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  • 1.
    Aberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Coagulation and inflammation science.
    Eriksson, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Coagulation and inflammation science.
    Siegbahn, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Coagulation and inflammation science.
    Tissue Factor Noncoagulant Signaling: Mechanisms and Implications for Cell Migration and Apoptosis2015In: Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis, ISSN 0094-6176, E-ISSN 1098-9064, Vol. 41, no 7, p. 691-699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tissue factor (TF) is a 47-kDa transmembrane glycoprotein and the main initiator of the blood coagulation cascade. Binding to its ligand factor VIIa (FVIIa) also initiates noncoagulant signaling with broad biological implications. In this review, we discuss how TF interacts with other cell-surface proteins, which affect biological functions such as cell migration and cell survival. A vast number of publications have demonstrated the importance of TF-induced activation of protease-activated receptors, but recently published research has indicated a more complicated picture. As it has been discovered that TF interacts with integrins and receptor tyrosine kinases, novel signaling mechanisms for the TF/FVIIa complex have been presented. The knowledge of these new aspects of TF signaling may, for instance, facilitate the development of new treatment strategies for cancer and acute coronary syndromes, two examples of diseases characterized by aberrant TF expression and signaling.

  • 2.
    Eriksson, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Coagulation and inflammation science.
    Studies on Tissue Factor with Focus on Cell Signaling and Cancer2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis have explored the functions of the protein Tissue Factor (TF), which together with its ligand coagulation factor VII/VIIa (FVII/FVIIa) forms a proteolytic complex that functions in initiation of blood coagulation and activation of cell signaling.

    In paper I, the mechanisms behind the observation that TF/FVIIa signaling protects cells from apoptosis were further investigated. Using cell culture models, we found that antiapoptotic signaling by TF/FVIIa requires signaling by the Insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGF-1R), as synthetic IGF-1R inhibitors and IGF1-R siRNA knock-down abolished the antiapoptotic effect of FVIIa. Furthermore, the IGF-1R translocated to the cell nucleus after FVIIa stimulation, implying a role in regulation of gene expression.

    Papers II and III describe the discovery that the Eph tyrosine kinase receptors EphB2 and EphA2 are proteolytically cleaved directly by TF/FVIIa. By using mass spectrometry and N-terminal Edman sequencing, the exact cleavage site was identified after a conserved arginine residue in the EphA2/EphB2 ligand binding domains, in agreement with the cleavage preferences of FVIIa. TF and EphA2/EphB2 co-localized in cancer cell lines and FVIIa potentiated ligand-dependent Eph signaling by increasing cytoskeletal remodeling and cell repulsion, demonstrating a novel proteolytical event that modulates Eph receptor signaling.

    In paper IV, expression of TF was investigated in colorectal cancer in both the stromal and tumor cell compartments by immunohistochemistry using an anti-TF-antibody developed and validated by the Human Protein Atlas project. In normal large intestine, TF was strongly expressed in the innermost pericryptal sheath cell layer lining the epithelium, in a cell population distinct from intestinal pericryptal myofibroblasts. We evaluated TF expression in two colorectal cancer materials, and found that TF was variably present in both the stromal and tumor cell compartments. TF expressed by pericryptal sheath cells was progressively lost after the adenoma-to-carcinoma transition and was a strong predictor of survival in rectal but not colon cancer patients independently of disease stage, histological tumor grade and age.

    In summary, this thesis demonstrates novel signaling mechanisms for the TF/FVIIa complex, and provides evidence of a hitherto unknown role of TF expressed by a specific population of stromal cells in colorectal cancer.

    List of papers
    1. Tissue factor/factor VIIa induces cell survival and gene transcription by transactivation of the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tissue factor/factor VIIa induces cell survival and gene transcription by transactivation of the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor
    2014 (English)In: Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 0340-6245, Vol. 111, no 4, p. 748-760Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) is known to promote survival and has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of several disease states, including cardiovascular disorders and cancer. Recently, we showed that binding of coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa) to its receptor tissue factor (TF) protects cancer cells from TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis. Here we present evidence that this biological function of TF/FVIIa is dependent on the IGF-1R. IGF-1R inhibitors AG1024 and PPP as well as siRNA-mediated downregulation of IGF-1R, abolished the TF/FVIIa-mediated protection against TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Moreover, FVIIa rapidly induced a time- and concentration-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of the IGF-1R in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and in primary human monocytes, an event that was accompanied by IGF-1R chromatin binding and gene transcription. We hereby present novel evidence of a cross-talk between the coagulation and IGF-1R signalling systems, and propose that the IGF-1R is a key player in mediating TF/FVIIa-induced cell survival.

