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  • 1.
    Gustavsson, Catharina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, SE-79188 Falun, Sweden;Malardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Box 883, SE-72123 Vasteras, Sweden.
    Nordqvist, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Malardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Box 883, SE-72123 Vasteras, Sweden.
    Bröms, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Jerdén, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, SE-79188 Falun, Sweden.
    Kallings, Lena V
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Swedish Sch Sport & Hlth Sci GIH, Dept Sport & Hlth Sci, Box 5626, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wallin, Lars
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, SE-79188 Falun, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Div Nursing, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, SE-17770 Stockholm, Sweden;Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Hlth Care Sci, Box 457, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    What is required to facilitate implementation of Swedish physical activity on prescription?: - interview study with primary healthcare staff and management2018In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 18, article id 196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The method, Swedish Physical Activity on Prescription (SPAP), has been launched in Swedish healthcare to promote physical activity for prevention and treatment of lifestyle related health disorders. Despite scientific support for the method, and education campaigns, it is used to a limited extent by health professionals. The aim of the study was to describe the views of health professionals on perceived facilitators, barriers and requirements for successful implementation of SPAP in primary healthcare. Methods: Eighteen semi-structured interviews with stakeholders in SPAP, i.e. ten people working in local or central management and eight primary healthcare professionals in two regional healthcare organisations, were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results: We identified an overarching theme regarding requirements for successful implementation of SPAP: Need for knowledge and organisational support, comprising four main categories: Need for increased knowledge and affirmative attitude among health professionals; Need for clear and supportive management; Need for central supporting structures; Need for local supporting structures. Knowledge of the SPAP method content and core components was limited. Confidence in the method varied among health professionals. There was a discrepancy between the central organisation policy documents declaring that disease preventive methods were prioritised and a mandatory assignment, while the health professionals asked for increased interest, support and resources from management, primarily time and supporting structures. There were somewhat conflicting views between primary healthcare professionals and managers concerning perceived barriers and requirements. In contrast to some of the management's beliefs, all primary healthcare professionals undisputedly acknowledged the importance of promoting physical activity, but they lacked time, written routines and in some cases competence for SPAP counselling. Conclusion: The study provides knowledge regarding requirements to facilitate the implementation of SPAP in healthcare. There was limited knowledge among health professionals regarding core components of SPAP and how to practise the method, which speaks for in-depth training in the SPAP method. The findings highlight the importance of forming policies and guidelines and establishing organisational supporting structures, and ensuring that these are well known and approved in all parts of the healthcare organisation.

  • 2.
    Husdal, Rebecka
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Leksell, Janeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Eliasson, Björn
    Jansson, Stefan
    Jerden, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden.
    Stålhammar, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Steen, Lars
    Wallman, Thorne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Svensson, Ann-Marie
    Thors Adolfsson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Resources and organisation in primary health care are associated with HbA1c level: A nationwide study of 230958 people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus.2018In: Primary Care Diabetes, ISSN 1751-9918, E-ISSN 1878-0210, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 23-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To examine the association between personnel resources and organisational features of primary health care centres (PHCCs) and individual HbA1c level in people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).

    METHODS: People with T2DM attending 846 PHCCs (n=230958) were included in this cross-sectional study based on PHCC-level data from a questionnaire sent to PHCCs in 2013 and individual-level clinical data from 2013 for people with T2DM reported in the Swedish National Diabetes Register, linked to individual-level data on socio-economic status and comorbidities. Data were analysed using a generalized estimating equations linear regression models.

    RESULTS: After adjusting for PHCC- and individual-level confounding factors, personnel resources associated with lower individual HbA1c level were mean credits of diabetes-specific education among registered nurses (RNs) (-0.02mmol/mol for each additional credit; P<0.001) and length of regular visits to RNs (-0.19mmol/mol for each additional 15min; P<0.001). Organisational features associated with HbA1c level were having a diabetes team (-0.18mmol/mol; P<0.01) and providing group education (-0.20mmol/mol; P<0.01).

    CONCLUSIONS: In this large sample, PHCC personnel resources and organisational features were associated with lower HbA1c level in people with T2DM.

