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  • 1.
    Torbakov, Igor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    A Parting of Ways?: The Kremlin Leadership and Russia’s New-Generation Nationalist Thinkers2015In: Demokratizatsiya, ISSN 1074-6846, E-ISSN 1940-4603, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 427-457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on what appears to be a turning point in the complex relationship between the political leadership of post-Soviet Russia and the new generation of Russian nationalists, who are increasingly setting the tone in the nationalist movement. My objective is to explore how this nationalist “New Wave” critiques the Russian nationalist tradition – not least the relationship between Russian nationalism and the Russian state – and to discuss nationalists’ views on how Russian nationalism should be reinvigorated so that it can become a truly influential popular movement. I argue that the moral and political revulsion of nationalist thinkers at the Kremlin’s attempt to masquerade as a nationalist force marks a crucial watershed in contemporary Russian history – namely, a definitive parting of ways between the new-generation democratic-oriented Russian nationalists and the Kremlin leadership.

  • 2.
    Torbakov, Igor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    After Empire: Nationalist Imagination and Symbolic Politics in Russia and Eurasia in the Twentieth and Twenty First Century2018Book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Torbakov, Igor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Becoming Eurasian: Intellectual Odyssey of Georgii Vladimirovich Vernadsky2015In: Between Europe and Asia: The Origins, Theories, and Legacies of Russian Eurasianism / [ed] Mark Bassin, Sergei Glebov and Marlene Laruelle, Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2015, p. 113-136Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Torbakov, Igor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Between Russia, Ukraine, and Eurasia: George Vernadskii’s Search for Identity2013In: Empire De/Centered: New Spatial Histories of Russia and the Soviet Union / [ed] Sanna Turoma and Maxim Waldstein, Farnham: Ashgate, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Torbakov, Igor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Celebrating Red October: A Story of the Ten Anniversaries of the Russian Revolution, 1927-20172018In: Scando-Slavica, ISSN 0080-6765, E-ISSN 1600-082X, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 7-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay seeks to shed light on how the constantly evolving Soviet system shaped and reshaped the myth of Red October and how post-Soviet ruling elites treated the memory surrounding the 1917 Russian Revolution while pursuing political ends. At the center of the analysis are the politics of history and commemorative practices of the past ten decades, with the demise of communist ideology and the breakup of the Soviet Union serving as clear rupture points. Through its focus on revolutionary jubilees, the essay traces the trajectory of attitudes towards the Revolution over the past one hundred years - from treating Red October as a foundation myth for the entire Soviet era to viewing it as an inconvenient event that does not fit easily into the essentially counter-revolutionary official narrative of contemporary Russia.

  • 6.
    Torbakov, Igor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Defining the ‘True’ Nationalism: Russian Ethnic Nationalists vs. Eurasianists2017In: The Politics of Eurasianism: Identity, Popular Culture and Russia’s Foreign Policy / [ed] Mark Bassin and Gonzalo Pozo, London: Rowman & Littlefield International, 2017, p. 19-38Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Torbakov, Igor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Divisive Historical Memories: Russia and Eastern Europe2014In: Confronting Memories of World War II: European and Asian Legacies / [ed] Daniel Chirot, Gi-Wook Shin, and Daniel Sneider, Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2014, p. 234-257Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Torbakov, Igor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    History, Memory and National Identity: Understanding Politics of History and Memory Wars in Post-Soviet Lands2011In: Demokratizatsiya, ISSN 1074-6846, E-ISSN 1940-4603, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 209-232Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Torbakov, Igor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Managing Imperial Peripheries: Russia and China in Central Asia2016In: The New Great Game: China and South and Central Asia in the Era of Reforms / [ed] Tom Fingar, Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Torbakov, Igor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    'Middle Continent' or 'Island Russia': Eurasianist Legacy and Vadim Tsymburskii’s Revisionist Geopolitics2018In: Cultural and Political Imaginaries in Putin’s Russia / [ed] Niklas Bernsand and Barbara Törnquist-Plewa, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2018, p. 37-62Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Torbakov, Igor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Neo-Ottomanism versus Neo-Eurasianism?: Nationalism and Symbolic Geography in Postimperial Turkey and Russia2017In: Mediterranean Quarterly, ISSN 1047-4552, E-ISSN 1527-1935, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 125-145Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Torbakov, Igor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies. Schwed Inst Int Angelegenheiten UI, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Paradoxe Familienähnlichkeit: Russland, die Türkei und die Grenzen ihrer Allianz2018In: Osteuropa: Zeitschrift für Gegenwartsfragen des Ostens, ISSN 0030-6428, Vol. 68, no 10-12, p. 95-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At first glance, Russia and Turkey resemble twins. They have an imperial heritage, the nation building process has not yet been completed, and modernisation has occurred through state mobilisation. Their relationship with Europe is also ambivalent. The authoritarian regimes appear to be ideal alliance partners. Yet in reality, this is far from true. Their current joint appearance belies the fact that they are pursuing different interests in their shared regional environment, where they have become competitors due to the ongoing imperialist nature of their strategic culture.

