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  • 1.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Clinical Consequences of Axonal Injury in Traumatic Brain Injury2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI), mainly caused by road-traffic accidents and falls, is a leading cause of mortality. Survivors often display debilitating motor, sensory and cognitive symptoms, leading to reduced quality of life and a profound economic burden to society. Additionally, TBI is a risk factor for future neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Commonly, TBI is categorized into focal and diffuse injuries, and based on symptom severity into mild, moderate and severe TBI. Diffuse axonal injury (DAI), biomechanically caused by rotational acceleration-deceleration forces at impact, is characterized by widespread axonal injury in superficial and deep white substance. DAI comprises a clinical challenge due to its variable course and unreliable prognostic methods. Furthermore, axonal injury may convey the link to neurodegeneration since molecules associated with neurodegenerative events aggregate in injured axons.

    The aim of this thesis was to study clinical consequences of axonal injury, its detection and pathological features, and potential link to neurodegeneration in severe TBI patients treated at the neurointensive care unit at Uppsala University Hospital. In paper I and IV DAI patients were studied for the relation of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) and poor outcome to axonal injury on magnetic resonance imaging. In paper II, soluble amyloid-beta aggregates (oligomers and protofibrils), characteristic of AD pathology, were investigated in surgically resected brain tissue from severe TBI patients, using highly-selective Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assays. In paper III, brain tissue biopsy samples from TBI patients with either focal injury or DAI were examined for differential proteome profiles using mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    The results provide evidence that axonal injury, located in the central brain stem, in substantia nigra and the mesencephalic tegmentum, is particularly related to poor outcome and increased ICP during neurointensive care of DAI patients. A novel classification system for prognostication after DAI is proposed. Furthermore, the thesis shows that severe TBI induces rapid accumulation of neurotoxic soluble amyloid-beta oligomers and protofibrils. In addition, DAI initiates unique proteome profiles different from that of focal TBI in structurally normal-appearing brain. These findings have implication for the clinical management of DAI patients, and provide new insight in the neuropathological consequences of axonal injury.

    List of papers
    1. Extended anatomical grading in diffuse axonal injury using MRI: Hemorrhagic lesions in the substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum indicate poor long-term outcome
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Extended anatomical grading in diffuse axonal injury using MRI: Hemorrhagic lesions in the substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum indicate poor long-term outcome
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 5, no 34, p. 341-352Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical outcome after traumatic diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is difficult to predict. In this study, three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences were used to quantify the anatomical distribution of lesions, to grade DAI according to the Adams grading system, and to evaluate the value of lesion localization in combination with clinical prognostic factors to improve outcome prediction. Thirty patients (mean 31.2 years ±14.3 standard deviation) with severe DAI (Glasgow Motor Score [GMS] <6) examined with MRI within 1 week post-injury were included. Diffusion-weighted (DW), T2*-weighted gradient echo and susceptibility-weighted (SWI) sequences were used. Extended Glasgow outcome score was assessed after 6 months. Number of DW lesions in the thalamus, basal ganglia, and internal capsule and number of SWI lesions in the mesencephalon correlated significantly with outcome in univariate analysis. Age, GMS at admission, GMS at discharge, and low proportion of good monitoring time with cerebral perfusion pressure <60 mm Hg correlated significantly with outcome in univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis revealed an independent relation with poor outcome for age (p = 0.005) and lesions in the mesencephalic region corresponding to substantia nigra and tegmentum on SWI (p  = 0.008). We conclude that higher age and lesions in substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum indicate poor long-term outcome in DAI. We propose an extended MRI classification system based on four stages (stage I—hemispheric lesions, stage II—corpus callosum lesions, stage III—brainstem lesions, and stage IV—substantia nigra or mesencephalic tegmentum lesions); all are subdivided by age (≥/<30 years).

