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  • 1.
    Bravo, Andrea Garcia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. bDepartment of Marine Biology and Oceanography, Institut de Ciències del Mar, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Peura, Sari
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Buck, Moritz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Osman, Omneya
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mateos-Rivera, Alejandro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Herrero Ortega, Sonia
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Schaefer, Jeffra K.
    Bouchet, Sylvain
    Tolu, Julie
    Björn, Erik
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Methanogens and Iron-Reducing Bacteria: the Overlooked Members of Mercury-Methylating Microbial Communities in Boreal Lakes2018In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 0099-2240, E-ISSN 1098-5336, Vol. 84, no 23, p. 1-16, article id e01774-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Methylmercury is a potent human neurotoxin which biomagnifies in aquatic food webs. Although anaerobic microorganisms containing the hgcA gene potentially mediate the formation of methylmercury in natural environments, the di- versity of these mercury-methylating microbial communities remains largely unex- plored. Previous studies have implicated sulfate-reducing bacteria as the main mer- cury methylators in aquatic ecosystems. In the present study, we characterized the diversity of mercury-methylating microbial communities of boreal lake sediments us- ing high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA and hgcA genes. Our results show that in the lake sediments, Methanomicrobiales and Geobacteraceae also represent abun- dant members of the mercury-methylating communities. In fact, incubation experi- ments with a mercury isotopic tracer and molybdate revealed that only between 38% and 45% of mercury methylation was attributed to sulfate reduction. These re- sults suggest that methanogens and iron-reducing bacteria may contribute to more than half of the mercury methylation in boreal lakes.

  • 2.
    Bravo, Andrea Garcia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zopfi, Jakob
    Aquatic and Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry, University of Basel, Basel CH-4056, Switzerland.
    Buck, Moritz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jingying, Xu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schaefer, Jeffra K.
    Environmental Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA.
    Poté, John
    Environmental Biogeochemistry and Ecotoxicology, University of Geneva, Geneva CH-1205, Switzerland.
    Cosio, Claudia
    Environmental Biogeochemistry and Ecotoxicology, University of Geneva, Geneva CH-1205, Switzerland.;Unité Stress Environnementaux et BIOSurveillance des Milieux Aquatiques UMR-I 02 (SEBIO), Université de Reims Champagne Ardenne, Reims F-51687, France.
    Geobacteraceae are important members of mercury-methylating microbial communities of sediments impacted by waste water releases2018In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 12, p. 802-812Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microbial mercury (Hg) methylation in sediments can result in bioaccumulation of the neurotoxin methylmercury (MMHg) in aquatic food webs. Recently, the discovery of the gene hgcA, required for Hg methylation, revealed that the diversity of Hg methylators is much broader than previously thought. However, little is known about the identity of Hg-methylating microbial organisms and the environmental factors controlling their activity and distribution in lakes. Here, we combined high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA and hgcA genes with the chemical characterization of sediments impacted by a waste water treatment plant that releases significant amounts of organic matter and iron. Our results highlight that the ferruginous geochemical conditions prevailing at 1–2 cm depth are conducive to MMHg formation and that the Hgmethylating guild is composed of iron and sulfur-transforming bacteria, syntrophs, and methanogens. Deltaproteobacteria, notably Geobacteraceae, dominated the hgcA carrying communities, while sulfate reducers constituted only a minor component, despite being considered the main Hg methylators in many anoxic aquatic environments. Because iron is widely applied in waste water treatment, the importance of Geobacteraceae for Hg methylation and the complexity of Hgmethylating communities reported here are likely to occur worldwide in sediments impacted by waste water treatment plant discharges and in iron-rich sediments in general.

  • 3.
    Buck, Moritz
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Nilsson, Louise K. J.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Ecol, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Brunius, Carl
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Food Sci, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Dabire, Roch K.
    Inst Rech Sci Sante, Ctr Muraz, O1 BP 390, Bobo Dioulasso 01, Burkina Faso..
    Hopkins, Richard
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Ecol, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.;Univ Greenwich, Nat Resources Inst, Cent Ave, Chatham ME4 4TB, Kent, England..
    Terenius, Olle
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Ecol, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Bacterial associations reveal spatial population dynamics in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 22806Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The intolerable burden of malaria has for too long plagued humanity and the prospect of eradicating malaria is an optimistic, but reachable, target in the 21st century. However, extensive knowledge is needed about the spatial structure of mosquito populations in order to develop effective interventions against malaria transmission. We hypothesized that the microbiota associated with a mosquito reflects acquisition of bacteria in different environments. By analyzing the whole-body bacterial flora of An. gambiae mosquitoes from Burkina Faso by 16 S amplicon sequencing, we found that the different environments gave each mosquito a specific bacterial profile. In addition, the bacterial profiles provided precise and predicting information on the spatial dynamics of the mosquito population as a whole and showed that the mosquitoes formed clear local populations within a meta-population network. We believe that using microbiotas as proxies for population structures will greatly aid improving the performance of vector interventions around the world.

  • 4.
    Buck, Moritz
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Nilsson, Louise K. J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Microbiology. Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Ecol, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Brunius, Carl
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Food Sci, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Dabire, Roch K.
    Inst Rech Sci Sante, Ctr Muraz, O1 BP 390, Bobo Dioulasso 01, Burkina Faso..
    Hopkins, Richard
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Ecol, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.;Univ Greenwich, Nat Resources Inst, Cent Ave, Chatham ME4 4TB, Kent, England..
    Terenius, Olle
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Ecol, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Bacterial associations reveal spatial population dynamics in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 22806Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The intolerable burden of malaria has for too long plagued humanity and the prospect of eradicating malaria is an optimistic, but reachable, target in the 21st century. However, extensive knowledge is needed about the spatial structure of mosquito populations in order to develop effective interventions against malaria transmission. We hypothesized that the microbiota associated with a mosquito reflects acquisition of bacteria in different environments. By analyzing the whole-body bacterial flora of An. gambiae mosquitoes from Burkina Faso by 16 S amplicon sequencing, we found that the different environments gave each mosquito a specific bacterial profile. In addition, the bacterial profiles provided precise and predicting information on the spatial dynamics of the mosquito population as a whole and showed that the mosquitoes formed clear local populations within a meta-population network. We believe that using microbiotas as proxies for population structures will greatly aid improving the performance of vector interventions around the world.