    National Category
    Cell and Molecular Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-223990 (URN)10.1160/TH13-07-0593 (DOI)000334152900024 ()24336871 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-04-29 Created: 2014-04-29 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
    2. The Eph Tyrosine Kinase Receptors EphB2 and EphA2 Are Novel Proteolytic Substrates of Tissue Factor/Coagulation Factor VIIa
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Eph Tyrosine Kinase Receptors EphB2 and EphA2 Are Novel Proteolytic Substrates of Tissue Factor/Coagulation Factor VIIa
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 289, no 47Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Tissue factor (TF) binds the serine protease factor VIIa (FVIIa) to form a proteolytically active complex that can trigger coagulation or activate cell signaling. Here we addressed the involvement of tyrosine kinase receptors (RTKs) in TF/FVIIa signaling by antibody array analysis and subsequently found that EphB2 and EphA2 of the Eph RTK family were cleaved in their ectodomains by TF/FVIIa. We used N-terminal Edman sequencing and LC-MS/MS analysis to characterize the cleaved Eph isoforms and identified a key arginine residue at the cleavage site, in agreement with the tryptic serine protease activity of FVIIa. Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) signaling and downstream coagulation activity was non-essential in this context, in further support of a direct cleavage by TF/FVIIa. EphB2 was cleaved by FVIIa concentrations in the subnanomolar range in a number of TF expressing cell types, indicating that the active cellular pool of TF was involved. FVIIa caused potentiation of cell repulsion by the EphB2 ligand ephrin-B1, demonstrating a novel proteolytical event to control Eph-mediated cell segregation. These results define Eph RTKs as novel proteolytical targets of TF/FVIIa and provide new insights into how TF/FVIIa regulates cellular functions independently of PAR2.

    National Category
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-240089 (URN)10.1074/jbc.M114.599332 (DOI)000345335000001 ()25281742 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2015-01-05 Created: 2015-01-05 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    3. Tissue Factor/coagulation factor VIIa potentiates ligand-dependent EphA2 signaling in cancer cells
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tissue Factor/coagulation factor VIIa potentiates ligand-dependent EphA2 signaling in cancer cells
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-245804 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-03-01 Created: 2015-03-01 Last updated: 2015-04-17
    4. Tissue Factor in pericryptal sheath cells identifies a specific intestinal cell population and constitutes a candidate prognostic biomarker for rectal cancer
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tissue Factor in pericryptal sheath cells identifies a specific intestinal cell population and constitutes a candidate prognostic biomarker for rectal cancer
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-245803 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-03-01 Created: 2015-03-01 Last updated: 2015-04-17
  • 3.
    Eriksson, Oskar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Coagulation and inflammation science.
    Asplund, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hegde, Geeta
    Human Prot Atlas Project, Lab Surgpath, Mumbai Site, Bombay, Maharashtra, India..
    Edqvist, Per-Henrik D
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Navani, Sanjay
    Human Prot Atlas Project, Lab Surgpath, Mumbai Site, Bombay, Maharashtra, India..
    Ponten, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Siegbahn, A
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    A stromal cell population in the large intestine identified by tissue factor expression that is lost during colorectal cancer progression2016In: Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 0340-6245, Vol. 116, no 6, p. 1050-1059Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, and the composition of the tumour stroma is a strong predictor of survival in this cancer type. Tissue factor (TF) functions as the trigger of haemostasis together with its ligand coagulation factor VII/ VIIa, and TF expression has been found in tumour cells of colorectal tumours. However, TF expression in the CRC tumour stroma or its relationship to patient outcome has not yet been studied. To address this question we developed and validated a specific anti-TF antibody using standardised methods within the Human Protein Atlas project. We used this antibody to investigate TF expression in normal colorectal tissue and CRC using immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry in two patient cohorts. TF was strongly expressed in a cell population immediately adjacent to the colorectal epithelium. These TF-positive cells were ACTA2-negative but weakly vimentin-positive, defining a specific population of pericryptal sheath cells. In colorectal tumours, TF-positive sheath cells were progressively lost after the adenoma-to-carcinoma transition, demonstrating downregulation of this source of TF in CRC. Furthermore, loss of sheath cell TF was significantly associated with poor overall and disease-specific survival in rectal but not colon cancers. In conclusion, we demonstrate that TF is a marker of a specific cell population in the large intestine, which is lost during CRC progression. Our results highlight the role of the tumour stroma in this cancer type and suggest TF to be a potential prognostic biomarker in rectal cancers through the identification of pericryptal sheath cells.