    Keywords
    adult brain injury, axonal injury, head trauma, MRI, susceptibility weighted imaging
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine Neurology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-309038 (URN)10.1089/neu.2016.4426 (DOI)000391754800009 ()27356857 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2016-12-01 Created: 2016-12-01 Last updated: 2018-07-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Rapid amyloid-β oligomer and protofibril accumulation in traumatic brain injury
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rapid amyloid-β oligomer and protofibril accumulation in traumatic brain injury
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: Brain Pathology, ISSN 1015-6305, E-ISSN 1750-3639, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 451-462Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) is central to Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis and associated with progressive neurodegeneration in traumatic brain injury (TBI). We analyzed predisposing factors for Aβ deposition including monomeric Aβ40, Aβ42 and Aβ oligomers/protofibrils, Aβ species with pronounced neurotoxic properties, following human TBI. Highly selective ELISAs were used to analyze N-terminally intact and truncated Aβ40 and Aβ42, as well as Aβ oligomers/protofibrils, in human brain tissue, surgically resected from severe TBI patients (n = 12; mean age 49.5 ± 19 years) due to life-threatening brain swelling/hemorrhage within one week post-injury. The TBI tissues were compared to post-mortem AD brains (n = 5), to post-mortem tissue of neurologically intact (NI) subjects (n = 4) and to cortical biopsies obtained at surgery for idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus patients (iNPH; n = 4). The levels of Aβ40 and Aβ42 were not elevated by TBI. The levels of Aβ oligomers/protofibrils in TBI were similar to those in the significantly older AD patients and increased compared to NI and iNPH controls (P < 0.05). Moreover, TBI patients carrying the AD risk genotype Apolipoprotein E epsilon3/4 (APOE ε3/4; n = 4) had increased levels of Aβ oligomers/protofibrils (P < 0.05) and of both N-terminally intact and truncated Aβ42 (P < 0.05) compared to APOE ε3/4-negative TBI patients (n = 8). Neuropathological analysis showed insoluble Aβ aggregates (commonly referred to as Aβ plaques) in three TBI patients, all of whom were APOE ε3/4 carriers. We conclude that soluble intermediary Aβ aggregates form rapidly after TBI, especially among APOE ε3/4 carriers. Further research is needed to determine whether these aggregates aggravate the clinical short- and long-term outcome in TBI.

    Keywords
    Alzheimer's disease, amyloid β oligomers, amyloid-β, traumatic brain injury
    National Category
    Neurosciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-341911 (URN)10.1111/bpa.12532 (DOI)000439749700001 ()28557010 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    The Swedish Brain FoundationSwedish Research CouncilSwedish Institute
    Note

    De två första författarna delar förstaförfattarskapet.

    Available from: 2018-02-15 Created: 2018-02-15 Last updated: 2019-07-03Bibliographically approved
    3. Proteomic differences between focal and diffuse traumatic brain injury in human brain tissue
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Proteomic differences between focal and diffuse traumatic brain injury in human brain tissue
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 6807Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The early molecular response to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) was evaluated using biopsies of structurally normal-appearing cortex, obtained at location for intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring, from 16 severe TBI patients. Mass spectrometry (MS; label free and stable isotope dimethyl labeling) quantitation proteomics showed a strikingly different molecular pattern in TBI in comparison to cortical biopsies from 11 idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus patients. Diffuse TBI showed increased expression of peptides related to neurodegeneration (Tau and Fascin, p < 0.05), reduced expression related to antioxidant defense (Glutathione S-transferase Mu 3, Peroxiredoxin-6, Thioredoxin-dependent peroxide reductase; p < 0.05) and increased expression of potential biomarkers (e.g. Neurogranin, Fatty acid-binding protein, heart p < 0.05) compared to focal TBI. Proteomics of human brain biopsies displayed considerable molecular heterogeneity among the different TBI subtypes with consequences for the pathophysiology and development of targeted treatments for TBI.

