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  • 1.
    André, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Odelstad, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Graham, Daniel B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Eriksson, Anders I.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Karlsson, T.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Elect Engn, Dept Space & Plasma Phys, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wieser, G. Stenberg
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, Kiruna, Sweden.
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Norgren, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Johansson, Fredrik L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Henri, P.
    Lab Phys & Chim Environm & Espace, Orleans, France.
    Rubin, M.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, Bern, Switzerland.
    Richter, I.
    TU Braunschweig, Inst Geophys & Extraterr Phys, Braunschweig, Germany.
    Lower hybrid waves at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko2017In: Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, ISSN 0035-8711, E-ISSN 1365-2966, Vol. 469, p. S29-S38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the generation of waves in the lower hybrid frequency range by density gradients in the near plasma environment of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. When the plasma is dominated by water ions from the comet, a situation with magnetized electrons and unmagnetized ions is favourable for the generation of lower hybrid waves. These waves can transfer energy between ions and electrons and reshape the plasma environment of the comet. We consider cometocentric distances out to a few hundred km. We find that when the electron motion is not significantly interrupted by collisions with neutrals, large average gradients within tens of km of the comet, as well as often observed local large density gradients at larger distances, are often likely to be favourable for the generation of lower hybrid waves. Overall, we find that waves in the lower hybrid frequency range are likely to be common in the near plasma environment.

  • 2.
    Beth, A.
    et al.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England..
    Altwegg, K.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Balsiger, H.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Berthelier, J. -J
    Calmonte, U.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Combi, M. R.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Atmospher Ocean & Space Sci, 2455 Hayward, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA..
    De Keyser, J.
    Royal Belgian Inst Space Aeron, BIRA, IASB, Ringlaan 3, B-1180 Brussels, Belgium..
    Dhooghe, F.
    Royal Belgian Inst Space Aeron, BIRA, IASB, Ringlaan 3, B-1180 Brussels, Belgium..
    Fiethe, B.
    TU Braunschweig, Inst Comp & Network Engn IDA, Hans Sommer Str 66, D-38106 Braunschweig, Germany..
    Fuselier, S. A.
    Univ Texas San Antonio, Dept Phys & Astron, San Antonio, TX 78228 USA.;Southwest Res Inst San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78228 USA..
    Galand, M.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England..
    Gasc, S.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Gombosi, T. I.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Atmospher Ocean & Space Sci, 2455 Hayward, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA..
    Hansen, K. C.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Atmospher Ocean & Space Sci, 2455 Hayward, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA..
    Hassig, M.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland.;Univ Texas San Antonio, Dept Phys & Astron, San Antonio, TX 78228 USA..
    Heritier, K. L.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England..
    Kopp, E.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Le Roy, L.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Mandt, K. E.
    Univ Texas San Antonio, Dept Phys & Astron, San Antonio, TX 78228 USA.;Southwest Res Inst San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78228 USA..
    Peroy, S.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England..
    Rubin, M.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Semon, T.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Tzou, C. -Y
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    First in situ detection of the cometary ammonium ion NH4+ (protonated ammonia NH3) in the coma of 67P/C-G near perihelion2016In: Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, ISSN 0035-8711, E-ISSN 1365-2966, Vol. 462, p. S562-S572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we report the first in situ detection of the ammonium ion NH4+ at 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P/C-G) in a cometary coma, using the Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis (ROSINA)/Double Focusing Mass Spectrometer (DFMS). Unlike neutral and ion spectrometers onboard previous cometary missions, the ROSINA/DFMS spectrometer, when operated in ion mode, offers the capability to distinguish NH4+ from H2O+ in a cometary coma. We present here the ion data analysis of mass-to-charge ratios 18 and 19 at high spectral resolution and compare the results with an ionospheric model to put these results into context. The model confirms that the ammonium ion NH4+ is one of the most abundant ion species, as predicted, in the coma near perihelion.

  • 3.
    Cui, J.
    et al.
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Sch Atmospher Sci, Zhuhai, Guangdong, Peoples R China;Chinese Acad Sci, Natl Astron Observ, Key Lab Lunar & Deep Space Explorat, Beijing, Peoples R China;Chinese Acad Sci, Ctr Excellence Comparat Planetol, Hefei, Anhui, Peoples R China.
    Cao, Y-T
    Chinese Acad Sci, Natl Astron Observ, Key Lab Lunar & Deep Space Explorat, Beijing, Peoples R China.
    Wu, X-S
    Chinese Acad Sci, Natl Astron Observ, Key Lab Lunar & Deep Space Explorat, Beijing, Peoples R China;Chinese Acad Sci, Ctr Excellence Comparat Planetol, Hefei, Anhui, Peoples R China.
    Xu, S-S
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Space Sci Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Yelle, R. , V
    Stone, S.
    Univ Arizona, Lunar & Planetary Lab, Tucson, AZ 85721 USA.
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Edberg, Niklas J. T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Shen, C-L
    Chinese Acad Sci, Ctr Excellence Comparat Planetol, Hefei, Anhui, Peoples R China;Univ Sci & Technol China, Sch Earth & Space Sci, Hefei, Anhui, Peoples R China.
    He, F.
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Geol & Geophys, Beijing, Peoples R China.
    Wei, Y.
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Geol & Geophys, Beijing, Peoples R China.
    Evaluating Local Ionization Balance in the Nightside Martian Upper Atmosphere during MAVEN Deep Dip Campaigns2019In: Astrophysical Journal Letters, ISSN 2041-8205, E-ISSN 2041-8213, Vol. 876, no 1, article id L12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Combining the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) measurements of atmospheric neutral and ion densities, electron temperature, and energetic electron intensity, we perform the first quantitative evaluation of local ionization balance in the nightside Martian upper atmosphere, a condition with the electron impact ionization (EI) of CO2 exactly balanced by the dissociative recombination (DR) of ambient ions. The data accumulated during two MAVEN Deep Dip (DD) campaigns are included: DD6 on the deep nightside with a periapsis solar zenith angle (SZA) of 165 degrees, and DD3 close to the dawn terminator with a periapsis SZA of 110 degrees. With the electron temperatures at low altitudes corrected for an instrumental effect pertaining to the MAVEN Langmuir Probe and Waves, a statistical agreement between the EI and DR rates is suggested by the data below 140 km during DD6 and below 180 km during DD3, implying that electron precipitation is responsible for the nightside Martian ionosphere under these circumstances and extra sources are not required. In contrast, a substantial enhancement in EI over DR is observed at higher altitudes during both campaigns, which we interpret as a signature of plasma escape down the tail.

  • 4. Cui, J.
    et al.
    Galand, M.
    Zhang, S. J.
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Zou, H.
    The electron thermal structure in the dayside Martian ionosphere implied by the MGS radio occultation data2015In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Planets, ISSN 2169-9097, E-ISSN 2169-9100, Vol. 120, no 2, p. 278-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a revised Chapman model for the ionosphere of Mars by allowing for vertical variation of electron temperature. An approximate energy balance between solar EUV heating and CO2 collisional cooling is applied in the dayside Martian ionosphere, analogous to the method recently proposed by Withers et al. (2014). The essence of the model is to separate the contributions of the neutral and electron thermal structures to the apparent width of the main ionospheric layer. Application of the model to the electron density profiles from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) radio occultation measurements reveals a clear trend of elevated electron temperature with increasing solar zenith angle (SZA). It also reveals that the characteristic length scale for the change of electron temperature with altitude decreases with increasing SZA. These observations may imply enhanced topside heat influx near the terminator, presumably an outcome of the solar wind interactions with the Martian upper atmosphere. Our analysis also reveals a tentative asymmetry in electron temperature between the northern and southern hemispheres, consistent with the scenario of elevated electron temperature within minimagnetospheres.

  • 5.
    Edberg, Niklas J. T.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Alho, M.
    Aalto Univ, Sch Elect Engn, Dept Radio Sci & Engn, POB 13000, FI-00076 Aalto, Finland..
    André, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Andrews, David J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Behar, E.
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, Box 812, SE-98128 Kiruna, Sweden..
    Burch, J. L.
    Southwest Res Inst, 6220 Culebra Rd, San Antonio, TX 78238 USA..
    Carr, C. M.
    Imperial Coll London, Exhibit Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England..
    Cupido, E.
    Imperial Coll London, Exhibit Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England..
    Engelhardt, Ilka. A. D.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Eriksson, Anders I.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Glassmeier, K. -H
    Goetz, C.
    TU Braunschweig, Inst Geophys & Extraterr Phys, Mendelssohnstr 3, D-38106 Braunschweig, Germany..
    Goldstein, R.
    Southwest Res Inst, 6220 Culebra Rd, San Antonio, TX 78238 USA..
    Henri, P.
    Lab Phys & Chim Environm & Espace, F-45071 Orleans 2, France..
    Johansson, Fredrik L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Koenders, C.
    TU Braunschweig, Inst Geophys & Extraterr Phys, Mendelssohnstr 3, D-38106 Braunschweig, Germany..
    Mandt, K.
    Southwest Res Inst, 6220 Culebra Rd, San Antonio, TX 78238 USA.;Univ Texas San Antonio, Dept Phys & Astron, San Antonio, TX 78249 USA..
    Moestl, C.
    Austrian Acad Sci, Space Res Inst, Schmiedlstr 6, A-8042 Graz, Austria..
    Nilsson, H.
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, Box 812, SE-98128 Kiruna, Sweden..
    Odelstad, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Richter, I.
    TU Braunschweig, Inst Geophys & Extraterr Phys, Mendelssohnstr 3, D-38106 Braunschweig, Germany..
    Wedlund, C. Simon
    Univ Oslo, Dept Phys, Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo, Norway..
    Wieser, G. Stenberg
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, Box 812, SE-98128 Kiruna, Sweden..
    Szego, K.
    Wigner Res Ctr Phys, Konkoly Thege Miklos Ut 29-33, H-1121 Budapest, Hungary..
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Volwerk, M.
    Austrian Acad Sci, Space Res Inst, Schmiedlstr 6, A-8042 Graz, Austria..
    CME impact on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko2016In: Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, ISSN 0035-8711, E-ISSN 1365-2966, Vol. 462, p. S45-S56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present Rosetta observations from comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko during the impact of a coronal mass ejection (CME). The CME impacted on 2015 Oct 5-6, when Rosetta was about 800 km from the comet nucleus, and 1.4 au from the Sun. Upon impact, the plasma environment is compressed to the level that solar wind ions, not seen a few days earlier when at 1500 km, now reach Rosetta. In response to the compression, the flux of suprathermal electrons increases by a factor of 5-10 and the background magnetic field strength increases by a factor of similar to 2.5. The plasma density increases by a factor of 10 and reaches 600 cm(-3), due to increased particle impact ionization, charge exchange and the adiabatic compression of the plasma environment. We also observe unprecedentedly large magnetic field spikes at 800 km, reaching above 200 nT, which are interpreted as magnetic flux ropes. We suggest that these could possibly be formed by magnetic reconnection processes in the coma as the magnetic field across the CME changes polarity, or as a consequence of strong shears causing Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in the plasma flow. Due to the limited orbit of Rosetta, we are not able to observe if a tail disconnection occurs during the CME impact, which could be expected based on previous remote observations of other CME-comet interactions.