  • 5.
    Eklöf, Karin
    et al.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Aquat Sci & Assessment, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bishop, Kevin
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Aquat Sci & Assessment, SE-75007 Uppsala, Swede.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Björn, Erik
    Umea Univ, Dept Chem, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden.
    Buck, Moritz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Umea Univ, Dept Chem, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden.; National Bioinformatics Infrastructure Sweden, Uppsala SE-75236, Sweden.
    Skyllberg, Ulf
    Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden.
    Osman, Omneya
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kronberg, Rose Marie
    Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden.
    Bravo, Andrea Garcia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Formation of mercury methylation hotspots as a consequence of forestry operations2018In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 613-614, p. 1069-1078Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Earlier studies have shown that boreal forest logging can increase the concentration and export of methylmercury (MeHg) in stream runoff. Here we test whether forestry operations create soil environments of high MeHg net formation associated with distinct microbial communities. Furthermore, we test the hypothesis that Hg methylation hotspots are more prone to form after stump harvest than stem-only harvest, because of more severe soil compaction and soil disturbance. Concentrations of MeHg, percent MeHg of total Hg (THg), and bacterial community composition were determined at 200 soil sampling positions distributed across eight catchments. Each catchment was either stem-only harvested (n = 3), stem- and stump-harvested (n = 2) or left undisturbed (n = 3). In support of our hypothesis, higher MeHg to THg ratios was observed in one of the stump-harvested catchments. While the effects of natural variation could not be ruled out, we noted that most of the highest % MeHg was observed in water-filled cavities created by stump removal or driving damage. This catchment also featured the highest bacterial diversity and highest relative abundance of bacterial families known to include Hg methylators. We propose that water-logged and disturbed soil environments associated with stump harvest can favor methylating microorganisms, which also enhance MeHg formation.

  • 6.
    Garcia, Sarahi L
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Department of Bacteriology, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA.
    Buck, Moritz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hamilton, Joshua J.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Bacteriol, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Wurzbacher, Christian
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Goteborg, Germany.
    Grossart, Hans-Peter
    Leibniz Inst Freshwater Ecol & Inland Fisheries, Dept Expt Limnol, Stechlin, Germany;Potsdam Univ, Inst Biochem & Biol, Potsdam, Germany.
    McMahon, Katherine D.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Civil & Environm Engn, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Dept Bacteriol, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Eiler, Alexander
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Univ Oslo, Dept Biosci, Sect Aquat Biol & Toxicol, Oslo, Norway.
    Model Communities Hint at Promiscuous Metabolic Linkages between Ubiquitous Free-Living Freshwater Bacteria2018In: MSPHERE, ISSN 2379-5042, Vol. 3, no 3, article id e00202-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genome streamlining is frequently observed in free-living aquatic microorganisms and results in physiological dependencies between microorganisms. However, we know little about the specificity of these microbial associations. In order to examine the specificity and extent of these associations, we established mixed cultures from three different freshwater environments and analyzed the cooccurrence of organisms using a metagenomic time series. Free-living microorganisms with streamlined genomes lacking multiple biosynthetic pathways showed no clear recurring pattern in their interaction partners. Free-living freshwater bacteria form promiscuous cooperative associations. This notion contrasts with the well-documented high specificities of interaction partners in host-associated bacteria. Considering all data together, we suggest that highly abundant free-living bacterial lineages are functionally versatile in their interactions despite their distinct streamlining tendencies at the single-cell level. This metabolic versatility facilitates interactions with a variable set of community members.

  • 7.
    Garcia, Sarahi L.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Buck, Moritz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    McMahon, Katherine D.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Bacteriol, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Dept Civil & Environm Engn, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Grossart, Hans-Peter
    Leibniz Inst Freshwater Ecol & Inland Fisheries, Dept Expt Limnol, D-16775 Ot Neuglobsow, Stechlin, Germany.;Univ Potsdam, Inst Biochem & Biol, D-14476 Potsdam, Germany..
    Eiler, Alexander
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Warnecke, Falk
    Univ Jena, Jena Sch Microbial Commun, D-07743 Jena, Germany..
    Auxotrophy and intrapopulation complementary in the "interactome' of a cultivated freshwater model community2015In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 24, no 17, p. 4449-4459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microorganisms are usually studied either in highly complex natural communities or in isolation as monoclonal model populations that we manage to grow in the laboratory. Here, we uncover the biology of some of the most common and yet-uncultured bacteria in freshwater environments using a mixed culture from Lake Grosse Fuchskuhle. From a single shotgun metagenome of a freshwater mixed culture of low complexity, we recovered four high-quality metagenome-assembled genomes (MAGs) for metabolic reconstruction. This analysis revealed the metabolic interconnectedness and niche partitioning of these naturally dominant bacteria. In particular, vitamin- and amino acid biosynthetic pathways were distributed unequally with a member of Crenarchaeota most likely being the sole producer of vitamin B12 in the mixed culture. Using coverage-based partitioning of the genes recovered from a single MAG intrapopulation metabolic complementarity was revealed pointing to social' interactions for the common good of populations dominating freshwater plankton. As such, our MAGs highlight the power of mixed cultures to extract naturally occurring interactomes' and to overcome our inability to isolate and grow the microbes dominating in nature.

  • 8.
    Hubalek, Valerie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Buck, Moritz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tan, BoonFei
    University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada; Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology, Leipzig, Germany.
    Foght, Julia
    University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
    Wendeberg, Annelie
    Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany.
    Berry, David
    University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Eiler, Alexander
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. eDNA Solutions AB, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Vitamin and Amino Acid Auxotrophy in Anaerobic Consortia Operating under Methanogenic Conditions2017In: mSystems, E-ISSN 2379-5077, Vol. 2, no 5, article id e00038-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Syntrophy among Archaea and Bacteria facilitates the anaerobic degra- dation of organic compounds to CH4 and CO2 . Particularly during aliphatic and aro- matic hydrocarbon mineralization, as in the case of crude oil reservoirs and petroleum-contaminated sediments, metabolic interactions between obligate mutu- alistic microbial partners are of central importance. Using micromanipulation com- bined with shotgun metagenomic approaches, we describe the genomes of complex consortia within short-chain alkane-degrading cultures operating under methano- genic conditions. Metabolic reconstruction revealed that only a small fraction of genes in the metagenome-assembled genomes encode the capacity for fermenta- tion of alkanes facilitated by energy conservation linked to H2 metabolism. Instead, the presence of inferred lifestyles based on scavenging anabolic products and inter- mediate fermentation products derived from detrital biomass was a common fea- ture. Additionally, inferred auxotrophy for vitamins and amino acids suggests that the hydrocarbon-degrading microbial assemblages are structured and maintained by multiple interactions beyond the canonical H2 -producing and syntrophic alkane degrader-methanogen partnership. Compared to previous work, our report points to a higher order of complexity in microbial consortia engaged in anaerobic hydrocar- bon transformation. IMPORTANCE

  • 9.