    National Category
    Neurosciences Neurology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-341912 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-25060-0 (DOI)000431113100005 ()29717219 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    The Swedish Brain FoundationVINNOVASwedish Research CouncilLars Hierta Memorial FoundationStiftelsen Gamla Tjänarinnor
    Available from: 2018-02-15 Created: 2018-02-15 Last updated: 2018-07-13Bibliographically approved
    4. Intracranial pressure elevations in diffuse axonal injury are associated with non-hemorrhagic MR lesions in central mesencephalic structures
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intracranial pressure elevations in diffuse axonal injury are associated with non-hemorrhagic MR lesions in central mesencephalic structures
    Show others...
    (English)In: Article in journal (Other academic) Submitted
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Increased intracranial pressure (ICP) in severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients with diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is not well defined. This study investigated the occurrence of increased ICP and whether clinical factors and lesion localization on MRI were associated with increased ICP in DAI patients.

    Methods: Fifty-two severe TBI patients (median 24, range 9-61 years), with ICP-monitoring and DAI on MRI, using T2*-weighted gradient echo, susceptibility-weighted and diffusion-weighted (DW) sequences, were enrolled. Proportion of good monitoring time (GMT) with ICP>20 mmHg during the first 120 hours post-injury was calculated and associations with clinical and MRI-related factors were evaluated using linear regression. 

    Results: All patients had episodes of ICP>20 mmHg. The mean proportion of GMT with ICP>20 mmHg was 5% and 27% of the patients (14/52) had more than 5% of GMT with ICP>20 mmHg. Glasgow Coma Scale motor score at admission (P=0.04) and lesions on DW images in the substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum (SN-T, P=0.001) were associated with the proportion of GMT with ICP>20 mmHg. In multivariate linear regression, lesions on DW images in SN-T (8% of GMT with ICP>20 mmHg, 95% CI 3–13%, P=0.004) and young age (-0.2% of GMT with ICP>20 mmHg, 95% CI -0.07–-0.3%, P=0.0008) were associated with increased ICP.   

    Conclusions: Increased ICP occurs in ~1/3 of severe TBI patients with DAI. Age and lesions on DW images in the central mesencephalon (SN-T) associate with elevated ICP. These findings suggest that MR lesion localization may aid prediction of increased ICP in DAI patients.

    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-341913 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-02-15 Created: 2018-02-15 Last updated: 2018-07-13
  • 2.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lytsy, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Medicine, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Surgical site infections in standard neurosurgery procedures-a study of incidence, impact and potential risk factors2014In: British Journal of Neurosurgery, ISSN 0268-8697, E-ISSN 1360-046X, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 270-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. Surgical site infections (SSIs) may be devastating for the patient and they carry high economic costs. Studies of SSI after neurosurgery report an incidence of 1 - 11%. However, patient material, follow-up time and definition of SSI have varied. In the present study we prospectively recorded the prevalence of SSI 3 months after standard intracranial neurosurgical procedures. The incidence, impact and risk factors of SSI were analysed. Methods. We included patients admitted during 2010 to our unit for postoperative care after standard neurosurgical procedures. SSI was defined as evident with positive cultures from surgical samples or CSF, and/or purulent discharge during reoperation. Follow-up was done after 3 and 12 months and statistics was obtained after 3 months. The predictive values on the outcome of demographic and clinical factors describing the surgical procedure were evaluated using linear regression. Results. A total of 448 patients were included in the study and underwent a total of 466 procedures. Within 3 and 12 months, 33 and 88 patients, respectively, had died. Of the surviving patients, 20 (4.3% of procedures) developed infections within 3 months and another 3 (4.9% of procedures) within 12 months. Risk factors for SSI were meningioma, longer operation time, craniotomy, dural substitute, and staples in wound closure. Patients with SSI had significantly longer hospital stay. Multivariate analysis showed that factors found significant in univariate analysis frequently occur together. Discussion. We studied the prevalence of SSI after 3 and 12 months in a prospective 1-year material with standard neurosurgical procedures and found it to be 4.3% and 4.9%, respectively. The analysis of the results showed that a combination of parameters indicating a longer and more complicated procedure predicted the development of SSI. Our conclusion is that the prevention of SSI has to be done at many levels, especially with patients undergoing long surgical procedures.