  • 4.
    Eriksson, Oskar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Coagulation and inflammation science. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Antaros Med AB, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bossart, M.
    Sanofi Aventis, Frankfurt, Germany..
    Haack, T.
    Sanofi Aventis, Frankfurt, Germany..
    Laitinen, I.
    Sanofi Aventis, Frankfurt, Germany..
    Larsen, P.
    Sanofi Aventis, Frankfurt, Germany..
    Plettenburg, O.
    Helmholtz Zentrum, Munich, Germany..
    Johansson, L.
    Antaros Med AB, Molndal, Sweden..
    Pierrou, S.
    Antaros Med AB, Molndal, Sweden..
    Wagner, M.
    Sanofi Aventis, Frankfurt, Germany..
    Velikyan, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preparative Medicinal Chemistry. Uppsala PET Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden..
    First-in-class PET tracer for the glucagon receptor2017In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 60, p. S400-S400Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Eriksson, Oskar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Coagulation and inflammation science.
    Håkansson, Lena Douhan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Karawajczyk, Malgorzata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Garwicz, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Neutrophil CD64 expression - comparison of two different flow cytometry protocols on EPICs MCL and the Leuko64 (TM) assay on a Celldyn Sapphire haematology analyser2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 75, no 5, p. 428-433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To evaluate the Trillium Diagnostics Leuko64 (TM) assay on Abbott Celldyn Sapphire haematology analyser compared to two flow cytometry protocols on Beckman Coulter EPICS MCL flow cytometer. Materials and methods. CD64 expression on neutrophils was determined by two flow cytometry protocols and by a commercial assay on an automatic haematology analyser. The inclusion of study subjects was based on elevated procalcitonin (PCT) values, identifying patients where a systemic infection was suspected. Healthy blood donors were used as a reference group. Results. Statistically significant correlations between the Trillium Diagnostics Leuko64 (TM) assay and the flow cytometry methods were found when measuring neutrophil CD64 expression. Conclusions. The good correlation between a reference method and an automated haematology analyser method for CD64 expression on neutrophils supports introduction of the latter assay for routine use as an independent biomarker of bacterial infection and inflammation.

  • 6.
    Eriksson, Oskar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Mohlin, Camilla
    Linnaeus Univ, Linnaeus Ctr Biomat Chem, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    N. Ekdahl, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Linnaeus Univ, Linnaeus Ctr Biomat Chem, Kalmar, Sweden.
    The Human Platelet as an Innate Immune Cell: Interactions Between Activated Platelets and the Complement System2019In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 10, article id 1590Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Platelets play an essential role in maintaining homeostasis in the circulatory system after an injury by forming a platelet thrombus, but they also occupy a central node in the intravascular innate immune system. This concept is supported by their extensive interactions with immune cells and the cascade systems of the blood. In this review we discuss the close relationship between platelets and the complement system and the role of these interactions during thromboinflammation. Platelets are protected from complement-mediated damage by soluble and membrane-expressed complement regulators, but they bind several complement components on their surfaces and trigger complement activation in the fluid phase. Furthermore, localized complement activation may enhance the procoagulant responses of platelets through the generation of procoagulant microparticles by insertion of sublytic amounts of C5b9 into the platelet membrane. We also highlight the role of post-translational protein modifications in regulating the complement system and the critical role of platelets in driving these reactions. In particular, modification of disulfide bonds by thiol isomerases and protein phosphorylation by extracellular kinases have emerged as important mechanisms to fine-tune complement activity in the platelet microenvironment. Lastly, we describe disorders with perturbed complement activation where part of the clinical presentation includes uncontrolled platelet activation that results in thrombocytopenia, and illustrate how complement-targeting drugs are alleviating the prothrombotic phenotype in these patients. Based on these clinical observations, we discuss the role of limited complement activation in enhancing platelet activation and consider how these drugs may provide opportunities for further dissecting the complex interactions between complement and platelets.

  • 7.
    Eriksson, Oskar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Coagulation and inflammation science.
    Ramström, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Hörnaeus, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Mokhtari, Dariush
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Coagulation and inflammation science.
    Siegbahn, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Coagulation and inflammation science.
    The Eph Tyrosine Kinase Receptors EphB2 and EphA2 Are Novel Proteolytic Substrates of Tissue Factor/Coagulation Factor VIIa2014In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 289, no 47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tissue factor (TF) binds the serine protease factor VIIa (FVIIa) to form a proteolytically active complex that can trigger coagulation or activate cell signaling. Here we addressed the involvement of tyrosine kinase receptors (RTKs) in TF/FVIIa signaling by antibody array analysis and subsequently found that EphB2 and EphA2 of the Eph RTK family were cleaved in their ectodomains by TF/FVIIa. We used N-terminal Edman sequencing and LC-MS/MS analysis to characterize the cleaved Eph isoforms and identified a key arginine residue at the cleavage site, in agreement with the tryptic serine protease activity of FVIIa. Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) signaling and downstream coagulation activity was non-essential in this context, in further support of a direct cleavage by TF/FVIIa. EphB2 was cleaved by FVIIa concentrations in the subnanomolar range in a number of TF expressing cell types, indicating that the active cellular pool of TF was involved. FVIIa caused potentiation of cell repulsion by the EphB2 ligand ephrin-B1, demonstrating a novel proteolytical event to control Eph-mediated cell segregation. These results define Eph RTKs as novel proteolytical targets of TF/FVIIa and provide new insights into how TF/FVIIa regulates cellular functions independently of PAR2.