    Hubalek, Valerie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Wu, Xiaofen
    Linnaeus Univ, Ctr Ecol & Evolut Microbial Model Syst EEMiS, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Eiler, Alexander
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Buck, Moritz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Heim, Christine
    Univ Gottingen, GZG Geobiol, Gottingen, Germany.
    Dopson, Mark
    Linnaeus Univ, Ctr Ecol & Evolut Microbial Model Syst EEMiS, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Ionescu, Danny
    Leibniz Inst Freshwater Ecol & Inland Fisheries, Dept Expt Limnol, Neuglobsow, Germany.
    Connectivity to the surface determines diversity patterns in subsurface aquifers of the Fennoscandian shield2016In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 10, no 10, p. 2447-2458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little research has been conducted on microbial diversity deep under the Earth/'s surface. In this study, the microbial communities of three deep terrestrial subsurface aquifers were investigated. Temporal community data over 6 years revealed that the phylogenetic structure and community dynamics were highly dependent on the degree of isolation from the earth surface biomes. The microbial community at the shallow site was the most dynamic and was dominated by the sulfur-oxidizing genera Sulfurovum or Sulfurimonas at all-time points. The microbial community in the meteoric water filled intermediate aquifer (water turnover approximately every 5 years) was less variable and was dominated by candidate phylum OD1. Metagenomic analysis of this water demonstrated the occurrence of key genes for nitrogen and carbon fixation, sulfate reduction, sulfide oxidation and fermentation. The deepest water mass (5000 year old waters) had the lowest taxon richness and surprisingly contained Cyanobacteria. The high relative abundance of phylogenetic groups associated with nitrogen and sulfur cycling, as well as fermentation implied that these processes were important in these systems. We conclude that the microbial community patterns appear to be shaped by the availability of energy and nutrient sources via connectivity to the surface or from deep geological processes.

  • 10. Jingying, Xu
    et al.
    Buck, Moritz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Eklöf, Karin
    Osman, Omneya
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schaefer, Jeffra K.
    Bishop, Kevin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, Centre for Environment and Development Studies.
    Björn, Erik
    Skyllberg, Ulf
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bravo, Andrea Garcia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Present address: Department of Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA), Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), C/Jordi Girona, 18-26 - E-08034 Barcelona – Spain.
    Mercury methylating microbial communities of boreal forest soilsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The formation of the potent neurotoxic methylmercury (MeHg) is a microbially mediated process that has raised much concern because MeHg poses threats to wildlife and human health. Since boreal forest soils can be a source of MeHg in aquatic networks, it is crucial to understand the biogeochemical processes involved in the formation of this pollutant. High-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA and the mercury methyltransferase, hgcA, combined with geochemical characterisation of soils, were used to determine the microbial populations contributing to MeHg formation in forest soils across Sweden. The hgcA sequences obtained were distributed among diverse clades, including Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Methanomicrobia, with Deltaproteobacteria, particularly Geobacteraceae, dominating the libraries across all soils examined. Our results also suggest that MeHg formation is linked to the composition of also non-mercury methylating bacterial communities, likely providing growth substrate (e.g. acetate) for the hgcA-carrying microorganisms responsible for the actual methylation process. While previous research focused on mercury methylating microbial communities of wetlands, this study provides some first insights into the diversity of mercury methylating microorganisms in boreal forest soils.

  • 11.
    Jingying, Xu
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Liem-Nguyen, Van
    School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Buck, Moritz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Björn, Erik
    Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Bravo, Andrea Garcia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Department of Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA), Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Barcelona, Spain.
    Mercury methylating microbial communities in boreal wetlandsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the formation of the potent neurotoxic methylmercury (MeHg) is a major concern due to its threats to wildlife and human health. As boreal wetlands play a crucial role for Hg cycling on a global scale, it is crucial to understand the biogeochemical processes involved in MeHg formation in this landscape. A strategy combining high-throughput hgcA amplicon sequencing with molecular barcoding was used to revealed diverse clades of Hg(II) methylators in a wide range of wetland soils. Our results confirms a predominant role of Deltaproteobacteria, and in particular Geobacteraceae, as important Hg(II) methylators in boreal wetland soils. Firmicutes, and in particular Ruminococcaceae, were also abundant members of the Hg(II) methylating microbial communities. Our survey highlight the importance of nutrient status for the shaping of Hg(II) methylating communities across the four wetlands and reveal that water content and prevailing redox states are key factors determining the local variation in Hg(II) methylating community composition within individual wetlands. Also, our study suggests that high nutrient levels linked to low redox potential seemed to favour Hg(II) methylating methanogens within the Methanoregulaceae. Our findings expand the current knowledge on the Hg(II) methylating microbial community composition in wetland soils and the geochemical factors underpinning spatial heterogeity in such communities.  

  • 12. Mantzouki, Evanthia
    et al.
    Bravo, Andrea Garcia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Urrutia Cordero, Pablo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Buck, Moritz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Colom-Montero, William
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Pierson, Don
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    A European Multi Lake Survey dataset of environmental variables , phytoplankton pigments and cyanotoxins2018In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 5, no October, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Under ongoing climate change and increasing anthropogenic activity, which continuously challenge ecosystem resilience, an in-depth understanding of ecological processes is urgently needed. Lakes, as providers of numerous ecosystem services, face multiple stressors that threaten their functioning. Harmful cyanobacterial blooms are a persistent problem resulting from nutrient pollution and climate-change induced stressors, like poor transparency, increased water temperature and enhanced stratification. Consistency in data collection and analysis methods is necessary to achieve fully comparable datasets and for statistical validity, avoiding issues linked to disparate data sources. The European Multi Lake Survey (EMLS) in summer 2015 was an initiative among scientists from 27 countries to collect and analyse lake physical, chemical and biological variables in a fully standardized manner. This database includes in-situ lake variables along with nutrient, pigment and cyanotoxin data of 369 lakes in Europe, which were centrally analysed in dedicated laboratories. Publishing the EMLS methods and dataset might inspire similar initiatives to study across large geographic areas that will contribute to better understanding lake responses in a changing environment.

