted.

  • 28.
    Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    The Role of ‘NGOs’ in Knowledge Management of Conflicts2017In: Государственное управление. Электронный вестник, ISSN 2070-1381, no 64, p. 362-376Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    The Role of Russian NGOs in New Public Diplomacy2018In: Journal of Political Marketing, ISSN 1537-7857, E-ISSN 1537-7865, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 137-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The manner in which public diplomacy is being practiced isconstantly evolving, new means are being developed to create politicalrelationships between states and international publics. Countriesare competing globally for the hearts and minds of internationalpublics in their quest for gaining and accumulating soft power. Thisquest is driven by the assumption that soft power gives countries thatpossess it advantages, such as a freer hand in foreign policy orattracting foreign investment. Russia is one of those countries thatis competing in the global arena, and have been developing theirtools of new public diplomacy. One of these tools is the creationand the use of NGOs, which are directed at creating an informationenvironment where Russian policy better placed to be realized.

  • 30.
    Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Vladimir Putin's Political Image: An Inside and Outside Perspective2017In: Baltic Rim Economies, ISSN 1459-9759, no 2, p. 1p. 32-32Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Simons, Gregory
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of East European Studies.
    Education in Russia: Laying the Foundations for Great Russia: Education in Russia, The Independent States and Eastern Europe2004In: Education in Russia: Laying the Foundations for Great Russia: Education in Russia, The Independent States and Eastern Europe, ISSN 1351-0371, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 17-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Simons, Gregory
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies. Swedish Defence University.
    ‘Good’ Battles and ‘Bad’ Battles: A Comparative Analysis of Western Media Coverage of the Battles of Mosul and Aleppo2017In: Tractus Aevorum, ISSN 2312-3044, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 114-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The author examines the coverage of two simultaneously occurring battles, Mosul and Aleppo, in the Western media. Although both battles are intended to be key moments in defeating terrorist organisations, there is a stark contrast in the Western media`s framing of these events. In order to analyse the vast gaps in the coverage of these battles, the lens of news management, which is a means to influence public perception and opinion, is employed to view these two distinct events in Iraq and Syria. The author concludes that news management is applied to the information flows in these events in order to shape public opinion and perception of the battles Mosul and Aleppo—one ‘good’ and the other ‘bad.’

  • 33.
    Simons, Gregory
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of East European Studies.
    Media, Identity and the Russian Orthodox Church: Media Development - Journal of the World Association for Christian Communication2004In: Media, Identity and the Russian Orthodox Church: Media Development - Journal of the World Association for Christian Communication, Vol. LI, no 2/2004, p. 5-Article in journal (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 34.
    Simons, Gregory
    The Swedish Institute of International Affairs.
    Nation Branding and Russian Foreign Policy2013Report (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Simons, Gregory
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of East European Studies.
    Religious Resurgence: The Influence of the Russian Orthodox Church as Reflected Through the Media2004Book (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 36.
    Simons, Gregory
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of East European Studies.
    Russian Orthodox Church Versus Art: The Sakharov Museum Trial2004In: Inblick, ISSN 1404-014X, no 1/2004Article in journal (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 37.
    Sumskaya, Anna
    et al.
    Ural Federal University.
    Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    концепция «моральной паники» в современной медиареальности россии и запада: опыт восприятия с позициикоммуникативно-культурной памяти2018In: Znak, ISSN 2070-0695, p. 184-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The media audience builds relationships with the outside world, focusing on content, which, in fact,is an interpretation of reality. Media reality is constructed as a result of the selection of facts, the modelingof meanings and forms of information delivery. The concept of “moral panic” is increasingly usedby the media to model the political agenda of Russia and the West. Based on the analysis of 80 mediamaterials (40 Russian and foreign), the application of the concept in the formation of an actual politicalmedia reality is explored. The results of the work testify to the active implementation at the present timeof the concept of “moral panic” both in Russia and in the West. This can be identified by the collectivememory of the peoples of the countries surveyed as a new level of dissociation in the post-Soviet period,while political influence groups use constructed fears to distract the attention of the population fromunfavorable socio-economic conditions and to make unpopular management decisions.

  • 38.
    Suslov, Mikhail
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Engström, Maria
    Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Digital Orthodoxy: Mediating Post-Secularity in Russia2015In: Digital Icons: Studies in Russian, Eurasian and Central European New Media, ISSN 2043-7633, Vol. 14, p. i-xiArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 39. Yakushik, V. M.
    et al.
    Simons, Gregory
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Вооружённый конфликт как кризис восприятия и коммуникации2017In: Контентно-потокові моделі як тактичні інструменти комунікаційно-контентної безпеки, Kyiv, Ukraine: К.: ВІКНУ , 2017, p. 237-242Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 39 of 39
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