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  • 1.
    Bohm, Satu
    et al.
    Uppsala University, University Library.
    Byström, Karin
    Uppsala University, University Library.
    Nerelius, Petter
    Uppsala University, University Library.
    Thorn, Linda
    Uppsala University, University Library.
    Negotiating Change2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Uppsala University Library is one of the largest in Sweden, with a wide range of specialties – old collections, digital repositories and current support to faculty and students. In the last 18 month the library has gone through a re-organization with the aim to make the library more united – one library. The change is among the most comprehensive that the 400-year-old library has undergone.

    The purpose of this paper is to describe how the library has developed ways of leading change by involving employees and managers at different levels in the change process. We focus on change management based on our experiences as change leaders. We will describe the major success factors and failures.

    The re-organization was done in several steps. Library units were merged and three processes introduced; Media and Collections, Study and Research Support and Information Services.  A Program Leader was assigned to coordinate the re-organization in the fall of 2015 and in January 2016 three Process Managers were added to lead and to work with the change processes.

    Within the processes, three working groups were established with the goal to present new workflows and services for digitization, working methods in library teaching and management of the virtual reference desk. Broad groups were set up with staff from all parts of the library. During the initial process a crucial point was to create a trusting and safe climate in the group to promote creativity and participation. Another key concept for success was to allow enough time for discussions and high sensitivity to when there were problems in the group that needed to be resolved, such as disagreement about a proposed solution. 

    The aim with the broad working groups was to reach a broad acceptance of the Changes, and during the discussions they developed a joint understanding of the need for change and for the chosen solution. This meant that the pace of change was slower than expected from start, but also that the changes at the end where easier to implement.

    Some of the resistance to change that appeard was due to different interpretations of the vision and reasons for re-organization. This shows that the understanding of the purposes of the changes also can influence the readiness for change. A success factor was to allow deeper discussions about the vision for the library and library services of the future.

    Negotiations about the changes was held at all levels of the organization. Problems, options and solutions in the process mapping were discussed by leaders and managers regularly.  To gain approval for the changes, all processes also had reference groups where new ideas and proposals were discussed. Information meetings for all staff were also arranged.

    Findings

    In anchoring change at all levels we believe negotiation is a key concept. Openness for discussion contributes to a feeling of being included amongst employees as well as management at all levels. Negotiating change guarantees quality and substantiated decisions from both a user perspective and an organizational perspective. Negotiation has also been a way of reflective practice around goals, effectiveness, working methods and leadership. It is not a fast track to results but we believe that anchoring change at all levels is a key concept for long-term success.

    Another success factor has been a joint change leadership between the Process Managers and the Program Leader. Leading change is a challenge even for an experienced leader. Step by step we created a strategy to lead the working groups through the change and created a joint change competency. 

    Conclusions

    The library has developed new ways of leading change by involving employees and managers at different levels in the change process.

    Changes can result in lot of tension and resistance in the organization and the new methods  have been an important part in avoiding this – to include concerned groups in the process and to take time to anchor the change.

  • 2.
    Bohm, Satu
    et al.
    Uppsala University, University Library.
    Byström, Karin
    Uppsala University, University Library.
    Nerelius, Petter
    Uppsala University, University Library.
    Thorn, Linda
    Uppsala University, University Library.
    Organizing for change at Uppsala University Library2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Uppsala University library is one of the largest in Sweden with a wide range of specialties and subjects. In the last 18 month the library has gone through a re-organization with the aim to make the library more united. The re-organization meant that eleven library units were merged into five, and three processes were introduced; Media and Collections, Study- and Research Support and Information Services. The change is among the most comprehensive that the 400-year-old library has undergone.

    The re-organization and the three processes have started a chain reaction of changes, both in the day-to-day work, in collaboration and in decision making. Within the processes, three organizational development projects: the digitization workflow, new working methods in library instruction and management of the virtual reference desk has been finished. Large working groups with representatives from concerned departments worked with the mapping and development of new solutions and ways to work. The groups used scenarios, process modeling, pilot studies and other methods to create a creative and open discussion.

    One important objective has been to include concerned groups in the process and to take time to gain acceptance for the change. This has meant a slower pace of change, but has also been a part of the success. The use of different methods and active working groups has sparked a new energy into the organization. This paper will describe the methods used for change management in the organization and in developing new solutions to meet the needs of library users.