  • 13.
    Mantzouki, Evanthia
    et al.
    Univ Geneva, Dept FA Forel Environm & Aquat Sci, CH-1205 Geneva, Switzerland.
    Lurling, Miquel
    Wageningen Univ & Res, Dept Environm Sci, NL-6700 Wageningen, Netherlands;Netherlands Inst Ecol NIOO KNAW, Dept Aquat Ecol, NL-6700 Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Fastner, Jutta
    German Environm Agcy, Unit Drinking Water Resources & Water Treatment, Correnspl 1, D-14195 Berlin, Germany.
    Domis, Lisette de Senerpont
    Wageningen Univ & Res, Dept Environm Sci, NL-6700 Wageningen, Netherlands;Netherlands Inst Ecol NIOO KNAW, Dept Aquat Ecol, NL-6700 Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Wilk-Wozniak, Elzbieta
    Polish Acad Sci, Inst Nat Conservat, PL-31120 Krakow, Poland.
    Koreiviene, Judita
    Nat Res Ctr, Inst Bot, LT-08412 Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Seelen, Laura
    Wageningen Univ & Res, Dept Environm Sci, NL-6700 Wageningen, Netherlands;Netherlands Inst Ecol NIOO KNAW, Dept Aquat Ecol, NL-6700 Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Teurlincx, Sven
    Netherlands Inst Ecol NIOO KNAW, Dept Aquat Ecol, NL-6700 Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Verstijnen, Yvon
    Wageningen Univ & Res, Dept Environm Sci, NL-6700 Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Krzton, Wojciech
    Polish Acad Sci, Inst Nat Conservat, PL-31120 Krakow, Poland.
    Walusiak, Edward
    Polish Acad Sci, Inst Nat Conservat, PL-31120 Krakow, Poland.
    Karosiene, Jurate
    Nat Res Ctr, Inst Bot, LT-08412 Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Kasperoviciene, Jurate
    Nat Res Ctr, Inst Bot, LT-08412 Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Savadova, Ksenija
    Nat Res Ctr, Inst Bot, LT-08412 Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Vitonyte, Irma
    Nat Res Ctr, Inst Bot, LT-08412 Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Cillero-Castro, Carmen
    3Edata, R&D Dept Environm Engn, Lugo 27004, Spain.
    Budzynska, Agnieszka
    Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Dept Water Protect, PL-61614 Poznan, Poland.
    Goldyn, Ryszard
    Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Dept Water Protect, PL-61614 Poznan, Poland.
    Kozak, Anna
    Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Dept Water Protect, PL-61614 Poznan, Poland.
    Rosinska, Joanna
    Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Dept Water Protect, PL-61614 Poznan, Poland.
    Szelag-Wasielewska, Elzbieta
    Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Dept Water Protect, PL-61614 Poznan, Poland.
    Domek, Piotr
    Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Dept Water Protect, PL-61614 Poznan, Poland.
    Jakubowska-Krepska, Natalia
    Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Dept Water Protect, PL-61614 Poznan, Poland.
    Kwasizur, Kinga
    Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Dept Hydrobiol, PL-61614 Poznan, Poland.
    Messyasz, Beata
    Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Dept Hydrobiol, PL-61614 Poznan, Poland.
    Pelechata, Aleksandra
    Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Dept Hydrobiol, PL-61614 Poznan, Poland.
    Pelechaty, Mariusz
    Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Dept Hydrobiol, PL-61614 Poznan, Poland.
    Kokocinski, Mikolaj
    Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Dept Hydrobiol, PL-61614 Poznan, Poland.
    Garcia-Murcia, Ana
    AECOM URS, Dept Limnol & Water Qual, Barcelona 08036, Spain.
    Real, Monserrat
    AECOM URS, Dept Limnol & Water Qual, Barcelona 08036, Spain.
    Romans, Elvira
    AECOM URS, Dept Limnol & Water Qual, Barcelona 08036, Spain.
    Noguero-Ribes, Jordi
    AECOM URS, Dept Limnol & Water Qual, Barcelona 08036, Spain.
    Parreno Duque, David
    AECOM URS, Dept Limnol & Water Qual, Barcelona 08036, Spain.
    Fernandez-Moran, Elisabeth
    AECOM URS, Dept Limnol & Water Qual, Barcelona 08036, Spain.
    Karakaya, Nusret
    Abant Izzet Baysal Univ, Dept Environm Engn, TR-14280 Bolu, Turkey.
    Haggqvist, Kerstin
    Abo Akad Univ, Dept Sci & Engn, FIN-20520 Turku, Finland.
    Demir, Nilsun
    Ankara Univ, Dept Fisheries & Aquaculture, TR-6100 Ankara, Turkey.
    Beklioglu, Meryem
    Middle East Tech Univ, Dept Biol, TR-6800 Ankara, Turkey.
    Filiz, Nur
    Middle East Tech Univ, Dept Biol, TR-6800 Ankara, Turkey.
    Levi, Eti E.
    Middle East Tech Univ, Dept Biol, TR-6800 Ankara, Turkey.
    Iskin, Ugur
    Middle East Tech Univ, Dept Biol, TR-6800 Ankara, Turkey.
    Bezirci, Gizem
    Middle East Tech Univ, Dept Biol, TR-6800 Ankara, Turkey.
    Tavsanoglu, Ulku Nihan
    Middle East Tech Univ, Dept Biol, TR-6800 Ankara, Turkey.
    Ozhan, Koray
    Middle East Tech Univ, Dept Oceanog, Inst Marine Sci, TR-06800 Ankara, Turkey.
    Gkelis, Spyros
    Aristotle Univ Thessaloniki, Dept Bot, Thessaloniki 54124, Greece.
    Panou, Manthos
    Aristotle Univ Thessaloniki, Dept Bot, Thessaloniki 54124, Greece.
    Fakioglu, Ozden
    Ataturk Univ, Dept Basic Sci, TR-25240 Erzurum, Turkey.
    Avagianos, Christos
    Athens Water Supply & Sewerage Co, Water Qual Dept, Athens 11146, Greece.
    Kaloudis, Triantafyllos
    Athens Water Supply & Sewerage Co, Water Qual Dept, Athens 11146, Greece.
    Celik, Kemal
    Balikesir Univ, Dept Biol, TR-10145 Balikesir, Turkey.
    Yilmaz, Mete
    Bursa Tech Univ, Dept Bioengn, TR-16310 Bursa, Turkey.
    Marce, Rafael
    Catalan Inst Water Res ICRA, Girona 17003, Spain.
    Catalán, Núria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Catalan Inst Water Res ICRA, Girona 17003, Spain.
    Bravo, Andrea Garcia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Buck, Moritz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Colom-Montero, William
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Mustonen, Kristiina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics.
    Pierson, Don
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Yang, Yang
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics.
    Raposeiro, Pedro M.
    Univ Azores, Fac Sci & Technol, InBIO Associated Lab, Res Ctr Biodivers & Genet Resources CIBIO Azores, P-9501801 Ponta Delgada, Portugal.
    Goncalves, Vitor
    Univ Azores, Fac Sci & Technol, InBIO Associated Lab, Res Ctr Biodivers & Genet Resources CIBIO Azores, P-9501801 Ponta Delgada, Portugal.
    Antoniou, Maria G.
    Cyprus Univ Technol, Dept Environm Sci & Technol, CY-3036 Lemesos, Cyprus.
    Tsiarta, Nikoletta
    Cyprus Univ Technol, Dept Environm Sci & Technol, CY-3036 Lemesos, Cyprus.
    McCarthy, Valerie
    Dundalk Inst Technol, Ctr Freshwater & Environm Studies, Dundalk A91 K584, Ireland.
    Perello, Victor C.
    Dundalk Inst Technol, Ctr Freshwater & Environm Studies, Dundalk A91 K584, Ireland.
    Feldmann, Tonu
    Estonian Univ Life Sci, Inst Agr & Environm Sci, EE-51014 Tartu, Estonia.
    Laas, Alo
    Estonian Univ Life Sci, Inst Agr & Environm Sci, EE-51014 Tartu, Estonia.
    Panksep, Kristel
    Estonian Univ Life Sci, Inst Agr & Environm Sci, EE-51014 Tartu, Estonia.
    Tuvikene, Lea
    Estonian Univ Life Sci, Inst Agr & Environm Sci, EE-51014 Tartu, Estonia.
    Gagala, Ilona
    Polish Acad Sci, European Reg Ctr Ecohydrol, PL-90364 Lodz, Poland.
    Mankiewicz-Boczek, Joana
    Polish Acad Sci, European Reg Ctr Ecohydrol, PL-90364 Lodz, Poland.
    Yagci, Meral Apaydin
    Republ Turkey Minist Food Agr, Fisheries Res Inst, TR-32500 Isparta, Turkey.
    Cinar, Sakir
    Republ Turkey Minist Food Agr, Fisheries Res Inst, TR-32500 Isparta, Turkey.
    Capkin, Kadir
    Republ Turkey Minist Food Agr, Fisheries Res Inst, TR-32500 Isparta, Turkey.
    Yagci, Abdulkadir
    Republ Turkey Minist Food Agr, Fisheries Res Inst, TR-32500 Isparta, Turkey.
    Cesur, Mehmet
    Republ Turkey Minist Food Agr, Fisheries Res Inst, TR-32500 Isparta, Turkey.
    Bilgin, Fuat
    Republ Turkey Minist Food Agr, Fisheries Res Inst, TR-32500 Isparta, Turkey.
    Bulut, Cafer
    Republ Turkey Minist Food Agr, Fisheries Res Inst, TR-32500 Isparta, Turkey.
    Uysal, Rahmi
    Republ Turkey Minist Food Agr, Fisheries Res Inst, TR-32500 Isparta, Turkey.
    Obertegger, Ulrike
    Fdn Edmund Mach, Dept Sustainable Ecosyst & Bioresources, I-38010 San Michele All Adige, Italy.
    Boscaini, Adriano
    Fdn Edmund Mach, Dept Sustainable Ecosyst & Bioresources, I-38010 San Michele All Adige, Italy.
    Flaim, Giovanna
    Fdn Edmund Mach, Dept Sustainable Ecosyst & Bioresources, I-38010 San Michele All Adige, Italy.
    Salmaso, Nico
    Fdn Edmund Mach, Dept Sustainable Ecosyst & Bioresources, I-38010 San Michele All Adige, Italy.
    Cerasino, Leonardo
    Fdn Edmund Mach, Dept Sustainable Ecosyst & Bioresources, I-38010 San Michele All Adige, Italy.
    Richardson, Jessica
    Univ Stirling, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland.
    Visser, Petra M.
    Univ Amsterdam, Dept Freshwater & Marine Ecol, NL-1090 GE Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Verspagen, Jolanda M. H.
    Univ Amsterdam, Dept Freshwater & Marine Ecol, NL-1090 GE Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Karan, Tunay
    Gaziosmanpasa Univ, Dept Mol Biol & Genet, TR-60250 Merkez, Turkey.
    Soylu, Elif Neyran
    Giresun Univ, Dept Biol, TR-28100 Giresun, Turkey.
    Maraslioglu, Faruk
    Hitit Univ, Dept Biol, TR-19040 Corum, Turkey.
    Napiorkowska-Krzebietke, Agnieszka
    Inland Fisheries Inst, Dept Icthyol Hydrobiol & Aquat Ecol, PL-10719 Olsztyn, Poland.
    Ochocka, Agnieszka
    Natl Res Inst, Dept Freshwater Protect, Inst Environm Protect, PL-01692 Warsaw, Poland.
    Pasztaleniec, Agnieszka
    Natl Res Inst, Dept Freshwater Protect, Inst Environm Protect, PL-01692 Warsaw, Poland.
    Antao-Geraldes, Ana M.
    Inst Politecn Braganca, Ctr Invest Montanha, Campus Santa Apolonia, P-5300253 Braganca, Portugal.
    Vasconcelos, Vitor
    Interdisciplinary Ctr Marine & Environm Res CIIMA, P-4450208 Matosinhos, Portugal;Univ Porto, P-4450208 Matosinhos, Portugal.