  • 3.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lannsjö, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Howells, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Extended anatomical grading in diffuse axonal injury using MRI: Hemorrhagic lesions in the substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum indicate poor long-term outcome2017In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 5, no 34, p. 341-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical outcome after traumatic diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is difficult to predict. In this study, three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences were used to quantify the anatomical distribution of lesions, to grade DAI according to the Adams grading system, and to evaluate the value of lesion localization in combination with clinical prognostic factors to improve outcome prediction. Thirty patients (mean 31.2 years ±14.3 standard deviation) with severe DAI (Glasgow Motor Score [GMS] <6) examined with MRI within 1 week post-injury were included. Diffusion-weighted (DW), T2*-weighted gradient echo and susceptibility-weighted (SWI) sequences were used. Extended Glasgow outcome score was assessed after 6 months. Number of DW lesions in the thalamus, basal ganglia, and internal capsule and number of SWI lesions in the mesencephalon correlated significantly with outcome in univariate analysis. Age, GMS at admission, GMS at discharge, and low proportion of good monitoring time with cerebral perfusion pressure <60 mm Hg correlated significantly with outcome in univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis revealed an independent relation with poor outcome for age (p = 0.005) and lesions in the mesencephalic region corresponding to substantia nigra and tegmentum on SWI (p  = 0.008). We conclude that higher age and lesions in substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum indicate poor long-term outcome in DAI. We propose an extended MRI classification system based on four stages (stage I—hemispheric lesions, stage II—corpus callosum lesions, stage III—brainstem lesions, and stage IV—substantia nigra or mesencephalic tegmentum lesions); all are subdivided by age (≥/<30 years).

  • 4.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Enblad: Neurosurgery.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Enblad: Neurosurgery.
    Lewén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Enblad: Neurosurgery.
    Howells, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Enblad: Neurosurgery.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Enblad: Neurosurgery.
    Intracranial pressure elevations in diffuse axonal injury: association with nonhemorrhagic MR lesions in central mesencephalic structures2019In: Journal of Neurosurgery, ISSN 0022-3085, E-ISSN 1933-0693, Vol. 131, no 2, p. 604-611Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Increased intracranial pressure (ICP) in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) with diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is not well defined. This study investigated the occurrence of increased ICP and whether clinical factors and lesion localization on MRI were associated with increased ICP in patients with DAI.

    Methods: Fifty-two patients with severe TBI (median age 24 years, range 9–61 years), who had undergone ICP monitoring and had DAI on MRI, as determined using T2*-weighted gradient echo, susceptibility-weighted imaging, and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) sequences, were enrolled. The proportion of good monitoring time (GMT) with ICP > 20 mm Hg during the first 120 hours postinjury was calculated and associations with clinical and MRI-related factors were evaluated using linear regression.

    Results: All patients had episodes of ICP > 20 mm Hg. The mean proportion of GMT with ICP > 20 mm Hg was 5%, and 27% of the patients (14/52) spent more than 5% of GMT with ICP > 20 mm Hg. The Glasgow Coma Scale motor score at admission (p = 0.04) and lesions on DWI sequences in the substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum (SN-T, p = 0.001) were associated with the proportion of GMT with ICP > 20 mm Hg. In multivariable linear regression, lesions on DWI sequences in SN-T (8% of GMT with ICP > 20 mm Hg, 95% CI 3%–13%, p = 0.004) and young age (−0.2% of GMT with ICP > 20 mm Hg, 95% CI −0.07% to −0.3%, p = 0.002) were associated with increased ICP.

    Conclusions: Increased ICP occurs in approximately one-third of patients with severe TBI who have DAI. Age and lesions on DWI sequences in the central mesencephalon (i.e., SN-T) are associated with elevated ICP. These findings suggest that MR lesion localization may aid prediction of increased ICP in patients with DAI.