  • 6.
    Edberg, Niklas J. T.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Univ Iowa, Dept Phys & Astron, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA..
    Andrews, David J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Bertucci, C.
    IAFE, Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina..
    Gurnett, D. A.
    Univ Iowa, Dept Phys & Astron, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA..
    Holmberg, Mika K. G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Jackman, C. M.
    Univ Southampton, Southampton, Hants, England..
    Kurth, W. S.
    Univ Iowa, Dept Phys & Astron, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA..
    Menietti, J. D.
    Univ Iowa, Dept Phys & Astron, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA..
    Opgenoorth, Hermann J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Shebanits, Oleg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Wahlund, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Effects of Saturn's magnetospheric dynamics on Titan's ionosphere2015In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics, ISSN 2169-9380, E-ISSN 2169-9402, Vol. 120, no 10, p. 8884-8898Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science/Langmuir probe measurements of the electron density from the first 110 flybys of Titan to study how Saturn's magnetosphere influences Titan's ionosphere. The data is first corrected for biased sampling due to varying solar zenith angle and solar energy flux (solar cycle effects). We then present results showing that the electron density in Titan's ionosphere, in the altitude range 1600-2400km, is increased by about a factor of 2.5 when Titan is located on the nightside of Saturn (Saturn local time (SLT) 21-03h) compared to when on the dayside (SLT 09-15 h). For lower altitudes (1100-1600km) the main dividing factor for the ionospheric density is the ambient magnetospheric conditions. When Titan is located in the magnetospheric current sheet, the electron density in Titan's ionosphere is about a factor of 1.4 higher compared to when Titan is located in the magnetospheric lobes. The factor of 1.4 increase in between sheet and lobe flybys is interpreted as an effect of increased particle impact ionization from approximate to 200eV sheet electrons. The factor of 2.5 increase in electron density between flybys on Saturn's nightside and dayside is suggested to be an effect of the pressure balance between thermal plus magnetic pressure in Titan's ionosphere against the dynamic pressure and energetic particle pressure in Saturn's magnetosphere.

  • 7.
    Edberg, Niklas J. T.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Eriksson, Anders I.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Odelstad, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Henri, P.
    Lebreton, J. -P
    Gasc, S.
    Rubin, M.
    André, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Gill, Reine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Johansson, Erik P. G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Johansson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Wahlund, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Carr, C. M.
    Cupido, E.
    Glassmeier, K. -H
    Goldstein, R.
    Koenders, C.
    Mandt, K.
    Nemeth, Z.
    Nilsson, H.
    Richter, I.
    Wieser, G. Stenberg
    Szego, K.
    Volwerk, M.
    Spatial distribution of low-energy plasma around comet 67P/CG from Rosetta measurements2015In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 42, no 11, p. 4263-4269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use measurements from the Rosetta plasma consortium Langmuir probe and mutual impedance probe to study the spatial distribution of low-energy plasma in the near-nucleus coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The spatial distribution is highly structured with the highest density in the summer hemisphere and above the region connecting the two main lobes of the comet, i.e., the neck region. There is a clear correlation with the neutral density and the plasma to neutral density ratio is found to be approximate to 1-210(-6), at a cometocentric distance of 10km and at 3.1AU from the Sun. A clear 6.2h modulation of the plasma is seen as the neck is exposed twice per rotation. The electron density of the collisionless plasma within 260km from the nucleus falls off with radial distance as approximate to 1/r. The spatial structure indicates that local ionization of neutral gas is the dominant source of low-energy plasma around the comet.

  • 8.
    Edberg, Niklas J. T.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Eriksson, Anders I.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Odelstad, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Andrews, D. J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Johansson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Burch, J. L.
    SW Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Carr, C. M.
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Space & Atmospher Phys Grp, London, England..
    Cupido, E.
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Space & Atmospher Phys Grp, London, England..
    Glassmeier, K. -H
    Goldstein, R.
    SW Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Halekas, J. S.
    Univ Iowa, Dept Phys & Astron, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA..
    Henri, P.
    Lab Phys & Chim Environm & Espace, Orleans, France..
    Koenders, C.
    TU Braunschweig, Inst Geophys & Extraterr Phys, Braunschweig, Germany..
    Mandt, K.
    SW Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Mokashi, P.
    SW Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Nemeth, Z.
    Wigner Res Ctr Phys, Budapest, Hungary..
    Nilsson, H.
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, S-98128 Kiruna, Sweden..
    Ramstad, R.
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, S-98128 Kiruna, Sweden..
    Richter, I.
    TU Braunschweig, Inst Geophys & Extraterr Phys, Braunschweig, Germany..
    Wieser, G. Stenberg
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, S-98128 Kiruna, Sweden..
    Solar wind interaction with comet 67P: Impacts of corotating interaction regions2016In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics, ISSN 2169-9380, E-ISSN 2169-9402, Vol. 121, no 2, p. 949-965Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present observations from the Rosetta Plasma Consortium of the effects of stormy solar wind on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Four corotating interaction regions (CIRs), where the first event has possibly merged with a coronal mass ejection, are traced from Earth via Mars (using Mars Express and Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN mission) to comet 67P from October to December 2014. When the comet is 3.1-2.7AU from the Sun and the neutral outgassing rate approximate to 10(25)-10(26)s(-1), the CIRs significantly influence the cometary plasma environment at altitudes down to 10-30km. The ionospheric low-energy (approximate to 5eV) plasma density increases significantly in all events, by a factor of >2 in events 1 and 2 but less in events 3 and 4. The spacecraft potential drops below -20V upon impact when the flux of electrons increases. The increased density is likely caused by compression of the plasma environment, increased particle impact ionization, and possibly charge exchange processes and acceleration of mass-loaded plasma back to the comet ionosphere. During all events, the fluxes of suprathermal (approximate to 10-100eV) electrons increase significantly, suggesting that the heating mechanism of these electrons is coupled to the solar wind energy input. At impact the magnetic field strength in the coma increases by a factor of 2-5 as more interplanetary magnetic field piles up around the comet. During two CIR impact events, we observe possible plasma boundaries forming, or moving past Rosetta, as the strong solar wind compresses the cometary plasma environment. We also discuss the possibility of seeing some signatures of the ionospheric response to tail disconnection events.

  • 9.
    Edberg, Niklas J. T.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Eriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Johansson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Goetz, Charlotte
    Tech Univ Carolo Wilhelmina Braunschweig, Inst Geophys & Extraterr Phys, Braunschweig, Germany.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, POB 812, SE-98128 Kiruna, Sweden;Lulea Univ Technol, Dept Comp Sci Elect & Space Engn, Rymdcampus 1, SE-98128 Kiruna, Sweden.
    Gilet, Nicolas
    CNRS, LPC2E, Orleans, France.
    Henri, Pierre
    CNRS, LPC2E, Orleans, France.
    The Convective Electric Field Influence on the Cold Plasma and Diamagnetic Cavity of Comet 67P2019In: Astronomical Journal, ISSN 0004-6256, E-ISSN 1538-3881, Vol. 158, no 2, article id 71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied the distribution of cold electrons (<1 eV) around comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko with respect to the solar wind convective electric field direction. The cold plasma was measured by the Langmuir Probe instrument and the direction of the convective electric field E-conv = -nu x B was determined from magnetic field (B) measurements inside the coma combined with an assumption of a purely radial solar wind velocity nu. We found that the cold plasma is twice as likely to be observed when the convective electric field at Rosetta's position is directed toward the nucleus (in the -E(conv )hemisphere) compared to when it is away from the nucleus (in the +E-conv hemisphere). Similarly, the diamagnetic cavity, in which previous studies have shown that cold plasma is always present, was also found to be observed twice as often when in the -E-conv hemisphere, linking its existence circumstantially to the presence of cold electrons. The results are consistent with hybrid and Hall magnetohydrodynamic simulations as well as measurements of the ion distribution around the diamagnetic cavity.

  • 10.
    Edberg, Niklas J. T.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Snowden, D.
    Cent Washington Univ, Dept Phys, Ellensburg, WA USA.
    Regoli, L. H.
    Univ Michigan, Climate & Space Sci & Engn, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA.
    Shebanits, Oleg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, London, England.
    Wahlund, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Andrews, David J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Bertucci, C.
    IAFE, Ciudad Univ, Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina.
    Cui, J.
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Sch Atmospher Sci, Zhuhai, Peoples R China;Chinese Acad Sci, Key Lab Lunar & Deep Space Explorat, Beijing, Peoples R China.
    Titan's Variable Ionosphere During the T118 and T119 Cassini Flybys2018In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 45, no 17, p. 8721-8728Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on unusual dynamics in Titan's ionosphere as a significant difference in ionospheric electron density is observed between the T118 and T119 Cassini nightside flybys. Two distinct nightside electron density peaks were present during T118, at 1,150 and 1,200km, and the lowest density ever observed in Titan's ionosphere at altitudes 1,000-1,350km was during T118. These flybys were quite similar in geometry, Saturn local time, neutral density, extreme ultraviolet flux, and ambient magnetic field conditions. Despite this, the Radio and Plasma Waves/Langmuir Probe measured a density difference up to a factor of 6 between the passes. The overall difference was present and similar during both inbound and outbound legs. By ruling out other factors, we suggest that an exceptionally low rate of particle impact ionization in combination with dynamics in the ionosphere is the explanation for the observations. Plain Language Summary Using the Cassini satellite in orbit around Saturn, we make measurements during two close passes of the moon Titan. We observe how the electron density in the uppermost part of the moon's atmosphere-the ionosphere-changes drastically from one pass to the next. We also observe unexpectedly high peaks of electron density in a specific altitude range during the first pass. The findings are attributed to low influx of charged particles from Saturn's magnetosphere as well as to increased dynamics of the plasma in the ionosphere. The study emphasizes the complexity of the physical process at play at the moon and aims at gaining further understanding of this environment.

  • 11.
    Engelhardt, Ilka. A. D.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Eriksson, Anders I.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Valliéres, X.
    Rubin, M.
    Gilet, N.
    Henri, P.
    Cold electrons at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko2018In: Astronomy and Astrophysics, ISSN 0004-6361, E-ISSN 1432-0746, article id A51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context. The electron temperature of the plasma is one important aspect of the environment. Electrons created by photoionization or impact ionization of atmospheric gas have energies ∼10 eV. In an active comet coma the gas density is high enough for rapid cooling of the electron gas to the neutral gas temperature (few hundred kelvin). How cooling evolves in less active comets has not been studied before.

    Aims. To investigate how electron cooling varied as comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko changed its activity by three orders of magnitude during the Rosetta mission.

    Methods. We use in-situ data from Rosetta plasma and neutral gas sensors. By combining Langmuir probe bias voltage sweeps and Mutual Impedance Probe measurements we determine when cold electrons form at least 25% of the total electron density. We compare the results to what is expected from simple models of electron cooling, using the observed neutral gas density as input.

