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  • 1.
    Nilsson, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Aligning the non-aligned:: a re-interpretation of why and how Sweden was granted access to US military materiel in the early cold war, 1948–19522010In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 35, no 3, 290-309 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Nilsson, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Amber Nine:: NATO’s Secret Use of A Flight Path Over Sweden and the Incorporation of Sweden in NATO’s Infrastructure2009In: Journal of contemporary history, ISSN 0022-0094, E-ISSN 1461-7250, Vol. 44, no 2, 287-307 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Nilsson, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    American Propaganda, Swedish Labor, and the Swedish Press in the Cold War:: The USIA and Co-Production of U.S. Hegemony in Sweden During the 1950s and 1960s2012In: International History Review, ISSN 0707-5332, E-ISSN 1949-6540Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Nilsson, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Hugh Trevor-Roper and the English Editions of Hitler’s Table Talk and Testament2016In: Journal of contemporary history, ISSN 0022-0094, E-ISSN 1461-7250, Vol. 51, no 4, 788-812 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the publication of the famous ‘Hitler’s Table Talk’ and ‘The Testament of Adolf Hitler’ as well as the role of British historian Hugh Trevor-Roper in this process, including his relationship with the Swiss banker Franc ̧ois Genoud – the owner of the ‘original’ manuscripts. The article is based on research utilizing Trevor- Roper’s personal correspondence and papers; material that has never before been used to investigate this matter. Besides shedding light on many previously unknown details concerning the publication of these documents, the article shows how Trevor-Roper consistently failed to enlighten his readers about central source-critical problems con- nected to the documents he was validating. He did so on numerous occasions and through several editions of the sources, even though his personal correspondence shows that he was well aware of the problems. The article argues that Trevor-Roper chose not to reveal these problems in public so as not to upset his business relationship with Genoud so that he would gain access to further documents in Genoud’s possession. 

  • 5.
    Nilsson, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Limiting Diplomatic Friction:: Sweden, the United States, and SKF’s Ball Bearing Exports to Eastern Europe, 1950–19522009In: Scandinavian Economic History Review, ISSN 0358-5522, E-ISSN 1750-2837, Vol. 57, no 3, 273-288 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Nilsson, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Pretty Much Your Typical Love-Hate Relationship:: The United States and the European Neutrals During the Cold War, 1945–19912017In: Journal of Cold War Studies, ISSN 1520-3972, E-ISSN 1531-3298, Vol. 19, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Nilsson, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Science as Propaganda:: Swedish Scientists and the Co-Production of U.S. Hegemony in Sweden During the Cold War, 1953–19682012In: European Review of History, ISSN 1350-7486, E-ISSN 1469-8293, Vol. 19, no 2, 275-302 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Nilsson, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Sweden and the Cold War:: A Historiography of A Work in Progress2013In: International Bibliography of Military History, Vol. 33, no 1, 35-71 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Nilsson, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Swedish Catholicism and Authoritarian Ideologies: Attitudes to Communism, National Socialism, Fascism, and Authoritarian Conservatism in a Swedish Catholic Journal, 1922–19452016In: Journal of comparative fascist studies, ISSN 2211-6249, Vol. 5, no 1, 66-88 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the attitude to communism, National Socialism, Fascism, and authoritarian conservatism in the Swedish Catholic Church’s journal Credo from 1922 to 1945. The comparative approach has made it possible to see how the journal distinguished between the various forms of authoritarian ideologies in Europe during this period. The article shows that the Catholic Church in Sweden took a very negative view of communism (the Soviet Union and the Spanish Republic) and strongly condemned it throughout the period, while it took a largely very positive stance towards Fascism (Italy) and Authoritarian Conservativism (Spain and Portugal). In the case of National Socialism (Nazi Germany) the attitude was more diverse. Credo was largely negative towards National Socialism but only because it was thought to threaten Catholics and Catholicism in Germany. However, Credo never criticized discrimination and genocidal violence against the Jews.

  • 10.
    Nilsson, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    The Battle for Hearts and Minds in the High North:: The USIA and American Cold War Propaganda in Sweden, 1952-19692016Book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Nilsson, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    The Editor and the CIA:: Herbert Tingsten and the Congress for Cultural Freedom—A Symbiotic Relationship2011In: European Review of History, ISSN 1350-7486, E-ISSN 1469-8293, Vol. 18, no 2, 147-174 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Nilsson, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    The Power of Technology:: U.S. Hegemony and the Transfer of Advanced Military Technology to NATO During the Cold War, 1953-19622008In: Comparative Technology Transfer and Society, ISSN 1542-0132, E-ISSN 1543-3404, Vol. 6, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Nilsson, Mikael
    KTH, Filosofi och teknikhistoria.
    Tools of Hegemony: Military Technology and Swedish-American Security Relations, 1945-19622007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This doctoral thesis analyze the process whereby Sweden gained access to American guided missiles during the late 1950s and early 1960s. It also tracks the Swedish efforts to develop guided missiles domestically. The concept of hegemony is used to interpret these processes, the dynamic in the Swedish-American relationship, and its consequences for the Swedish policy of neutrality.

    Sweden’s domestic guided missile development program, begun in the end of World War Two, met with great difficulties already by the end of the 1940s, and had entered a cul de sac by the early 1950s. The reason for this was a contunuous lack of funding and personnel, as well as a lack of foreign hardware and know-how. By 1947 the United States had largely established its hegemony in Western Europe, and the U.S. government then sought to gain the consent of the Swedish government as well. The U.S. government used its preponderant position, and pressured Sweden to adapt its policies by withholding vital technology from the Swedes. The U.S. refusal to deliver arms to a neutral Scandinavian Defense Union was significant in this respect. Sweden gradually gave its concurrence through a series of steps, most importantly the participation in the Marshall Plan in 1948, and COCOM in the summer of 1951. The confirmation of the U.S. government’s acceptance of Sweden came in the summer of 1952 when was made eligible to buy armaments in the United States under the Mutual Defense Assistance Act (MDAA).

    However, Sweden was not granted access to American guided missiles. This was an experience shared with most of the NATO countries (with the limited exception of Britain and Canada). During the course of the 1950s the United States was forced to change its position, due to prodding from the nato allies. The annual nato meetings were used as a platform by the nato countries in this endevour. The U.S. government reversed its non-disclosure policy in 1957 because of worries that its hegemonic position was threatened if it did not provide these weapons to its allies. Guided missile deliveries to Europe was used as a means to keep the alliance together, and to preserve U.S. hegemony in Western Europe.

    Because of its consent to U.S. hegemony Sweden gained access to U.S. missiles at the same time, and many times even before the NATO countries. Sweden was the first Western European country to purchase Sidewinder (1959) and Hawk (1962), and license manufactured two versions of the Falcon missile. Because of these deliveries the development of Swedish surface-to-air and air-to-air missiles was halted. Sweden was dependent upon the U.S. for deliveries of additional missiles in wartime, and this could have become a problem for Sweden’s ability to defend its territory against Western intrusions, since Sweden’s defense was based on help arriving from the West if Sweden was attacked by the USSR. The Swedish government, using the Royal Air Force Board as a proxy, signed a memorandum of Understanding in 1961 which gave the U.S. government the rigth to any improvements to the Falcon missiles, as well as the right to use them anywhere in the world. Sweden had thus de facto become a part of the U.S. military’s supply line.

  • 14.
    Nilsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Gribbe, Johan
    The Foreign Domestic:: Hard Artefacts and Soft Politics in Sweden During the First Half of the Cold War, 1945-1967.2005In: Journal of the International Committee for the History of Technology (ICON), Vol. 11, 51-62 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Nilsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Stenlås, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Cold War Neutrality and Technological Dependence:: Sweden's Military Technology in the East-West Trade2005In: East-West Trade and the Cold War / [ed] Jari Eloranta and Jari Ojala, University of Jyväskäly , 2005, 133-152 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Nilsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Wyss, Marco
    University of Chichester.
    The Armed Neutrality Paradox: Sweden and Switzerland in US Cold War Armaments Policy2016In: Journal of contemporary history, ISSN 0022-0094, E-ISSN 1461-7250, Vol. 51, no 2, 335-363 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the first comparative study of US policy towards two European neutrals, Sweden and Switzerland, in the late 1940s and early 1950s. During this period, Sweden and Switzerland were integrated into the Western security regime through a series of diplomatic, economic and technological steps until certain parts of the Swedish and Swiss armed forces were hard to separate from their NATO counterparts. This pioneering multi-archival study shows not only that US policy towards the neutrals was coordinated in order to make them conform to US security demands (a fact previously unnoticed by historians), but it also points towards another surprising and previously unknown conclusion - which the article calls the armed neutrality paradox'. The article argues that the transfers of military technology to Sweden and Switzerland, which were needed to make their neutrality credible, effectively undermined the very credibility that they were supposed to ensure. This technology became a conduit of foreign influence reaching straight into the nerve centre of the armed neutrals, and the more ubiquitous and advanced the technology got, the less control over its use the governments seemed to have. US policy, together with the efforts of the neutral governments to increase security, spawned this paradox.

1 - 16 of 16
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