    Abbreviations: ADC = apparent diffusion coefficient; CPP = cerebral perfusion pressure; DAI = diffuse axonal injury; DWI = diffusion-weighted imaging; EVD = external ventricular drain; GCS = Glasgow Coma Scale; GMT = good monitoring time; GOSE = Glasgow Outcome Scale–Extended; ICC = intraclass correlation coefficient; ICP = intracranial pressure; MAP = mean arterial blood pressure; NICU = neurointensive care unit; SN-T = substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum; SWI = susceptibility-weighted imaging; TBI = traumatic brain injury; T2*GRE = T2*-weighted gradient echo.

  • 5.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lewén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Howells, Timothy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Intracranial pressure elevations in diffuse axonal injury are associated with non-hemorrhagic MR lesions in central mesencephalic structuresIn: Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Increased intracranial pressure (ICP) in severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients with diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is not well defined. This study investigated the occurrence of increased ICP and whether clinical factors and lesion localization on MRI were associated with increased ICP in DAI patients.

    Methods: Fifty-two severe TBI patients (median 24, range 9-61 years), with ICP-monitoring and DAI on MRI, using T2*-weighted gradient echo, susceptibility-weighted and diffusion-weighted (DW) sequences, were enrolled. Proportion of good monitoring time (GMT) with ICP>20 mmHg during the first 120 hours post-injury was calculated and associations with clinical and MRI-related factors were evaluated using linear regression. 

    Results: All patients had episodes of ICP>20 mmHg. The mean proportion of GMT with ICP>20 mmHg was 5% and 27% of the patients (14/52) had more than 5% of GMT with ICP>20 mmHg. Glasgow Coma Scale motor score at admission (P=0.04) and lesions on DW images in the substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum (SN-T, P=0.001) were associated with the proportion of GMT with ICP>20 mmHg. In multivariate linear regression, lesions on DW images in SN-T (8% of GMT with ICP>20 mmHg, 95% CI 3–13%, P=0.004) and young age (-0.2% of GMT with ICP>20 mmHg, 95% CI -0.07–-0.3%, P=0.0008) were associated with increased ICP.   

    Conclusions: Increased ICP occurs in ~1/3 of severe TBI patients with DAI. Age and lesions on DW images in the central mesencephalon (SN-T) associate with elevated ICP. These findings suggest that MR lesion localization may aid prediction of increased ICP in DAI patients.

  • 6.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Rollman Waara, Erik
    BioArctic Neurosci AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Möller, Christer
    BioArctic Neurosci AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Söderberg, Linda
    BioArctic Neurosci AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Basun, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics. BioArctic Neuroscience AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Hillered, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lannfelt, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics. BioArctic Neuroscience AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ingelsson, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Rapid amyloid-β oligomer and protofibril accumulation in traumatic brain injury2018In: Brain Pathology, ISSN 1015-6305, E-ISSN 1750-3639, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 451-462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) is central to Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis and associated with progressive neurodegeneration in traumatic brain injury (TBI). We analyzed predisposing factors for Aβ deposition including monomeric Aβ40, Aβ42 and Aβ oligomers/protofibrils, Aβ species with pronounced neurotoxic properties, following human TBI. Highly selective ELISAs were used to analyze N-terminally intact and truncated Aβ40 and Aβ42, as well as Aβ oligomers/protofibrils, in human brain tissue, surgically resected from severe TBI patients (n = 12; mean age 49.5 ± 19 years) due to life-threatening brain swelling/hemorrhage within one week post-injury. The TBI tissues were compared to post-mortem AD brains (n = 5), to post-mortem tissue of neurologically intact (NI) subjects (n = 4) and to cortical biopsies obtained at surgery for idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus patients (iNPH; n = 4). The levels of Aβ40 and Aβ42 were not elevated by TBI. The levels of Aβ oligomers/protofibrils in TBI were similar to those in the significantly older AD patients and increased compared to NI and iNPH controls (P < 0.05). Moreover, TBI patients carrying the AD risk genotype Apolipoprotein E epsilon3/4 (APOE ε3/4; n = 4) had increased levels of Aβ oligomers/protofibrils (P < 0.05) and of both N-terminally intact and truncated Aβ42 (P < 0.05) compared to APOE ε3/4-negative TBI patients (n = 8). Neuropathological analysis showed insoluble Aβ aggregates (commonly referred to as Aβ plaques) in three TBI patients, all of whom were APOE ε3/4 carriers. We conclude that soluble intermediary Aβ aggregates form rapidly after TBI, especially among APOE ε3/4 carriers. Further research is needed to determine whether these aggregates aggravate the clinical short- and long-term outcome in TBI.

  • 7.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Shevchenko, Ganna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Mi, Jia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Musunuri, Sravani
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Proteomic differences between focal and diffuse traumatic brain injury in human brain tissue2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 6807Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The early molecular response to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) was evaluated using biopsies of structurally normal-appearing cortex, obtained at location for intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring, from 16 severe TBI patients. Mass spectrometry (MS; label free and stable isotope dimethyl labeling) quantitation proteomics showed a strikingly different molecular pattern in TBI in comparison to cortical biopsies from 11 idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus patients. Diffuse TBI showed increased expression of peptides related to neurodegeneration (Tau and Fascin, p < 0.05), reduced expression related to antioxidant defense (Glutathione S-transferase Mu 3, Peroxiredoxin-6, Thioredoxin-dependent peroxide reductase; p < 0.05) and increased expression of potential biomarkers (e.g. Neurogranin, Fatty acid-binding protein, heart p < 0.05) compared to focal TBI. Proteomics of human brain biopsies displayed considerable molecular heterogeneity among the different TBI subtypes with consequences for the pathophysiology and development of targeted treatments for TBI.

  • 8.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Shevchenko, Ganna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Mi, Jia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Musunuri, Sravani
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Proteomic Differences Between Focal And Diffuse Traumatic Brain Injury In Human Brain Tissue2018In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 35, no 16, p. A238-A239Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Virhammar, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Sehlin, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Cesarini, Kristina G
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Brain tissue Aβ42 levels are linked to shunt response in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus2018In: Journal of Neurosurgery, ISSN 0022-3085, E-ISSN 1933-0693, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE The authors conducted a study to test if the cortical brain tissue levels of soluble amyloid beta (Aβ) reflect the propensity of cortical Aβ aggregate formation and may be an additional factor predicting surgical outcome following idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) treatment. METHODS Highly selective ELISAs (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays) were used to quantify soluble Aβ40, Aβ42, and neurotoxic Aβ oligomers/protofibrils, associated with Aβ aggregation, in cortical biopsy samples obtained in patients with iNPH (n = 20), sampled during ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt surgery. Patients underwent pre- and postoperative (3-month) clinical assessment with a modified iNPH scale. The preoperative CSF biomarkers and the levels of soluble and insoluble Aβ species in cortical biopsy samples were analyzed for their association with a favorable outcome following the VP shunt procedure, defined as a ≥ 5-point increase in the iNPH scale. RESULTS The brain tissue levels of Aβ42 were negatively correlated with CSF Aβ42 (Spearman's r = -0.53, p < 0.05). The Aβ40, Aβ42, and Aβ oligomer/protofibril levels in cortical biopsy samples were higher in patients with insoluble cortical Aβ aggregates (p < 0.05). The preoperative CSF Aβ42 levels were similar in patients responding (n = 11) and not responding (n = 9) to VP shunt treatment at 3 months postsurgery. In contrast, the presence of cortical Aβ aggregates and high brain tissue Aβ42 levels were associated with a poor outcome following VP shunt treatment (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS Brain tissue measurements of soluble Aβ species are feasible. Since high Aβ42 levels in cortical biopsy samples obtained in patients with iNPH indicated a poor surgical outcome, tissue levels of Aβ species may be associated with the clinical response to shunt treatment.