  • 3.
    Qvarnström, Satu
    Uppsala University, University Library.
    Critical Friends: a Way of Enhancing Teaching Quality in Academic Libraries2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Critical friends, a method for empowerment and quality enhancement within an academic library environment

    This poster seeks to describe a developing project with the concept critical friends, at Uppsala University Library, with the aim to enhance the quality of teaching. Academic librarians work in close cooperation with the University’s lecturers and information literacy courses are an integrated part of most subject courses. This places demands on the librarian’s pedagogical skills but there is often little time for teaching librarians to discuss and reflect on pedagogical matters. Methods for continuous improvement of teaching methods as well as evaluation of the teaching librarian´s own efforts have thus become essential.

    In December 2011, an introductory seminar was held for teaching librarians on the topic of critical friends. Spring 2012 two preparatory educational workshops were held: one on the theme “pedagogical basic view," and one entitled "critical friends". The workshops were held in cooperation with the Division for Development of Teaching and Learning at Uppsala University. We also visited Stockholm University Library to share their experiences of critical friends. A start-up meeting took place in August 2012.

    The model provides opportunities to reflection on teaching practice, to enhance and deepen insights in pedagogical methods. The process improves the quality of teaching and thus eventually contributes to raise the student’s level of information literacy. A critical friend offer new perspectives on teaching and provides tips about what can be improved on the basis of areas agreed on in advance. Additional expected outcomes are enhanced collegial cooperation which may result in several collaborations across library units.  

  • 4.
    Qvarnström, Satu
    Uppsala University, University Library.
    Development of Library Teaching in Law Programme Education, Uppsala University2013In: European Conference on Information Literacy (ECIL), Istanbul, Turkey, 22-25 Oct, 2013: Abstracts, Ankara: Hacettepe University, Department of Information Management , 2013, p. 152-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Development of Library Teaching in Law Programme Education, Uppsala University

    Objective

    Since 2008 the teaching team at the Law Library has been working to transform information literacy instruction. For a lawyer, learning how to find legal materials is an important professional skill. In recent years more and more material has become accessible electronically. A change has occurred from print material to electronic sources. This poses new challenges for the law librarians. A few years ago Library instruction consisted mostly in telling the students about print material and showing databases, with little student activity. Focus was on the teacher as expert and lecturer and not on the students’ own learning. The result was less motivated students and no clear correlation with the students’ own task. We experienced a need to motivate students and clarify how information searching is related to the topic and thus is a part of legal method and a lawyer’s professional skills.

    Method

    The change was made in several steps. The online Law subject guide proved to be a useful tool in library instruction. The clicking of databases was reduced. Instead we informed the students in which databases they could find the electronic material, and let them practice seeking information for their paper. More focus was placed on information seeking strategies and on student activity. The printed material was presented as a basis for understanding the structure of legal sources. Goals for the library seminar was formulated and presented to students at the beginning of class. A self-evaluation has made it possible for teaching librarians to monitor our teaching experience for several years in a row.

    Results

    The effort to change the library instruction sessions has led to more focus on students’ own activity and learning. Goals for library seminars give structure to the teaching and make it clearer what students can expect. Students get the opportunity to reflect upon their own learning at the end of the session through the formative evaluation. The library seminars are linked directly to students’ specific needs to find information, which increases motivation. The first time the students come to the library, at the beginning of the term, they receive an introduction to the library. During the tour of the library they solve some tasks that the librarian has assigned. Students come back for a library seminar a few weeks later when they have started writing their paper. In this way the teaching session is performed at a time when the students are most motivated to search for information. A degree of progression in information retrieval has thus also been introduced. Focus is now on student activity and problem solving as well as on legal methods and basic information retrieval skills. Students no longer learn only detailed knowledge about the library, databases, books and articles, but also get strategic knowledge about how to find information. Library teaching is more clearly linked to the students’ task. In Spring 2013 further development took place through students’ group-work.

    Keywords:Academic libraries,library instruction, instructional development, law libraries, evaluation, student activity, online subject guides

  • 5.
    Qvarnström, Satu
    Uppsala University, University Library.
    Förteckning över Sture Bergströms tryckta juridiska tidskrifter 1975-20042007In: Skattenytt, ISSN 0346-1254, no 11, p. 704-710Article in journal (Other academic)
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