    Morais, Joao
    Interdisciplinary Ctr Marine & Environm Res CIIMA, P-4450208 Matosinhos, Portugal;Univ Porto, P-4450208 Matosinhos, Portugal.
    Vale, Micaela
    Interdisciplinary Ctr Marine & Environm Res CIIMA, P-4450208 Matosinhos, Portugal;Univ Porto, P-4450208 Matosinhos, Portugal.
    Koker, Latife
    Istanbul Univ, Fac Aquat Sci, Dept Freshwater Resource & Management, TR-34134 Istanbul, Turkey.
    Akcaalan, Reyhan
    Istanbul Univ, Fac Aquat Sci, Dept Freshwater Resource & Management, TR-34134 Istanbul, Turkey.
    Albay, Meric
    Istanbul Univ, Fac Aquat Sci, Dept Freshwater Resource & Management, TR-34134 Istanbul, Turkey.
    Maronic, Dubravka Spoljaric
    Josip Juraj Strossmayer Univ Osijek, Dept Biol, Osijek 31000, Croatia.
    Stevic, Filip
    Josip Juraj Strossmayer Univ Osijek, Dept Biol, Osijek 31000, Croatia.
    Pfeiffer, Tanja Zuna
    Josip Juraj Strossmayer Univ Osijek, Dept Biol, Osijek 31000, Croatia.
    Fonvielle, Jeremy
    Leibniz Inst Freshwater Ecol & Inland Fisheries, Dept Expt Limnol, D-16775 Stechlin, Germany.
    Straile, Dietmar
    Univ Konstanz, Limnol Inst, Dept Biol, D-78464 Constance, Germany.
    Rothhaupt, Karl-Otto
    Univ Konstanz, Limnol Inst, Dept Biol, D-78464 Constance, Germany.
    Hansson, Lars-Anders
    Lund Univ, Dept Biol, S-22362 Lund, Sweden.
    Urrutia Cordero, Pablo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Lund Univ, Dept Biol, S-22362 Lund, Sweden.
    Blaha, Ludek
    Masaryk Univ, RECETOX, Fac Sci, Brno 62500, Czech Republic.
    Geris, Rodan
    Morava Board Author, Dept Hydrobiol, Brno 60200, Czech Republic.
    Frankova, Marketa
    Czech Acad Sci, Inst Bot, Lab Paleoecol, Brno 60200, Czech Republic.
    Kocer, Mehmet Ali Turan
    Mediterranean Fisheries Res Prod & Training Inst, Dept Environm & Resource Management, TR-7090 Antalya, Turkey.
    Alp, Mehmet Tahir
    Mersin Univ, Fac Aquaculture, TR-33160 Mersin, Turkey.
    Remec-Rekar, Spela
    Slovenian Environm Agcy, Water Qual Dept, Ljubljana 1000, Slovenia.
    Elersek, Tina
    Natl Inst Biol, Dept Genet Toxicol & Canc Biol, Ljubljana 1000, Slovenia.
    Triantis, Theodoros
    Natl Ctr Sci Res Demokritos, Inst Nanosci & Nanotechnol, Attiki 15341, Greece.
    Zervou, Sevasti-Kiriaki
    Natl Ctr Sci Res Demokritos, Inst Nanosci & Nanotechnol, Attiki 15341, Greece.
    Hiskia, Anastasia
    Natl Ctr Sci Res Demokritos, Inst Nanosci & Nanotechnol, Attiki 15341, Greece.
    Haande, Sigrid
    Norwegian Inst Water Res, Dept Freshwater Ecol, N-0349 Oslo, Norway.
    Skjelbred, Birger
    Norwegian Inst Water Res, Dept Freshwater Ecol, N-0349 Oslo, Norway.
    Madrecka, Beata
    Poznan Univ Tech, Inst Environm Engn, PL-60965 Poznan, Poland.
    Nemova, Hana
    Publ Hlth Author Slovak Republ, Natl Reference Ctr Hydrobiol, Bratislava 82645, Slovakia.
    Drastichova, Iveta
    Publ Hlth Author Slovak Republ, Natl Reference Ctr Hydrobiol, Bratislava 82645, Slovakia.
    Chomova, Lucia
    Publ Hlth Author Slovak Republ, Natl Reference Ctr Hydrobiol, Bratislava 82645, Slovakia.
    Edwards, Christine
    Robert Gordon Univ, Sch Pharm & Life Sci, Aberdeen AB10 7GJ, Scotland.
    Sevindik, Tugba Ongun
    Sakarya Univ, Dept Biol, TR-54187 Sakarya, Turkey.
    Tunca, Hatice
    Sakarya Univ, Dept Biol, TR-54187 Sakarya, Turkey.
    OEnem, Burcin
    Sakarya Univ, Dept Biol, TR-54187 Sakarya, Turkey.
    Aleksovski, Boris
    SS Cyril & Methodius Univ, Fac Nat Sci & Math, Skopje 1000, Macedonia.
    Krstic, Svetislav
    SS Cyril & Methodius Univ, Fac Nat Sci & Math, Skopje 1000, Macedonia.
    Vucelic, Itana Bokan
    Teaching Inst Publ Hlth Primorje Gorski Kotar Cty, Dept Ecotoxicol, Rijeka 51000, Croatia.
    Nawrocka, Lidia
    State Univ Appl Sci, Inst Technol, PL-82300 Elblag, Poland.
    Salmi, Pauliina
    Univ Jyvaskyla, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Jyvaskyla 40014, Finland.
    Machado-Vieira, Danielle
    Univ Fed Paraiba, Dept Sistemat & Ecol, BR-58059970 Joao Pessoa, Paraiba, Brazil.
    de Oliveira, Alinne Gurjao
    Univ Fed Paraiba, Dept Sistemat & Ecol, BR-58059970 Joao Pessoa, Paraiba, Brazil.
    Delgado-Martin, Jordi
    Univ A Coruna, Dept Civil Engn, La Coruna 15192, Spain.
    Garcia, David
    Univ A Coruna, Dept Civil Engn, La Coruna 15192, Spain.
    Cereijo, Jose Luis
    Univ A Coruna, Dept Civil Engn, La Coruna 15192, Spain.
