uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Carneiro, Miguel
    et al.
    Rubin, Carl-Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Di Palma, Federica
    Albert, Frank W.
    Alfoeldi, Jessica
    Barrio, Alvaro Martinez
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Pielberg, Gerli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Rafati, Nima
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Sayyab, Shumaila
    Turner-Maier, Jason
    Younis, Shady
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Afonso, Sandra
    Aken, Bronwen
    Alves, Joel M.
    Barrell, Daniel
    Bolet, Gerard
    Boucher, Samuel
    Burbano, Hernan A.
    Campos, Rita
    Chang, Jean L.
    Duranthon, Veronique
    Fontanesi, Luca
    Garreau, Herve
    Heiman, David
    Johnson, Jeremy
    Mage, Rose G.
    Peng, Ze
    Queney, Guillaume
    Rogel-Gaillard, Claire
    Ruffier, Magali
    Searle, Steve
    Villafuerte, Rafael
    Xiong, Anqi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Young, Sarah
    Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Good, Jeffrey M.
    Lander, Eric S.
    Ferrand, Nuno
    Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Rabbit genome analysis reveals a polygenic basis for phenotypic change during domestication2014In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 345, no 6200, p. 1074-1079Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The genetic changes underlying the initial steps of animal domestication are still poorly understood. We generated a high-quality reference genome for the rabbit and compared it to resequencing data from populations of wild and domestic rabbits. We identified more than 100 selective sweeps specific to domestic rabbits but only a relatively small number of fixed (or nearly fixed) single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for derived alleles. SNPs with marked allele frequency differences between wild and domestic rabbits were enriched for conserved noncoding sites. Enrichment analyses suggest that genes affecting brain and neuronal development have often been targeted during domestication. We propose that because of a truly complex genetic background, tame behavior in rabbits and other domestic animals evolved by shifts in allele frequencies at many loci, rather than by critical changes at only a few domestication loci.

  • 2.
    Kundu, Soumi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Xiong, Anqi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    The involvement of heparan sulfate proteoglycans in stem cell differentiation and in malignant glioma2016In: The European Physical Journal Plus, ISSN 2190-5444, E-ISSN 2190-5444, Vol. 131, no 4, article id 85Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans (HSPG) are major components of the extracellular matrix. They interact with a plethora of macromolecules that are of physiological importance. The pattern of sulfation of the HS chain determines the specificity of these interactions. The enzymes that synthesize and degrade HS are thus key regulators of processes ranging from embryonic development to tissue homeostasis and tumor development. Formation of the nervous system is also critically dependent on appropriate HSPGs as shown by several studies on the role of HS in neural induction from embryonic stem cells. High-grade glioma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor among adults, and the prognosis is poor. Neural and glioma stem cells share several traits, including sustained proliferation and highly efficient migration in the brain. There are also similarities between the neurogenic niche where adult neural stem cells reside and the tumorigenic niche, including their interactions with components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The levels of many of these components, for example HSPGs and enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and modification of HS are attenuated in gliomas. In this paper, HS regulation of pathways involved in neural differentiation and how these may be of importance for brain development are discussed. The literature suggesting that modifications of HS could regulate glioma growth and invasion is reviewed. Targeting the invasiveness of glioma cells by modulating HS may improve upon present therapeutic options, which only marginally enhance the survival of glioma patients.

  • 3.
    Truve, Katarina
    et al.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, Uppsala, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Bioinformat Core Facil, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Dickinson, Peter
    Univ Calif Davis, Sch Vet Med, Dept Surg & Radiol Sci, Davis, CA 95616 USA..
    Xiong, Anqi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    York, Daniel
    Univ Calif Davis, Sch Vet Med, Dept Surg & Radiol Sci, Davis, CA 95616 USA..
    Jayashankar, Kartika
    Univ Calif Davis, Sch Vet Med, Dept Populat Hlth & Reprod, Davis, CA 95616 USA..
    Pielberg, Gerli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Koltookian, Michele
    Broad Inst Harvard & Massachusetts Inst Technol M, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Murén, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Fuxelius, Hans-Henrik
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Weishaupt, Holger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Swartling, Fredrik J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Andersson, Göran
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hedhammar, Ake
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Clin Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Bannasch, Danika
    Univ Calif Davis, Sch Vet Med, Dept Populat Hlth & Reprod, Davis, CA 95616 USA..
    Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Broad Inst Harvard & Massachusetts Inst Technol M, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Utilizing the Dog Genome in the Search for Novel Candidate Genes Involved in Glioma Development-Genome Wide Association Mapping followed by Targeted Massive Parallel Sequencing Identifies a Strongly Associated Locus2016In: PLoS Genetics, ISSN 1553-7390, E-ISSN 1553-7404, Vol. 12, no 5, article id e1006000Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gliomas are the most common form of malignant primary brain tumors in humans and second most common in dogs, occurring with similar frequencies in both species. Dogs are valuable spontaneous models of human complex diseases including cancers and may provide insight into disease susceptibility and oncogenesis. Several brachycephalic breeds such as Boxer, Bulldog and Boston Terrier have an elevated risk of developing glioma, but others, including Pug and Pekingese, are not at higher risk. To identify glioma-associated genetic susceptibility factors, an across-breed genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed on 39 dog glioma cases and 141 controls from 25 dog breeds, identifying a genome-wide significant locus on canine chromosome (CFA) 26 (p = 2.8 x 10(-8)). Targeted re-sequencing of the 3.4 Mb candidate region was performed, followed by genotyping of the 56 SNVs that best fit the association pattern between the re-sequenced cases and controls. We identified three candidate genes that were highly associated with glioma susceptibility: CAMKK2, P2RX7 and DENR. CAMKK2 showed reduced expression in both canine and human brain tumors, and a non-synonymous variant in P2RX7, previously demonstrated to have a 50% decrease in receptor function, was also associated with disease. Thus, one or more of these genes appear to affect glioma susceptibility.