  • 10.
    Tsitsopoulos, Parmenion P.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery. Aristotle Univ Thessaloniki, Hippokratio Gen Hosp, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery. Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Neurosurg, Lund, Sweden..
    Current Opportunities for Clinical Monitoring of Axonal Pathology in Traumatic Brain injury2017In: Frontiers in Neurology, ISSN 1664-2295, E-ISSN 1664-2295, Vol. 8, article id 599Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a multidimensional and highly complex disease commonly resulting in widespread injury to axons, due to rapid inertial acceleration/deceleration forces transmitted to the brain during impact. Axonal injury leads to brain network dysfunction, significantly contributing to cognitive and functional impairments frequently observed in TBI survivors. Diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is a clinical entity suggested by impaired level of consciousness and coma on clinical examination and characterized by widespread injury to the hemispheric white matter tracts, the corpus callosum and the brain stem. The clinical course of DAI is commonly unpredictable and it remains a challenging entity with limited therapeutic options, to date. Although axonal integrity may be disrupted at impact, the majority of axonal pathology evolves over time, resulting from delayed activation of complex intracellular biochemical cascades. Activation of these secondary biochemical pathways may lead to axonal transection, named secondary axotomy, and be responsible for the clinical decline of DAI patients. Advances in the neurocritical care of TBI patients have been achieved by refinements in multimodality monitoring for prevention and early detection of secondary injury factors, which can be applied also to DAI. There is an emerging role for biomarkers in blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and interstitial fluid using microdialysis in the evaluation of axonal injury in TBI. These biomarker studies have assessed various axonal and neuroglial markers as well as inflammatory mediators, such as cytokines and chemokines. Moreover, modern neuroimaging can detect subtle or overt DAI/white matter changes in diffuse TBI patients across all injury severities using magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging, and positron emission tomography. Importantly, serial neuroimaging studies provide evidence for evolving axonal injury. Since axonal injury may be a key risk factor for neurodegeneration and dementias at long-term following TBI, the secondary injury processes may require prolonged monitoring. The aim of the present review is to summarize the clinical short-and long-term monitoring possibilities of axonal injury in TBI. Increased knowledge of the underlying pathophysiology achieved by advanced clinical monitoring raises hope for the development of novel treatment strategies for axonal injury in TBI.

  • 11.
    Wicher, Grzegorz K.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wallenquist, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lei, Ying
    Karolinska Inst, Immunol & Allergy Unit, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Enoksson, Mattias
    Karolinska Inst, Immunol & Allergy Unit, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Li, Xiaofei
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Fuchs, Barbara
    Karolinska Inst, Immunol & Allergy Unit, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Hillered, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Nilsson, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology. Karolinska Inst, Immunol & Allergy Unit, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Forsberg Nilsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Interleukin-33 Promotes Recruitment of Microglia/Macrophages in Response to Traumatic Brain Injury2017In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 34, no 22, p. 3173-3182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a devastating condition, often leading to life-long consequences for patients. Even though modern neurointensive care has improved functional and cognitive outcomes, efficient pharmacological therapies are still lacking. Targeting peripherally derived, or resident inflammatory, cells that are rapid responders to brain injury is promising, but complex, given that the contribution of inflammation to exacerbation versus improved recovery varies with time post-injury. The injury-induced inflammatory response is triggered by release of alarmins, and in the present study we asked whether interleukin-33 (IL-33), an injury-associated nuclear alarmin, is involved in TBI. Here, we used samples from human TBI microdialysate, tissue sections from human TBI, and mouse models of central nervous system injury and found that expression of IL-33 in the brain was elevated from nondetectable levels, reaching a maximum after 72 h in both human samples and mouse models. Astrocytes and oligodendrocytes were the main producers of IL-33. Post-TBI, brains of mice deficient in the IL-33 receptor, ST2, contained fewer microglia/macrophages in the injured region than wild-type mice and had an altered cytokine/chemokine profile in response to injury. These observations indicate that IL-33 plays a role in neuroinflammation with microglia/macrophages being cellular targets for this interleukin post-TBI.

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