  • 8.
    Eriksson, Oskar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Coagulation and inflammation science.
    Thulin, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Coagulation and inflammation science.
    Asplund, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Hedge, G.
    Navani, S.
    Siegbahn, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Coagulation and inflammation science.
    Cross-talk between tissue factor and EPHA2 in cancer: potentiation of ligand-dependent EPHA2-signaling in vitro and co-expression in human colorectal cancer specimens2015In: Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 1538-7933, E-ISSN 1538-7836, Vol. 13, no S2, p. 111-111, article id OR046Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Eriksson, Oskar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Coagulation and inflammation science.
    Thulin, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Coagulation and inflammation science.
    Asplund, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Hegde, Geeta
    Human Prot Atlas Project, Lab Surgpath, Mumbai Site, Bombay, Maharashtra, India..
    Navani, Sanjay
    Human Prot Atlas Project, Lab Surgpath, Mumbai Site, Bombay, Maharashtra, India..
    Siegbahn, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Coagulation and inflammation science.
    Cross-talk between the Tissue Factor/coagulation factor VIIa complex and the tyrosine kinase receptor EphA2 in cancer2016In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 16, article id 341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Tissue Factor (TF) forms a proteolytically active complex together with coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa) and functions as the trigger of blood coagulation or alternatively activates cell signaling. We recently described that EphA2 of the Eph tyrosine kinase receptor family is cleaved directly by the TF/FVIIa complex. The aim of the present study was to further characterize the cross-talk between TF/FVIIa and EphA2 using in vitro model systems and human cancer specimens. Methods: Cleavage and phosphorylation of EphA2 was studied by Western blot. Subcellular localization of TF and EphA2 was investigated by a proximity ligation assay and confocal microscopy. Phalloidin staining of the actin cytoskeleton was used to study cell rounding and retraction fiber formation. Expression of TF and EphA2 in human colorectal cancer specimens was examined by immunohistochemistry. Results: TF and EphA2 co-localized constitutively in MDA-MB-231 cells, and addition of FVIIa resulted in cleavage of EphA2 by a PAR2-independent mechanism. Overexpression of TF in U251 glioblastoma cells lead to co-localization with EphA2 at the leading edge and FVIIa-dependent cleavage of EphA2. FVIIa potentiated ephrin-A1-induced cell rounding and retraction fiber formation in MDA-MB-231 cells through a RhoA/ROCK-dependent pathway that did not require PAR2-activation. TF and EphA2 were expressed in colorectal cancer specimens, and were significantly correlated. Conclusions: These results suggest that TF/FVIIa-EphA2 cross-talk might potentiate ligand-dependent EphA2 signaling in human cancers, and provide initial evidence that it is possible for this interaction to occur in vivo.

  • 10.
    Åberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Coagulation and inflammation science.
    Eriksson, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Coagulation and inflammation science.
    Mokhtari, Dariush
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Coagulation and inflammation science.
    Siegbahn, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Coagulation and inflammation science.
    The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor mediates tissue factor/FVIIa-induced cell survival2013In: Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 1538-7933, E-ISSN 1538-7836, Vol. 11, no S2, p. 171-172Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Åberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Coagulation and inflammation science. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Eriksson, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Coagulation and inflammation science. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mokhtari, Dariush
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Coagulation and inflammation science. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Siegbahn, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Coagulation and inflammation science. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tissue factor/factor VIIa induces cell survival and gene transcription by transactivation of the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor2014In: Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 0340-6245, Vol. 111, no 4, p. 748-760Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) is known to promote survival and has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of several disease states, including cardiovascular disorders and cancer. Recently, we showed that binding of coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa) to its receptor tissue factor (TF) protects cancer cells from TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis. Here we present evidence that this biological function of TF/FVIIa is dependent on the IGF-1R. IGF-1R inhibitors AG1024 and PPP as well as siRNA-mediated downregulation of IGF-1R, abolished the TF/FVIIa-mediated protection against TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Moreover, FVIIa rapidly induced a time- and concentration-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of the IGF-1R in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and in primary human monocytes, an event that was accompanied by IGF-1R chromatin binding and gene transcription. We hereby present novel evidence of a cross-talk between the coagulation and IGF-1R signalling systems, and propose that the IGF-1R is a key player in mediating TF/FVIIa-induced cell survival.

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