    Goma, Joan
    Univ Barcelona, Dept Evolutionary Biol Ecol & Environm Sci, E-08028 Barcelona, Spain.
    Trapote, Mari Carmen
    Univ Barcelona, Dept Evolutionary Biol Ecol & Environm Sci, E-08028 Barcelona, Spain.
    Vegas-Vilarrubia, Teresa
    Univ Barcelona, Dept Evolutionary Biol Ecol & Environm Sci, E-08028 Barcelona, Spain.
    Obrador, Biel
    Univ Barcelona, Dept Evolutionary Biol Ecol & Environm Sci, E-08028 Barcelona, Spain.
    Grabowska, Magdalena
    Univ Bialystok, Dept Hydrobiol, PL-15245 Bialystok, Poland.
    Karpowicz, Maciej
    Univ Bialystok, Dept Hydrobiol, PL-15245 Bialystok, Poland.
    Chmura, Damian
    Univ Bielsko Biala, Inst Environm Protect & Engn, PL-43309 Bielsko Biala, Poland.
    Ubeda, Barbara
    Univ Cadiz, Dept Biol, Puerto Real 11510, Spain.
    Angel Galvez, Jose
    Univ Cadiz, Dept Biol, Puerto Real 11510, Spain.
    Ozen, Arda
    Univ Cankiri Karatekin, Dept Forest Engn, TR-18200 Cankiri, Turkey.
    Christoffersen, Kirsten Seestern
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Biol, Freshwater Biol Lab, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Warming, Trine Perlt
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Biol, Freshwater Biol Lab, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kobos, Justyna
    Univ Gdansk, Dept Marine Biotechnol, PL-81378 Gdynia, Poland.
    Mazur-Marzec, Hanna
    Univ Gdansk, Dept Marine Biotechnol, PL-81378 Gdynia, Poland.
    Perez-Martinez, Carmen
    Univ Granada, Dept Ecol, E-18071 Granada, Spain.
    Ramos-Rodriguez, Eloisa
    Univ Granada, Dept Ecol, E-18071 Granada, Spain.
    Arvola, Lauri
    Univ Helsinki, Lammi Biol Stn, Lammi 16900, Finland.
    Alcaraz-Parraga, Pablo
    Univ Jaen, Dept Anim Biol Plant Biol & Ecol, Jaen 23701, Spain.
    Toporowska, Magdalena
    Univ Life Sci Lublin, Dept Hydrobiol & Protect Ecosyst, PL-20262 Lublin, Poland.
    Pawlik-Skowronska, Barbara
    Univ Life Sci Lublin, Dept Hydrobiol & Protect Ecosyst, PL-20262 Lublin, Poland.
    Niedzwiecki, Michal
    Univ Life Sci Lublin, Dept Hydrobiol & Protect Ecosyst, PL-20262 Lublin, Poland.
    Peczula, Wojciech
    Univ Life Sci Lublin, Dept Hydrobiol & Protect Ecosyst, PL-20262 Lublin, Poland.
    Leira, Manel
    Univ Lisbon, Inst Dom Luiz, P-1749016 Lisbon, Portugal.
    Hernandez, Armand
    CSIC, ICTJA, Inst Earth Sci Jaume Almera, Barcelona 08028, Spain.
    Moreno-Ostos, Enrique
    Univ Malaga, Dept Ecol, E-29071 Malaga, Spain.
    Maria Blanco, Jose
    Univ Malaga, Dept Ecol, E-29071 Malaga, Spain.
    Rodriguez, Valeriano
    Univ Malaga, Dept Ecol, E-29071 Malaga, Spain.
    Juan Montes-Perez, Jorge
    Univ Malaga, Dept Ecol, E-29071 Malaga, Spain.
    Palomino, Roberto L.
    Univ Malaga, Dept Ecol, E-29071 Malaga, Spain.
    Rodriguez-Perez, Estela
    Univ Malaga, Dept Ecol, E-29071 Malaga, Spain.
    Carballeira, Rafael
    Univ A Coruna, Fac Ciencias, CICA, La Coruna 15071, Spain.
    Camacho, Antonio
    Univ Valencia, Cavanilles Inst Biodivers & Evolutionary Biol, Paterna Valencia 46980, Spain.
    Picazo, Antonio
    Univ Valencia, Cavanilles Inst Biodivers & Evolutionary Biol, Paterna Valencia 46980, Spain.
    Rochera, Carlos
    Univ Valencia, Cavanilles Inst Biodivers & Evolutionary Biol, Paterna Valencia 46980, Spain.
    Santamans, Anna C.
    Univ Valencia, Cavanilles Inst Biodivers & Evolutionary Biol, Paterna Valencia 46980, Spain.
    Ferriol, Carmen
    Univ Valencia, Cavanilles Inst Biodivers & Evolutionary Biol, Paterna Valencia 46980, Spain.
    Romo, Susana
    Univ Valencia, Dept Microbiol & Ecol, E-46100 Burjassot, Spain.
    Miguel Soria, Juan
    Univ Valencia, Dept Microbiol & Ecol, E-46100 Burjassot, Spain.
    Dunalska, Julita
    Univ Warmia & Mazury, Dept Water Protect Engn, PL-10720 Olsztyn, Poland.
    Sienska, Justyna
    Univ Warmia & Mazury, Dept Water Protect Engn, PL-10720 Olsztyn, Poland.
    Szymanski, Daniel
    Univ Warmia & Mazury, Dept Water Protect Engn, PL-10720 Olsztyn, Poland.
    Kruk, Marek
    Univ Warmia & Mazury, Dept Tourism Recreat & Ecol, PL-10720 Olsztyn, Poland.
    Kostrzewska-Szlakowska, Iwona
    Univ Warsaw, Fac Biol, PL-02096 Warsaw, Poland.
    Jasser, Iwona
    Univ Warsaw, Dept Plant Ecol & Environm Conservat, Fac Biol, PL-02089 Warsaw, Poland.
    Zutinic, Petar
    Univ Zagreb, Dept Biol, Fac Sci, Zagreb 10000, Croatia.
    Udovic, Marija Gligora
    Univ Zagreb, Dept Biol, Fac Sci, Zagreb 10000, Croatia.
    Plenkovic-Moraj, Andelka
    Univ Zagreb, Dept Biol, Fac Sci, Zagreb 10000, Croatia.