  • 13.
    Torbakov, Igor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Russia and Turkish-Armenian Normalization: Competing Interests in the South Caucasus2010In: Insight Turkey, ISSN 1302-177X, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 31-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the 2008 Georgia war, Russia reasserted itself as the main power in the Caucasus. The war shattered the old status quo and Moscow sought to make good use of the shifting geopolitical landscape to enhance its strategic footprint in the region. Russia's policy in the Caucasus has been an example of a subtle balancing act: it appeared to have encouraged Turkish-Armenian reconciliation while at the same time skillfully exploiting the suspicions that this process aroused in Azerbaijan and seeking to put an additional pressure on Georgia. Now, as Turkish-Armenian normalization seems to have hit a snag, Moscow can safely distance itself from what increasingly looks like a failure. After all, having deftly played all its "partners" off against each other, Russia appears to have secured its objective: both Armenia and Azerbaijan tend to lean more on Russia, while Turkey's relations with the two Caucasus countries has deteriorated. Moreover, Ankara's ties with Washington became frayed, too, which, from Moscow's perspective, isn't bad either.

  • 14.
    Torbakov, Igor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Russia-Europe Relations in Historical Perspective: Investigating the Role of Ukraine2017In: Insight Turkey, ISSN 1302-177X, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 69-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There seems to be a consensus within both Russian and European analytic communities as to the ultimate reason behind the dramatic deterioration of Russia-EU relations over the last three years. This reason boils down to a single word: Ukraine. This essay intends to investigate a two-pronged question: 1) how the differing, quasi-imperial natures of Russia and the EU make it hard for them to find an accommodation in their shared neighborhood and 2) how the recent EU-Russia dynamics prompted Moscow's policy elite to re-conceptualize Russia as a distinct civilization, apart from Europe. While exploring these issues, the essay will maintain a special focus on Ukraine whose role in the Russia-Europe relationship has historically been and continues to be pivotal.

  • 15.
    Torbakov, Igor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    The EU, Russia, and the ‘in-between Europe’: Managing Interdependence2013In: The European Union Neighborhood: Challenges and Opportunities / [ed] Teresa Cierco, Farnham: Ashgate, 2013, p. 173-190Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Torbakov, Igor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    The Past as Present: Foreign Relations and Russia’s Politics of History2015In: After the Soviet Empire: Legacies and Pathways / [ed] Sven Eliaeson, Lyudmila Harutyunyan and Larissa Titarenko, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2015, p. 358-380Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Torbakov, Igor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    The Russian Orthodox Church and Contestations over History in Contemporary Russia2014In: Demokratizatsiya, ISSN 1074-6846, E-ISSN 1940-4603, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 145-170Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Torbakov, Igor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    The Southern Vector: Russian Strategic Interests in Central and South Asia2010In: Does South Asia Exist?: Prospects for Regional Integration / [ed] Rafiq Dossani, Daniel Sneider and Vikram Sood, Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution Press, 2010Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Torbakov, Igor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    ‘This Is a Strife of Slavs among Themselves’: Understanding Russian-Ukrainian Relations as the Conflict of Contested Identities2014In: The Maidan Uprising, Separatism and Foreign Intervention: Ukraine’s Complex Transition / [ed] Klaus Bachmann and Igor Lyubashenko, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2014, p. 183-205Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Torbakov, Igor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Ukraine and Russia: Entangled Histories, Contested Identities and a War of Narratives2016In: Revolution and War in Contemporary Ukraine: The Challenge of Change / [ed] Olga Bertelsen, Stuttgart: Ibidem-Verlag, 2016, p. 89-120Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Torbakov, Igor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Understanding Moscow’s Conduct: The Analysis of the Domestic Politics-Foreign Policy Nexus in Russia2013In: Economization Versus Power Ambitions: Rethinking Russia’s Policy towards Post-Soviet States / [ed] Stefan Meister, Baden-Baden: Nomos Verlagsgesellschaft, 2013, p. 19-33Chapter in book (Refereed)
1 - 21 of 21
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