  • 3.
    Husdal, Rebecka
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Leksell, Janeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Eliasson, Björn
    Jansson, Stefan
    Jerdén, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Stålhammar, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Steen, Lars
    Wallman, Thorne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Adolfsson, Eva Thors
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Resource allocation and organisational features in Swedish primary diabetes care: Changes from 2006 to 20132017In: Primary Care Diabetes, ISSN 1751-9918, E-ISSN 1878-0210, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 20-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To compare the resource allocation and organisational features in Swedish primary diabetes care for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) between 2006 and 2013.

    METHODS: Using a repeated cross-sectional study design, questionnaires covering personnel resources and organisational features for patients with T2DM in 2006 and 2013 were sent to all Swedish primary health care centres (PHCCs) during the following year. In total, 684 (74.3%) PHCCs responded in 2006 and 880 (76.4%) in 2013.

    RESULTS: Compared with 2006, the median list size had decreased in 2013 (p<0.001), whereas the median number of listed patients with T2DM had increased (p<0.001). Time devoted to patients with T2DM and diabetes-specific education levels for registered nurses (RNs) had increased, and more PHCCs had in-house psychologists (all p<0.001). The use of follow-up systems and medical check-ups had increased (all p<0.05). Individual counselling was more often based on patients' needs, while arrangement of group-based education remained low. Patient participation in setting treatment targets mainly remained low.

    CONCLUSIONS: Even though the diabetes-specific educational level among RNs increased, the arrangement of group-based education and patient participation in setting treatment targets remained low. These results are of concern and should be prioritised as key features in the care of patients with T2DM.

  • 4.
    Husdal, Rebecka
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Thors Adolfsson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Leksell, Janeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism. Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden.
    Eliasson, Björn
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jansson, Stefan
    Örebro Univ, Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Sch Med Sci, Örebro, Sweden.
    Jerdén, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden.
    Stålhammar, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Steen, Lars
    Sörmland Cty Council, Drug & Therapeut Comm, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Wallman, Thorne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Svensson, Ann-Marie
    Natl Diabet Register, Ctr Registers, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Associations between quality of work features in primary health care and glycaemic control in people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus: A nationwide survey.2019In: Primary Care Diabetes, ISSN 1751-9918, E-ISSN 1878-0210, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 176-186, article id S1751-9918(18)30277-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To describe and analyse the associations between primary health care centres’ (PHCCs’) quality of work (QOW) and individual HbA1c levels in people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).

    Methods: This cross-sectional study invited all 1152 Swedish PHCCs to answer a questionnaire addressing QOW conditions. Clinical, socio-economic and comorbidity data for 230,958 people with T2DM were linked to data on QOW conditions for 846 (73.4%) PHCCs.

    Results: Of the participants, 56% had controlled (≤52 mmol/mol), 31.9% intermediate (53–69 mmol/mol), and 12.1% uncontrolled (≥70 mmol/mol) HbA1c. An explanatory factor analysis identified seven QOW features. The features having a call-recall system, having individualized treatment plans, PHCCs’ results always on the agenda, and having a follow-up strategy combined with taking responsibility of outcomes/results were associated with lower HbA1c levels in the controlled group (all < 0.05). For people with intermediate or uncontrolled HbA1c, having individualized treatment plans was the only QOW feature that was significantly associated with a lower HbA1c level (< 0.05).

    Conclusions: This nationwide study adds important knowledge regarding associations between QOW in real life clinical practice and HbA1c levels. PHCCs’ QOW may mainly only benefit people with controlled HbA1c and more effective QOW strategies are needed to support people with uncontrolled HbA1c.