    Results. We demonstrate that the slope of the Langmuir probe sweep can be used as a proxy for cold electron presence. We show statistics of cold electron observations over the 2 year mission period. We find cold electrons at lower activity than expected by a simple model based on free radial expansion and continuous loss of electron energy. Cold electrons are seen mainly when the gas density indicates an exobase may have formed.

    Conclusions. Collisional cooling of electrons following a radial outward path is not sufficient for explaining the observations. We suggest the ambipolar electric field is important for the observed cooling. This field keeps electrons in the inner coma for much longer time, giving them time to dissipate energy by collisions with the neutrals. We conclude there is need of better models to describe the plasma environment of comets, including at least two populations of electrons and the ambipolar field.

  • 12.
    Eriksson, Anders I.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Engelhardt, Ilka. A. D.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy.
    André, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Boström, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Edberg, Niklas J. T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Johansson, Fredrik L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy.
    Odelstad, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Wahlund, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Henri, P.
    LPC2E, Lab Phys & Chim Environm & Espace.
    Lebreton, J. -P
    LPC2E, Lab Phys & Chim Environm & Espace.
    Miloch, W. J.
    Univ Oslo, Dept Phys.
    Paulsson, J. J. P.
    Univ Oslo, Dept Phys.
    Wedlund, Cyril Simon
    Univ Oslo, Dept Phys.
    Yang, L.
    Univ Oslo, Dept Phys.
    Karlsson, T.
    Royal Inst Technol, Alfvén Lab.
    Jarvinen, R.
    Finnish Meteorol Inst, Helsinki 00560.
    Broiles, Thomas
    Southwest Res Inst, San Antonio.
    Mandt, K.
    Southwest Res Inst, San Antonio; Univ Texas San Antonio, Dept Phys & Astron.
    Carr, C. M.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys.
    Galand, M.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys.
    Nilsson, H.
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, S-98128 Kiruna.
    Norberg, C.
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, S-98128 Kiruna.
    Cold and warm electrons at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko2017In: Astronomy and Astrophysics, ISSN 0004-6361, E-ISSN 1432-0746, Vol. 605, article id A15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context. Strong electron cooling on the neutral gas in cometary comae has been predicted for a long time, but actual measurements of low electron temperature are scarce. Aims. Our aim is to demonstrate the existence of cold electrons in the inner coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and show filamentation of this plasma.

    Methods. In situ measurements of plasma density, electron temperature and spacecraft potential were carried out by the Rosetta Langmuir probe instrument, LAP. We also performed analytical modelling of the expanding two-temperature electron gas.

    Results. LAP data acquired within a few hundred km from the nucleus are dominated by a warm component with electron temperature typically 5-10 eV at all heliocentric distances covered (1.25 to 3.83 AU). A cold component, with temperature no higher than about 0.1 eV, appears in the data as short (few to few tens of seconds) pulses of high probe current, indicating local enhancement of plasma density as well as a decrease in electron temperature. These pulses first appeared around 3 AU and were seen for longer periods close to perihelion. The general pattern of pulse appearance follows that of neutral gas and plasma density. We have not identified any periods with only cold electrons present. The electron flux to Rosetta was always dominated by higher energies, driving the spacecraft potential to order -10 V.

    Conclusions. The warm (5-10 eV) electron population observed throughout the mission is interpreted as electrons retaining the energy they obtained when released in the ionisation process. The sometimes observed cold populations with electron temperatures below 0.1 eV verify collisional cooling in the coma. The cold electrons were only observed together with the warm population. The general appearance of the cold population appears to be consistent with a Haser-like model, implicitly supporting also the coupling of ions to the neutral gas. The expanding cold plasma is unstable, forming filaments that we observe as pulses.

  • 13.
    Fuselier, S. A.
    et al.
    Southwest Res Inst, 6220 Culebra Rd, San Antonio, TX 78228 USA.;Univ Texas San Antonio, Dept Phys & Astron, San Antonio, TX 78249 USA..
    Altwegg, K.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, Sidlerstr 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Balsiger, H.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, Sidlerstr 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Berthelier, J. J.
    LATMOS, 4 Ave Neptune, F-94100 St Maur, France..
    Beth, A.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, Space & Atmospher Phys Grp, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England..
    Bieler, A.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, Sidlerstr 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland.;Univ Michigan, Dept Atmospher Ocean & Space Sci, 2455 Hayward, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA..
    Briois, C.
    Univ Orleans, CNRS, Lab Phys & Chim Environm & Espace LPC2E, UMR 6115, F-45071 Orleans, France..
    Broiles, T. W.
    Southwest Res Inst, 6220 Culebra Rd, San Antonio, TX 78228 USA..
    Burch, J. L.
    Southwest Res Inst, 6220 Culebra Rd, San Antonio, TX 78228 USA..
    Calmonte, U.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, Sidlerstr 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Cessateur, G.
    Belgian Inst Space Aeron BIRA IASB, Ringlaan 3, B-1180 Brussels, Belgium..
    Combi, M.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, Space & Atmospher Phys Grp, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England..
    De Keyser, J.
    Belgian Inst Space Aeron BIRA IASB, Ringlaan 3, B-1180 Brussels, Belgium..
    Fiethe, B.
    TU Braunschweig, Inst Comp & Network Engn IDA, Hans Sommer Str 66, D-38106 Braunschweig, Germany..
    Galand, M.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, Space & Atmospher Phys Grp, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England..
    Gasc, S.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, Sidlerstr 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Gombosi, T. I.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Atmospher Ocean & Space Sci, 2455 Hayward, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA..
    Gunell, H.
    Belgian Inst Space Aeron BIRA IASB, Ringlaan 3, B-1180 Brussels, Belgium..
    Hansen, K. C.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Atmospher Ocean & Space Sci, 2455 Hayward, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA..
    Hassig, M.
    Southwest Res Inst, 6220 Culebra Rd, San Antonio, TX 78228 USA..
    Heritier, K. L.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, Space & Atmospher Phys Grp, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England..
    Korth, A.
    Max Planck Inst Sonnensyst Forsch, Justus Von Liebig Weg 3, D-37077 Gottingen, Germany..
    Le Roy, L.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, Sidlerstr 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Luspay-Kuti, A.
    Southwest Res Inst, 6220 Culebra Rd, San Antonio, TX 78228 USA..
    Mall, U.
    Max Planck Inst Sonnensyst Forsch, Justus Von Liebig Weg 3, D-37077 Gottingen, Germany..
    Mandt, K. E.
    Southwest Res Inst, 6220 Culebra Rd, San Antonio, TX 78228 USA.;Univ Texas San Antonio, Dept Phys & Astron, San Antonio, TX 78249 USA..
    Petrinec, S. M.
    Lockheed Martin Adv Technol Ctr, Palo Alto, CA 94304 USA..
    Reme, H.
    Univ Toulouse, UPS OMP, IRAP, F-31400 Toulouse, France.;CNRS, IRAP, 9 Ave Colonel Roche,BP 44346, F-31028 Toulouse 4, France..
    Rinaldi, M.
    Southwest Res Inst, 6220 Culebra Rd, San Antonio, TX 78228 USA..
    Rubin, M.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, Sidlerstr 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Semon, T.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, Sidlerstr 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Trattner, K. J.
    Univ Colorado, Lab Atmospher & Space Phys, Boulder, CO 80303 USA..
    Tzou, C. -Y
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Waite, J. H.
    Southwest Res Inst, 6220 Culebra Rd, San Antonio, TX 78228 USA.;Univ Texas San Antonio, Dept Phys & Astron, San Antonio, TX 78249 USA..
    Wurz, P.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, Sidlerstr 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Ion chemistry in the coma of comet 67P near perihelion2016In: Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, ISSN 0035-8711, E-ISSN 1365-2966, Vol. 462, p. S67-S77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The coma and the comet-solar wind interaction of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko changed dramatically from the initial Rosetta spacecraft encounter in 2014 August through perihelion in 2015 August. Just before equinox (at 1.6 au from the Sun), the solar wind signal disappeared and two regions of different cometary ion characteristics were observed. These 'outer' and 'inner' regions have cometary ion characteristics similar to outside and inside the ion pileup region observed during the Giotto approach to comet 1P/Halley. Rosetta/Double-Focusing Mass Spectrometer ion mass spectrometer observations are used here to investigate the H3O+/H2O+ ratio in the outer and inner regions at 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The H3O+/H2O+ ratio and the H3O+ signal are observed to increase in the transition from the outer to the inner region and the H3O+ signal appears to be weakly correlated with cometary ion energy. These ion composition changes are similar to the ones observed during the 1P/Halley flyby. Modelling is used to determine the importance of neutral composition and transport of neutrals and ions away from the nucleus. This modelling demonstrates that changes in the H3O+/H2O+ ratio appear to be driven largely by transport properties and only weakly by neutral composition in the coma.

  • 14.
    Fuselier, S. A.
    et al.
    SW Res Inst, Div Space Sci, San Antonio, TX 78228 USA.;Univ Texas San Antonio, Dept Phys & Astron, San Antonio, TX 78249 USA..
    Altwegg, K.
    Univ Bern, Inst Phys, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Balsiger, H.
    Univ Bern, Inst Phys, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Berthelier, J. J.
    LATMOS, F-94100 St Maur, France..
    Bieler, A.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Atmospher Ocean & Space Sci, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA..
    Briois, C.
    Univ Orleans, CNRS, UMR 6115, Lab Phys & Chim Environm & Espace LPC2E, F-45071 Orleans 2, France..
    Broiles, T. W.
    SW Res Inst, Div Space Sci, San Antonio, TX 78228 USA..
    Burch, J. L.
    SW Res Inst, Div Space Sci, San Antonio, TX 78228 USA..
    Calmonte, U.
    Univ Bern, Inst Phys, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Cessateur, G.
    Belgian Inst Space Aeron BIRA IASB, B-1180 Brussels, Belgium..
    Combi, M.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Atmospher Ocean & Space Sci, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA..
    De Keyser, J.
    Belgian Inst Space Aeron BIRA IASB, B-1180 Brussels, Belgium..
    Fiethe, B.
    Tech Univ Carolo Wilhelmina Braunschweig, Inst Comp & Network Engn IDA, D-38106 Braunschweig, Germany..
    Galand, M.
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Dept Phys, Space & Atmospher Phys Grp, London SW7 2AZ, England..
    Gasc, S.
    Univ Bern, Inst Phys, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Gombosi, T. I.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Atmospher Ocean & Space Sci, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA..
    Gune, H.
    Belgian Inst Space Aeron BIRA IASB, B-1180 Brussels, Belgium..
    Hansen, K. C.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Atmospher Ocean & Space Sci, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA..
    Haessig, M.
    SW Res Inst, Div Space Sci, San Antonio, TX 78228 USA..
    Jaeckel, A.
    Univ Bern, Inst Phys, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Korth, A.
    Max Planck Inst Sonnensyst Forsch, D-37077 Gottingen, Germany..
    Le Roy, L.
    Univ Bern, Inst Phys, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Mall, U.
    Max Planck Inst Sonnensyst Forsch, D-37077 Gottingen, Germany..
    Mandt, K. E.
    SW Res Inst, Div Space Sci, San Antonio, TX 78228 USA..
    Petrinec, S. M.
    Lockheed Martin Adv Technol Ctr, Palo Alto, CA 94304 USA..
    Raghuram, S.
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Dept Phys, Space & Atmospher Phys Grp, London SW7 2AZ, England..
    Reme, H.
    Univ Toulouse, UPS OMP, IRAP, F-31028 Toulouse, France.;CNRS, IRAP, F-31028 Toulouse 4, France..
    Rinaldi, M.
    SW Res Inst, Div Space Sci, San Antonio, TX 78228 USA..
    Rubin, M.
    Univ Bern, Inst Phys, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Semon, T.
    Univ Bern, Inst Phys, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Trattner, K. J.
    Univ Colorado, Lab Atmospher & Space Phys, Boulder, CO 80303 USA..
    Tzou, C. -Y
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Waite, J. H.
    SW Res Inst, Div Space Sci, San Antonio, TX 78228 USA.;Univ Texas San Antonio, Dept Phys & Astron, San Antonio, TX 78249 USA..
    Wurz, P.
    Univ Bern, Inst Phys, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    ROSINA/DFMS and IES observations of 67P: Ion-neutral chemistry in the coma of a weakly outgassing comet2015In: Astronomy and Astrophysics, ISSN 0004-6361, E-ISSN 1432-0746, Vol. 583, article id A2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context. The Rosetta encounter with comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko provides a unique opportunity for an in situ, up-close investigation of ion-neutral chemistry in the coma of a weakly outgassing comet far from the Sun. Aims. Observations of primary and secondary ions and modeling are used to investigate the role of ion-neutral chemistry within the thin coma. Methods. Observations from late October through mid-December 2014 show the continuous presence of the solar wind 30 km from the comet nucleus. These and other observations indicate that there is no contact surface and the solar wind has direct access to the nucleus. On several occasions during this time period, the Rosetta/ROSINA/Double Focusing Mass Spectrometer measured the low-energy ion composition in the coma. Organic volatiles and water group ions and their breakup products (masses 14 through 19), COP, and CO, (masses 28 and 44) and other mass peaks (at masses 26, 27, and possibly 30) were observed. Secondary ions include H3O+ and HCO+ (masses 19 and 29). These secondary ions indicate ion-neutral chemistry in the thin coma of the comet. A relatively simple model is constructed to account for the low H3O /H2O+ and HCO /CO+ ratios observed in a water dominated coma. Results from this simple model are compared with results from models that include a more detailed chemical reaction network. Results. At low outgassing rates, predictions from the simple model agree with observations and with results from more complex models that include much more chemistry. At higher outgassing rates, the ion-neutral chemistry is still limited and high HCO /CO+ ratios are predicted and observed. However, at higher outgassing rates, the model predicts high H3O /H2O+ ratios and the observed ratios are often low. These low ratios may be the result of the highly heterogeneous nature of the coma, where CO and CO2 number densities can exceed that of water.

  • 15.
    Galand, M.
    et al.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England..
    Heritier, K. L.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England..
    Odelstad, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Henri, P.
    Univ Orleans, CNRS, LPC2E, 3A,Ave Rech Sci, F-45071 Orleans 2, France..
    Broiles, T. W.
    Southwest Res Inst, PO Drawer 28510, San Antonio, TX 78228 USA..
    Allen, A. J.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England..
    Altwegg, K.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, Sidlerstr 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Beth, A.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England..
    Burch, J. L.
    Southwest Res Inst, PO Drawer 28510, San Antonio, TX 78228 USA..
    Carr, C. M.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England..
    Cupido, E.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England..
    Eriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Glassmeier, K. -H
    Johansson, Fredrik L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Lebreton, J. -P
    Mandt, K. E.
    Southwest Res Inst, PO Drawer 28510, San Antonio, TX 78228 USA..
    Nilsson, H.
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, POB 812, SE-98128 Kiruna, Sweden..
    Richter, I.
    TU Braunschweig, Inst Geophys & Extraterr Phys, Mendelssohnstr 3, D-38106 Braunschweig, Germany..
    Rubin, M.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, Sidlerstr 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Sagnieres, L. B. M.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England..
    Schwartz, S. J.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England..
    Semon, T.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, Sidlerstr 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Tzou, C. -Y
    Vallieres, X.
    Univ Orleans, CNRS, LPC2E, 3A,Ave Rech Sci, F-45071 Orleans 2, France..
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Wurz, P.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, Sidlerstr 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Ionospheric plasma of comet 67P probed by Rosetta at 3 au from the Sun2016In: Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, ISSN 0035-8711, E-ISSN 1365-2966, Vol. 462, p. S331-S351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose to identify the main sources of ionization of the plasma in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko at different locations in the coma and to quantify their relative importance, for the first time, for close cometocentric distances (< 20 km) and large heliocentric distances (> 3 au). The ionospheric model proposed is used as an organizing element of a multi-instrument data set from the Rosetta Plasma Consortium (RPC) plasma and particle sensors, from the Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis and from the Microwave Instrument on the Rosetta Orbiter, all on board the ESA/Rosetta spacecraft. The calculated ionospheric density driven by Rosetta observations is compared to the RPC-Langmuir Probe and RPC-Mutual Impedance Probe electron density. The main cometary plasma sources identified are photoionization of solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation and energetic electron-impact ionization. Over the northern, summer hemisphere, the solar EUV radiation is found to drive the electron density - with occasional periods when energetic electrons are also significant. Over the southern, winter hemisphere, photoionization alone cannot explain the observed electron density, which reaches sometimes higher values than over the summer hemisphere; electron-impact ionization has to be taken into account. The bulk of the electron population is warm with temperature of the order of 7-10 eV. For increased neutral densities, we show evidence of partial energy degradation of the hot electron energy tail and cooling of the full electron population.

  • 16.
    Hadid, Lina Z
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Morooka, Michiko W.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Wahlund, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Moore, L.
    Boston Univ, Ctr Space Phys, Boston, MA 02215 USA.
    Cravens, T. E.
    Univ Kansas, Dept Phys & Astron, Lawrence, KS 66045 USA.
    Hedman, M. M.
    Univ Idaho, Dept Phys, Moscow, ID USA.
    Edberg, Niklas J. T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Waite, J. H., Jr.
    Southwest Res Inst, Space Sci & Engn Div, San Antonio, TX USA.
    Perryman, R.
    Southwest Res Inst, Space Sci & Engn Div, San Antonio, TX USA.
    Kurth, W. S.
    Univ Iowa, Dept Phys & Astron, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA.
    Farrell, W. M.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA.
    Eriksson, Anders I.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Ring Shadowing Effects on Saturn's Ionosphere: Implications for Ring Opacity and Plasma Transport2018In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 45, no 19, p. 10084-10092Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present new results obtained by the Radio and Plasma Wave Science Langmuir probe on board Cassini during the Grand Finale. The total direct current sampled by the Langmuir probe at negative bias voltage is used to study the effect of the ring shadows on the structure of the Kronian topside ionosphere. The D and C rings and the Cassini Division are confirmed to be optically thin to extreme ultraviolet solar radiation. However, different responses from the opaque A and B rings are observed. The edges of the A ring shadow are shown to match the A ring boundaries, unlike the B ring, which indicates variable responses to the B ring shadow. We show that the variable responses are due to the ionospheric plasma, more precisely to the longer chemical lifetime of H+ compared to H-2(+) and H-3(+), suggesting that the plasma is transported from the sunlit region to the shadowed one in the ionosphere. Plain Language Summary As Saturn's northern hemisphere experienced summer during the Grand Finale, the planet's northern dayside hemisphere and its rings were fully illuminated by the Sun. However, the southern hemisphere was partly obscured because of the shadows cast by the A and B rings. Using the in situ measurements of the Langmuir probe part of the Radio and Plasma Wave Science investigation on board the Cassini spacecraft, we study for the first time the effect of the ring shadows on Saturn's ionosphere. From the ring shadows signatures on the total ion current collected by the Langmuir probe, we show that the A and B rings are optically thicker (to the solar extreme ultraviolet radiation) than the inner C and D rings and the Cassini Division to the solar extreme ultraviolet radiation. Moreover, we reproduce the boundaries of the A ring and the outer edge of the B ring. Furthermore, observed variations with respect to the inner edge of the B ring imply a delayed response of the ionospheric H+ because of its long lifetime and suggest that the ionospheric plasma is transported from an unshadowed region to a shadowed one in the ionosphere.

  • 17.
    Henri, P.
    et al.
    CNRS, LPC2E, F-45071 Orleans, France;CNRS, LPC2E, 3A Ave Rech Sci, F-45071 Orleans, France.
    Vallieres, X.
    CNRS, LPC2E, F-45071 Orleans, France.
    Hajra, R.
    CNRS, LPC2E, F-45071 Orleans, France.
    Goetz, C.
    TU Braunschweig, Inst Geophys & Extraterr Phys, Mendelssohnstr 3, D-38106 Braunschweig, Germany.
    Richter, I.
    TU Braunschweig, Inst Geophys & Extraterr Phys, Mendelssohnstr 3, D-38106 Braunschweig, Germany.
    Glassmeier, K. -H
    Galand, M.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England.
    Rubin, M.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, Sidlerstr 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland.
    Eriksson, Anders I.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Nemeth, Z.
    Wigner Res Ctr Phys, Budapest, Hungary.
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Beth, A.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England.
    Burch, J. L.
    Southwest Res Inst, PO Drawer 28510, San Antonio, TX 78228 USA.
    Carr, C.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England.
    Nilsson, H.
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, POB 812, SE-98128 Kiruna, Sweden.
    Tsurutani, B.
    CALTECH, Jet Prop Lab, 4800 Oak Grove Dr, Pasadena, CA 91125 USA.
    Wattieaux, G.
    Univ Toulouse, CNRS, LAPLACE, F-31062 Toulouse, France.
    Diamagnetic region(s): structure of the unmagnetized plasma around Comet 67P/CG2017In: Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, ISSN 0035-8711, E-ISSN 1365-2966, Vol. 469, p. S372-S379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ESA's comet chaser Rosetta has monitored the evolution of the ionized atmosphere of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P/CG) and its interaction with the solar wind, during more than 2 yr. Around perihelion, while the cometary outgassing rate was highest, Rosetta crossed hundreds of unmagnetized regions, but did not seem to have crossed a large-scale diamagnetic cavity as anticipated. Using in situ Rosetta observations, we characterize the structure of the unmagnetized plasma found around comet 67P/CG. Plasma density measurements from RPC-MIP are analysed in the unmagnetized regions identified with RPC-MAG. The plasma observations are discussed in the context of the cometary escaping neutral atmosphere, observed by ROSINA/COPS. The plasma density in the different diamagnetic regions crossed by Rosetta ranges from similar to 100 to similar to 1500 cm(-3). They exhibit a remarkably systematic behaviour that essentially depends on the comet activity and the cometary ionosphere expansion. An effective total ionization frequency is obtained from in situ observations during the high outgassing activity phase of comet 67P/CG. Although several diamagnetic regions have been crossed over a large range of distances to the comet nucleus (from 50 to 400 km) and to the Sun (1.25-2.4 au), in situ observations give strong evidence for a single diamagnetic region, located close to the electron exobase. Moreover, the observations are consistent with an unstable contact surface that can locally extend up to about 10 times the electron exobase.