  • 4. Truvé, Katarina
    et al.
    Dickinson, Peter
    Xiong, Anqi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    York, Daniel
    Jayashankar, Kartika
    Pielberg, Gerli
    Koltookian, Michele
    Murén, Eva
    Fuxelius, Hans-Henrik
    Weishaupt, Holger
    J. Swartling, Fredrik
    Andersson, Göran
    Hedhammar, Åke
    Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik
    Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Bannasch, Danika
    Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin
    Genome-Wide Association Mapping of Canine Glioma Followed by Targeted Massive Parallel Sequencing Identifies CAMKK2, P2RX7 and DENR as Novel Candidate Genes for Canine and Human GliomaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Xiong, Anqi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Kundu, Soumi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Forsberg, Maud
    Xiong, Yuyuan
    Bergström, Tobias
    Ilan, Neta
    Li, Jin-Ping
    Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Heparanase confers a growth advantage to differentiating embryonic stem cells, and enhances their differentiation into oligodendrocytesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Xiong, Anqi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kundu, Soumi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Forsberg, Maud
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Xiong, Yuyuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bergström, Tobias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Paavilainen, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kjellén, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Li, Jin-Ping
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Heparanase confers a growth advantage to differentiating murine embryonic stem cells, and enhances oligodendrocyte formation.2017In: Matrix Biology, ISSN 0945-053X, E-ISSN 1569-1802, Vol. 62, p. 92-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), ubiquitous components of mammalian cells, play important roles in development and homeostasis. These molecules are located primarily on the cell surface and in the pericellular matrix, where they interact with a multitude of macromolecules, including many growth factors. Manipulation of the enzymes involved in biosynthesis and modification of HSPG structures alters the properties of stem cells. Here, we focus on the involvement of heparanase (HPSE), the sole endo-glucuronidase capable of cleaving of HS, in differentiation of embryonic stem cells into the cells of the neural lineage. Embryonic stem (ES) cells overexpressing HPSE (Hpse-Tg) proliferated more rapidly than WT ES cells in culture and formed larger teratomas in vivo. In addition, differentiating Hpse-Tg ES cells also had a higher growth rate, and overexpression of HPSE in NSPCs enhanced Erk and Akt phosphorylation. Employing a two-step, monolayer differentiation, we observed an increase in HPSE as wild-type (WT) ES cells differentiated into neural stem and progenitor cells followed by down-regulation of HPSE as these NSPCs differentiated into mature cells of the neural lineage. Furthermore, NSPCs overexpressing HPSE gave rise to more oligodendrocytes than WT cultures, with a concomitant reduction in the number of neurons. Our present findings emphasize the importance of HS, in neural differentiation and suggest that by regulating the availability of growth factors and, or other macromolecules, HPSE promotes differentiation into oligodendrocytes.

  • 7.
    Xiong, Anqi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kundu, Soumi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Heparan sulfate in the regulation of neural differentiation and glioma development2014In: The FEBS Journal, ISSN 1742-464X, E-ISSN 1742-4658, Vol. 281, no 22, p. 4993-5008Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are the main components of the extracellular matrix, where they interact with a large number of physiologically important macromolecules. The sulfation pattern of heparan sulfate (HS) chains determines the interaction potential of the proteoglycans. Enzymes of the biosynthetic and degradation pathways for HS chains are thus important regulators in processes ranging from embryonic development to tissue homeostasis, but also for tumor development. Formation of the nervous system is also critically dependent on intact HSPGs, and several studies have outlined the role of HS in neural induction from embryonic stem cells. High-grade glioma is the most common malignant primary brain tumor among adults, and the outcome is poor. Neural stem cells and glioma stem cells have several common traits, such as sustained proliferation and a highly efficient migratory capacity in the brain. There are also similarities between the neurogenic niche where adult neural stem cells reside, and the tumorigenic niche. These include interactions with the extracellular matrix, and many of the matrix components are deregulated in glioma, e.g. HSPGs and enzymes implementing the biosynthesis and modification of HS. In this article, we will present how HS-regulated pathways are involved in neural differentiation, and discuss their impact on brain development. We will also review and critically discuss the important role of structural modifications of HS in glioma growth and invasion. We propose that targeting invasive mechanisms of glioma cells through modulation of HS structure and HS-mediated pathways may be an attractive alternative to other therapeutic attempts, which so far have only marginally increased survival for glioma patients.

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf