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  • 1.
    Lundin, Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Stillesjö, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Nyberg, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Rask-Andersen, Helge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Experiences from Auditory Brainstem Implantation (ABI) in four Paediatric Patients2016In: Cochlear Implants International, ISSN 1467-0100, E-ISSN 1754-7628Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Lundin, Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Stillesjö, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Nyberg, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Rask-Andersen, Helge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Self-Reported Benefit, Sound Perception, and Quality-of-Life in Patients with Auditory Brainstem Implants (ABIs)2016In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251, Vol. 136, no 1, p. 62-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONCLUSION:

    The majority of the patients used their auditory brainstem implants (ABIs) all the time, reporting that he/she would make the decision to receive an implant again if the decision were reconsidered. The findings support that the ABI is a valuable treatment in patients with type 2 neurofibromatosis (NF2) and in children with congenital inner ear and nerve anomalies or cochlear ossification.

    OBJECTIVE:

    To evaluate the patients who underwent ABI implantation in Uppsala during 1993-2013. This study analyzed patients' implant use, perception of environmental sounds, perceived benefit from the implant, and quality-of-life (QoL).

    METHOD:

    The NF2-patients (n = 20) comprised the majority of the patients, and there were a few non-NF2 pediatric patients (n = 4). The exclusion criteria included deceased patients (n = 4) and patients with no hearing sensations from the implant, or those with an inactivated ABI (n = 2). The data were collected from a questionnaire survey.

    RESULTS:

    Eleven adult patients and two pediatric patients answered the questionnaires. Eight of the adult patients used their implants 'always'. The two children always used their implants. Hearing problems had the largest negative effect on the QoL. The non-users and the users scored equally on the NFTI-QoL.

  • 3.
    Lundin, Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Stillesjö, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Rask-Andersen, Helge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Experiences and Results from Cochlear Implantation in Patients with Long Duration of Deafness2014In: Audiology & Neurotology Extra, ISSN 1664-5537, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 46-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:

    The aim of the present study was to gauge factors that influence the outcome of cochlear implants (CI) in patients who have been deaf for an extended period.

    Patients and Methods:

    Twelve adult cases (13 ears) were operated on at the CI unit in Uppsala during the period of 2002-2013. These patients had a deafness duration ranging between 20 and 72 years in the implanted ear and severe to profound hearing loss or deafness in the other ear. Data concerning pre- and postoperative speech perception, deafness duration, hearing/deafness duration in the contralateral ear, age at implantation, intraoperative electrophysiological measurements, cause of deafness, and user status were collected.

    Results:

    Eleven of 12 patients (13 ears) benefitted from CI treatment.

    Conclusion:

    The overall hearing experience, deafness duration, and age at onset of deafness are important issues to consider prior to CI.

  • 4. Lundin, Karin
    et al.
    Stillesjö, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Rask-Andersen, Helge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Prognostic value of electrically evoked auditory brainstem responses in cochlear implantation.2015In: Cochlear Implants International, ISSN 1467-0100, E-ISSN 1754-7628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate whether electrical auditory brainstem responses (eABRs) obtained during cochlear implantation (CI) can predict CI outcomes. We also aimed to assess whether eABR can be used to select patients for auditory brainstem implantation (ABI). Methods This was a retrospective study. The latencies and quality of the eABR waveforms from adult patients implanted with CI in Uppsala from 2011 to 2013 (n = 74) and four children with severe cochlear abnormalities were analyzed. Speech perception was assessed through postoperative monosyllabic word (MS-word) recognition. A score was constructed for each patient based on wave II, III, and V patency. Results eABR latencies increased towards base stimulation of the cochlea. Wave V for the mid- and low-frequency regions was the most robust. Significant latency shifts occurred in wave V from the low- to high-frequency regions (**P  < 0.01) and from the mid- to high-frequency regions (**P  < 0.01). No correlations were found between waveform score, wave III-V interval, wave V latency, and MS-word scores. A negative eABR always predicted a negative outcome. Among the patients with negative outcomes, 75% had eABRs. Discussion Implant electrical stimulation and brain stem recordings can be used (eABRs wave V) to predict a negative functional outcome. Low-frequency waves V were observed in all patients with successful CI outcomes. Patients for whom eABR waveforms were completely absent had unsuccessful CI outcomes.

  • 5. Siegbahn, Malin
    et al.
    Lundin, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Olsson, Gun-Britt
    Stillesjö, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Kinnefors, Anders
    Rask-Andersen, Helge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Nyberg, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Auditory Brainstem Implants (ABIs): 20 Years of Clinical Experience in Uppsala, Sweden2014In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251, Vol. 134, no 10, p. 1052-1061Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Even though sound perception may be limited after treatment with an auditory brainstem implant (ABI), it provides benefits and should be selectively offered to patients. Importantly the patients must be motivated, given reasonable expectations of outcome and offered long-term rehabilitation with a considerable 'learn to listen' period with the implant device.

    OBJECTIVES:

    To describe the clinical experiences and results of 24 ABI surgeries performed in Uppsala University Hospital between 1993 and 2013.

    METHODS:

    Most patients (n = 20) suffered from neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2); a few patients (n = 4) were paediatric non-NF2 patients. The files were searched for information on the presurgery size of the vestibular schwannoma, whether the patient had undergone gamma knife treatment, the surgical approach, the side effects of the surgery and of the use of the implant, the electrode activation pattern and implant use, and categories of auditory performance (CAP) score.

    RESULTS:

    Our results show that many patients greatly benefited from an ABI, and most of the patients used their implants even though the hearing improvements usually consisted of awareness of surrounding sounds and improved lip-reading. No severe side effects were observed from implant stimulation.

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