  • 5.
    Joffer, Junia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Burell, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Bergstrom, Erik
    Stenlund, Hans
    Sjors, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Jerden, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Predictors of smoking among Swedish adolescents2014In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 14, p. 1296-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Smoking most often starts in adolescence, implying that understanding of predicting factors for smoking initiation during this time period is essential for successful smoking prevention. The aim of this study was to examine predicting factors in early adolescence for smoking in late adolescence. Methods: Longitudinal cohort study, involving 649 Swedish adolescents from lower secondary school (12-13 years old) to upper secondary school (17-18 years old). Tobacco habits, behavioural, intra-and interpersonal factors and socio-demographic variables were assessed through questionnaires. Descriptive statistics, univariable and multivariable logistic regression were used to identify predicting factors. Results: Smoking prevalence increased from 3.3% among 12-13 year olds to 25.1% among 17-18 year olds. Possible predictors of smoking were: female sex, lower parental education, poorer family mood, poorer self-rated health, poorer self-esteem, less negative attitude towards smoking, binge drinking, snus use and smoking. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, female sex (OR 1.64, CI 1.08-2.49), medium and low self-esteem (medium: OR 1.57, CI 1.03-2.38, low: 2.79, CI 1.46-5.33), less negative attitude towards smoking (OR 2.81, CI 1.70-4.66) and ever using snus (OR 3.43, CI 1.78-6.62) remained significant independent predicting factors. Conclusions: The study stresses the importance of strengthening adolescents' self-esteem, promoting anti-smoking attitudes in early adolescence, as well as avoidance of early initiation of snus. Such measures should be joint efforts involving parents, schools, youth associations, and legislating authorities.

  • 6.
    Joffer, Junia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Umea Univ, Dept Epidemiol & Global Hlth, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden.
    Flacking, Renee
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, SE-79188 Falun, Sweden.
    Bergstrom, Erik
    Umea Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Pediat, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden.
    Randell, Eva
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, SE-79188 Falun, Sweden.
    Jerdén, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Umea Univ, Dept Epidemiol & Global Hlth, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden;Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, SE-79188 Falun, Sweden.
    Self-rated health, subjective social status in school and socioeconomic status in adolescents: a cross-sectional study2019In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 19, article id 785Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundSocial position, traditionally measured by objective data on socioeconomic status (SES), is linked to health status in adults. In adolescents, the association is more uncertain and there are some studies suggesting that subjective social status (SSS) might be more adequate in relation to health. This study aimed to examine associations between SSS in school, SES and self-rated health (SRH) in adolescent boys and girls.MethodsA descriptive cross-sectional research design with quantitative survey data was used. The study involved 705 Swedish adolescents in upper secondary school (17-18-year-olds). SRH was measured with a single-item question and SSS by a question where adolescents were asked to assess their social position within their school. Formal education level of the parents was used as a proxy for objective SES. Univariable and multivariable ordinal regression analyses were conducted to assess the associations between SRH and SSS in school and SES.ResultsIn the multivariable analysis, SSS in school was positively associated with SRH, whereas no significant association between SES and SRH was found. The proportion of adolescents with high SRH increased with higher steps on the SSS ladder. Significant gender differences were found in that boys rated their SRH and SSS in school higher than girls did.ConclusionsThe study shows that self-rated health in adolescents is related to perceived social position in school. Subjective social status in school seems to be a useful health-related measure of social position in adolescents.

  • 7.
    Joffer, Junia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med Epidemiol & Global Hlth, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Jerden, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med Epidemiol & Global Hlth, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden.; Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, SE-79188 Falun, Sweden..
    Öhman, Ann
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med Epidemiol & Global Hlth, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Umea Ctr Gender Studies, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Flacking, Renee
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, SE-79188 Falun, Sweden..
    Exploring self-rated health among adolescents: a think-aloud study2016In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 16, article id 156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite extensive use of self-rated health questions in youth studies, little is known about what such questions capture among adolescents. Hence, the aim of this study was to explore how adolescents interpret and reason when answering a question about self-rated health. Methods: A qualitative study using think-aloud interviews explored the question, "How do you feel most of the time?", using five response options ("Very good", "Rather good", "Neither good, nor bad", "Rather bad", and "Very bad"). The study involved 58 adolescents (29 boys and 29 girls) in lower secondary school (7th grade) and upper secondary school (12th grade) in Sweden. Results: Respondents' interpretations of the question about how they felt included social, mental, and physical aspects. Gender differences were found primarily in that girls emphasized stressors, while age differences were reflected mainly in the older respondents' inclusion of a wider variety of influences on their assessments. The five response options all demonstrated differences in self-rated health, and the respondents' understanding of the middle option, "Neither good, nor bad", varied widely. In the answering of potential sensitive survey questions, rationales for providing honest or biased answers were described. Conclusions: The use of a self-rated health question including the word 'feel' captured a holistic view of health among adolescents. Differences amongst response options should be acknowledged when analyzing self-rated health questions. If anonymity is not feasible when answering questions on self-rated health, a high level of privacy is recommended to increase the likelihood of reliability.

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