    Frak, Magdalena
    Warsaw Univ Life Sci SGGW, Fac Civil & Environm Engn, Dept Environm Improvement, PL-02787 Warsaw, Poland.
    Bankowska-Sobczak, Agnieszka
    Warsaw Univ Life Sci SGGW, Fac Civil & Environm Engn, Dept Hydraul Engn, PL-02787 Warsaw, Poland.
    Wasilewicz, Michal
    Warsaw Univ Life Sci SGGW, Fac Civil & Environm Engn, Dept Hydraul Engn, PL-02787 Warsaw, Poland.
    Ozkan, Korhan
    Middle East Tech Univ, Inst Marine Sci Marine Biol & Fisheries, TR-06800 Ankara, Turkey.
    Maliaka, Valentini
    Wageningen Univ & Res, Dept Environm Sci, NL-6700 Wageningen, Netherlands;Soc Protect Prespa, Agios Germanos 53077, Greece;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Dept Aquat Ecol & Environm Biol, Inst Water & Wetland Res, NL-6525 AJ Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Kangro, Kersti
    Estonian Univ Life Sci, Inst Agr & Environm Sci, EE-51014 Tartu, Estonia;Univ Tartu, Fac Sci & Technol, Tartu Observ, EE-61602 Tartu, Estonia.
    Grossart, Hans-Peter
    Leibniz Inst Freshwater Ecol & Inland Fisheries, Dept Expt Limnol, D-16775 Stechlin, Germany;Univ Potsdam, Inst Biochem & Biol, D-14469 Potsdam, Germany.
    Paerl, Hans W.
    Univ N Carolina, Inst Marine Sci, Chapel Hill, NC 28557 USA.
    Carey, Cayelan C.
    Virginia Tech, Dept Biol Sci, Blacksburg, VA 24061 USA.
    Ibelings, Bas W.
    Univ Geneva, Dept FA Forel Environm & Aquat Sci, CH-1205 Geneva, Switzerland.
    Temperature Effects Explain Continental Scale Distribution of Cyanobacterial Toxins2018In: Toxins, ISSN 2072-6651, E-ISSN 2072-6651, Vol. 10, no 4, article id 156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Insight into how environmental change determines the production and distribution of cyanobacterial toxins is necessary for risk assessment. Management guidelines currently focus on hepatotoxins (microcystins). Increasing attention is given to other classes, such as neurotoxins (e.g., anatoxin-a) and cytotoxins (e.g., cylindrospermopsin) due to their potency. Most studies examine the relationship between individual toxin variants and environmental factors, such as nutrients, temperature and light. In summer 2015, we collected samples across Europe to investigate the effect of nutrient and temperature gradients on the variability of toxin production at a continental scale. Direct and indirect effects of temperature were the main drivers of the spatial distribution in the toxins produced by the cyanobacterial community, the toxin concentrations and toxin quota. Generalized linear models showed that a Toxin Diversity Index (TDI) increased with latitude, while it decreased with water stability. Increases in TDI were explained through a significant increase in toxin variants such as MC-YR, anatoxin and cylindrospermopsin, accompanied by a decreasing presence of MC-LR. While global warming continues, the direct and indirect effects of increased lake temperatures will drive changes in the distribution of cyanobacterial toxins in Europe, potentially promoting selection of a few highly toxic species or strains.

  • 14.
    Peura, Sari
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Univ Jyvaskyla, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Jyvaskyla, Finland;Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sci Life Lab, Dept Forest Mycol & Plant Pathol, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Buck, Moritz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Aalto, Sanni L.
    Univ Jyvaskyla, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Jyvaskyla, Finland.
    Morales, Sergio E.
    Univ Otago, Dept Microbiol & Immunol, Dunedin, New Zealand.
    Nykanen, Hannu
    Univ Jyvaskyla, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Jyvaskyla, Finland;Univ Eastern Finland, Dept Environm & Biol Sci, Kuopio, Finland.
    Eiler, Alexander
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Univ Oslo, Dept Biosci, Oslo, Norway.
    Novel Autotrophic Organisms Contribute Significantly to the Internal Carbon Cycling Potential of a Boreal Lake2018In: mBio, ISSN 2161-2129, E-ISSN 2150-7511, Vol. 9, no 4, article id e00916-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oxygen-stratified lakes are typical for the boreal zone and also a major source of greenhouse gas emissions in the region. Due to shallow light penetration, restricting the growth of phototrophic organisms, and large allochthonous organic carbon inputs from the catchment area, the lake metabolism is expected to be dominated by heterotrophic organisms. In this study, we test this assumption and show that the potential for autotrophic carbon fixation and internal carbon cycling is high throughout the water column. Further, we show that during the summer stratification carbon fixation can exceed respiration in a boreal lake even below the euphotic zone. Metagenome-assembled genomes and 16S profiling of a vertical transect of the lake revealed multiple organisms in an oxygen-depleted compartment belonging to novel or poorly characterized phyla. Many of these organisms were chemolithotrophic, potentially deriving their energy from reactions related to sulfur, iron, and nitrogen transformations. The community, as well as the functions, was stratified along the redox gradient. The autotrophic potential in the lake metagenome below the oxygenic zone was high, pointing toward a need for revising our concepts of internal carbon cycling in boreal lakes. Further, the importance of chemolithoautotrophy for the internal carbon cycling suggests that many predicted climate changeassociated fluctuations in the physical properties of the lake, such as altered mixing patterns, likely have consequences for the whole-lake metabolism even beyond the impact to the phototrophic community. IMPORTANCE Autotrophic organisms at the base of the food web are the only life form capable of turning inorganic carbon into the organic form, facilitating the survival of all other organisms. In certain environments, the autotrophic production is limited by environmental conditions and the food web is supported by external carbon inputs. One such environment is stratified boreal lakes, which are one of the biggest natural sources of greenhouse gas emissions in the boreal region. Thus, carbon cycling in these habitats is of utmost importance for the future climate. Here, we demonstrate a high potential for internal carbon cycling via phototrophic and novel chemolithotrophic organisms in the anoxic, poorly illuminated layers of a boreal lake. Our results significantly increase our knowledge on the microbial communities and their metabolic potential in oxygen-depleted freshwaters and help to understand and predict how climate change-induced alterations could impact the lake carbon dynamics.

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