  • 18.
    Heritier, K. L.
    et al.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England.
    Altwegg, K.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, Sidlerstr 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland.
    Balsiger, H.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, Sidlerstr 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland.
    Berthelier, J. -J
    Beth, A.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England.
    Bieler, A.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, Sidlerstr 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland.
    Biver, N.
    Univ Paris Diderot, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Sorbonne Univ, CNRS,PSL Res Univ,Observat Paris,LESIA, Sorbonne Paris Cite,5 Pl Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon, France.
    Calmonte, U.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, Sidlerstr 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland.
    Combi, M. R.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Atmospher Ocean & Space Sci, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA.
    De Keyser, J.
    Royal Belgian Inst Space Aeron, BIRA IASB, Ringlaan 3, B-1180 Brussels, Belgium.
    Eriksson, Anders I.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Fiethe, B.
    TU Braunschweig, Inst Comp & Network Engn IDA, D-38106 Braunschweig, Germany.
    Fougere, N.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Atmospher Ocean & Space Sci, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA.
    Fuselier, S. A.
    Southwest Res Inst, PO Drawer 28510, San Antonio, TX 78228 USA;Univ Texas San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78249 USA.
    Galand, M.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England.
    Gasc, S.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, Sidlerstr 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland.
    Gombosi, T. I.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Atmospher Ocean & Space Sci, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA.
    Hansen, K. C.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Atmospher Ocean & Space Sci, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA.
    Hassig, M.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, Sidlerstr 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland;Southwest Res Inst, PO Drawer 28510, San Antonio, TX 78228 USA.
    Kopp, E.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, Sidlerstr 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland.
    Odelstad, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Rubin, M.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, Sidlerstr 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland.
    Tzou, C. -Y
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Vuitton, V.
    Univ Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, IPAG, F-38000 Grenoble, France.
    Ion composition at comet 67P near perihelion: Rosetta observations and model-based interpretation2017In: Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, ISSN 0035-8711, E-ISSN 1365-2966, Vol. 469, p. S427-S442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the ion composition in the coma of comet 67P with newly detected ion species over the 28-37 u mass range, probed by Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis (ROSINA)/Double Focusing Mass Spectrometer (DFMS). In summer 2015, the nucleus reached its highest outgassing rate and ion-neutral reactions started to take place at low cometocentric distances. Minor neutrals can efficiently capture protons from the ion population, making the protonated version of these neutrals a major ion species. So far, only NH4+ has been reported at comet 67P. However, there are additional neutral species with proton affinities higher than that of water (besides NH3) that have been detected in the coma of comet 67P: CH3OH, HCN, H2CO and H2S. Their protonated versions have all been detected. Statistics showing the number of detections with respect to the number of scans are presented. The effect of the negative spacecraft potential probed by the Rosetta Plasma Consortium/LAngmuir Probe on ion detection is assessed. An ionospheric model has been developed to assess the different ion density profiles and compare them to the ROSINA/DFMS measurements. It is also used to interpret the ROSINA/DFMS observations when different ion species have similar masses, and their respective densities are not high enough to disentangle them using the ROSINA/DFMS high-resolution mode. The different ion species that have been reported in the coma of 67P are summarized and compared with the ions detected at comet 1P/Halley during the Giotto mission.

  • 19.
    Heritier, K. L.
    et al.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England.
    Henri, P.
    Univ Orleans, CNRS, LPC2E, F-45100 Orleans, France.
    Vallieres, X.
    Univ Orleans, CNRS, LPC2E, F-45100 Orleans, France.
    Galand, M.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England.
    Odelstad, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Eriksson, Anders I.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Johansson, F. L.
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, Angstrom Lab, Lagerhyddsvagen 1, SE-75237 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Altwegg, K.
    Univ Bern, Inst Phys, Sidlerstr 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland.
    Behar, E.
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, POB 812, SE-98128 Kiruna, Sweden.
    Beth, A.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England.
    Broiles, T. W.
    Southwest Res Inst, PO Drawer 28510, San Antonio, TX 78228 USA.
    Burch, J. L.
    Southwest Res Inst, PO Drawer 28510, San Antonio, TX 78228 USA.
    Carr, C. M.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England.
    Cupido, E.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England.
    Nilsson, H.
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, POB 812, SE-98128 Kiruna, Sweden.
    Rubin, M.
    Univ Bern, Inst Phys, Sidlerstr 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland.
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Vertical structure of the near-surface expanding ionosphere of comet 67P probed by Rosetta2017In: Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, ISSN 0035-8711, E-ISSN 1365-2966, Vol. 469, p. S118-S129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The plasma environment has been measured for the first time near the surface of a comet. This unique data set has been acquired at 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko during ESA/Rosetta spacecraft's final descent on 2016 September 30. The heliocentric distance was 3.8 au and the comet was weakly outgassing. Electron density was continuously measured with Rosetta Plasma Consortium (RPC)-Mutual Impedance Probe (MIP) and RPC-LAngmuir Probe (LAP) during the descent from a cometocentric distance of 20 km down to the surface. Data set from both instruments have been cross-calibrated for redundancy and accuracy. To analyse this data set, we have developed a model driven by Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis-COmetary Pressure Sensor total neutral density. The two ionization sources considered are solar extreme ultraviolet radiation and energetic electrons. The latter are estimated from the RPC-Ion and Electron Sensor (IES) and corrected for the spacecraft potential probed by RPC-LAP. We have compared the results of the model to the electron densities measured by RPC-MIP and RPC-LAP at the location of the spacecraft. We find good agreement between observed and modelled electron densities. The energetic electrons have access to the surface of the nucleus and contribute as the main ionization source. As predicted, the measurements exhibit a peak in the ionospheric density close to the surface. The location and magnitude of the peak are estimated analytically. The measured ionospheric densities cannot be explained with a constant outflow velocity model. The use of a neutral model with an expanding outflow is critical to explain the plasma observations.

  • 20.
    Holmberg, M. K. G.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy. Univ Toulouse, CNES, UPS, IRAP,CNRS, Toulouse, France..
    Shebanits, Oleg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy.
    Wahlund, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy.
    Morooka, Michiko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Swedish Inst Space Phys, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Andre, N.
    Univ Toulouse, CNES, UPS, IRAP,CNRS, Toulouse, France..
    Garnier, P.
    Univ Toulouse, CNES, UPS, IRAP,CNRS, Toulouse, France..
    Persoon, A. M.
    Univ Iowa, Dept Phys & Astron, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA..
    Genot, V.
    Univ Toulouse, CNES, UPS, IRAP,CNRS, Toulouse, France..
    Gilbert, L. K.
    Univ Coll London, Mullard Space Sci Lab, Dorking, Surrey, England..
    Density Structures, Dynamics, and Seasonal and Solar Cycle Modulations of Saturn's Inner Plasma Disk2017In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics, ISSN 2169-9380, E-ISSN 2169-9402, Vol. 122, no 12, p. 12258-12273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present statistical results from the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) Langmuir probe measurements recorded during the time interval from orbit 3 (1 February 2005) to 237 (29 June 2016). A new and improved data analysis method to obtain ion density from the Cassini LP measurements is used to study the asymmetries and modulations found in the inner plasma disk of Saturn, between 2.5 and 12 Saturn radii (1 RS = 60, 268 km). The structure of Saturn's plasma disk is mapped, and the plasma density peak, n(max), is shown to be located at similar to 4.6 RS and not at the main neutral source region at 3.95 RS. The shift in the location of n(max) is due to that the hot electron impact ionization rate peaks at similar to 4.6 RS. Cassini RPWS plasma disk measurements show a solar cycle modulation. However, estimates of the change in ion density due to varying EUV flux is not large enough to describe the detected dependency, which implies that an additional mechanism, still unknown, is also affecting the plasma density in the studied region. We also present a dayside/nightside ion density asymmetry, with nightside densities up to a factor of 2 larger than on the dayside. The largest density difference is found in the radial region 4 to 5 RS. The dynamic variation in ion density increases toward Saturn, indicating an internal origin of the large density variability in the plasma disk rather than being caused by an external source origin in the outer magnetosphere.

  • 21.
    Holmberg, Mika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Wahlund, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Cassidy, Tim
    Univ Colorado, Atmospher & Space Phys Lab, Campus Box 392, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Andrews, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Transport and chemical loss rates in Saturn's inner plasma disk2016In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics, ISSN 2169-9380, E-ISSN 2169-9402, Vol. 121, no 3, p. 2321-2334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Kronian moon Enceladus is constantly feeding its surrounding with new gas and dust, from cryovolcanoes located in its south polar region. Through photoionization and impact ionization of the neutrals a plasma disk is created, which mainly contains hydrogen ions H+ and water group ions W+. This paper investigates the importance of ion loss by outward radial transport and ion loss by dissociative recombination, which is the dominant chemical loss process in the inner plasma disk. We use plasma densities derived from several years of measurements by the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) electric field spectrums and Langmuir probe (LP), to derive the total flux tube content NL2. Our calculation show that NL2 agrees well with earlier estimates within L shell 8. We also show that loss by transport dominates chemical loss in between L shell 2.5 and 10. The loss rate by transport is ∼5 times larger at 5 Saturn radii (1 RS = 60,268 km) and the difference is increasing as L7.7 for larger radial distances, for the total ion population. Chemical loss may still be important for the structure of the plasma disk in the region closest to Enceladus (∼±0.5 RS) at 3.95 RS, since the transport and chemical loss rates only differ by a factor of ∼2 in this region. We also derive the total plasma content of the plasma disk from L shell 4 to 10 to be 1.9×10^33 ions, and the total ion source rate for the same region to be 5.8×10^27 s^−1. The equatorial ion production rate P, ranges from 2.6×10^−5 cm^−3s^−1 (at L = 10) to 1.1×10^−4 cm^−3s^−1 (at L = 4.8). The net mass loading rate is derived to be 123 kg/s for L shell 4 to 10. 

  • 22.
    Johansson, Fredrik L.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Odelstad, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Paulsson, J. J. P.
    Univ Oslo, Dept Phys, Sem Saelands Vei 24,Postbox 1048, N-0317 Oslo, Norway.
    Harang, S. S.
    Univ Oslo, Dept Phys, Sem Saelands Vei 24,Postbox 1048, N-0317 Oslo, Norway.
    Eriksson, Anders I.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Mannel, T.
    Austrian Acad Sci, Space Res Inst, Schmiedlstr 6, A-8042 Graz, Austria;Karl Franzens Univ Graz, Phys Inst, Univ Pl 5, A-8010 Graz, Austria.
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Edberg, Niklas J. T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Miloch, W. J.
    Univ Oslo, Dept Phys, Sem Saelands Vei 24,Postbox 1048, N-0317 Oslo, Norway.
    Wedlund, C. Simon
    Univ Oslo, Dept Phys, Sem Saelands Vei 24,Postbox 1048, N-0317 Oslo, Norway.
    Thiemann, E.
    Univ Colorado, Lab Atmospher & Space Phys, 3665 Discovery Dr, Boulder, CO 80303 USA.
    Eparvier, F.
    Univ Colorado, Lab Atmospher & Space Phys, 3665 Discovery Dr, Boulder, CO 80303 USA.
    Andersson, L.
    Univ Colorado, Lab Atmospher & Space Phys, 3665 Discovery Dr, Boulder, CO 80303 USA.
    Rosetta photoelectron emission and solar ultraviolet flux at comet 67P2017In: Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, ISSN 0035-8711, E-ISSN 1365-2966, Vol. 469, p. S626-S635Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Langmuir Probe instrument on Rosetta monitored the photoelectron emission current of the probes during the Rosetta mission at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, in essence acting as a photodiode monitoring the solar ultraviolet radiation at wavelengths below 250 nm. We have used three methods of extracting the photoelectron saturation current from the Langmuir probe measurements. The resulting data set can be used as an index of the solar far and extreme ultraviolet at the Rosetta spacecraft position, including flares, in wavelengths which are important for photoionization of the cometary neutral gas. Comparing the photoemission current to data measurements by MAVEN/EUVM and TIMED/SEE, we find good correlation when 67P was at large heliocentric distances early and late in the mission, but up to 50 per cent decrease of the expected photoelectron current at perihelion. We discuss possible reasons for the photoemission decrease, including scattering and absorption by nanograins created by disintegration of cometary dust far away from the nucleus.

  • 23.
    Morooka, Michiko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Wahlund, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Hadid, Lina Z.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Eriksson, Anders I.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Edberg, Niklas J. T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Andrews, David J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Persoon, A. M.
    Univ Iowa, Dept Phys & Astron, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA.
    Kurth, W. S.
    Univ Iowa, Dept Phys & Astron, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA.
    Gurnett, D. A.
    Univ Iowa, Dept Phys & Astron, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA.
    Farrell, W. M.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA.
    Waite, J. H.
    Southwest Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA.
    Perryman, R. S.
    Southwest Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA.
    Perry, M.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Appl Phys Lab, Laurel, MD USA.
    Saturn's Dusty Ionosphere2019In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics, ISSN 2169-9380, E-ISSN 2169-9402, Vol. 124, no 3, p. 1679-1697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Measurements of electrons and ions in Saturn's ionosphere down to 1,500-km altitudes as well as the ring crossing region above the ionosphere obtained by the Langmuir probe onboard the Cassini spacecraft are presented. Five nearly identical deep ionosphere flybys during the Grand Finale orbits and the Final plunge orbit revealed a rapid increase in the plasma densities and discrepancies between the electrons and ions densities (N-e and N-i) near the closest approach. The small N-e/N-i ratio indicates the presence of a dusty plasma, a plasma which charge carrier is dominated by negatively charged heavy particles. Comparison of the Langmuir probe obtained density with the light ion density obtained by the Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer confirmed the presence of heavy ions. An unexpected positive floating potential of the probe was also observed when N-e/N-i << 1. This suggests that Saturn's ionosphere near the density peak is in a dusty plasma state consisting of negatively and positively charged heavy cluster ions. The electron temperature (T-e) characteristics in the ionosphere are also investigated and unexpectedly high electron temperature value, up to 5000 K, has been observed below 2,500-km altitude in a region where electron-neutral collisions should be prominent. A well-defined relationship between T-e and N-e/N-i ratio was found, implying that the electron heating at low altitudes is related to the dusty plasma state of the ionosphere.

  • 24.
    Nilsson, Hans
    et al.
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, Box 812, SE-98128 Kiruna, Sweden;Lulea Univ Technol, Dept Comp Sci Elect & Space Engn, SE-98128 Kiruna, Sweden.
    Wieser, Gabriella Stenberg
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, Box 812, SE-98128 Kiruna, Sweden.
    Behar, Etienne
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, Box 812, SE-98128 Kiruna, Sweden;Lulea Univ Technol, Dept Comp Sci Elect & Space Engn, SE-98128 Kiruna, Sweden.
    Gunell, Herbert
    Royal Belgian Inst Space Aeron, Ave Circulaire 3, B-1180 Brussels, Belgium;Umea Univ, Dept Phys, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden.
    Wieser, Martin
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, Box 812, SE-98128 Kiruna, Sweden.
    Galand, Marina
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England.
    Wedlund, Cyril Simon
    Univ Oslo, Dept Phys, POB 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo, Norway.
    Alho, Markku
    Aalto Univ, Sch Elect Engn, Dept Elect & Nanoengn, POB 15500, FI-00076 Aalto, Finland.
    Goetz, Charlotte
    Tech Univ Carolo Wilhelmina Braunschweig, Inst Geophys & Extraterr Phys, Mendelssohnstr 3, D-38106 Braunschweig, Germany.
    Yamauchi, Masatoshi
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, Box 812, SE-98128 Kiruna, Sweden.
    Henri, Pierre
    CNRS, LPC2E, 3A Ave Rech Sci, F-45071 Orleans 2, France.
    Odelstad, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Evolution of the ion environment of comet 67P during the Rosetta mission as seen by RPC-ICA2017In: Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, ISSN 0035-8711, E-ISSN 1365-2966, Vol. 469, p. S252-S261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rosetta has followed comet 67P from low activity at more than 3.6 au heliocentric distance to high activity at perihelion (1.24 au) and then out again. We provide a general overview of the evolution of the dynamic ion environment using data from the RPC-ICA ion spectrometer. We discuss where Rosetta was located within the evolving comet magnetosphere. For the initial observations, the solar wind permeated all of the coma. In 2015 mid-April, the solar wind started to disappear from the observation region, to re-appear again in 2015 December. Low-energy cometary ions were seen at first when Rosetta was about 100 km from the nucleus at 3.6 au, and soon after consistently throughout the mission except during the excursions to farther distances from the comet. The observed flux of low-energy ions was relatively constant due to Rosetta's orbit changing with comet activity. Accelerated cometary ions, moving mainly in the antisunward direction gradually became more common as comet activity increased. These accelerated cometary ions kept being observed also after the solar wind disappeared from the location of Rosetta, with somewhat higher fluxes further away from the nucleus. Around perihelion, when Rosetta was relatively deep within the comet magnetosphere, the fluxes of accelerated cometary ions decreased, as did their maximum energy. The disappearance of more energetic cometary ions at close distance during high activity is suggested to be due to a flow pattern where these ions flow around the obstacle of the denser coma or due to charge exchange losses.

  • 25.
    Odelstad, Elias
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Eriksson, Anders I.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Edberg, Niklas J. T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Johansson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    André, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Tzou, C. -Y
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, Bern, Switzerland.
    Carr, C.
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Space & Atmospher Phys Grp, London, England..
    Cupido, E.
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Space & Atmospher Phys Grp, London, England..
    Evolution of the plasma environment of comet 67P from spacecraft potential measurements by the Rosetta Langmuir probe instrument2015In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 42, no 23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the evolution of the plasma environment of comet 67P using measurements of the spacecraft potential from early September 2014 (heliocentric distance 3.5 AU) to late March 2015 (2.1 AU) obtained by the Langmuir probe instrument. The low collision rate keeps the electron temperature high (similar to 5 eV), resulting in a negative spacecraft potential whose magnitude depends on the electron density. This potential is more negative in the northern (summer) hemisphere, particularly over sunlit parts of the neck region on the nucleus, consistent with neutral gas measurements by the Cometary Pressure Sensor of the Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis. Assuming constant electron temperature, the spacecraft potential traces the electron density. This increases as the comet approaches the Sun, most clearly in the southern hemisphere by a factor possibly as high as 20-44 between September 2014 and January 2015. The northern hemisphere plasma density increase stays around or below a factor of 8-12, consistent with seasonal insolation change.

  • 26.
    Odelstad, Elias
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Eriksson, Anders I.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Johansson, Fredrik L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Henri, Pierre
    Gilet, Nicolas
    Héritier, Kevin
    Vallières, Xavier
    Rubin, Martin
    André, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Ion Velocity and Electron Temperature Inside and Around the Diamagnetic Cavity of Comet 67P2018In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics, ISSN 2169-9380, E-ISSN 2169-9402, Vol. 123, no 7, p. 5870-5893Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract A major point of interest in cometary plasma physics has been the diamagnetic cavity, an unmagnetized region in the innermost part of the coma. Here we combine Langmuir and Mutual Impedance Probe measurements to investigate ion velocities and electron temperatures in the diamagnetic cavity of comet 67P, probed by the Rosetta spacecraft. We find ion velocities generally in the range 2?4 km/s, significantly above the expected neutral velocity 1 km/s, showing that the ions are (partially) decoupled from the neutrals, indicating that ion-neutral drag was not responsible for balancing the outside magnetic pressure. Observations of clear wake effects on one of the Langmuir probes showed that the ion flow was close to radial and supersonic, at least with respect to the perpendicular temperature, inside the cavity and possibly in the surrounding region as well. We observed spacecraft potentials  V throughout the cavity, showing that a population of warm (?5 eV) electrons was present throughout the parts of the cavity reached by Rosetta. Also, a population of cold ( ) electrons was consistently observed throughout the cavity, but less consistently in the surrounding region, suggesting that while Rosetta never entered a region of collisionally coupled electrons, such a region was possibly not far away during the cavity crossings.

  • 27.
    Sagnieres, Luc B. M.
    et al.
    Univ London, London, England.
    Galand, Marina
    Univ London, London, England.
    Cui, Jun
    Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing, Peoples R China.
    Lavvas, Panayotis P.
    Univ Reims, Reims, France.
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Vuitton, Veronique
    Inst Planetol & Astrophys Grenoble, Grenoble, France.
    Yelle, Roger V.
    Univ Arizona, Tucson, USA.
    Wellbrock, Anne
    Univ Coll London, England..
    Coates, Andrew J.
    Univ Coll London, England..
    Influence of local ionization on ionospheric densities in Titan's upper atmosphere2015In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics, ISSN 2169-9380, E-ISSN 2169-9402, Vol. 120, no 7, p. 5899-5921Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Titan has the most chemically complex ionosphere of the solar system. The main sources of ions on the dayside are ionization by EUV solar radiation and on the nightside include ionization by precipitated electrons from Saturn's magnetosphere and transport of ions from the dayside, but many questions remain open. How well do models predict local ionization rates? How strongly do the ionization processes drive the ionospheric densities locally? To address these questions, we have carried out an analysis of ion densities from the Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) from 16 close flybys of Titan's upper atmosphere. Using a simple chemical model applied to the INMS data set, we have calculated the ion production rates and local ionization frequencies associated with primary ions and . We find that on the dayside the solar energy deposition model overestimates the INMS-derived production rates by a factor of 2. On the nightside, however, the model driven by suprathermal electron intensities from the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer Electron Spectrometer sometimes agrees and other times underestimates the INMS-derived production rates by a factor of up to 2-3. We find that below 1200km, all ion number densities correlate with the local ionization frequency, although the correlation is significantly stronger for short-lived ions than long-lived ions. Furthermore, we find that, for a given N-2 local ionization frequency, has higher densities on the dayside than on the nightside. We explain that this is due to CH4 being more efficiently ionized by solar photons than by magnetospheric electrons for a given amount of N-2 ionization.

  • 28.
    Shebanits, Oleg
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Wahlund, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Edberg, Niklas J. T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Cui, Jun
    School of Atmospheric Sciences, Sun Yat-Sen University, China.
    Mandt, Kathleen
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, USA.; Space Science and Engineering Division, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX, USA..
    Waite, Hunter
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, USA.
    Photoionization modeling of Titan’s dayside ionosphere2017In: Astrophysical Journal Letters, ISSN 2041-8205, E-ISSN 2041-8213, Vol. 850, no 2, article id L26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous modeling studies of Titan’s dayside ionosphere predicts electron numberdensities roughly a factor of 2 higher than observed by the RPWS/Langmuir probe. The issuecan equivalently be described as that the ratio between the calculated electron productionrates and the square of the observed electron number densities result in roughly a factor of4 higher effective recombination coefficient than expected from the ion composition and theelectron temperature. Here we make an extended reassessment of Titan’s dayside ionizationbalance focusing on 34 flybys between TA and T120. Using a re-calibrated dataset and bytaking the presence of negative ions into account we arrive at lower effective recombinationcoefficients compared with earlier studies. The values are still higher than expected from theion composition and the electron temperature, but by a factor of ~2 − 3 instead of a factorof ~4. We have also investigated whether the derived effective recombination coefficientsdisplay dependencies on parameters such as the solar zenith angle, the integrated solar EUVintensity (< 80 nm) and the corotational plasma ram direction and found statisticallysignificant trends which may be explained by a declining photoionization against thebackground ionization by magnetospheric particles (SZA, RAM) and altered photochemistry(EUV). We find that a series of flybys that occurred during solar minimum (2008) and withsimilar flyby geometries are associated with enhanced values of the effective recombinationcoefficient compared with the remaining dataset, which also suggests a chemistry dependenton the sunlight conditions.

  • 29.
    Shebanits, Oleg
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy.
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Wahlund, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Holmberg, Mika
    Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse, France.; CNRS, IRAP, Toulouse, France.
    Morooka, Michiko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy.
    Edberg, Niklas J. T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Mandt, Kathleen
    Waite, Hunter
    Titan’s ionosphere: A survey of solar EUV influences2017In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics, ISSN 2169-9380, E-ISSN 2169-9402, Vol. 122, no 7, p. 7491-7503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Effects of solar EUV on positive ions and heavy negative charge carriers (molecular ions, aerosol, and/or dust) in Titan’s ionosphere are studied over the course of almost 12 years, including 78 flybys below 1400 km altitude between TA (October 2004) and T120 (June 2016). The Radio and Plasma Wave Science/Langmuir Probe-measured ion charge densities (normalized by the solar zenith angle) show statistically significant variations with respect to the solar EUV flux. Dayside charge densities increase by a factor of ≈2 from solar minimum to maximum, while nightside charge densities are found to anticorrelate with the EUV flux and decrease by a factor of ≈3–4. The overall EUV dependence of the ion charge densities suggest inapplicability of the idealized Chapman theory below 1200 km in Titan’s ionosphere. Nightside charge densities are also found to vary along Titan’s orbit, with higher values in the sunward magnetosphere of Saturn compared to the magnetotail.

  • 30.
    Shebanits, Oleg
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Wahlund, J. -E
    Edberg, Niklas J. T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Crary, F. J.
    Univ Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO USA..
    Wellbrock, A.
    UCL, Mullard Space Sci Lab, London, England.;Univ London Birkbeck Coll, Ctr Planetary Sci, London, England..
    Andrews, David J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Desai, R. T.
    UCL, Mullard Space Sci Lab, London, England.;Univ London Birkbeck Coll, Ctr Planetary Sci, London, England..
    Coates, A. J.
    UCL, Mullard Space Sci Lab, London, England.;Univ London Birkbeck Coll, Ctr Planetary Sci, London, England..
    Mandt, K. E.
    Southwest Res Inst, Space Sci & Engn Div, San Antonio, TX USA.;Univ Texas San Antonio, Dept Phys & Astron, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Waite, J. H., Jr.
    Southwest Res Inst, Space Sci & Engn Div, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Ion and aerosol precursor densities in Titan's ionosphere: A multi-instrument case study2016In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics, ISSN 2169-9380, E-ISSN 2169-9402, Vol. 121, no 10, p. 10075-10090Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of the heavy ions and dust grains for the chemistry and aerosol formation in Titan's ionosphere has been well established in the recent years of the Cassini mission. In this study we combine independent in situ plasma (Radio Plasma and Wave Science Langmuir Probe (RPWS/LP)) and particle (Cassini Plasma Science Electron Spectrometer, Cassini Plasma Science Ion Beam Spectrometer, and Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer) measurements of Titan's ionosphere for selected flybys (T16, T29, T40, and T56) to produce altitude profiles of mean ion masses including heavy ions and develop a Titan-specific method for detailed analysis of the RPWS/LP measurements (applicable to all flybys) to further constrain ion charge densities and produce the first empirical estimate of the average charge of negative ions and/or dust grains. Our results reveal the presence of an ion-ion (dusty) plasma below similar to 1100 km altitude, with charge densities exceeding the primary ionization peak densities by a factor >= 2 in the terminator and nightside ionosphere (n(e)/n(i) <= 0.1). We suggest that ion-ion (dusty) plasma may also be present in the dayside ionosphere below 900 km (n(e)/n(i) < 0.5 at 1000 km altitude). The average charge of the dust grains (>= 1000 amu) is estimated to be between -2.5 and -1.5 elementary charges, increasing toward lower altitudes.

  • 31.
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Analytic model of comet ionosphere chemistry2018In: Astronomy and Astrophysics, ISSN 0004-6361, E-ISSN 1432-0746, Vol. 616, article id A59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context. We consider a weakly to moderately active comet and make the following simplifying assumptions: (i) The partial ionization frequencies are constant throughout the considered part of the coma. (ii) All species move radially outward with the same constant speed. (iii) Ion-neutral reactions affect the chemical composition of the ions, but ion removal through dissociative recombination with free electrons is negligible. Aims. We aim to derive an analytical model for the radial variation of the abundances of various cometary ions. Methods. We present two methods for retrieving the ion composition as a function of r. The first method, which has previously been used frequently, solves a series of coupled differential equations. The new method introduced here is based on probabilistic arguments and is analytical in nature. Results. For a pure H2O coma, the resulting closed-form expressions yield results that are identical to the standard method, but are computationally much less expensive. Conclusions. In addition to the computational simplicity, the analytical model provides insight into how the various abundances depend on parameters such as comet production rate, outflow speed, and reaction rate coefficients. It can also be used to investigate limiting cases. It cannot easily be extended to account for a radially varying flow speed or dissociative recombination in the way a code based on numerical integrations can.

  • 32.
    Vigren, Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Altwegg, K.
    Univ Bern, Inst Phys, Bern, Switzerland..
    Edberg, Niklas J. T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Eriksson, Anders. I.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Galand, M.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, London, England..
    Henri, P.
    Lab Phys & Chim Environm & Espace, Orleans, France..
    Johansson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics. Lab Phys & Chim Environm & Espace, Orleans, France..
    Odelstad, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Tzou, C. -Y
    Vallieres, X.
    Lab Phys & Chim Environm & Espace, Orleans, France..
    Model-Observation Comparisons Of Electron Number Densities In The Coma Of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko During 2015 January2016In: Astronomical Journal, ISSN 0004-6256, E-ISSN 1538-3881, Vol. 152, no 3, article id 59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During 2015 January 9-11, at a heliocentric distance of similar to 2.58-2.57 au, the ESA Rosetta spacecraft resided at a cometocentric distance of similar to 28 km from the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, sweeping the terminator at northern latitudes of 43 degrees N-58 degrees N. Measurements by the Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis/Comet Pressure Sensor (ROSINA/COPS) provided neutral number densities. We have computed modeled electron number densities using the neutral number densities as input into a Field Free Chemistry Free model, assuming H2O dominance and ion-electron pair formation by photoionization only. A good agreement (typically within 25%) is found between the modeled electron number densities and those observed from measurements by the Mutual Impedance Probe (RPC/MIP) and the Langmuir Probe (RPC/LAP), both being subsystems of the Rosetta Plasma Consortium. This indicates that ions along the nucleus-spacecraft line were strongly coupled to the neutrals, moving radially outward with about the same speed. Such a statement, we propose, can be further tested by observations of H3O+/H2O+ number density ratios and associated comparisons with model results.

  • 33.
    Vigren, Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    André, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Edberg, Niklas J. T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Engelhardt, Ilka. A. D.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Eriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Galand, M.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, London SW7 2AZ, England.
    Goetz, C.
    Tech Univ Carolo Wilhelmina Braunschweig, Inst Geophys & Extraterr Phys, D-38106 Braunschweig, Germany.
    Henri, P.
    Lab Phys & Chim Environm & Espace, F-45071 Orleans 2, France.
    Heritier, K.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Phys, London SW7 2AZ, England.
    Johansson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy.
    Nilsson, H.
    Swedish Inst Space Phys Kiruna, SE-98128 Kiruna, Sweden.
    Odelstad, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Rubin, M.
    Univ Bern, Inst Phys, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland.
    Stenberg-Wieser, G.
    Swedish Inst Space Phys Kiruna, SE-98128 Kiruna, Sweden.
    Tzou, C. -Y
    Vallieres, X.
    Lab Phys & Chim Environm & Espace, F-45071 Orleans 2, France.
    Effective ion speeds at similar to 200-250 km from comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko near perihelion2017In: Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, ISSN 0035-8711, E-ISSN 1365-2966, Vol. 469, p. S142-S148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2015 August, comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the target comet of the ESA Rosetta mission, reached its perihelion at similar to 1.24 au. Here, we estimate for a three-day period near perihelion, effective ion speeds at distances similar to 200-250 km from the nucleus. We utilize two different methods combining measurements from the Rosetta Plasma Consortium (RPC)/Mutual Impedance Probe with measurements either from the RPC/Langmuir Probe or from the Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis (ROSINA)/Comet Pressure Sensor (COPS) (the latter method can only be applied to estimate the effective ion drift speed). The obtained ion speeds, typically in the range 2-8 km s(-1), are markedly higher than the expected neutral outflow velocity of similar to 1 km s(-1). This indicates that the ions were de-coupled from the neutrals before reaching the spacecraft location and that they had undergone acceleration along electric fields, not necessarily limited to acceleration along ambipolar electric fields in the radial direction. For the limited time period studied, we see indications that at increasing distances from the nucleus, the fraction of the ions' kinetic energy associated with radial drift motion is decreasing.

  • 34.
    Vigren, Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Eriksson, Anders I.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    A 1D Model of Radial Ion Motion Interrupted by Ion-Neutral Interactions in a Cometary Coma2017In: Astronomical Journal, ISSN 0004-6256, E-ISSN 1538-3881, Vol. 153, no 4, article id 150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Because ion- neutral reaction cross sections are energy dependent, the distance from a cometary nucleus within which ions remain collisionally coupled to the neutrals is dictated not only by the comet's activity level but also by the electromagnetic fields in the coma. Here we present a 1D model simulating the outward radial motion of water group ions with radial acceleration by an ambipolar electric field interrupted primarily by charge transfer processes with H2O. We also discuss the impact of plasma waves. For a given electric field profile, the model calculates key parameters, including the total ion density, n(I), the H3O+/H2O+ number density and flux ratios, R-dens and R-flux, and the mean ion drift speed, < u(I)>, as a function of cometocentric distance. We focus primarily on a coma roughly resembling that of the ESA Rosetta mission target comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko near its perihelion in 2015 August. In the presence of a weak ambipolar electric field in the radial direction the model results suggest that the neutral coma is not sufficiently dense to keep the mean ion flow speed close to that of the neutrals by the spacecraft location (similar to 200 km from the nucleus). In addition, for electric field profiles giving nI and < u(I)> within limits constrained by measurements, the Rdens values are significantly higher than values typically observed. However, when including the ion motion in large-amplitude plasma waves in the model, results more compatible with observations are obtained. We suggest that the variable and often low H3O+/H2O+ number density ratios observed may reflect nonradial ion trajectories strongly influenced by electromagnetic forces and/or plasma instabilities, with energization of the ion population by plasma waves.

  • 35.
    Vigren, Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Eriksson, Anders I.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    On the ion-neutral coupling in cometary comae2019In: Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, ISSN 0035-8711, E-ISSN 1365-2966, Vol. 482, no 2, p. 1937-1941Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a cometary coma, the ion-neutral decoupling distance, sometimes referred to as the ion exobase or collisionopause, can be defined as the cometocentric distance, r(in), where ions, initially moving with the neutral outgassing speed, have a probability of 1/e of not colliding with neutrals on their subsequent journey radially outwards. We present an analytical model for calculating this decoupling distance in the presence of a static radial electric field. We show that for a logarithmically decaying potential, the value of r(in) can even decrease to similar to 15 per cent of its field-free case value. Moreover, already at this distance, the effective ion speed can be expected to markedly exceed the neutral expansion velocity. These analytical results are in line with previous numerical calculations, adapting similar but not identical field profiles. The presence of a non-negligible ambipolar electric field and limited importance of ion-neutral collisional coupling are further supported by observations in the diamagnetic cavity of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by plasma instruments onboard Rosetta that reveal ion speeds several times higher than the neutral expansion velocity.

  • 36.
    Vigren, Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Galand, M.
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Dept Phys, London SW7 2AZ, England..
    Eriksson, Anders I.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Edberg, Niklas J. T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Odelstad, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy.
    Schwartz, S. J.
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Dept Phys, London SW7 2AZ, England..
    On The Electron-To-Neutral Number Density Ratio In The Coma Of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko: Guiding Expression And Sources For Deviations2015In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 812, no 1, article id 54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We compute partial photoionization frequencies of H2O, CO2, and CO, the major molecules in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the target comet of the ongoing ESA Rosetta mission. Values are computed from Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energy and Dynamics/Solar EUV Experiment solar EUV spectra for 2014 August 1, 2015 March 1, and for perihelion (2015 August, as based on prediction). From the varying total photoionization frequency of H2O, as computed from 2014 August 1 to 2015 May 20, we derive a simple analytical expression for the electron-to-neutral number density ratio as a function of cometocentric. and heliocentric distance. The underlying model assumes radial movement of the coma constituents and does not account for chemical loss or the presence of electric fields. We discuss various effects/processes that can cause deviations between values from the analytical expression and actual electron-to-neutral number density ratios. The analytical expression is thus not strictly meant as predicting the actual electron-to-neutral number density ratio, but is useful in comparisons with observations as an indicator of processes at play in the cometary coma.

  • 37.
    Vigren, Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Galand, M.
    Lavvas, P.
    Eriksson, Anders I.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Wahlund, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    On the Possibility of Significant Electron Depletion Due to Nanograin Charging in the Coma of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko Near Perihelion2015In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 798, no 2, article id 130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We approach the complicated phenomena of gas-dust interactions in a cometary ionosphere, focusing in particular on the possibility of significant depletion in electron number density due to grain charging. Our one-dimensional ionospheric model, accounting for grain charging processes, is applied to the subsolar direction and the diamagnetic cavity of 67P/Churyuomov-Gerasimenko, the target comet for the ESA Rosetta mission, at perihelion (similar to 1.25-1.30 AU). We argue on the one hand that grains with radii >100 nm are unlikely to significantly affect the overall ionospheric particle balance within this environment, at least for cometocentric distances >10 km. On the other hand, if nanograins with radii in the 1-3 nm range are ejected to the coma at a level of similar to 1% with respect to the mass of the sublimated gas, a significant electron depletion is expected up to cometocentric distances of several tens of kilometers. We relate these results to the recent Cassini discoveries of very pronounced electron depletion compared with the positive ion population in the plume of Enceladus, which has been attributed to nanograin charging.

  • 38.
    Vigren, Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Galand, M.
    Yelle, R. V.
    Wellbrock, A.
    Coates, A. J.
    Snowden, D.
    Cui, J.
    Lavvas, P.
    Edberg, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Shebanits, Oleg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Wahlund, Jan Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Vuitton, V.
    Mandt, K.
    Ionization balance in Titan's nightside ionosphere2015In: Icarus (New York, N.Y. 1962), ISSN 0019-1035, E-ISSN 1090-2643, Vol. 248, p. 539-546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a multi-instrumental Cassini dataset we make model versus observation comparisons of plasma number densities, n(p) = (n(e)n(1))(1/2) (n(e) and n(1) being the electron number density and total positive ion number density, respectively) and short-lived ion number densities (N+, CH2+, CH3+, CH4+) in the southern hemisphere of Titan's nightside ionosphere over altitudes ranging from 1100 and 1200 km and from 1100 to 1350 km, respectively. The n(p) model assumes photochemical equilibrium, ion-electron pair production driven by magnetospheric electron precipitation and dissociative recombination as the principal plasma neutralization process. The model to derive short-lived-ion number densities assumes photochemical equilibrium for the short-lived ions, primary ion production by electron-impact ionization of N-2 and CH4 and removal of the short-lived ions through reactions with CH4. It is shown that the models reasonably reproduce the observations, both with regards to tip and the number densities of the short-lived ions. This is contrasted by the difficulties in accurately reproducing ion and electron number densities in Titan's sunlit ionosphere. (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 39.
    Wahlund, Jan-Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Morooka, Michiko W
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Hadid, Lina Z
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Persoon, A. M.
    Univ Iowa, Dept Phys & Astron, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA..
    Farrell, W. M.
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Solar Syst Explorat Div, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA..
    Gurnett, D. A.
    Univ Iowa, Dept Phys & Astron, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA..
    Hospodarsky, G.
    Univ Iowa, Dept Phys & Astron, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA..
    Kurth, W. S.
    Univ Iowa, Dept Phys & Astron, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA..
    Ye, S. -Y
    Andrews, David J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Edberg, Niklas J. T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Eriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    In situ measurements of Saturn's ionosphere show that it is dynamic and interacts with the rings2018In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 359, no 6371, p. 66-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ionized upper layer of Saturn's atmosphere, its ionosphere, provides a closure of currents mediated by the magnetic field to other electrically charged regions (for example, rings) and hosts ion-molecule chemistry. In 2017, the Cassini spacecraft passed inside the planet's rings, allowing in situ measurements of the ionosphere. The Radio and Plasma Wave Science instrument detected a cold, dense, and dynamic ionosphere at Saturn that interacts with the rings. Plasma densities reached up to 1000 cubic centimeters, and electron temperatures were below 1160 kelvin near closest approach. The density varied between orbits by up to two orders of magnitude. Saturn's A- and B-rings cast a shadow on the planet that reduced ionization in the upper atmosphere, causing a north-south asymmetry.

  • 40.
    Wu, X. -S
    et al.
    Chinese Acad Sci, CAS Key Lab Lunar & Deep Space Explorat, Beijing, Peoples R China; Chinese Acad Sci, CAS Ctr Excellence Comparat Planetol, Hefei, Anhui, Peoples R China.
    Cui, J.
    Chinese Acad Sci, CAS Key Lab Lunar & Deep Space Explorat, Beijing, Peoples R China; Chinese Acad Sci, CAS Ctr Excellence Comparat Planetol, Hefei, Anhui, Peoples R China; Sun Yat Sen Univ, Sch Atmospher Sci, Zhuhai, Peoples R China.
    Xu, S. S.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Space Sci Lab, Berkeley, CA, USA.
    Lillis, R. J.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Space Sci Lab, Berkeley, CA, USA.
    Yelle, R. V.
    Univ Arizona, Lunar & Planetary Lab, Tucson, AZ, USA.
    Edberg, Niklas J. T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Rong, Z. -J
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Geol & Geophys, Beijing, Peoples R China.
    Fan, K.
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Geol & Geophys, Beijing, Peoples R China.
    Guo, J. -P
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Sch Atmospher Sci, Zhuhai, Peoples R China.
    Cao, Y. -T
    Chinese Acad Sci, CAS Key Lab Lunar & Deep Space Explorat, Beijing, Peoples R China.
    Jiang, F. -Y
    Chinese Acad Sci, CAS Key Lab Lunar & Deep Space Explorat, Beijing, Peoples R China; Univ Arizona, Lunar & Planetary Lab, Tucson, AZ USA.
    Wei, Y.
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Geol & Geophys, Beijing, Peoples R China.
    Mitchell, D. L.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Space Sci Lab, Berkeley, CA, USA.
    The Morphology of the Topside Martian Ionosphere: Implications on Bulk Ion Flow2019In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Planets, ISSN 2169-9097, E-ISSN 2169-9100, Vol. 124, no 3, p. 734-751Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Prior to the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution mission, the only information on the composition of the Martian ionosphere came from the Viking Retarding Potential Analyzer data, revealing the presence of substantial ion outflow on the dayside of Mars. Extensive measurements made by the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer allow us to examine the morphology of the Martian ionosphere not only in unprecedented detail but also on both the dayside and the nightside of the planet. Above 300 km, various ionospheric species present a roughly constant density scale height around 100 km on the dayside and 180 km on the nightside. An evaluation of the ion force balance, appropriate for regions with near‐horizontal magnetic field lines, suggests the presence of supersonic ion outflow predominantly driven by the ambient magnetic pressure, with characteristic dayside and nightside flow velocities of 4 and 20 km/s, respectively, both referred to an altitude of 500 km. The corresponding total ion outflow rates are estimated to be 5 × 1025 s−1 on the dayside and 1 × 1025 s−1 on the nightside. The data also indicate a prominent variation with magnetic field orientation in that the ion distribution over regions with near‐vertical field lines tends to be more extended on the dayside but more concentrated on the nightside, as compared to regions with near‐horizontal field lines. These observations should have important implications on the pattern of ion dynamics in the vicinity of Mars.

1 - 40 of 40
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